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* Posts by Charlie Clark

2257 posts • joined 16 Apr 2007

Philips 42PFL7666 42in 3D LED Smart TV

Charlie Clark
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Re: smart net portal is well stocked

Opera is the runtime for the apps and also available as a standalone browser. Even though you can connect a USB keyboard I'm not sure you really want to use the telly for browsing. Better to have a tablet to hand, which you can also as a remote or for looking at the programme guide with the Philips.

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Munich's mayor claims €4m savings from Linux switch

Charlie Clark
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Oink

Budge up, would you? I want my fair share!

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Charlie Clark
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Re: Hmmm

What fragmentation issues, wanker? It's Jormany so it's SuSE though to be honest for the desktop that hardly matters. OpenOffice is a more than adequate replacement for MS Office in the few cases where it's required: many Jorman terminals are just that: Fujitsu-Siemens terminals talking to some host. Oh, you might mean they need browsers in which case *anything* but Microsoft would be an improvement. IE 9 won't run on XP so new hardware and software needed plus it's poo anyway. What else would office-workers need MS Windows for?

Security: it doesn't matter whether it's SuSE or Debian or RedHat all of the systems have tried and tested methods of rolling out security patches and a lot more often than once a fooking month. Of course, FreeBSD is the best of the lot.

As for support: if my own experience on the Windows 7 migration is anything to go by, Microsoft still has a long way to go. Don't get me wrong: it is a vast improvement but still full of issues. I reckon a locked down XFree desktop is easier to manage.

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ARM-Android to outship Windows-Anything by 2016

Charlie Clark
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Re: Don't believe it....

<quote>It will simply be down to - does Android have iTunes? No. Does Android have Office? No. Does Android play all top games? No. Hence it's restriction to phones....</quote>

Let's take those in order - ITunes isn't a dealbreaker for many just a requirement for IOS devices. Amazon is leading the way in making its store available on whatever platform.

Office - no MS Office but things that let work with MS Office documents. I've hardly used it because I hardly have the need to work with MS Office documents but I've seen a few fanbois happily pounding away at the IOS office suite. IMHO Office isn't as important as it was a few years ago. Be interesting to see if anyone sponsors an OpenOffice port to Android.

Games - what is your definition of "top games"? Angry Birds certainly looks to be up there now but for impressive graphics there is also Sony's Android-based strategy.

Going back to creative stuff - Adobe is really pushing it's Android and IOS offerings.

No, apart from third-party support what's holding Android back from the desktop is the hardware. The Asus Transformer shows what is possible but is still too expensive for large scale take up. File servers, printer drivers, etc. still required but then I can imagine Android based notebooks (13" and up) and mini-desktops running with standard peripherals and dirt cheap.

We've only really seen one year of the Android tablets - Honeycomb was essential - but the mass market is now being addressed (Aldi is pushing the "Lifetab") and people are becoming as familiar with Android as they have in the past with Windows and IOS. Lone warriors who want to bring their own device to work with them are more accepted now - I know of two corporate IT policies which expect this model to dominate by 2015. Standard connections, like the I-Phone port needed to give this a push. Can't see that taking off immediately but I sense the opportunity is there for anyone prepared to invest heavily enough: Lenovo or possibly HP if they get their head out of their arse in time.

Too early to call in my view. MS does have an opportunity on tablets as you suggest, at least for the enterprise market. The consumers are already adopting Android in sufficient numbers.

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Charlie Clark
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Re: Windows on the rise in the world of embedded systems?

It was in the previous article on IDC's predictions linked from the article. Yes, it was pretty unbelievable and not really worth a read. There are some good comments from people in the industry who know what's needed and how much things can cost and how much power they can draw, etc. x86 will have a chance in embedded systems when Apple switches to it for their phones, something that seems unlikely at the moment.

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100 EARTH-LIKE PLANETS orbit stars WITHIN 30 LIGHT-YEARS!

Charlie Clark
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Re: Does this mean ...

Definitely let the Playmonauts claim the new planets to stop humanity getting there and fucking things up!

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Dotcom hike will net MEEELLIONS of bucks for Verisign, ICANN

Charlie Clark
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Things are not quite what you think

It's worth noting that .org, .net, etc are not generic but US property even if they are just as liberally marketed. The second round (.biz, .info, etc) are more competitive and generally cheaper but also just a bit shit. I can't remember the term but it's an example of perceived value skewing the market. .com isn't different than any other TLD but is somehow more desirable.

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Who killed ITV Digital? Rupert Murdoch - but not the way you think

Charlie Clark
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Re: Footy

Very true. The irony is, of course, that Murdoch originally only got the licence to broadcast to Luxembourg. Irony, inasmuch as it has been fighting tooth-and-claw to stop people wanting football matches broadcast say to Albania or Greece but whose signals are still visible in the UK. With the monopoly on the premier league, existing customer and conditional access Sky was always able to outbid the competition and sell ads on top.

The popular myth is that satellite dishes were owned by good-for-nothing, layabout scuffers on housing estates where they were more visible because of the density. Of course, that accounts for a large part of the traditional footballing public and now increasingly forced to watch via satellite due to the increase in ticket prices, but there were always upper middle class and up prepared to pay to watch footy but also tennis, gold and formula 1. Sky continues to outbid terrestrial competition if ever something becomes popular and Parliament hasn't banned conditional access.

Movies have always been a bit of an add-on. Quality series from HBO and co. is more important now that ITV can no longer afford to compete. Originally commissioned programming apart from the sport which is beautifully produced is still largely shit.

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Bio student thrown in the clink for Muamba Twitter rant

Charlie Clark
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Re: Slippery slope..

It does make you think how the "tweets" are classed: expressions of opinion or publication. IIRC you can be done for (racial) abuse no matter where you are. Quite rightly so but you have to be addressing and abusing someone. But incitement to (racial) hatred is a bit of different matter and being a bigoted tosser usually doesn't count. Didn't Blair push something through under the guise of anti-terrorism that basically neutered the right of free speech?

The guy's a knobhead and his exclamations are despicable but I don't think the court's time should be devoted to this. If it is then thought-crimes will be next and then we're all doomed.

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Dot Pharmacy: New web weapon in war on duff drug peddlers

Charlie Clark
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Re: Oh, good grief...

Like so many things the sticking plaster is preferred to a real solution because it offers so many opportunities: "Verified by SomeDodgyBunch" badges make money.

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'Intelligent systems' poised to outsell PCs, smartphones

Charlie Clark
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What does the article actually say?

"""a new breed of intelligent devices will take over the market and drive the current fashionable terms de jour: Big Data and "the internet of things"

"""

Should we infer from this that all these embedded systems are going to be running SETI and the like because they are bored? CERN or JPL offloading data processing to Las Vegas slot machines? Sounds like the plot of a Douglas Adams story.

People who know more than I do have already pointed out how ARM is moving both down and up the embedded systems value chain with the M0 down to something like µW for real work and Tegra et al already able to do heavy video processing. If El Reg is going to cover these reports some kind of critical analysis of the press release would be appreciated.

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Charlie Clark
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Re: "Crap" Oh God yes, just imagine.

My future is filled the fear of "computer says no" every time I want a beer...

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Mobile operators mourn death of embedded 4G

Charlie Clark
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Re: Depends upon definition

Been at it about the same time - though my first connection was a null-modem serial link to the notebook. Fortunately, we now have micro-USB as standard. Cables are the way to go to reduce power draw. I currently use a mix of devices depending on where I am. PAYG dongles are often a good choice when travelling with a notebook as they tend to offer the best speeds earliest and you should share from the device with the biggest battery as tethering really eats power.

PAYG is the way to go once you find you don't use a lot of mobile data anyway. I used to have € 5 (for 5 GB) a month on top of my contract for data but dropped it once I realised I only needed it about three times a year and the network kept on changing the details. Also not networks are equal so you might well want to have a different provider for the phone and something else for data. Kudos to 3 for pushing that and building out its data network.

Has anyone challenged the T&C's about limiting tethering on a data contract? I'm not a network neutrality freak and I don't mind the networks throttling heavy use to make sure everyone gets a slice of the spectrum and I don't mind the restrictions on VoIP too much (it's a waste of bandwidth and they are obliged to provide telephony services as part of the licence and they have to pay for the infrastructure somehow) but I do object to pretending a website on a phone is intrinsicly different to one on a tablet or a notebook.

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BOFH: Dawn raid on Fort BOFH

Charlie Clark
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Re: not...

@JDX I really like the original line: satirical but true. Why go an spoil it by attacking someone who is obviously lacking a sense of humour.

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Fragmentation bomb wounds Android in developer war

Charlie Clark
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Cross-platform = web?

In one of his better articles a while back Matt Asay suggested that the future of app development would be HTML 5 & JS. The stats seem to be backing that up. Not good news for cross-platform systems like Appcelerator but it makes more sense for developers.

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Apple New iPad Wi-Fi only

Charlie Clark
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Yebut, nobut...

Other manufacturers already have HD screens in the works if not in the shops. So the competition is aware of the issue. Albeit most of them already have higher resolutions than the Ipad 2 so the difference is less marked; my Galaxy 8.9 already has around 170 ppi versus 120 ppi for the old Ipad.

Higher resolution is important for text-rendering and presumably makes it easier when connecting to a larger monitor. The main appeal for tablets is crisper and clearer rendering of text in magazine applications. The aspect ratio is wasted on watching movies as illustrated by the screenshot and that extra screen real estate weighs quite a lot. The competition should push the weight advantage as it is really noticeable if you hold the thing for anything more than two minutes.

E-ink is easier on the eye because of the higher contrast and lack of the backlight. Look closely and text on the Ipad will look nicer - it's a similar effect to different types of paper from newsprint (e-ink) to glossy magazine (Ipad), but your "newsprint" is infinitely more readable in bright sunshine.

Heise notes significant performance issues on things like Google Maps.

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E.ON to flog stake in wind farms to private firms

Charlie Clark
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Re: Subtle withdrawal

Possibly, although the feed-in tariff model still makes renewables very attractive investments. It might just be that power plants of *any* sort - it's a bit naughty in the article to point the finger at renewables coal and nuclear are really expensive to build and take longer to come onstream - are extremely capital intensive and 7 billion is a drop in the ocean of the several hundred billion per country that is expected to be required to switch to renewables.

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US, European iPad ownership rockets

Charlie Clark
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Comparison

IIRC 100 % year on year is below Apple's figures, i.e. Apple's growth is not in Europe. More figures needed: are the figures disappointing because Europeans aren't buying pads in the numbers they are elsewhere? or impressive because Apple still has the market to itself? ComScore has more detailed figures on this, surprised not to seem them in this report.

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Tory minister: Let's exploit our rich resource of mud, er, wind

Charlie Clark
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Re: Re: spot price falling

The spot price is determined by the most expensive form of electricity - wind is already cheaper than gas (on the spot market where the price of gas is coupled to the price of oil)- this is indeed going to favour storage systems over gas for servicing the spot market. The feed-in tariff for wind guarantees the minimum price paid which has been a subsidy thus far. Now that this is below the spot price increased demand will reward investors in wind without increasing the subsidy.

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Charlie Clark
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Re: Re: Is this the Daily Mail?

The point of the paragraph, and I agree it's a bit convoluted, is that in Germany, which pioneered feed-in tariffs and has already shovelled billions in subsidies to renewables, future increases in the price of electricity will not be due to the growing capacity of renewables, even the money pit that is solar. That is good news.

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Charlie Clark
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Is this the Daily Mail?

What else are you supposed to do with resources? A better jibe might have been a reference to Dilbert's Elbonia but seeks to make use of resources such as dampness.

Yes, there is cross-subsidy of renewables just as there is cross-subsidy for nuclear. The decision to go with renewables is a political one based on the expected shortage of affordable conventional fuel; the costs and risks associated with nuclear; and the debatable risks of climate change. Independence from fossil fuels has been a political aim since the oil crisis of the 1970s. Peak North Sea oil has passed and the availability from other sources such as tar sands, the Arctic or extremely deep sea is dependent upon a high price and political stability. Shale gas is indeed a welcome introduction to the gas market, not least because it breaks the bond between the price of oil and the price of gas.

If you want some really large figures you might take Germany as example: around € 100 billion has been made available to renewables via the feed-in tariff with solar being the disproportionate beneficiary. However, future price rises are no longer likely to be due to feed-in tariffs but to exceptions given to industry including coal mining! Due to drastic cutbacks in tariffs last year the projected cost of more solar in 2012 is 0.06 %, exceptions 0.6 % Germany is ahead of its renewables target, primarily through wind generation which is already below the spot price from gas powered stations with the difference likely to grow as the price of gas goes up.

When comparing such figures it is important to factor in the subsidies available to the other generators: coal is subsidised as is nuclear and no one really knows what decommissioning and storage nuclear waster will cost.

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iPad 3 launch news pushes Apple shares to $500bn high

Charlie Clark
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Point of order

Companies usually get bullied into paying dividends if investors think the price is too low. As long as people are still able to sell shares for a profit there is little incentive for Apple to do anything.

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Euro banks slam dot-bank plan

Charlie Clark
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Too much faith in the gatekeeper

You seriously suggest that making a domain registrar the arbiter of a good financial institution, including all those fine businesses registered in the Cayman Islands, Moldova, etc. ?

Even if the screening process is reasonable, and past performance has given more than enough reason to doubt this, what about resale of domains? It's the usual "lipstick on a pig" approach of dressing something up to avoid the problem.

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Hubble snaps exploding star's near-fatal weight-loss bid

Charlie Clark
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Business opportunity?

I've just registered the Eta Carinae Final Performance Company which has exclusive rights to tickets to watch the event close-up from the comfort of The Golgofrincham II. The early bird tariff also includes a cryogenic storage at no extra cost! The spectacular is being described as the closest thing to rapture. Tickets are limited so do hurry...

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Asus outs 1920 x 1280 Android ICS tablet

Charlie Clark
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Re: Can you actually read anything on it?

Just ask the fanbois about their beloved "retina display" and they'll gush about how wonderful it is. I think the IPS is more important but that's more difficult to market. Higher resolution does add crispness to the display and the OS normally upscales text and images to make them usable and look better.

HD-Res makes for a more compelling video performance and the basis of a media centre - simply connect to the TV and watch in full HD. Let the pad replace Blu-ray players and suboptimal "Smart-TV interfaces".

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Charlie Clark
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Re: Specs

Since when did Apple start launching legal cases against world + dog? If you go back 12 months there were not many of the devices in the wild and the Ipad 2 was still better than most, especially regarding battery life and the prices were close for high-end. And Apple held the lead in apps for its pad for a while. Only since ICS has it been possible for developers to build apps for both phones and pads.

I know everyone is waiting with baited breath for the next Applegasm - personally I don't think there is that much need to improve the hardware but the competition have caught up in record time and the Transformer now the model to follow for pads cum notebooks: something desirable/useful in itself.

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Telefonica zaps 100Mbps 4G masts with shrink ray

Charlie Clark
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Does it come with a free tinfoil hat?

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Hey Commentard! - or is that Commenter?

Charlie Clark
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Analogous to Andrew O.'s use of "freetard", "commentard" could reserved for those intellectually challenged who frequent the forums to vent their spleen by engaging keyboard before brain. Much in the spirit of the Far Side cartoon "Midvale School for the Gifted". I think shifting from "er" to "ar" is a bit shit. "commenturd" would keep the pronunciation, irony and add some toilet humour. But for normal dudes "commenter" should suffice.

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Spitzer spots first solid buckyballs in stellar disc

Charlie Clark
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Coat

Carbon-60? Man that's heavy! What's the half-life? Can it be used to prove or disprove climate change or track sneaky criminals?

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Heatmiser PRT-TS Wi-Fi RF thermostat

Charlie Clark
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Better insulation required

Looks like your flat cools down pretty quickly. Better spending the money on better insulation or a more efficient boiler.

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Microsoft blasts 'web video killer' Motorola Mobility in EU gripe

Charlie Clark
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Re: Not Members

Certainly looks like that but it's too early to tell. I love the moniker the MPEG-LA gives itself: "patent pool". Sounds so much like a party when it is just another cartel.

Wonder how long before we start seeing phones with nice WebM badges on them.

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Researchers propose ‘overclock’ scheme for mobiles

Charlie Clark
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Flawed premise

"It’s getting increasingly difficult to pack enough processing power into mobile phone form factors..."

What? So unless we do something quickly the phones of tomorrow will be completely unusable even if they are built exactly the same way because they are somehow losing processing power?

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Google gobbles kaput search robot Cuil's patents

Charlie Clark
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Not so crappy

Cuil seemed to get most of the bugs out of the software some time before they ran out of money. I switched to it as default search engine for about six weeks until it stopped and they had some interesting stuff under development. Much more so than all the "identity traders" have managed to come up with in the last 18 months or so.

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CRACK made by quakes FOUND ON MOON

Charlie Clark
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I blame CERN

The cracks were probably caused by those irresponsible boffins in Geneva meddling with things that were better left alone. And, having already pushed the dial all the way to 11, they seem content to go off the scale. We're all doomed!

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Two UK airports scrap IRIS eye-scanners

Charlie Clark
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Re: Attention! New technology!

The whole thing was never about reducing queues but reducing staff. In the long term this is supposed to save money except it rarely does because the machines are a) very expensive and b) not very reliable and usually c) don't increase the security of the situation.

Every time I fly to and from the UK I'm amazed that the queues seem to take the airports by surprise when they know well in advance from the airlines how many people they need to be able to process. This can be quite farcical at times: I remember one guy closing the ticket scanner in a vain attempt to reduce the number of people joining the queue for the body scanning: another wasteful money pit. The solution is simple: hire more staff when you know you're going to busy. Who knows, people who pass through controls might spend more at the countless tat bazaars that now fill airports. Manchester's "shopping slalom" is particularly annoying and I am severely tempted to let my luggage catch the odd display as I'm herded through.

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Oracle claims 70X speed-up with MySQL Cluster 7.2

Charlie Clark
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Trying to play catch up with Postgres which is, of course, threatening Oracle's main breadwinner: Oracle itself.

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Philips intros dual-view telly tech

Charlie Clark
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Re: saved marriages

And what about the sound from the two different channels at once?

Just got a Philips 6806 - very nice picture and Philips have put some thought into tidy cabling, although mine's still a mess as it's not in its final destination.

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FCC hangs up on 4G broadband biz LightSquared

Charlie Clark
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Re: Re: Just Plain Stupid

@M7S

au contraire exactly that kind of technical nous can be expected from investors in the scheme. It wasn't open to the general public coming from a hedge fund. Hello? Aren't they supposed to specialise in arbitrage in the financial markets? Can you point out exactly how they are providing liquidity to the markets here?

The whole deal stank from the start and the hedge fund only got involved because it knew the rules were being gamed. Greed over foresight, as per bloody usual.

As for those investors: didn't the name "Harbinger" ring any bells?

Kudos to Mr Ray for the Scooby Doo allusion.

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iPad spanks Galaxy Tab in its own backyard

Charlie Clark
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Standards

Isn't Korea on non CDMA for UMTS? And I think the LTE rollout is pretty impressive. Lots of sense to invest in a "MiFi" or a handset that does tethering than adding unnecessarily to the price of the pad.

As for the figures: Korea and Japan are notoriously fast and fickle of the latest and greatest. Certainly impressive figures for Apple as elsewhere in the world - and why shouldn't the be? Apple did a great job in 2011 in staying ahead of the competition on technical and marketing merits but the recent slew of court actions is indicative of someone constantly looking over their shoulder.

When are those larger OLED devices coming from Samsung?

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Windows 8 on ARM: Microsoft bets on Office 15 and IE10

Charlie Clark
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Battery life as an excuse?

Paraphrasing: "one of the reasons why virtualisation won't be supported on WOA is because of battery life". Codswallop! Virtualising x86 would be a lovely little differentiator for companies wanting to offer it as an optional extra especially. Of course, running the whole stack through an x86 emulator will hammer batteries but AMD is openly pimping mixed cores with HSA and good systems management would really reduce the power drain for the couple of apps written for x86 that haven't been cross-compiled. The real reason for disabling emulation is a sop to Intel.

I smell either a huge opportunity for anyone who provides an environment for Windows x86 on ARM, presumably through hardware, or a mega-fail. Cross-compiling core components for x86 and ARM is very important to MacOS/IOS migration strategy.

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Apple demands US ban on Samsung's Galaxy Nexus

Charlie Clark
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Interesting

"Even worse ... the full harm to Apple cannot be calculated, making it impossible for Apple to be compensated by money damages."

This does somewhat beg the question of why go to court if the alleged damages are incalculable? How very naughty of Samsung to dare to use the same or similar components in their phones as they make for Apple.

As for the patents: I'm pretty sure they're all prior art. However, what are the chances of Apple being done for wasting the court's time with all these actions? At least it's more free publicity for Samsung.

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Cable thieves wreak havoc for cops, BT punters

Charlie Clark
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Calm down

As it's privately owned by BT it can't be "part of the national infrastructure". And, as usual, calls for stiffer penalties - do you know what the existing ones are? - mean bollocks all if you don't catch them which generally means spending money on security and law *enforcement*.

Disruptive as it is, it is not terrorism but perhaps more akin to causing a public nuisance by blocking a road, etc. As many of the perpetrators are probably not aware of the consequences of their actions it's probably a good idea to try and raise awareness but at the end of the day such high prices for metals are driving the market. In a sense we're lucky that we only get cables nicked as opposed to more or less all out war in Africa when it comes to mining the raw minerals.

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Charlie Clark
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You would think so, wouldn't you?

Chatting with an engineer who was replacing the cable to my mum's house just before Christmas he said that most exchanges are already connected by fibre to the backbone and the full FTTH rollout is under way. Unfortunately that doesn't stop the head-the-balls from cutting cable without checking beforehand whether there's any copper in it. As more and more fibre is rolled out that is increasingly what's happening. The repairs are quicker and cheaper but people are still cut off.

Here in Jormany they're starting to rollout "fingerprinted" cable which makes tracing the culprits at the point of sale a lot easier. This seems to be having an effect although I suspect it will just displace the activity back to the building sector.

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Googorola's desire for iPhone royalties will upset Apple cart

Charlie Clark
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re. Microsoft patents. As far as I know the patents - things like FAT are not part of the telephony stack and, therefore, not covered by the whole FRAND thing. In fact I think patents that are to be covered cannot be covered by an NDA. That's why the court cases are generally in the US as software patents while generally recognised in the EU are on shaky ground, hence the vociferous lobbying for us to accept them.

I think that may be an example of the post-war European tradition of "arrangement" against the Anglo-Saxon tradition of winner/lawyer takes all.

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Charlie Clark
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@Probing Analyst - the point is not the precise terms - and you have forgotten to mention how much you have to pay to play with MPEG* - but the same kind of cosy industry cartel that makes these kind of rules. The ETSI rates are, as these things usually are, negotiable.

That the ETSI system has survived so long without too many challenges says something about how it worked for members. Now, with the move towards services instead of devices, it doesn't seem to suit some players. And while Apple locks people in with its services, it makes its money with the hardware as Mr Orlowski so cogently argued about I-Tunes so many years ago. And, while there are still plenty of people prepared to buy whatever shiny shiny Apple offer, I'm sure that if they were forced to break down the walls of their garden, they'd have a different price policy.

*You used to have to buy your way into MPEG for about 1 million USD which was one of the things that did for BeOS, if memory serves. And if WebM wasn't around I think the MPEG decision to be royalty free for playback might have come out a bit differently!

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Charlie Clark
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FRAND rules out discriminatory pricing. The offer is 2.5 % of the end product. This can be offset by cross-licensing. Apple's move: either offer some useful, preferably, radio patents or pay up. This is how the consumer electronics business works. Apple is more than happy to be in the MPEG patent pool but cries foul over ETSI because it has nothing to offer.

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Chrome to weed out dodgy website SSL certificates by itself

Charlie Clark
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Quis custodiet ipsos custodes?

At what point does Chrome's update system get subverted and the certificate list get manipulated?

If the problem is with what to do with checks that fail because they can't be completed then you need to reengineer that path. Caching might be part of the solution and the browser makers are indeed in a good position to be part of a public key infrastructure to distribute and update such lists or CA public keys, much as they now provide synchronisation services. Of course, any such approach is also open to subversion at some point in the chain. So, just as browsers are eminently suited to being gatekeepers they just as suitable to be the target for attacks through malware. Currently, I can't think a of a truly secure way to bootstrap the process without using an external channel such as a smartcard.

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Revealed: Apple's plea for fairness in mobile patent war

Charlie Clark
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hahaha

I think Firewire chips are covered by a very similar arrangement from which Apple profits handsomely. IIRC the choice of a percentage or a fixed fee is specifically related to tiny components where fixed fees would significantly drive up licensing costs. It's an *industry standard" approach.

As for the other points: who gets to decide what component or patent really adds value? If the rules aren't clear from day one the system will break down quickly. That will vary from product to product and over time: GSM patents are becoming less relevant as we move via UMTS to LTE, etc.

The fact that GSM* and its derivatives have become the dominant standards for mobile telecommunications speaks volumes for how well the, admittedly closed-shop, approach has worked. It is designed to have a high cost of entry to stop Johnny-Come-Latelys profiting too easily from some ground-breaking research. At the same time FRAND has also made it impossible for companies to rest on their laurels and hope to make money just from their patents: witness the demise of so many European handset manufacturers as components other than radios have started to make an impact. The rise of Huawei, Samsung, HTC and, of course, Apple all demonstrate the openness of this field.

I suppose we can look forward to Apple's boffins devising and building their own network stack and infrastructure designed exclusively for their devices.

* Yes, I know this is about ETSI but that is also just an *industry* body.

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Android's Chrome finish comes too late for Flash coating

Charlie Clark
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Because there are still no standards for audio and video output and no copy protection on them. Additionally, < IE 9 can't handle SVG for scalabe, zoomable images. You can blame Microsoft for that.

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Google adds Chrome finish to Android

Charlie Clark
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The default browser in Android 3 certainly looks and feels very much like chrome. As for the rest: well, Opera was there first.

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