* Posts by Charlie Clark

3167 posts • joined 16 Apr 2007

Windows XP's market share grows AGAIN!

Charlie Clark
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FAIL

Re: As usual

Collect another badge of fail. Your assumptions 1 and 3 are the same and number 2 is very similar to them both (if A is more generalised than B then B must be more specialised than A. You only qualify this by indicating where the specialisation may be). It doesn't really matter because the assumptions are only relevant in a hypothesis that you are going to test empirically. Which you can't because El Reg doesn't provide the numbers. This is logic, we haven't even got to the statistics.

Furthermore, you might want to get out your dictionary and look up corroboration. El Reg's numbers don't have to be the same as either of these two services to provide corroboration. However, in the past the numbers have *not* been corroborated by data collected by Akamai to which I have repeatedly referred.

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Charlie Clark
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Re: As usual

Thing is, El Reg is a tech site so any stats are going to be skewed to the readership base so you wont corroborate with general stats.

That's a remarkable conclusion to draw in the absence of the evidence. What is the readership for the statcounter / netmarketshare?

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Charlie Clark
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As usual

we ask for corroboration based on El Reg's own stats. As usual silence.

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Google's 'encrypted-by-default' Android is NOT encrypting by default

Charlie Clark
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Re: it's a shame...

or they could just, you know, license it?

Google doesn't decide which chips companies use in their devices and, therefore, it doesn't pay for the licences. Maybe this will encourage more companies not to use Qualcomm's chip which might not be such a bad thing considering their close relationship with the US military.

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Charlie Clark
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Re: I don't really like Apple/iOs

However, this might get me to change, and I should probably be thinking about an upgrade on my 2+ year old Android phone anyway.

Or you could just enable encryption yourself (if it isn't done already). Personally, while I think encryption of data on device by default is good, for most people I reckon it's more important to encrypt network traffic. Apple and Google will happily encrypt your device and just as happily read your address book, calendar, e-mail, text messages, etc.

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3 spectastic Lumias for price of 1 rival flagship: Microsoft sells biz on cheapie experience

Charlie Clark
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Shurely shome mishtake?

You also get 60 landline minutes a month and 1TB of data

Sounds like a torrentor's dream and would probably burn through even Microsoft's vast cash pile pretty quickly.

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Acer enters Windows Phone fray with cheap Liquid M220 mobe

Charlie Clark
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Re: Backing the underdog

And look at how well Sony and HTC are doing with Android phones. They may be selling them - but they're not making any money. The only company doing well with Android is Samsung.

Xiaomi seems to be doing quite well with Android.

Google didn't buy Motorola to get into the hardware business but to get the patents.

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Charlie Clark
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Incentives

The claim falls far short of reality though, with fewer apps available, and often worse implementations of apps that are on the market. Still, the arrival of the M220 shows that Microsoft is making some impact with its universal app strategy, which will make it easier for developers to target Windows desktop, tablet and phone with the same code.

How many crack pipes did you smoke to draw that conclusion? There aren't any universal apps at the moment. The reason for doing the phone is: they already have compatible hardware; the OS is free; MS will no doubt offer marketing support; and sales of their Android phones are disappointing. This is simply a case of try it and see. The reason every other company stopped making Windows phones is that the sales weren't enough to justify even this minimalist approach to diversification.

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Microsoft working on 'Nano' version of Windows Server for web-scale ops

Charlie Clark
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Re: Wow

It looks remarkably like docker for Windows: hypervisor with runtime. The licensing model will be interesting.

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Phabba-dabba-do: Samsung hypes up Galaxy S6 and S6 Edge

Charlie Clark
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Re: NSA and GCHQ will be very happy

Don't forget to shake your head when you're outside so the cameras only get blurry images of you.

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Charlie Clark
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Re: Built in battery, no SD slot, no waterproofing?

/I'm curious, what do people need SD cards for? The lowest of the low phones comes with 16GB nowadays, and I only use 10.

For me it's mainly pictures, audio books and offline maps. I've got quite a few apps with their own beefy storage requirements meaning that the phone's own storage can start to look a little small. And it also makes a lot of sense to put certain kinds of data on separate media.

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Don't pay for the BBC? Then no Doctor Who for you, I'm afraid

Charlie Clark
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Re: Just stop there.

Surely it is far easier and far more efficient to remove the license fee and recover the money through fiscal drag on tax thresholds?

Sure, but the problem is that all tax goes to the treasury and this would make the BBC directly beholden to the government of the day. The licence fee guarantees a certain amount of independence from the government of the day.

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Charlie Clark
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Headmaster

Re: Trickle it in

licenses

tsk, tsk

To license but a licence. Same for practice and practise. Except in America which takes English spelling irregularities and makes a mockery of them. Sigh.

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Charlie Clark
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Coat

Greg Dyke

Anyone prepared to hold my coat while I give him a good kicking? I'll then hold yours while you have your go. He's the guy responsible for dumbing down the BBC.

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And the buggiest OS provider award goes to ... APPLE?

Charlie Clark
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Re: Android

Your statutory rights are unaffected by manufacturer's interpretations. You are perfectly within your rights to insist upon repair or replacement if you can demonstrate a defect in the product. IANAL but a known security vulnerability should count. Mention this and a possible to trip to the small claims court the next time you speak to them.

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Google deal means game over for mobile payments firm Softcard

Charlie Clark
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Re: So what exactly did Google buy that they didn't have before?

There isn't such a thing as an NFC payments infrastructure: NFC is the infrastructure. Apple did the unusual but smart thing of adopting it as opposed to trying to replicate it with its own. Clearing still has to be through the banks.

We'll have to wait to see quite what Google got but presumably includes indirect access to the network's customer base is part of it.

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Google opens 'Inbox' heir-to-email trial to biz users

Charlie Clark
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Re: If it ain't broke

@Robert Grant

Blaming e-mail for spam is like blaming the telephone system for cold callers.

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This one weird script continually crashes Android email

Charlie Clark
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Re: One thing isn't clear to me

It doesn't really affect anything because it's about on old version of the OS on a particular device. Sloppy article though.

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Charlie Clark
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Move along, please. Nothing to see here.

Doesn't really matter. I have a non-branded S4 mini and even before I put CM on it (about a year ago) Samsung had released OTA's beyond 4.2.2. Other people I know with carrier-branded devices have also been on 4.4 for quite some time.

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HTTP/2 spec gets green light: Faster web or needless complexity?

Charlie Clark
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serve the ads from the same server as the content

So why aren't they doing that already?

Two reasons: data aggregation and latency. Data aggregation: if Doubleclick can track users across websites with its own cookies it's arguably in a better position to serve up better targeted adverts which helps drive up their price. Latency: Doubleclick will hold a realtime auction for the ads based on the personal data it thinks it has, this will be faster if it already has a dedicated slot in the page and can serve directly from its servers otherwise it has to arrange for the advert to be proxied by the original website.

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Charlie Clark
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Re: i can see myself

using http/1.1 for the next decade.

Which is to suggest that there is nothing wrong with HTTP 1.1

This is quite simply not true. However, as long as it was good enough nobody could be bothered touching it. Google worked on SPDY, submitted it to the IETF and agreed to changes even though SPDY was getting adoption as a proprietary protocol. I'm pretty sure the work isn't finished with 2.0 but it is important that standard's bodies are open to suggestions from outside.

Kamp is not the only one involved: Mark Nottingham has been working with HTTP for a long time as have others on the committee. The best way to deal with any concerns is to do what Google did and come up with some working code and a relevant specification.

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Critical 0-days in open source? The problem isn't code, it's CASH

Charlie Clark
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Talking shop asks for more money

Remind me again what the Linux Foundation actually does? Maybe they could give Mr Zemlin some English lessons: "remedy" is also as a verb: "remediate" would be to "re-mediate".

The OpenSSL bug is interesting. Why did the Linux Foundation not get on board with the LibreSSL project – OpenSSL suffered not just through enough peer review but also being poorly designed. From my own view perspective I can see more and more acceptance of open source software by companies as long as they understand the costs associated with their own customisations and can be reassured that the software is actively maintained. The "free as in free speech" is an unwanted and unnecessary distraction in such discussions so it's good to see it coming up less and less.

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Qualcomm, ARM: We thought we had such HOT MODELS...

Charlie Clark
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Re: There could be some dangers to ARM

The problem with ARM is that it's not a common hardware platform.

This is pretty much true for the competition apart from perhaps, Intel. But there still isn't a common x86 for mobile platform and Intel is just as interested in lock-in as anyone else. And, until Intel can deliver an SoC of comparable power/performance at a competitive price to ARM, things are unlikely to change. All Intel's recent "wins" have been at a significant expense. Granted, with the money it makes selling x86, Intel can afford to keep subsidising SoC side but is this ever going to make sense in China where they're competing with the likes of Mediatek?

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Charlie Clark
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Re: What I Took From the Article

Since most Android programs use bytecode rather than native code, other chips more similar to ARM

This is a myth. The (current) move is more and more to native, which is why Intel has been so busy trying to optimise Android for x86 and support cross-compiling.

SPARC, PowerPC, MIPS, et al. can be easily licensed. Of them only MIPS really has any history in the small device space. IBM, the main force behind PowerPC, has made it clear that it's only interested in the data centre. Oracle, who own SPARC, is interested in selling complete systems. MIPS hasn't been that successful recently because it doesn't offer the right products, which is why Imagination (fuelled by Apple's cash) was able to buy it. It has yet to come up with credible SoC for mobile.

But ARM's competitive advantage isn't just the CPU, it's the eco-system: switching SoCs while painful is possible within a reasonable period of time ("native" code is essential for drivers) which is what you sometimes see with different revisions of the same device. Switching to a completely different architecture really isn't an option.

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Charlie Clark
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Re: Missing risk for Qualcomm

but everyone knows Intel is the only company that will have 10nm ready in 2016

We'll believe that when we see it. Recent geometry shrinks have all been hit by delays.

Intel only wants in on large margin business. Even the 250 million units you're touting is nothing like enough to cover the costs of a new fab. And switching to making ARM chips would send quite a signal to markets about Intel's faith in its own designs. If Apple were to go with Intel on mobile it would be x86.

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Charlie Clark
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Straw man

The history of mobile device processors is that of two companies, Qualcomm and ARM

This may be convenient for your argument but is very inaccurate. Lots of companies are involved in the history of mobile processors including, but not limited to, TI, Siemens, Alcatel, ST Thomson, Ericsson, Broadcom. Typical filler from Rethink though Wireless Watch is generally more readable than Faultline.

A comparison of Qualcomm and ARM based on their history might be interesting: Qualcomm growing out of the US military industrial complex which guarantee both lucrative research projects and, er, help when licensing them. CDMA didn't become the dominant standard in the US and, er, Korea by chance. ARM grew out of the failure of European manufacturer to compete in the high volume PC business.

In comparison to either Qualcomm or Intel, ARM is a minnow that shouldn't really survive. It's done well because it's viral done right: license ARM for a known quality at an incredibly low price. It's also done well by not diversifying that much. It talks the necessary talk to get journalists to cover it but spends most of its time developing what its vast customer base wants.

Qualcomm continues to supply the US military, where spending is more than then next 20 countries combined. Like Lockheed Martin, Boeing and the rest, no real danger there as long as this continues.

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Hey Apple - what's the $178bn for? Are you down with OTT?

Charlie Clark
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Re: BBC Death

where we all worship Jobs, Cook and Ive.

Assuming you mean Peter that might include me! ;-)

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Charlie Clark
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Re: BBC Death

The controversial point (in the UK anyway), is that this also removes the need for the BBC license fee model.

Utter crap. Oh, and it's licence by the way. The reason why the licence model has been so successful is that it provides a certain degree of independence from the state, commerce and special interest groups (which would be the echo chamber of your subscribers).

This doesn't alter the fact that the BBC has somewhat lost its way over the last decade (I still blame Greg Dyke for the dumbing down) and the problems the universal model (inform, educate and entertain) has when having to bid for things like rights to show football matches and, thus, diverting money away from other areas. But that is mainly a political issue with parliament able to decide which events should be universally (free to view) accessible.

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Lightbulb moment for visible light networking: 200 Gbps without a fibre

Charlie Clark
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Re: What's the use case for 100 Gbps wireless?

100 Gbps is just for the headlines. Anything that increases the real throughput in any particular situation will have its uses. 100 Gbps is only 50 Gbps duplex with only two members of a network, in optimal conditions. Real world situations might be closer to 10/20 Gbps or less. Plenty of situations where that would be nice to have.

WiFi is reaching the limits of its because of the bandwidth available at the frequencies at which it runs and contention with other networks. Research into alternatives is essential. And that is what this is: research.

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Microsoft's patchwork falls apart … AGAIN!

Charlie Clark
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Re: What do you mean "some?"

I guess it depends upon the nature of the patch. If the patch has security relevance then it needs applying as quickly as possible. Of course, more testing is required but the closed nature of Microsoft's software development makes this difficult.

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Patch now: Design flaw in Windows security allows hackers to own corporate laptops, PCs

Charlie Clark
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Re: @Charlie "unfixable on Server 2003."

@big_D: all clickthrough EULAs are unenforceable. It has to be informed consent and whether this has been given or not can be contested in court.

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Charlie Clark
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Re: @Charlie "unfixable on Server 2003."

Read the EULA, it absolves MS of any liability. It also states in weasel words that MS do not guarantee that their software will work in the way expected or indeed at all.

The EULA is only what MS thinks matters and this can always be contested in a court. For example, the clickthrough EULAs have been declared void in Germany. As, indeed, have labels on packaging informing people that by opening the package they agree to be bound by the licence agreement contained within.

IANAL but, based on other unlimited liability cases in the US, I reckon there's good grounds for a case.

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Charlie Clark
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Re: "unfixable on Server 2003."

You think an unsupported EOL 12 year old OS is worthy of class action?

Yes, because it's not EOL yet and not when the error was discovered.

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Charlie Clark
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Re: "unfixable on Server 2003."

Can anyone spell class action? If the flaw has been known about for more than a year and Microsoft is unable to provide a fix for some customers, then they are within their legal rights in many jurisdictions to seek redress in the courts.

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Still using the Google Talk app? You've got ONE WEEK to move on

Charlie Clark
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Re: Breaking news

@Dan Skype for me on MacOS and Android no longer work without a MS account so they've been removed.

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Charlie Clark
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Re: Remember when you could load up all your IM accounts in one program?

FWIW Hangouts uses WebRTC in order to be able to run in a browser meaning no additional software required, assuming the browser supports WebRTC.

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Charlie Clark
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Re: Breaking news

Along with how many others? Google does, in general, give plenty of advance warning when a service is being switched off. As this article makes clear Google started the migration two years ago.

But let's compare the switch-off with Microsoft's handling of Skype which required not only a new bit of software but a completely new id.

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Sitting on one's ARSE is the new CANCER, says Tim Cook - and an Apple watch will save you

Charlie Clark
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Re: Is it subsidised?

Solar in the UK and EU is heavily subsidised by the taxpayer

Yes, the investment will benefit from tax breaks, though nothing like as much as the issuance of bonds and share buybacks that Apple is currently engaged in.

As to who pays the subsidy: well, it's taxpayers and and energy consumers. But this is just as true for the new nuclear power station being built in the UK which will sell energy at a guaranteed price to the grid.

Subsidies for anything but the briefest of period are generally bad.

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Charlie Clark
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Re: $848M could have been spent more effectively

By removing the demand for bulk load it is already stimulating the demand for gas which is better at intermittent supply.

But it is not the job of a private company to effect CO2 reductions out of the goodness of its heart. This is a tax-efficient way of guaranteeing supply over a long-term. That said, solar in California is pretty efficient even without tax-breaks.

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Charlie Clark
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Your point about tax incentives as the reason for the deal is perfectly valid. Your swipe at solar as a legacy technology is nonsense. Ideological issues aside, long-term, guaranteed capacity deals like this do make a lot of sense for companies and they are risk-free.

The reason why private nuclear power has never really taken off is also financial: no one will insure the potential risks, which in a country as litigious as America include court cases.

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MongoDB's feline brains trust sink their claws into NoSQL

Charlie Clark
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MongoDB had been a slave to locking – make a change to one field or object and the entire database was locked while changes were replicated.

Just like MySQL's MyASM table type and how much fun that is!

This PR piece reads a bit like: "The last version was shit. The new version is less shit". Actually, the whole thing reads a bit like replacing MongoDB with a BerkeleyDB backend, which begs the question why this wasn't done in the first place?

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RIP SPDY, we hardly knew ye: Google to retire next-gen web protocol

Charlie Clark
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Google's decision to kill SPDY in Chrome will go unnoticed by most users.

Which is as it should be

Both the web browser and the server must support the protocol for it to have any effect, and few web servers enabled it – Google being a notable exception, naturally.

Quite a lot of high-traffic sites use SPDY and credit to Google for doing enough work to get a serious debate about HTTP2 which hadn't been going anywhere.

Google's work on open source and within standards bodies is generally pretty good and in stark contrast to Apple or how Microsoft used to work.

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Microsoft: Even cheapo Lumias to get slimmed down Windows 10

Charlie Clark
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Re: Wait,,,,What?

Microsoft sold 10.5 million Lumias last quarter alone

No, they shipped 10.5 million of them.

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Legalese and coding? Yup, it's the open-source FOSDEM shindig

Charlie Clark
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Re: Here's a question for your lawyers

Seriously WTF but possible loss of income isn't potential loss of income. If it were possible then you could also be sued for not winning a Nobel Prize.

Seeing as how the US legal system is now as much about forcing people into out-of-court settlements just in order to get their life back (and stop paying lawyer's fees). It's quite likely that's what's going on. Wish you luck.

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Charlie Clark
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RMS

I also saw photos of RMS (Richard Stallman) at large a few paces away, though I didn't get to meet him in person and buy one of his badges, alas...

I did meet him, although I didn't know who he was. He was handing out flyers and moaning about the proposed dropping of the "F" from FOSDEM. I disagreed with him and gave him his flyer back. Faced with my disagreement he said I hadn't thought very much about the issue. This is arrogant and condescending (I wrote some, and use lots of, open source software and couldn't give a toss whether it's Free with a capital F). But fair play to him for trying to get his opinion heard – that's free speech, something which I am very much in favour of.

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Has the world reached PEAK TWIT? Supplies of new Twitter users are drying up

Charlie Clark
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Re: Have a cigar

The story sounds an awful lot like lowering the lights and putting on soft music prior to selling yourself: Twitter is looking for a buyer that might want to plug-in its admittedly attentive if vacuous user base into something bigger.

I'll guess we know more once Facebook starts competing with What's App: How will Stephen Fry, Lady Gaga, etc. be able to resist a bigger audience?

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Get off Twitter – and onto Google if you want to find TWITS and tweets

Charlie Clark
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Re: ehhh

It's not just "is it down". It's "what happened". Site owners will take to Twitter to explain downtime.

Only when it doesn't matter.

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Charlie Clark
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Re: get instant reactions to live events

@sabroni - that's known as PR and will use whatever medium is currently available. Once the media fall out of love with Twitter we'll see things like What's App being used for the same thing.

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Charlie Clark
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Re: ehhh

Knock it if you want, but real time tweets are a pretty good or at least a possible way to gauge public opinion, get instant reactions to live events, see if/when websites have stopped working etc.

Nope, self-selection rules that out.

As for server monitoring. Did that with SMS (much more reliable) over 10 years ago.

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RIP Windows RT: Microsoft murders ARM Surface, Nokia tablets

Charlie Clark
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Re: hmm

If Windows on ARM fails (again) it won't be down to Windows itself but the handling of existing x86-based applications. This is perfectly doable in software but hardware support would make it better. When Apple made the change it had Intel's support. Unfortunately, Microsoft has made it even more complex with the different 32-bit and 64-bit versions.

Even with Apple's aggressive support of x86 it took years before developers switched to cross-compiling their applications (almost always new versions). The Windows environment is even more diverse.

The Windows on ARM initiative, however, may end up bypassing the tricky world of end-user software entirely and focus on the enterprise market where new kit with new applications is more plausible. The new ARM chips are going to be perfect quite a lot of workloads, even on Windows.

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