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* Posts by Charlie Clark

2257 posts • joined 16 Apr 2007

Fibre up, broadband up, IPTV up in Europe

Charlie Clark
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Apples and oranges

FTTH isn't really an option for Germany at the moment but it is doing very well with ADSL with 50 MB/s (as long as you do without IPTV) offered in most parts of most towns and 6 Mb/s the baseline. This is the result of an open market which encourages investment so that companies don't just depend on Deutsch Telekom reselling bandwidth wholesale but actually install their own DSLASMs in the exchanges which are connected by fibre to their own backbone. FTTC is also being rolled out but to a much lesser extent - the demand for > 50 MB/s isn't that great.

My understanding of the UK market is that it favours wholesale reselling over investment which is why services are more expensive and shoddier, at least when compared by El Reg.

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Adobe: crashing 100 million machines not an option

Charlie Clark
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All software is vulnerable

Flash's ubiquity across platforms makes it an attractive target for hacks. That is primarily used on the internet makes it even more attractive - people don't click on a link to download something but open a page hoping to watch something. This is more attractive for hackers than say office because it is one less hurdle.

But being a popular target does not necessarily mean that the software is more or less badly written than other stuff. As the browsers' own runtimes expand we can expect to see a return to targeting them, ie. poisoned h.264 or webm files, XSS, etc. Just wait for "online" office suites to become really popular for whole new problems to appear.

Simply bashing individual programs and vendors for software displays considerable ignorance about software development. Best power off your machine and pick up a book.

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Microsoft takes the Android profit, the Wonkas take the pain

Charlie Clark
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Simplistic assumptions

Andrew, the article makes several simplistic assumptions: on how much Google is spending on Android; on how much Microsoft is actually making; what is at stake legally.

1) Motorola purchase aside we don't know how much Google spends on Android. Is it less than Apple spends on the Iphone OS or Microsoft on the farce that Windows mobile was?

2) As others have noted all licensing deals with Microsoft have confidentiality agreements. Given that most of the manufacturers, Motorola notable here by its absence, also make Windows mobile phones it's hard not to imagine some kind of cross subsidy here. Essentially Microsoft is trying to make up for lost licence sales to said manufacturers and stop them jumping ship "because the next version will be so much better and no, Nokia, isn't going to be privileged." Yeah, right. Symbian - gone, RIM - going down fast, Windows Mobile - only Microsoft's equally deep pockets have given this one a second chance.

3) As for indemnifying the licensees - nobody forced them to use Android. Why didn't they press Google for indemnification? Or maybe, as far as Dalvik goes they already have? Anyway I can't see HTC or Samsung really complaining about their market share. Samsung may well overtake Nokia in total sales this year something that was unimaginable a few years ago.

4) Google likes to sit things out. Just look at the Youtube vs. Viacom case. Serial copyright abuse on Youtube since day one. Oh, there'll be an agreement in time but by sitting things out Google has managed to game; disrupted it as it were. I think they picked this up from how Microsoft ran the US department of justice such a merry dance of its licensing policy and that the agreements are made between the survivors who usually divide the spoils rather than worry about right and wrong.

5) Android is good enough. Other systems are faster or use less power but Android is usable and the hardware is fantastic. How long have people put up with the inverse: either great software with shit hardware or great hardware with shit software?

6) Android isn't search. Google now has millions of potential users of premium services - e.g. Google Apps - as well as potential advertising buckets. It's also worked out how to monetise its promiscuity: let the hardware manufacturers make some money and the networks as well, with the volumes now shifting Google can live well just from the crumbs.

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Amazon revamps E Ink Kindle line

Charlie Clark
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Let the price wars commence

Looks like Apple have been going after the wrong people - Ipad mini for USD 199? They'll probably sell like hot cakes and then Amazon will have them.

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Microsoft to skim Samsung Android takings

Charlie Clark
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Microsoft's traditional approach was to provide volume discounts for Windows as long as you only installed Windows on your hardware. Obviously they haven't got much chance of that with the phones but there is probably some kind of quid pro quo or volume discount for HTC and Samsung to encourage them to make phones that run Windows mobile. They're desperate for companies to make the phones until Nokia can come up with volume. Then it's a new round.

They probably won't bother going after Googola - Google will probably be only too happy to tell world + dog what the patents are and to provide replacements or workarounds in its own devices and Android.

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Mozilla forces Firefox 7 on memory diet

Charlie Clark
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I don't have many add-ons: PageSpeed and Screengrab are incompatible; Firebug, NoScript, Web Developer and YSlow all are. The newer release cycle generally breaks less than the old one.

One area I'd really like to see Mozilla work on is support for web forms. FF is as bad as IE in this respect and actually worse than IE 10 with only required and a couple of types (URL, e-mail) supported. C'mon guys, it can't be that difficult.

Memory use in something like a browser that is supposed to use a memory cache to speed up operations is difficult to get right - the in memory cache should be as big as possible without needing virtual memory but difficult to know for an app when the OS is going to want to park it to disk - but Firefox has always had a bigger memory footprint than Opera or Chrome at start up.

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Chocolate weighed in Schwarzeneggers: Official

Charlie Clark
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Wonderful

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Facebook's complexity will be its doom

Charlie Clark
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Google seems to have learned

Well, let's face it: they're success was based on being less cluttered and useless than Altavista and Yahoo had become. They added relatively discretely onto it and maintained separate platforms. Then they got seduced by the "social web" and gave birth to the brown slurry of "Buzz" and "Wave" and even their most ardent champions soon found that all the vaunted advantages were just new ways to waste time and that newsnet was more fun anyway.

Google+ seems to be deliberately understated in a bending-over-backwards way to please those early adopters amongst us likely not just to post about our frustration but also to call the cops, or in the case of Germany, set up a political party just to keep tabs on them. I suspect that they have learnt an awful lot about how *little* they need to know about individuals in order to be able to monetise it and that the 500 posts a day crowd probably aren't worth tracking.

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Ex-Microsofties' IE6 kill squad hits UK

Charlie Clark
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Fair play to them for identifying the need and providing a reasonably cheap interim solution. $ 5 per seat is probably a lot cheaper than buying new licences from Oracle, SAP and the rest who wrote these fucking awful "intranet applications".

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Sites downed by 1&1 web outage

Charlie Clark
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SLA

I think you'll find that a couple of hours downtime is well within your the service level agreement. If that's the case and you can't afford that then you need to colocate and manage your own DNS.

We have a server with 1&1 that was down for several hours this afternoon cutting off the website and e-mail. But that was the first time in 8 years. I think we can live with that.

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Facebook: 'We don't track logged-out users'

Charlie Clark
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Have you ever seen the network traffic if you scroll or move your mouse on a FB page? It's like having an army of goons watching and noting your every move.

Back to the problem - any FB JS checks for a FB cookie when it runs. That's largely what the "Like" buttons are for which is why in Jormany we're not allowed to use them without explicit consent from the visitor.

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Samsung shifts 10 millionth Galaxy SII

Charlie Clark
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Impressive numbers

Is it just possible that the phone is being sold on its own merits rather than in comparison to a putative Iphone 5? As for tying someone in - there are plenty of people happy to tie themselves into a contract and then try and work their way out of it and into the next one as soon as the next shiny, shiny appears.

Samsung's progress over the last few years is remarkable. Like HTC , whose progress has arguably been even more impressive, it is becoming a high-value phone brand, especially to the technologically informed who understand the differences between AMOLED and TFT. Still got some way to go before being iconic but certainly on the way to being understood as a technological leader. More Sony than Apple but impressive just the same.

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Faster-than-light back with surprising CERN discovery

Charlie Clark
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The question is...

Were they laden or unladen, African or European neutrinos?

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pWS8Mg-JWSg&html5=True

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Twitter discovers MMS for photo tweeting

Charlie Clark
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You forgot to mention

Operators' obsessions with billing minute details meant that MMS never worked across national boundaries. They did eventually let people send holiday snaps to friends back home but never how to send something to anyone on a foreign networks. This hamstrung quite a view added value services and definitely encouraged the take up of other forms of messaging such as e-mail.

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Adobe bets on Flash 11 to fend off HTML5 invasion

Charlie Clark
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Agree in general - this is more about the long-standing fight between Flash and Java ME as the development platform for choice for games and the fight for cross-platform development - but not in the details. There is now little practical difference between ActionScript and Javascript, Adobe has done a lot to bring them closer together, as languages but the Flash runtime does come with nicer libraries. Hardware acceleration isn't yet there for the browsers - largely irrelevant for 2D, and for security reasons not generally available for 3D.

Correctly positioned the tools should allow Adobe to cover a lot of bases - HTML native where appropriate and possible - and reduce developers' headaches.

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BBC website ditches modules in facelift

Charlie Clark
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It still looks unfinished but I agree with you that it's an improvement on the old one. As for HD - I don't run any browser maximised at 2500 x 1600 - because I can have two windows open in usable size next to each other.

I'm sure I'm not alone in using the BBC as a reference website for my own work - not for copying slavishly but as an informed check for complex content - and it's nice to see that they are continually refining it, nice to see that the two-stage top navigation from the news site has finally gone. FWIW their new media guidelines are a wonderful resource.

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Intel demos ultra low-juice chippery

Charlie Clark
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To be fair to Intel 2 W was mentioned for a 100 GFLOPs system that currently requires 200 W. If those chips were available I'm sure they would be snapped up. But they're not yet.

The article provides no clear information on the power requirements of Claremont. Certainly impressive improvements but sounds like process work at which Intel excel. In theory the same improvements would work for every architecture including ARM.

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Intel extends JavaScript for parallel programming

Charlie Clark
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I guess the extensions just happen to be x86 specific? After all, who else has all those cores idly doing nothing?

Interestingly over on the IE blog, which is refreshingly detailed, there's a discussion of using "promises" for concurrent programming, the sister of parallel programming.

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Google shamed by Apple in race to HTML5

Charlie Clark
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Facepalm

What a load of self-serving, disingenuous crap.

Apple embrace HTML5? What, like running a demo on their website that sniffs for the Safari user agent and otherwise says you can't come in? Yeah, that's pretty fucking progressive.

Hardware acceleration for website? Even MS has trouble making this sound really convincing and has to use synthetic goldfish bowls and Star Wars text to try and make a case. For web browsing it's totally irrelevant. For playing videos - well, duh, Google's YouTube property was one of the first to introduce non-Flash formats and thus make hardware acceleration possible.

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Apple Store newspaper headlock may be slipping

Charlie Clark
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Not a fair comparison

30 % would be pretty low for a retail channel but that isn't what at stake here.

This is about subscriptions which publishers love to own not just because of the lower overhead of maintaining the sale but also because of the direct relationship with the customer which is good for getting demographic information for advertisers and allows cross-sales of other publications or services. Apart from the potential data protection issues, it is plain bad business sense to share this hard won data with another company.

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Nokia's Ovi wunderkind is off ... to Nokia-backed Vision+

Charlie Clark
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Sugar Ape?

The cover of the magazine has got to be a joke, hasn't it? As long as there are publishers prepared to push that kind of shit out, you'll find people prepared to buy into it. The recent week's worth of Jobs sycophancy is a case in point.

Plus, you must give credit to people being able to sell themselves to companies looking for the "x factor" that they think is necessary for the next "phase" of their development. Germany had serial Thomas Middelhoff as a serial corporate idiot. Wonder how look Mr O. will stay with Vision+ (shouldn't that be with Tony Hart and Morph?) before he climbs again? Next stop HP?

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Samsung 'mulls bid for' HP's orphaned webOS

Charlie Clark
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True

The Bada world is full of Samsung's decision to massively expand it's software development operations in India:

From Indonesia via Google translation

http://translate.google.com/translate?client=tmpg&hl=en&u=http%3A%2F%2Fbadaindonesia.blogspot.com%2F2011%2F08%2Fsamsung-rekrut-1000-spesialis-software.html%23more&langpair=id|en

WebOS has a lot going for it but Samsung already has products where WebOS would work. WebOS would seem to make sense for someone who wants to get in the market but is software light such as a Chinese OEM.

Expanding software development in India will be a smart move if they can get it right. It's a hell of a lot cheaper than Europe and the US and closer to a different market where established Western brands don't have it all their own way: Coca Cola bought a local brand in India, initially to close out a competitor but kept it because of the size of the market. Nokia is still very successful there because it has worked hard.

The Western obsession with getting out of manufacturing and hoping to get by owning the top part of the value could end up biting a lot of companies. Samsung's USD 18 billion hasn't just come from being a copycat but from doing a lot of hard work and oodles of R&D.

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Android bakes bitter 20th birthday cake for Linux

Charlie Clark
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Straw man article

The whole point of open source software is allowing it to be forked. The FSF/GPL political shenanigans have long just been an annoyance.

Linus is probably right not to be worried about the fork. Android is out exploring uses that have little relevance to server environments. He should think about moving to a BSD licence and a possible merge with the NetBSD code base for the kernel.

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HP's UK PC boss: We're going nowhere

Charlie Clark
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Not just cheap tech

If all people wanted was cheap tech then they wouldn't buy shiny shiny in such huge numbers. Your basic point is valid: the poor value proposition. Apple is able to offer the Apple brand and the expectation that anyone can use the device and they will never ever have to answer a technical question. Other brands have to come up with their own value proposition otherwise they are destined for the bargain basement. The lack of sales for largely comparable products is customers expressing "make me a better offer, gov" for products that they might like but don't feel they need.

If Google can continue to polish Android and the OEMs continue to improve their manufacturing then it's conceivable that the perception of Apple's added value will change as has to a large degree happened with the phones where Droids are no longer the toys of the elite or Fanboi wannabes.

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Samsung's iOS rival gets multitasking and HTML5

Charlie Clark
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Version 2 is okay

I'm not a fan of these suites and Kies version 1 was a piece of shit. Version 2 is smaller faster and more usable for things like backing up your phone's data.

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Charlie Clark
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Misunderstood

All mobile phones must be able to multitask to be able manage the user interface and the radios.

Bada 1 already does co-operative multitasking of applications such as GPS navigation and playing music at the same time. In that respect it's already ahead of the version of IOS that supported it for Apple apps only and let the unwashed masses of third party apps join the party. From what I've seen users won't see much difference here which is good because most of us don't really care that much about the technical niceties.

The WAC is a nice way of packaging widgets as cross-platform apps and makes sense to Samsung for things like phones, tablets and TVs.

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The Torvalds of Drupal pledges HTML5 mobile love

Charlie Clark
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WTF?

Poorly written

Gavin, were you under a deadline to release this? Are you suffering from jet lag? Did it even get proofread? The article reads like the regurgitation of undigested notes made at a keynote.

HTML 5 (yes, I know officially it's written without the space), wow, big news. That is by and a large a simple DTD, which notably does not include a version number, that activates standards mode rendering with some optional new tags thrown in for good measure which make handmade markup significantly easier on the eye. The rest is effectively largely formalising current practices.

"HTML5 includes tags so that elements like forms can be rendered on different devices without needing to hard code them into their parent site"

Excuse me, what did you say? HTML 5 forms do not include new tags. New attributes at best. The new input types include support for richer native widgets such as sliders, calendars and colour pickers, they also support client-side content checking without javascript. All very nice but this is largely moving client functionality from JS libraries to a specification. That makes things more hard coded than before.

As for Drupal's structure and development procedure, still looks a long way behind the foundation and proposal approach common to systems like Plone.

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Woman in strop strip for Bermuda airport customs

Charlie Clark
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Big Brother

There's the rub

"If you don't want to be searched, don't come through customs."

This is the fundamental misunderstanding of the role of customs, as an organ of the state, with relation to the citizen that is becoming unfortunately commonplace. By extension: if you don't want to be arrested for loitering, don't leave the house; if you don't want your phone tapped, don't use it, etc.

Could you pass me my coat, please? It's the one with "The Social Contract" in the pocket.

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Apple wins (another) Samsung Android injunction in EU

Charlie Clark
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FAIL

Get a clue

Patents offer absolutely no protection for look-a-likes. That is the realm of trademarks. As for innovation - who makes the fucking processors and memory chips in the Iphones? That would be Samsung then. Oh, and Samsung *owns* AMOLED screens. Yes, "retina" is catchy but I'll take real blacks every time.

As for the injunction - October? i.e. giving Samsung enough time to shift inventory and stock up on modified product.

Billboards in Germany are currently pimping the Samsung Galaxy S II as the thinnest, bad-assest mobile around. It's dual-core, not that really matters except that the Iphone isn't. While the ads are different in style to last year's Applegasm ones, the one they do have in common is that they are run simultaneously by different networks. Yes, Apple has a better brand than any of the networks but they, too, do have value. Are the injunctions related to getting the much trailed Iphone 5 as much limelight as possible?

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Just how will Apple restrict device-ID snooping in iOS 5?

Charlie Clark
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IPv6?

All IOS devices are IPv6 capable and by default Apple doesn't enable the privacy extensions which means the Mac address is available as part of the local address.

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Facebook, Twitter: Doing better than before Google+

Charlie Clark
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FAIL

Smells like clickbait

1 million or 0.6% difference between two months? Statistically barely relevant. Of greater relevance might be that over a period of a month only 20 % of Facebook's loyal legions bothered to login. Oh, and now it's close to being banned in Germany.

Twitter is on the up and up as broadcasters like the BBC use it to replace paid-for infrastructure. Wonder what would happen if anyone challenged the BBC Trust over the use and in particular the promotion of commercial services?

Is El Reg descending into eyeball-grabbing Facebook and Iphone rumours to keep the advertisers happy?

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German authorities park tanks on Facebook's lawn

Charlie Clark
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FAIL

You don't understand

The decision doesn't refer directly to Facebook directly, where you're quite right that, in general, if people agree to the terms of service, then they have to live with the consequences*. It's about sites adding the "Track me", sorry, "Like" button to their pages. This causes tracking code to loaded without prior consent and is, thus, in breach of German and now EU law.

* A separate case can be made for the scope of the data collected and the form of agreement which is why Facebooks extension of biometric data has been challenged by German authorities. Then there are the problems about safe harbour. EU law has fairly strict rules about where and how personal data can be stored which is why SWIFT had to create a European data centre for banking transactions to stop the FBI and others snooping at will.

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Charlie Clark
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Lost in translation

The use of "... bitch" by Zuckerberg is extremely idiomatic and does not translate directly. I don't think either "Schlampe" or "Weibstück" (a better alternative than Weibchen) are appropriate in a phrase that could just as easily have been "... nigger" or "... asshole" or simply "... dude".

Good decision by the ULD, let's see whether anyone's got the balls to enforce it.

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Mystery railway buys 80 terabytes of Flash

Charlie Clark
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Clay tablets, surely?

NFT

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Googlola's closed source Android temptation

Charlie Clark
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FAIL

Where to start?

Operating systems are not created in a vacuum by "good programmers". Even so, in the US, that does not necessarily mean you will be free from copyright and patent issues. And then, when you do have an OS, you have to convince developers to work on it and provide them with all the tools.

That's why IOS is not a clean room development but based on Mac OS which is based on NextStep which is based on Unix which is based on... Probably simpler to buy QT from Nokia, or WebOS from HP.

If Google is going to turn into a large-scale manufacturer then it needs supply chain managers just as much as engineers.

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New Apple move against Galaxy Tab on Euro front

Charlie Clark
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Go

Galaxy Tabs still on sale in Germany

In the shops, advertising, etc. Good publicity for Samsung. Tempted to get one myself just to see what the fuss is about but I think I'll wait for the 9" one. Smaller and lighter and better for listenting to TMS on the balcony!

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Average sozzled Brit sinks 5,800 pints during life

Charlie Clark
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Pint

Dodgy maths

5800 pints a lifetime? Let's assume drinking lifetimes resemble working ones - 40 years so about 150 pints a year or 3 pints a week. That can't be right. I can't be bothered to do any research but I thought there were fairly reasonable EU stats on alcohol consumed.

As for £1000 a year on booze, that's only £20 a week. Again I can't think of who that would apply to. In London that would cover near teetotallers only! I reckon that barely covers an "average" session let alone a binge. Anyway, if the research is about the health risks then it should be accompanied by the number of curries, kebabs et al consumed! Are boozers more likely to partake of other intoxicating substances such as nicotine, fragrant tobacco, Afghan wholegrain and Bolivian marching powder?

Has this research been sponsored by the brewers association trying to wake national pride and raise the average?

Can we have some Reg SI units based research on this? Typical drinkers for both sexes ranging from Mother Teresa to Paris Hilton for women and the Pope to Oliver Reed for men?

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Canonical ARMs Ubuntu for microserver wars

Charlie Clark
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Just for devilment

How does NetBSD compare?

@Timothy Morgan - three years ago ARM notebooks were unfortunately not taking the world by storm. There were some concept builds but nothing to buy. Maybe this time next year they'll finally be around.

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Explaining the Chocolate Factory's Patent Panic

Charlie Clark
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Missing the point

It's too tempting to try and second guess the value of the patents. As most of us are not patent lawyers this really ends up as rooting for one side or the other. However, to claim that only the quality of the patents and not their quantity matters would seem to overlook several previously protracted battles in the past. It also assumes that judges are interested in and able to understand the technical details. I think a court in Texas is often cited as an example of where there this is not necessarily the case.

So, initially the purchase, if approved will give Google the opportunity to play the second most popular game in US business: sue and counter-sue (the most popular being mergers, acquisitions and sell-offs). This is rarely about the worthiness of a case and more about wearing down the opposition. As with takeovers, the sums involved are often irrelevant as it is usually OPM and can be created almost at will through central bank largesse. Google can now join in: Apple patents raindrops, Google patents snowflakes.

What about if Google's real aim is to reform the US patent system and have the most mickey mouse patents, of which Apple and Microsoft have a bundle, declared invalid? How about getting the US to adopt the European system which has much less scope for patenting software in the first place? Because Google doesn't make it's money from physical products it is, in a sense, ahead of the game. Apple and Microsoft's defensive use of patents doesn't look like innovation to me.

I suspect that reform of the US patent system is pretty much a certainty whether it be legislative or de facto - the sheer volume of stuff now being made and designed outside the US in China, Taiwan and Korea is tipping the scales already. How long do these financial behemoths think they can rule the roost when they effectively keep on handing over their IP to their real competitors? What is to stop Foxconn from doing a HTC / ZTE / Huawei and Samsung and start to offer its own innovations in its own products?

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Has Google wasted $12bn on a dud patent poker-chip?

Charlie Clark
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Compare and contrast

How GSM became the world standard for mobile phones in no small part because it was largely developed by European companies (Ericsson, Nokia, Siemens, Alcatel) who knew, since the success of PAL for TV, that would have to work together as much as compete with each other.

20 years later with the rise of the services based smartphones and, as has been noted in many places, American companies are better placed for their development. Suddenly, it's a no-holds-barred, winner-takes-all kind of thing.

The comparison isn't 100 % accurate (Nortel and Motorola were on board early as everyone was scared by Qualcomm) but instructive. Will consumers really benefit from the incompatible silo approach that gave us PCS, IDeN, CDMA, etc?

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People don't want tablets, they want iPads

Charlie Clark
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The German injunction

It's only temporary with the case due to be heard in detail on August 25th. That's why it's an injunction and not a ban.

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Google SHOCK! Snaps up Motorola phone biz for $12.5bn

Charlie Clark
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It can't be the hardware

That's largely all made in China by cheap workers or robots. Becoming a hardware company would be a huge change for Google which is interested in a volume that it probably couldn't provide as a single supplier. The acquisition reminds me on the OnVideo purchase last year which led to WebM. I really can't see any manufacturer want to take on Google with its new patent war chest. Motorola was involved in mobile phones from the beginning and have patents on the whole value chain. It's easy to get hyperbolic on this but Google could probably injunction the hell out of Cupertino.

Financially it is equivalent to the Nortel and Skype deals. Microsoft is also giving Nokia money for the switch. Based purely on like for like I would say that Google got by far the better deal. MS may have to buy Nokia after this.

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Grow up, Google: You're threatening IT growth

Charlie Clark
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It's not over until the fat lady sings

Given the nature of the injunctions taken out then Google was right not to indemnify Android. Samsung and Motorola will appeal and what will happen if they win? A bit of an oversight in your article to gloss over the current legal process and the possible outcomes. Also a bit unfair to lump Android in with the Youtube, Google Books copyright approach. I think they are very different beasts.

Incidentally I saw a 10.1 Tab in a store in Germany today with nobody attempting to stop it being sold. It looked nice and is definitely lighter than an Ipad. To me the injunctions look like a rearguard action by Apple who must be worried about not getting preferential treatment on the next hardware goody be it screen or multicore chip or whatever.

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Glaswegian arrested for pro-riot Facebook posts

Charlie Clark
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Sad but true

There's a reason why in many suburbs the standard shop front is made of metal. And now the scuffers have discovered that the city centre is "open for business".

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Local TV pioneers sought by Ministry of Fun

Charlie Clark
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Killer app

Political debates. At least according to Mr Hunt. I guess he needs to watch more US cable and public access or maybe just get out less.

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Sky wins TV riot battle

Charlie Clark
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What's a riot?

Doesn't look like one to me.

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Apple blocks sale of Samsung's Android fondleslab across EU

Charlie Clark
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Devil

Good time to be a Dutch trader

This was probably the most stupid thing Apple could have done. The Dutch are pastmasters at selling stuff across the border and this is virtually an incitement to German consumers to go "Dutch". It will get Samsung much more publicity than they would otherwise get and I don't see the injunction going very far. German courts are often quite happy to grant temporary injunctions.

According to Heise Apple defends the move claiming that Samsung "is abusing the reputation of the Ipad a well-known product with cult status". Yeah, right. Nobody thought of tablet computing before Apple?

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Tottenham MP calls for BlackBerry Messenging suspension

Charlie Clark
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Hear, here

I call on the authorities and Channel 4 to dust off Brass Eye and slip it in as a replacement for the news and wonder if anyone will notice.

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Groupon sees surge in subscribers, scrubs contentious fiscal metric

Charlie Clark
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Valuations

Unless the Federal Reserve pumps more money into the market then I would suggest that all bets regarding the current crop of tech bubble companies are off.

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Blackberry QNX phone details leaked

Charlie Clark
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Underpowered?

QNX doesn't need much power as long as it doesn't need to support resource intensive subsystems like Java a single core should be fine. QNX has always excelled at multitasking. Anyway, unlikely to matter much in such a small form factor device which is focussed on messaging.

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