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* Posts by Charlie Clark

2576 posts • joined 16 Apr 2007

Can nothing trip up the runaway cash monster that is Intel? Well...

Charlie Clark
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Re: Intel is getting a huge lift from mobile...

@Mage

They didn't flog ALL their ARM to Marvell either. They have an ARM based comms SoC.

AFAIK They did sell all the ARM to Marvell, the comms SoC was bought from Infineon and is a different beast to the pretty impressive StongARMs they had.

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Charlie Clark
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Re: Intel is getting a huge lift from mobile...

ARM trying to breakl into the server room is much like Intel trying to break into mobile space.

It will depend on the kind of servers being required: for some jobs x86 is just what you need, for others it's just too much silicon. Of course, there will only be any kind of take up if the migration between systems is easy enough and we may need a whole new metrics area which works out which services run best of which architectures. I think AMD's approach may work well here: x86 for grunt stuff, GPU for vectoring, custom (ARM) for encryption and standard ARM for simple stuff like http-serving.

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Charlie Clark
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Re: " we believe that over time we can make [mobility] a profitable business,"

As soon as we've got our pals Microsoft to drop all ARM support

Microsoft has pretty much done this already with the Surface 3 Pro being the only Surface 3 in town. Pretty much everyone else has given up making Windows Phone now that Microsoft makes them itself. But the world hasn't really noticed because, despite what the enthusiasts say, Windows Phone is very much a niche player.

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Charlie Clark
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Re: Investors aren't counting on Intel to succeed in mobile

But Intel dominates in PC CPUs, and whatever decline there is in PCs will be made up for by increases in servers.

For how much longer? The current server boom coincides but doesn't correlate with the PC business.

ARM is continuing to expand up the food chain and we'll start seeing serious ARM servers over the next 12 months. If any of them deliver significant reductions in capital or operating expenditure we can expect to see the results in Intel's bottom line as it will be forced to reduce prices to maintain market share.

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Microsoft takes on Chromebook with low-cost Windows laptops

Charlie Clark
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Re: Minimum specifications for Windows...

Hey cowardly AC, Then Windows 7 and Office 2010 is it,

Not being facetious but what bits can't you do with OpenOffice? I find 4.1 pretty damn good. Otherwise Office 2011 on Mac is fine. Or do you need Outlook?

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Charlie Clark
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Re: a netbook by any other name would stink as much

Netbooks were/are amazingly awesome. Until Microsoft got/get their hands on them, that is.

It was only the ones with XP that sold in any volume but the concept was really hampered by the restrictions that Intel placed on them, limiting screen size, etc.

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Charlie Clark
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Re: a netbook by any other name would stink as much

Actually, this looks like the Toshiba: http://www.toshiba.com/us/computers/laptops/satellite/C50/C55-B5299.

Around 2kg, only 2GB RAM and poor resolution for the screen size and not very beefy (not removable) battery.

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Remember when Google+ outed everyone by their real names? Now Google's sorry

Charlie Clark
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Re: G+ as an "identity service"

It is an identity service, just not a named identity service. But it couldn't do that without some kind of formal backup such as id cards.

Google+ is the single-sign-on for the Googly services. Google+ serves some people well as communities and others continue to ignore it.

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Mozilla and Facebook snip a further five per cent from all JPEGs

Charlie Clark
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Re: Open sauciness

Microsoft's JPEG-XR is not open source but it's also not worth bothering about. WebP via mod_pagespeed is probably the only sane thing to do (store a nice quality image and mod_pagespeed will handle compression and serve WebP if the browser can read it). HEVC is encumbered not sure about any restrictions on a spun-out bitmap format but I don't expect it to have legs over WebP.

As far as I can tell Facebook uses very high compression settings for relatively little gain.

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Japanese artist cuffed for disseminating 3D ladyparts files

Charlie Clark
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Re: Manco

"Manko" means mistake or drawback in German so you can imagine all the fun they have when discussing the reasons for vehicle recall.

Then there's "mushi, mushi" to say hello on the phone. This is funny in German because "mushi" is "fanny".

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YES: Scotland declares independence ... from the dot co dot uk empire

Charlie Clark
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Re: "If Scotland get independance, I'll be the first one to move there."

Oil will be 10% of Scottish GDP. Salmond is talking of getting loans of 3% GDP to stimulate businesses and create unemployment

What more of it? ;-)

Salmond is a smooth talker and a canny (no irony intended) politician (he's still a shit like the rest of them). However, I do think that much like Arafat he may actually prefer remaining First Minister a Scotland within the UK than of an independent Scotland because it is electorally extremely advantageous to be able to blame England/The Tories/London for things.

I hope the referendum in September goes well and sees a large turnout. I also hope that the "better together" campaign finds better arguments than the financial ones. Devolution has been an undoubted success, more of it please including to the English regions. Tax raising powers (and concomitant responsibility).

I can also recommend the piece in this week's Economist that covers many of the practicalities of dealing with independence. Worth reading whatever side you take on the issue.

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Charlie Clark
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Re: how long before...

I refrained from .sssr (Scottish soviet socialist republic) because that would give the wee man even more delusions of grandeur

I don't know. I can imagine Mr Putin being only too happy to help him out: out go the Tridents in come the Russian subs…

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Charlie Clark
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Re: Scotland using English tld?

Moot: the vast majority of Scots speak a descendant of Anglo-Saxon and not Gaelic (around 80,000 I believe).

The bigger problem is how all these vanity domains erode the underlying sense of the domain name system.

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Charlie Clark
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Re: Subsidised?

I agree that El Reg got it wrong but my understanding is that it's currently even stevens re. North Sea oil and money from Whitehall.

London has its own collection of subsidised masses: bankers, TechCity and anyone benefitting from the various subsidised mortgage schemes.

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Female! ex-Yahoo! coder! says! female! boss! fired! her! for! refusing! sex!

Charlie Clark
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Broken law

This is another example of why American law is so fucked. Sexual harassment should be a criminal offence: report it to the cops and let the public prosecutor take over and not a feast for civil action lawyers fighting not for right or wrong but for the biggest payout.

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BitTorrent not to blame for movie revenues, says economist

Charlie Clark
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Re: Add the 3d farce

I think you're the first Dutch person I've come across who dislikes subtitles. All my friends claim that they don't notice them, at least for English language films. Here in good old Jormany we get horribly dubbed films: Clouseau does not have a silly French accent in German versions of the Pink Panther!

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Charlie Clark
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Re: Cause or effect

So the implication is that studios should be paying the filesharers for the benefit they confer?

Not necessarily. The research does seem to back up the idea that file sharing can act as publicity: whether it's because people dislike screeners (I can't stand them myself) or subsequently decide to watch a film on the big screen or both.

However, one thing file sharing definitely does is displace activity: if you're watching something you've torrented you're not doing something else (such as watching the same item on DVD or TV or out down the pub with your mates). In fact, in many countries torrents of Hollywood films have displaced local films.

Hollywood has for years been griping about sales lost to piracy, and got some nice laws drafted for its efforts, but it has also been far more positive about digital downloads than the music industry. Both have suffered more from expected incomes from format shifts (remember all the CDs we bought for vinyl or DVDs of VHS we already had?) failing to materialise. In music this was coupled with some stupid contracts and artists rediscovering concerts (previously a means to publicise records, now highly lucrative events not least because the record companies were cut out). Hollywood has profited from the proliferation of TV channels as additional means of distribution in the digital age but failed to see those channels as potential threats: HBO, et al. have for years been producing better quality fare of their own and have become more interesting for artists.

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May: UK data slurp law is fine, but I still need EMERGENCY powers

Charlie Clark
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Re: "perceived threat from foreign companies ripping the government's current regulations to shreds"

It doesn't matter anyway as although the taps were/are illegal there won't be any court cases as a result, partly because they'll be too much leaning on the relevant companies from other governments keen to join in and partly because the "national security" joker would be played preventing any evidence being admitted.

However, it is foolish in the extreme to change the law before a new EU directive has been crafted.

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Gartner: To the right, to the right – biz sync firms who've won in a box to the right...

Charlie Clark
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Missing tagline?

"Study sponsored by EMC"?

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Microsoft's Lumia 930... a real HANDFUL

Charlie Clark
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FAIL

Re: Is this the review of a camera or a phone?

Having an app that performs a service using the system API means that app may screw up.

And? How is that going to make the system unstable? If the system is not providing APIs for this then it's going to be tightly coupled and much more difficult to maintain than one using an API.

This would require that they shoe-horn every cloud service into the current API

No, alternative services would have to provide code that fulfils the API. That is the whole point of an API.

Alternatively, they would have to add to the API to cover the cases that could not be driven within the current API.

Nice oxymoron.

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Charlie Clark
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Re: Is this the review of a camera or a phone?

a Skype client that doesn't allow old style Skype logins…

Is anyone still really using Skype? Only a matter of time before Microsoft starts closing down the old style accounts and forcing its UI abomination on the holdouts. For the odd time I use it I still have my pre-eBay Mac OS client; you know the simple one that just works.

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Charlie Clark
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Re: Is this the review of a camera or a phone?

Also don't see why they should support other competing cloud services instead, increases the risk of unreliability and bloatware in an Android-like way…

That is complete bollocks. Allowing users to choose different services has nothing whatsoever to do with unreliability and bloatware.

If I'm already using a service such as Dropbox to sync my data to, why shouldn't I be able to continue doing so? By preventing this Microsoft is throttling competition. By all means provide a default but let the user choose to decide otherwise.

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Charlie Clark
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Is this the review of a camera or a phone?

giving users a chance to do a little more than point, shoot and…

Why and? Point and shoot is what most people do with any camera, especially phones. I know Nokia has some very clever and good technology in the cameras in their phones but most people do just want stuff to work as quickly and simply as possible.

You praise Windows Phone 8.1 but how far does it go to resolve the gripes that people have with the previous version?

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LibreSSL crypto library leaps from OpenBSD to Linux, OS X, more

Charlie Clark
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Re: Two thumbs up to Theo DeRaadt ...

So thumbs up for the effort, but there is a need for an independent review effort…

That is a loaded statement. Code review is always good and should be part of the development process. However, let's think about the suggestion in the context of the OpenSSL debacle:

1. The fork was started after a code review

2. Any good fork should aim to pass at least all existing unit tests

3. There already exists sophisticated penetration testing infrastructure for testing the known weaknesses of OpenSSL and discovering new ones both in it and LibreSSL

4. Code counts - the best way to discover defects is to make the code available

If LibreSSL can pass the existing tests then it is as secure as OpenSSL. Cutting a release will encourage the security experts to scrutinise it and competition here between the two projects can only be good.

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Apple OS X Yosemite 4 TIMES more popular than Mavericks

Charlie Clark
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Mavericks is pretty well loved by owners of older Apple gear.

Not by me it isn't because it won't run on my MacMini because Apple won't do a 64-bit version of the graphics driver.

Most importantly for me: I wish Apple would move to OS + ports release schedule so that all the Posix plumbing can be updated outside OS updates.

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Charlie Clark
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Re: How about some more Mavericks love?

I find Mavericks more stable and responsive than Lion or Mountain Lion and many of the bugs introduced in the move to x86_64 in Snow Leopard still need resolving.

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Bloodied Samsung's profits down 25% as it clings to mobe crown

Charlie Clark
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Re: Being squeezed from both ends

And they had a good year last year. Tablet replacement cycles seem longer than phone ones, something that was also reflected in Apple's most recent report.

Samsung continues to invest in technology and I think may be well placed to benefit from Google's next Android offensive.

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Reg reader fires up Pi-powered anti-cat garden sprinkler system

Charlie Clark
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Re: Do you drink coffee?

Well, yes but… coffee grinds are not neutral for the garden. On the one hand they are full of nutrients, but on the other caffeine can also function as a herbicide.

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Charlie Clark
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Re: water pistol

You mean something like this: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QPgqfnKG_T4 ?

It uses OpenCV for image recognition.

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App permissions? Pah! Rogue Android soft can 'place phone calls at will'

Charlie Clark
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Re: I wonder....

If, as usual, the exploit is only exploitable by side-loaded apps then users are largely on their own as they have to set the phone to allow installs from other sources themselves.

It's a different matter if it can be exploited by apps from the official store but even then it's not really the carriers who need to worry.

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USA to insist on pre-flight mobe power probe

Charlie Clark
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Re: I wonder how they got this information?

You're saying they're not vetted thoroughly before being hired?

Who's they? You mean cleaners and baggage handlers and the security head-the-balls who, at least in America, don't even get paid the minimum wage? Sure, they're subject to thorough vetting and regular checks…

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Charlie Clark
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Re: I wonder how they got this information?

And what about the small army of poorly paid cleaners, security and baggage handlers that routinely pass through all checks with impunity?

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Storm-battered Rockall adventurer recalls 'worst experience of my life'

Charlie Clark
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Re: Prevailing winds

It also depends upon whether the weather can be relied upon to come from the same direction for the duration of your stay.

Sure, which is why I'm sceptical: the prevailing winds for Rockall may be from the SW but the north Atlantic does experience significant changes of wind directions as the various system move across.

As you're only strapping the container to a sheer face you're also still not compensating for leverage as you would if you really could dangle between faces so I don't see much difference to pegging it on the ledge: you're at the mercy of the weakest link so aerodynamics are possibly the most import consideration.

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Charlie Clark
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Re: Prevailing winds

Dangling from a cliff face might have been the better option at the time, from the sound of it.

Colour me stupid but I fail to see how dangling is going to give more stability. I can imagine some form of suspension on all sides being used to help diffuse the energy from the wind but how would that work here? How would you stop the thing from being smashed against the cliff face?

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Charlie Clark
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Re: So once again ...

Interesting point, upvoted, however stunts are publicity and publicity means awareness and so more donors.

You might expect that (seems to me like a very American position to adopt) but the numbers say not. The experience of many charities is that big, stuntish events tend to raise the take for individual events but lower the annual take. Plus, you keep on having to raise the bar. Little, but often is more effective which is why many charities now employ professional fundraisers and try to get people to subscribe to regular donations.

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THE GERMANS ARE CLOUDING: New AWS cloud region spotted

Charlie Clark
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Yep, and given the number of alternatives already in Germany I don't see this having legs for anything beyond things like CDNs.

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Viv Reding quits justice commish role - heads for EU parliament

Charlie Clark
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FAIL

Re: Thank you!

Non-roaming telephone users are subsidising those who do roam…

More nonsense: roaming incurs little or no costs for operators. Therefore, there is no (cross-)subsidy. If there was, then the European Commission might be obliged to act under the provisions of the Treaty of Luxembourg, aka known as the Single European Act, signed for the UK by dear, darling, dead Dame Thatcher.

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Charlie Clark
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Thumb Down

Re: Thank you!

but it raises the phone bills of everyone else

Nope, this is not the case: mobile telephony and data charges continue to fall around Europe. The network operators were given plenty of time to adjust to the changes and did so largely by offering bundles and consolidating network infrastructure. I certainly get more value from my UK PAYG SIM than I did 5 years ago.

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Charlie Clark
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FAIL

Re: European justice commissioner Viviane Reding...

does not represent anybody, has no democratic mandate and can never be voted out of office

As is true for any civil service, which is what the Commission is.

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Charlie Clark
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Tuesday, while Europeans using their smartphones beyond the EU will face much bigger bills as local carriers respond to the expected drop in sales resulting from the ruling by upping prices elsewhere.

While that may have been the case in the past it simply isn't true any more. Sure, calls outside the EU/EFTA are still more expensive but I continue to see prices falling around the world. This is down to: EU policy setting a precedent; customers getting smarter and using local SIMs where possible; technological change.

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'I don't want to go on the cart' ... OpenSSL revived with survival roadmap

Charlie Clark
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Admission of failure

is what the document reads like. Also, while it's nice listing the issues and the objectives it's missing the solution: when are the issues going to be addressed and who will be doing it? LibreSSL makes more and more sense: concentrate on getting the core functionality right first.

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Google kills its successful social network. Yes, we mean Orkut

Charlie Clark
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Why would closing this service be any different to the other services that Google has closed over the last few years? But equally, why should closing yet another marginal service have any affect on the professional, paid-for services such as docs and mail? Users of such services are protected by contracts unlike the users of free services, though I suspect the free versions will stick around in one form or another to entice people to use them. Personally, I don't use many of Google's services apart from the search.

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Conformist Google: Android devices must LOOK, WORK ALIKE

Charlie Clark
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Re: Google - More like Apple every day

And that's the way it will stay for those who can be bothered.

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Charlie Clark
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Re: Slow learners?

@paul how about having a look at the "Material Design" docs to see? They're not perfect but the show that it's not a "Metro moment".

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Saddle up for the Tour de Firmware

Charlie Clark
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Re: Grumpy old git

On a race bike there is always a strict tradeoff between technical advantage and weight. Particularly on hills there is a desire to spare every gram possible. It was not unusual for people to file or drill things that they thought they could do without. There are even those who consider something like a computer as too much extra weight.

Recently, however, carbon fibre frames have put a floor under the practical weight of a bike - much lighter and they won't really be ridable. You still won't find most of the gimmicks on a race bike but electronic gearing might be nice on a hill as that's the place that you're likely to have problems changing gears. I can also imagine some of the hard core preferring indicators over hand signals so they don't have to take their hands off the bars.

In real life there is usually more weight to be saved on the rider than on the bike so there is more room for creature comforts. Hub dynamos are down to around 450g and can easily provide enough power to charge a phone - handy if you're planning an extended camping trip.

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Spanish struggle to control spelling of 'WhatsApp'

Charlie Clark
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Re: Why translate?

It isn't translation but transcription or transliteration. Or how else do you think we got the word algebra?

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What a whopper, LG: Feast your eyes on this 77-inch bendy TV

Charlie Clark
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Re: Plasma

Does the upscale to 4K and latest panel negate the "cartoon" look of LCDs versus Plasma screens? I will wait for the professional reviews

OLED has a huge colour gamut and blacks as black, if not blacker, than plasma. But they tend to come poorly calibrated (oversaturated, too high contrast and not enough gamma) from the factory. You're right to wait for the professional reviews but I think you're likely to be surprised as to how good big OLED screens really are.

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BOFH: You can take our lives, but you'll never take OUR MACROS

Charlie Clark
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Re: Not usually the programs fault.

Access has some use like for a single user

No, it doesn't. There's almost always something more suitable around.

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Charlie Clark
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Unhappy

I still sometimes wonder how the muppets got on

They probably went on to found some NoSQL company and are busy at the moment drinking cocktails paid for by our pension funds!

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Charlie Clark
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Re: I beg your pardon...

Yeah, I just rely on Google/Apple/etc. to tell me what I've been watching!

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