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* Posts by Charlie Clark

2502 posts • joined 16 Apr 2007

Half of UK smart TV owners don't know what the 'smart' bit is for

Charlie Clark
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Big Brother

Re: Needs more input

Many of the TVs, at least from Philips, can use USB or Bluetooth keyboards. Though, to be honest I don't think keyboards are the right kind of interface for tellies. Be interesting to see what they come up with gesture control. Although that is likely to be another patent minefield: on asking Philips why I am no longer able to hide channels or remove useless "apps" they told me that this was a licensing issue and they had had to remove the function. I guess we're only months away from being automatically logged into one of the identity traders as soon as we switch the machine on, so that "our friends" know exactly what we're watching without us needing to press any buttons.

I've got other problems with DLNA, or more specifically with WiFi - apparently my DLNA server occasionally closes the connection because the telly fails to acknowledge an ICMP request. Yay, streaming over until connection is reinitialised. Philips is aware of the issue but doesn't seem to think it's their problem.

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Charlie Clark
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+1 on that

Take my mum. Please, take her. She puts the "Ludd" back into "Luddite" but is probably the world's digi-video-recorder champion!

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Wind farms create local warming

Charlie Clark
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Holmes

Nothing to see here

So, a power generation plant has an affect on the local micro-climate. How does 0.72° C compare with the temperature increase of around any plant that requires cooling? I'll note in passing that France regularly has to grant exceptions on water temperature limits in order not to have shut down many nuclear plants in the summer and heating water 0.7° C takes a fuck of a lot more energy than heating air because of the density (and, as long as we're willy-waving our knowledge of physics, specific heat capacity). Planting a few trees should neutralise any effects.

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Computer nostalgia is 10 PRINT 'BOLLOCKS'

Charlie Clark
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Re: Not just Pete Shelley

Yes, but I seem to remember that Pete Shelley actually wrote his own computer program. Buzzcocks rule!

But Alastair, recording from vinyl using a microphone in 1984. Seriously? That's far more embarrassing than your admission to buying the latest shiny shiny toy from Apple.

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Space-cadet Schwartz blows chunks out of Oracle's Java suit

Charlie Clark
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Happy

Time to call RCJ?

Surely someone with Mr Schwartz's vision is exactly what the Magic Roundabout needs to launch Shoreditch into orbit? If so, can I be the one to light the touch paper?

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MIT boffins play BUILDING-SIZED Tetris

Charlie Clark
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re. Performance

Of course, if you wanted to wring the absolute highest level of performance out of it, you’d probably go 10 GbE over copper

This is a very strange assertion as it seems to be prioritising network data speeds over the physical medium, which given the scale of the game might be considered relevant. It's a fact that radio waves travel through air than electrons along a copper wire: the difference is probably measurable at the higher windows. Assuming lights are either on or off you've got a minimal amount of data to send but if you are worried about data speeds and perhaps latency then you need fibre for this kind of stunt. Don't want windows flickering out of sync.

A more impressive but significantly more extravagant display:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7sS6FbTDDuo

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Opera retires Unite, widgets in latest browser cut

Charlie Clark
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Re: No dont take Unite Away

Unite is still part of 12 just disabled by default. Opera Dev currently has an article about porting from Unite to Extensions so I suspect that any Unite apps you were using will be reborn as Extensions. However, if you are talking about sync then you may be thinking of Opera Link which is not going away.

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Charlie Clark
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Re: A pity

but they can't seem to get Opera Mobile working reliably on Android of late...it's been almost unusable since early March.

I found the first build of Opera 12 mobile to be a bit ropey but the recent releases have improved it a lot.

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Charlie Clark
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Nearly right

The more extensions you have the slower your browser is likely to run. And as things stand you don't need many extensions in Opera: content blocking is built-in, as is a great mail-client and perfectly serviceable IRC client and RSS reader. I have just two extensions: NotScripts and YouTube WebM Plus.

Opera's line on extensions, as with so many other things, was to work with a standard to ensure interoperability and avoid vendor lock-in. Extensions, written in HTML and Javascript, are pretty portable between the Webkit crowd and Opera.

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Charlie Clark
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Slight quibble

Out of the box Unite allowed you to share music and photos very easily with other Opera users

As it was browser-based other people didn't need Opera to share and it was data protection heaven. Of course, it was dependent on being connected to the net and your uplink speed.

As extensions of the browser never really made sense - but the widget runtime for standalone widgets lives on.

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Ofcom: The Office of Screwing Over Murdoch?

Charlie Clark
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Re: Having followed the line of reasoning in this article as carefully as I can.........

Ofcom has been singularly poor at promoting competition in the industries it regulates. Ownership of BSkyB is of less interest than the failure to break up the rights monopoly on, say, Premier League matches after the collapse of Setanta.

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Twelve... classic 1980s 8-bit micros

Charlie Clark
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Unhappy

Lessons to be learned

We had a ZX81 and using it was such a trauma that it nearly put me off computers for life. I guess it was less the membrane keyboard itself and more the multiple keys for various characters. Still, the price appealed to many wishing to get their offspring interested in computing and generated enough cash for the much improved Spectrum: enough memory to do something without having to drop into assembler and a usable keyboard; colour was the icing on the cake.

Unfortunately, we never upgraded. Indeed, while all around us were playing fun games in colour, one bright spark at school even wrote a game for the Spectrum, we didn't get a colour system until the end of the decade and then only CGA. Sigh, just to goes to show how important some degree of "shiny shiny" and immediate gratification is for getting kids interesting in programming.

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'Apple will coast, and then decelerate' says Forrester CEO

Charlie Clark
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Re: Does this guy know anything about Cook?

Cook is the principle reason that Apple is a moneymaking machine today. There is nobody in the industry better at production control and supply chain management...Jobs was a product guy..

Much as I agree that the comments should be treated sceptically I think you inadvertently make the same point: Jobs was responsible for dreaming up new, desirable products and Cook and others for their execution. Of course, that is exactly the kind of dramatic oversimplification that the media loves to speculate upon. Despite his many qualities Steve Jobs was part of a team of dedicated and competent people who were all needed to make the products a success.

Nokia used to be king of the supply chain and look at it now.

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Educating Rory: Are BBC reporters unteachable?

Charlie Clark
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Mr Baggaley's problem is that he's a hopeless Utopian; he is as "bien pensant" in his own way as Mr Cellan-Jones. Programming from first principles? No, thanks. One size doesn't fit all; the education system is an inalienable part of the system of division of labour: some people will write rocket guidance systems and others will write the marketing brochures for the rockets.

Within the narrow scope of the web there is merit in an interdisciplinary approach and demystification of the arcane arts of programming. As such I broadly support the idea of people diving into programming without them later becoming master programmers. However, I agree wholeheartedly with Mr Orlowski's condemnation of Mr Cellan-Jones attending an opportunistic one day workshop: it's a car-crash waiting to happen.

Regarding the general principle of getting kids interesting in programming I was lucky enough to attend Vern Ceder's presentation of the work he did with a group of schoolchildren over a whole term. It's about Python but the language is secondary to the approach.

http://blip.tv/pycon-us-videos-2009-2010-2011/pycon-2011-python-and-robots-teaching-programming-in-high-school-4898767

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Charlie Clark
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Where have you been hiding?

"print" is no longer a statement but a function! For didactic purposes you should use the Python 3 syntax:

print("hello world") # and there's your simple beauty gone

Tsk, tsk. Programmers nowadays! ;-)

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Martha Lane Fox hits caps lock, yells at small biz websites

Charlie Clark
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Failure is more than an option.

It's nice to see that the FOI page is a 404: http://champions.go-on.co.uk/foi

And that the privacy statement linked to from the cookie thing is the homepage. Informed consent means informing people before asking their consent.

Still, Mrs Fox has a nice dress on.

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Windows 8 diet exposes Microsoft's weak ARM

Charlie Clark
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Enterprise

Seeing as Windows 7 rollouts are currently ongoing I'd suggest that no corporates are planning to touch this before 2014 by which time some of the bugs and the strategy might have been worked out. Can see some people being brave enough to buy a few tablets of whichever variety for road warriors assuming the necessary software is available and enterprise management is possible. But that would be in a sort of "Microsoft demonstrates..." environment.

So, MS have two years to stop wholesale abandonment of their platform in the corporate space. If you put it like that you can see that they still have room for manoeuvre.

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Cellco execs lay into Nokia's Lumia

Charlie Clark
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Megaphone

Where to start

1. Samsung is making plenty money from Android. Like Nokia it's a hardware company. Definitely doable.

2. My own anecdotal survey on the local public transport of what people are using has Samsung at around 75 % with I-Phones about 20 % and the rest. A year ago I would have said around 50 % I-Phones, Samsung slightly ahead of HTC and the rest. With the SII and it's gorgeously large screen Samsung really has cleaned up in the last few months. They're not cheap but they are popular. Skinflints can join in by being the cheaper versions which look like the real deal as long as you don't look at them too closely.

3. People are used to I-Phone and Android UIs - they're close enough that switching between them isn't difficult. Apple knows this which is why they're going so hard after Android. Tough for them that many people to seem to equate Android with a sort of generic version of the I-Phone. Viz. airport security generally refer to my Samsung Galaxy Tab as an I-Pad.

But really it comes down to Every review says if you want a WP7, buy a Nokia. Well, who really wants WP7? Where are the campaigns extolling the virtues of it? I've seen nothing apart from generous reviews on El Reg and elsewhere praising the Metro interface for phones. But I know that the browser is shit: any mobile browser must be able to handle HTML 5 forms to be any use; IE 9 can't.

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RIM mulls pimping BlackBerry OS to Samsung – report

Charlie Clark
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Re: Samsungs reaction...

Seems to be the default suggestion from "analysts" when it comes to ITLNH (interesting technology looking for a new home). It was the same with WebOS. Samsung has at least two OS of its own (Bada for smartphones and whatever runs on feature phones) plus Android and Windows and Tizen. You can see how they're desperate for more OS... Google or Microsoft as almost pure software vendors would make more sense.

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Toshiba Regza 46YL863 46in Smart TV

Charlie Clark
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Power draw

150 W! Ouch! I could have two of my Philips 46" side-by-side and still use less.

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Nordic region, Ireland adopt new 'connected telly' standard

Charlie Clark
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Storm in a teacup

I think the BBC's services are so much more advanced than what's on offer here in Germany.

I've got a lovely Philips 6806, which apart from apparently struggling to maintain a wireless connection (Philips say it's the router's fault for IPMG-Snooping, I'm not convinced), has a fantastic picture. Unlike all the digi-boxes I've used in the UK the additional functions were not available from the word go. I had to activate Hbb manually and it behaves differently if there is a network connection around when it generally takes longer to load and looks a bit shitty. Indeed many channels don't seem to support non-network based interactivity: press the red button and get nothing. Personally, I prefer the idea of side-loading the TV programme onto the TV without a network connection to loading a castrated version of the broadcaster's website. This is probably why I have never once seen a promotion of "press the red button to find out more" since digital TV has been available.

In summary, whatever it is that the BBC uses is infinitely more usable than what we have on the continent. However, if it is to be some kind technological dead end, then it's probably going to go into maintenance. But unless Hbb gets dramatically better it's not going anywhere either.

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RIP wind power: Minister blows away plans for more turbines

Charlie Clark
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Re: Meanwhile in Brussels

I believe Germany has in fact ditched nuclear in favour of coal

Then you are ill-informed. Coal has been being phased out in favour of (Russian) natural gas for years. Renewables are ahead of target thanks to the very generous feed-in tariffs we have here and effectively a swap with France with nuclear from them in the winter; and renewable to them in the summer when they don't have enough water to cool the nuclear plants. Though even France is going renewable with EDF busy offering free installation and maintenance of photovoltaic systems on nice new barns and free power to the farmers. Though, if they can get EU subsidies for nuclear then you can imagine the free barn programme being phased out pretty quickly.

Renewable energy might be of questionable value - I am in favour of it; the feed-in tariffs can be seen as a gravy train - but all those installations require people on the ground and I can think of worse government-sponsored employment programmes.

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Charlie Clark
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Coat

Re: Laugh? I nearly cried.

It's all in the negawatts: the cheapest power plants are ones you don't build.

Note, less consumption usually means greater energy efficiency - better insulation, lower stand-by draw, higher yield lighting, ARM instead of x86, etc. - rather than the return to a Luddite dark age.

Mine's the one with 9 W LED bulb in the pocket and the A+++ fridge.

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Charlie Clark
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Meanwhile in Brussels

The same department is, together with France, Poland and the Czech Republic, lobbying for EU subsidies of nuclear power. Unlikely to go anywhere because those horribly inefficient Jormans have ditched nuclear for renewables, massive imports of lovely French nuclear power during the winter notwithstanding. All this to say that if for every gravy train that gets retired another is ready to enter service.

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Himalayan glaciers actually GAINING ice, space scans show

Charlie Clark
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Nice try

But also Every year less ice in Canada. Admittedly entirely anecdotal but indicative of some kind of, er, climate change. At least for a part of Canada.

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Developer leaks Microsoft product plans for next two years

Charlie Clark
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Yawn

Originally wasn't IE 10 due last year? Microsoft's browser strategy is an epic fail and that, despite acknowledging their need to placate corporate IT, is driving people to adopt Firefox, Chrome and any phone OS that isn't Windows: IE 9 just doesn't cut the mustard.

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Intel discloses sub-10-watt 'Centerton' Atom chip

Charlie Clark
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Life after death

Aren't the Atoms the crippled chips that Intel developed for the netbooks that are no longer selling? They were also supposed to make their way into set-top boxes and phones IIRC. Seems that isn't happening so they're being repurposed as server chips. Crippled, of course, so as not to cannibalise the higher margin real server chips. In that comparison 6W is pretty impressive but what workload will they be handling? They might be able to virtualise but how many VMs will they comfortably handle? They might be 64-bit but somehow I don't see them being targeted for data warehousing.

We still have a while to go before the ARM-based servers arrive in force where OPS per Watt comparisons will be able to made. Yes, we know they won't be fully 64-bit but will it really matter for these smaller servers?

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Nokia shares fall as it drops first quarter forecast

Charlie Clark
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Re: Positive Spin?

From the article:

...Microsoft was trying to get Nokia to make a line of phones using Windows Mobile, and in return would make a version of Office to run on Symbian devices. Nokia wanted more; it asked Microsoft to use its Navteq mapping service and share revenues on ads that would appear with the maps. Unable to get the larger deal, the companies announced one to get Office onto some of Nokia's Symbian models...

As Office for Symbian has recently been announced it seems that this is what came to pass. Nokia has made an impressive turnaround and delivered Windows phones faster than I think many expected. This is indicative of the possible synergies between the two companies. In the same time it has also delivered some nice updates to Symbian but managed to throw market share away. All in all, maybe not that impressive.

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Apple to maintain tablet lead over Android

Charlie Clark
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Re: Gartner researcher can draw straight lines

Spot on. Really is just a bit of clickbait. Nice of Mr Smith not to include the link and waste everybody's time.

The tablet market isn't mature yet and there is still room for plenty of hardware innovation. E.g. whoever comes up first with a useable colour tablet for the outdoors is going to mint it.

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Android spanking iOS in world's BIGGEST mobile market

Charlie Clark
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Re: Does it really matter?

Yes, it matters. Find me a business owner who doesn't want more market share no matter how high their margins are. Even for a premium product like Apples market share is important for the attendant eco-system. This used to be Apple's problem pre x86 OS X as it was considered too expensive to develop the software for the market, though there were notable exceptions. The same could happen to Apple in China with phones. Gone are the days where, where the US leads everyone else follows.

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Charlie Clark
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Re: Stylus vs Touch

The ideal would of course be a combo screen that can do either stylus handwriting & sketches and finger gestures

Sounds a bit like Samung's Note which I think is doing well in some segments. Be interesting to see figures on that.

I'm not 100% on the handwriting recognition but you can't beat being able to scrawl stuff with a pen. I've got a Bamboo Stylus for my Galaxy 8.9 but was a little disappointed at how it handled handwritten notes.

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Renault Twizy budget e-car

Charlie Clark
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Re: tax and insurance

Good question. The pictures have it with a full French licence plate which means that, in France at least, it's a car not a scooter. Expect governments to adjust regulations to suit policy objectives and budgetary requirements!

Insurance might be close to scooters and subject to the usual postcode lottery. Alun should be fine as long as sticks to his usual surroundings and keeps out of Ordsall and the Moss! You can just see this kind of thing getting trashed by any estate yoof...

Nice to see it getting such a positive review for the handling.

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WTF is... UltraViolet

Charlie Clark
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Re: Wonder if you have to worry about the old "Region" crap with UV??

For streaming the answer is likely to be: yes, the content is blocked. Along the lines of trying to find the cheapest place to source the content or watch stuff that isn't available in your country. Usual anti-customer crap. :-/

Downloads might work.

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Toshiba to demo vid streaming without any work by the CPU

Charlie Clark
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GPU shouldn't come into it.

The description, which appears largely to be quoting the press release, implies that the card is effectively a beefed up network card for distributing encoded streams across the network. Ideal for production houses, content owners and presumably content delivery networks if it means that media servers with largely redundant CPUs can be replaced by dedicated, low power but hopefully still cheap boxes. GPUs should only be involved in the initial encoding and decoding of those streams. But, as it's from Toshiba I do wonder whether there isn't a Cell doing the grunt work.

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Five charged after fanboi sells kidney for iPad and iPhone

Charlie Clark
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Re: This is David Lander

It's episode 6 of the first series - 4oD isn't available in Jormany - where an unscrupulous surgeon performs needless surgery on hapless patients including harvesting their organs for sale. David Lander was an excellent precursor to Chris Morris' Brass Eye satire of the documentary though there is a kind of innocence from the age before nowtrage.

I'd like to say "life following art" but find the whole idea extremely disturbing: organ harvesting does unfortunately.go on.

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Charlie Clark
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This is David Lander

Terrible if it's true.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WuZ5tKucdfo&feature=relmfu

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The iPad 3 would make me so horny...

Charlie Clark
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Re: 2048 x 1536

I'm inclined to agree with you and the author that the higher resolution of the Ipad 3 is overrated and the increased power draw is a problem. A problem that will probably be redressed in a release later this year, I guess. But there are several points worth noting: the higher resolution does make for better text rendering which is easier on the eye. The problem with the Ipad as reading device is that it is not suitable for use in bright sunshine - for reading you are much better off with a nice e-ink display.

The Ipad 2's resolution combined with the form factor was not particular good for watching films - a friend of mine who is a happy owner of an Ipad 2 showed me with pride that it does show videos in fullscreen, but only by cropping them. The same video on my Samsung Galaxy 8.9 is fullscreen with no cropping and crisper but pretty much the same physical size.

Apple would have needed to bump the pixel density of the next release by at least 25 % to keep up with the competition. Having started the whole "pixel density race" on the phones they needed to catch up on the tablet. But HD (1080p) is probably all you need for gorgeous media consumption but then again, the 16:10 or 16:9 is what's required.

It is fascinating how Apple manage to dictate the terms of the debate and convince people that whichever technical feature they have mastered is the reason for buying the device. A good screen is not just one with the highest resolution - colour gamut, contrast and viewing angles are equally important but, as we saw with digital cameras, more difficult to market. Personally, I'm sold on the OLED colour gamut and contrast values over notional resolution. But that is beside the point. As Mr Orlowski pointed out years ago: Apple has become the master of encouraging people to sell their devices to themselves: I-Tunes promised to make it easy to buy digital music (as long as you had an I-pod) and the app store promise to make it easy to buy apps, films and books (as long as you have an I-pad).

Apple, as the article's author notes at the end of his piece, probably has done it again with the I-pad 3 - people will buy them because of the screen but I think his criticism should be noted: it does feel a bit like Nokia's N95 - technically brilliant at the time but still flawed; the nimbus is still there if somewhat dimmer.

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Star's guts turned INSIDE OUT in supernova mega-blast

Charlie Clark
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Coat

Re: Stellar dyspepsia?

More like a bit too much of the "Stellar Artois", methinks.

Alright, alright, I'm going. Mine's the one with the guide to intergalactic beverages and the popular heliosical cocktails book.

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Charlie Clark
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Alert

Confused

In Register Standard Units, please. And I find the repetition of 400 billion slightly worrying.

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Regulator probes Groupon as shares tumble

Charlie Clark
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Au contraire

The JOBS act which has just passed both Houses includes quite a lot of reforms. Just not the kind you might have been thinking about. A few highlights:

* "small" companies with under USD 1 billion in turnover a year will be freed from such onerous reporting

* companies will be able to have up to 2000 shareholders without having to publish their accounts. That they are currently limited to 500 is considered to be one of the reasons for Facebook going public

* unregulated crowdsourcing via the internet is to become legitimate

Sterling work by the investment banking and venture capital lobby, don't you agree? The next bubble is going to be so much bigger!

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Yes, Prime Minister to return after 24 years

Charlie Clark
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Re: Superb

Don't agree with you on that. I think The Thick of It was considerably funnier and I felt it to be close to the mark. For me, it was the updated version of "Yes, Minister" highlighting how interchangeable all the politicians have become. But, each to their own.

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Charlie Clark
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Yes, omitting the part played by the lobbies and party think-tanks is quite a lacuna: ACTA and the soon to be launched "Big Society Corporation" being cases in point. Mandarins didn't dream up public-private partnerships.

I'm rather fond of a dedicated civil service.

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Euro data roaming price cut too shallow

Charlie Clark
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Unbundling will be the key

Tony, you're right that the prices still bear little relation to costs involved providing them. But the proposed changes do include new provisions that have learned from previous regulation. The wholesale cap on data roaming was supposed to lead to lower prices for users. As this was rarely the case there is now a cap for users as well. More importantly the Commission is aggressively pushing unbundling so that you are not forced to choose between what the regulated best deal and something your operator cooks up that might be better value depending on how you use it. It will soon be possible to pick up a SIM abroad and keep your number or simply choose another provider of data services. Assuming the customer experience is smooth enough that will definitely encourage competition and drive down prices.

Finally, the regulation is also the result of compromise. The telco's lobby effectively through the national governments against any caps: Viviane Reding and the European Parliament originally wanted the same costs abroad as in your home network. It's progress even if it's slow. And pity those poor souls outside the EU who see no such regulation.

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Charlie Clark
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PAYG in the US

It's pretty easy to pick up a SIM: AT&T and T-Mobile both use compatible networks. There are plenty of MVNO who resell their networks. I picked up a SIM from SimpleMobile straight from SFO. The package I went with wasn't cheap: USD 100 but it did include calls to Europe for about USD 0.02 per minute and enough data (GPRS mainly on the T-Mobile network) for what I needed. You can also rent phones for the period your over. Worth checking out the websites before you travel,

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Vote now for the WORST movie EVER

Charlie Clark
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The Phantom Menace Haters

I see your point: it was a massive disappointment but it sill had pod-racers and Darth Maul.

Independence Day and Jurassic Park should also be down with the worst but maybe they can just slip quietly into oblivion?

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Philips 42PFL7666 42in 3D LED Smart TV

Charlie Clark
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Re: smart net portal is well stocked

Opera is the runtime for the apps and also available as a standalone browser. Even though you can connect a USB keyboard I'm not sure you really want to use the telly for browsing. Better to have a tablet to hand, which you can also as a remote or for looking at the programme guide with the Philips.

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Munich's mayor claims €4m savings from Linux switch

Charlie Clark
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Oink

Budge up, would you? I want my fair share!

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Charlie Clark
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Re: Hmmm

What fragmentation issues, wanker? It's Jormany so it's SuSE though to be honest for the desktop that hardly matters. OpenOffice is a more than adequate replacement for MS Office in the few cases where it's required: many Jorman terminals are just that: Fujitsu-Siemens terminals talking to some host. Oh, you might mean they need browsers in which case *anything* but Microsoft would be an improvement. IE 9 won't run on XP so new hardware and software needed plus it's poo anyway. What else would office-workers need MS Windows for?

Security: it doesn't matter whether it's SuSE or Debian or RedHat all of the systems have tried and tested methods of rolling out security patches and a lot more often than once a fooking month. Of course, FreeBSD is the best of the lot.

As for support: if my own experience on the Windows 7 migration is anything to go by, Microsoft still has a long way to go. Don't get me wrong: it is a vast improvement but still full of issues. I reckon a locked down XFree desktop is easier to manage.

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ARM-Android to outship Windows-Anything by 2016

Charlie Clark
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Re: Don't believe it....

<quote>It will simply be down to - does Android have iTunes? No. Does Android have Office? No. Does Android play all top games? No. Hence it's restriction to phones....</quote>

Let's take those in order - ITunes isn't a dealbreaker for many just a requirement for IOS devices. Amazon is leading the way in making its store available on whatever platform.

Office - no MS Office but things that let work with MS Office documents. I've hardly used it because I hardly have the need to work with MS Office documents but I've seen a few fanbois happily pounding away at the IOS office suite. IMHO Office isn't as important as it was a few years ago. Be interesting to see if anyone sponsors an OpenOffice port to Android.

Games - what is your definition of "top games"? Angry Birds certainly looks to be up there now but for impressive graphics there is also Sony's Android-based strategy.

Going back to creative stuff - Adobe is really pushing it's Android and IOS offerings.

No, apart from third-party support what's holding Android back from the desktop is the hardware. The Asus Transformer shows what is possible but is still too expensive for large scale take up. File servers, printer drivers, etc. still required but then I can imagine Android based notebooks (13" and up) and mini-desktops running with standard peripherals and dirt cheap.

We've only really seen one year of the Android tablets - Honeycomb was essential - but the mass market is now being addressed (Aldi is pushing the "Lifetab") and people are becoming as familiar with Android as they have in the past with Windows and IOS. Lone warriors who want to bring their own device to work with them are more accepted now - I know of two corporate IT policies which expect this model to dominate by 2015. Standard connections, like the I-Phone port needed to give this a push. Can't see that taking off immediately but I sense the opportunity is there for anyone prepared to invest heavily enough: Lenovo or possibly HP if they get their head out of their arse in time.

Too early to call in my view. MS does have an opportunity on tablets as you suggest, at least for the enterprise market. The consumers are already adopting Android in sufficient numbers.

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Charlie Clark
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Re: Windows on the rise in the world of embedded systems?

It was in the previous article on IDC's predictions linked from the article. Yes, it was pretty unbelievable and not really worth a read. There are some good comments from people in the industry who know what's needed and how much things can cost and how much power they can draw, etc. x86 will have a chance in embedded systems when Apple switches to it for their phones, something that seems unlikely at the moment.

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