Feeds

* Posts by Charlie Clark

2498 posts • joined 16 Apr 2007

Kobo revamps e-reader line, intros mini model

Charlie Clark
Silver badge

Re: The next generation

I agree and this is the market PlasticLogic was/still is going after. Closest thing seems to be the Wexler Flex. Coming from Russia, where PlasticLogic had a factory, but using LG's screen so presumably somekind of fallout.

Heise's CT magazine recently included a nice piece on PlasticLogic: you can punch holes in the printed screens and they still work. Pity no gear using them is on the horizon.

Having recently lost my Sony reader I'm looking for a replacement and saw a Kobo in a local score. Definitely a less reflexive screen than the Sony and, despite (shock, horror) not having an MP3 player, it looks the better tool for the job. Adobe's PDF reader on the Sony is definitely the dog's bollocks when it comes to PDF reflow but fortunately almost all the tech stuff I need is now available as EPUB/MOBI. So a Glo it is for me in October. € 130 here.

0
0

The world's first Windows Phone 8 hands on – what's it like?

Charlie Clark
Silver badge
Thumb Up

Nice review

That suggests that it might be worth looking at these phones when the come out. The imaging stuff sounds nice but not enough to sell a phone: we've been used to crappy pictures in low-light levels for years.

0
0

Android spat loser Oracle ordered to toss Google some change

Charlie Clark
Silver badge
Mushroom

So...

when is Mr Orlowski going to slam the court on this for not upholding Oracle's rights and innovation?

16
0

Apple hoards LTE patents to deflect Samsung attack

Charlie Clark
Silver badge

Re: 5%

Surely that should be a standard and not patentable at all??

Lots of standards depend on patents but I guess it's an indication of how much recent court cases have skewed the debate.

Done correctly standards encourage patent owners to pool their resources and, therefore their patents, to ensure interoperability. This is, after all, why patents are supposed to exist: not for hoarding but for sharing. This has worked very well with the GSM shepherded development of mobile phone technology which is has emerged as the dominant standard around the world - other forms were manufacturer-driven and usually limited to individual markets. Interoperability was mandated by the EU as a requirement for mobile phone networks. The standards allowed manufacturers to get a fair return on the work they put into essential parts of the standard, they earn a tiny cut but on every device in a growing market, without pricing other companies completely out of the market.

2
1
Charlie Clark
Silver badge

Re: Mueller is NOT an expert...

@ Alex

The article is troll-bait enough. Given that Mr Mueller has recently had to admit that he gets paid for blogging by Oracle the objection about quoting him unqualified is perfectly valid. Instead of "patent expert" it should have said "paid patent blogger".

18
1
Charlie Clark
Silver badge

Re: Anyone else wondering what LTE stands for???

"Long Term Evolution" - the shift to IP (internet protocol) based communication for both data and voice communications.

5
0

Broadband minister Hunt LOSES portfolio, takes on national health

Charlie Clark
Silver badge

Re: Qualifications?

As part of a representative democracy qualifications in the field are not per se a requirement; they would be in a technocrac. Ken Clarke was quite a good Chancellor despite being a lawyer by trade. Admittedly, this was after that utter idiot Lamont so even a Tellytubby would have looked good.

I'd like to say that Hunt can only be better than Lansley who is being given the shove for steaming ahead with and botching a reform that the government wanted. But, as even my mum, who doesn't swear lightly, has to take care when speaking his name, I can't say that with conviction. Well, more conviction than he has. I suspect that precisely nothing will happen in the department of health on his watch, which is probably the aim of the whole thing. He's an arse but he probably won't do much.

Removing Ken Clarke from Justice and so he could do no more damage with his heretical plans to lock fewer people up and replacing him with a slavering "hanging's too good for 'em" from the shires has me more worried.

And who is going to replace the utterly irreplaceable Louise Mensch as Minister for Chick Lit and Won't Somebody Think of the Children?

1
0

Samsung Galaxy Note 2 hands-on review

Charlie Clark
Silver badge

Re: Great device

re: dorks, saw one at the airport on Sunday taking pics of incoming planes with his pad. The ergonomics of holding something that weighs more than 500g at the end of your arm and using it take pictures are probably why it makes you look like a fool: because you are.

re: screen size. Would love to have something like the Note as my bike-mounted GPS. OSMAND is the dogs bollocks when you're out and about but would want something a little more robust. Something based on PlasticLogic's bendy e-paper or the Russian Wex might be the ticket, but an SIII or a Note would definitely been an option.

re: weather. I seem to remember an early complaint against all capacitative screens was that you can't use them with gloves.

1
0

iPhone 5 wait drives record Samsung smartphone sales

Charlie Clark
Silver badge

Re: Although i'm not a huge fan of fandroids/androids...

@the-it-slayer

I must admit, this articles smells of poo IMHO

The key word in the article is "shipment". That does not equal sales. I have no idea where all Nokia's phones are in Western Europe but they are certainly not really filling the shelves here in Germany.

0
0

BBC dishes out fanboi-only telly downloads ahead of ITV plans

Charlie Clark
Silver badge

Obviously never to MediaCity then

watch them on the road, on the tube, on a plane.

You get a tram> to the new HQ!

1
1

Torvalds bellows: 'The GNOME PEOPLE are in TOTAL DENIAL'

Charlie Clark
Silver badge

What am I missing?

I thought Gnome was environment for xFree86 on un*x systems? It seems to run fine on BSD and I see bits of it running in projects on Mac OS. So, what's all the fuss about? Linux is and always a kernel. Want anything else and you have to do a lot more integration and tight-coupling of the components yourself just like Google has done with Android (and what Next did with BSD) and which is why they have been successful.

4
1

Markets to remain glutted with rapidly-depreciating Facebook shares

Charlie Clark
Silver badge

Re: Bubble? or Pump-n-dump?

And why do you think that? The IPO was prepared and ran largely, apart from a bit of a slap on NASDAQ's hands, according to the rules; no one sold before their lock-in period expired, etc.. The SEC is going to say: move along now, nothing to see here.

0
1
Charlie Clark
Silver badge

Re: LinkedIn

I'm not sure what your point is: should LinkedIn's P/E be used to justify a higher valuation for Facebook? Or should I be bashing LinkedIn as well?

In case of the former: the 20:1 comes from the Case-Schiller analysis and is itself a little frothy, long term ratios are generally around 14:1 but in any case, it's an average across all industries and time which, in my view, makes it a better frame of reference than say a single competitor. Besides, I think LinkedIn took a recent charge which skewed the P/E ratio.

In case of the second: I'm not a fan of either Facebook nor LinkedIn but both seem to have positive cash flows and, depending on how well they handle privacy, reasonable prospects. Bashing them, their users or investors is fun but churlish.

I am a little worried about the investment environment that let such wild swings in valuation. Someone has or still is taking a big bath, while those would could cash in have made fat profits, since this IPO and given the calculations it does look like deliberate market manipulation with the blessing of the SEC.

0
0
Charlie Clark
Silver badge

Analysts are not what they used to be

That viewpoint led Salmon to lower Facebook's stock price target to $15 from $25

Many of us have been agitating for a P/E ratio of 20, still well above the historical average but on a par with other tech stocks, which puts the stock at around $ 8. So, either Mr Salmon is smoking something he shouldn't or knows something we don't or there is still some way to go. On the other hand I am not stock analyst and do not pretend to offer advice.

12
0

Patent flame storm: Reg hack biteback in reader-pack sack attack

Charlie Clark
Silver badge
Thumb Down

Re: Richard's basic hypothesis is wrong

Apple has history of screwing over other people's IP: the use of Adobe's technology in Quartz; the ODBC manager supplied with Mac OS. Their open source reputation isn't without it's blemishes either: Snow Leopard came with a borked version of Python that Apple had kept secret about.

2
2
Charlie Clark
Silver badge

Re: Strawmen

Another strawman - this time about my hobbies, about which I think you know less than you suggest and you further imply that I know little or nothing about anything other than software. Weren't the validated patents about software - the "bounce" feature and the design of icons? Design patents and copyrights are extremely limited as the case of Christoph Laboutin versus Yves Saint Laurent. And, of course, when it comes to industrial patents, Samsung has a quite few more than Apple.

Add to this the disingenuous oversimplification and thus misrepresentation of The Economist's position on juries; or at least the referred to article restricts itself to patent cases and not "justice" in general, though I would contend that trial by jury is not the same as peer review.

Judges are not necessarily elites but they may be specialists. But even within the realm of jury trials, the advice given by judges is crucial as evinced by http://www.economist.com/blogs/babbage/2012/06/oracle-v-google. Were you cheerleading for Oracle on that as well?

You have previously provided an incisive understanding of the Apple business model: the ability not necessarily to be first to market but the one to provide the best user experience. Given this your current polemics seem a surprising volte-face: patents can be used to support the creation and maintenance of monopolies (the very antithesis of why they were introduced).

Court cases like this considerably add to the costs of doing business in the United States of America. Reform of both the patent application and approval system as well as its enforcement may well become essential if America does not want to be shut out, especially as growth shifts to Asia. The whole thing is slightly reminiscent of the high tariffs imposed by America on imported manufactured goods in the 19th century.

8
1
Charlie Clark
Silver badge

Strawmen

It's interesting that the leader in this week's Economist, a paper not known for it's whalesong and subsidy love, drew significantly different conclusions in particular about juries decide on patent cases: Not every innovation deserves a patent. Not every copycat deserves a punishment. I found The Economist both more coherent and convincing.

24
2

Now Apple wants Samsung S III, Galaxy Notes off the shelves too

Charlie Clark
Silver badge

Weird thing:

There is no doubt that the frequency with which I come across articles like these is adding to the favourable impression I have of Samsung and I mean above and beyond any sort of David versus Goliath thing. It makes me look more closely at the products they have an offer and, as they do produce good gear, every time I look I am more impressed.

0
0

France U-turns on public TV advertising

Charlie Clark
Silver badge

Re: Who and How?

If the court rules in favour of the Commission then there is normally a period of grace for the member state to change or adopt the law. If the country does nothing then the Commission can and does impose fines. But the court cases can take a few years. Fines are almost never imposed from the date of the infringement. A universal, per household licence fee really is about the best way to fund state broadcasting whilst minimising state interference, though Channel 4's charter is also quite interesting: it is funded by a guaranteed levy on other commercial stations plus what it can earn itself and editorial and programming independence are written into the charter.

For the record France is not significantly worse than other countries in this respect; I think only the Scandinavians are the only countries with nearly spotless records with everyone else taking up to five years to do what they've agreed to. Greece is noticeably lax and that's just getting the laws on or off the statute books - its inability to enforce such laws in one of the subtexts of the current bailout mechanism, which is why the Commission is part of the troika and gets to provide the bureaucrats to check the Greek paper work: "you know that law you passed on ....Well, it doesn't actually do anything, does it?". Sorry, for the aside.

1
1

Why the Apple-Samsung verdict is good for you, your kids and tech

Charlie Clark
Silver badge
Thumb Down

Poor piece

Lumping all critics of the case and the decision together is to be guilty of one the article's main claims. Do the amateur "experts" with no clue include El Reg's own Neil McAllister who came out pretty strongly against the decision? Not that you all have to agree but it's a pretty heavy sleight of a supposed colleague.

Regarding the idea of taking such cases before juries, if one follows your argument through to its conclusion we should surely do away with patent offices altogether and replace them with juries? How does this square up with: a) the Oracle vs Google suit or b) the case of Apple versus Samsung in the UK?

Regarding the case itself I'm still having a hard time trying to work out what is being patented and what is being copyrighted: is rubber-banding a design or a software patent? Or are we allowed to mix and match the two? Is the case about counterfeiting, ie. customers have been fooled into buying a Samsung product when they thought they were buying Apple? industrial espionage? Did Samsung abuse the knowledge of the parts it makes for Apple in its own products? Does citing Mr Dyson who makes physical products make much sense in this context? Or has started suing people for making see-through vacuum cleaners?

This court case asks many more questions than it answers and it certainly does not vindicate the US patent system, which is so badly flawed that it was already reformed partly last year.

1
0

Hipsters hacking on PostgreSQL

Charlie Clark
Silver badge

Re: Matt Assay knows nothing

Agreed: it really is an embarrassing article displaying an almost complete lack of knowledge what databases are. Mr Asay might want to reconsider his choice of career, maybe a barista, interior decorator or insurance salesman would suit him better? This way to some clues but he might just be better off perpetuating his ignorance at the fount of all slop.

* relational databases can guarantee data integrity. If you don't have this in an application that has financial transaction then you are being negligent and will fail

* open source database are also available in commercial versions or with commercial support. The Enterprise DB release of Postgres also includes support for Oracle's PL/SQL to make migration easier

* if all you want is really fast writes then switch off constraint checks. Be warned it that you do this at your own risk but it's your database to use it as you wish

2
1

Arctic ice shrinks to ‘smallest in satellite era’ - NASA

Charlie Clark
Silver badge

Re: Question is, what caused it.

Trade via the North East passage is likely to increase and lead to a reduction in CO2 emissions because it's shorter, no pirates either. OTOH the soot from ship's diesel causes merry hell with Arctic ice.

1
0

Samsung fights to stay on US shelves as Apple calls for ban

Charlie Clark
Silver badge
Thumb Down

Re: e.u

Someone needs to go learn about the World Trade Organisation. Should the EU try a stupid move like that they would be subject to economic sanctions. Enough with the school yard stuff.

Countering nonsense with nonsense. The EU is not going to go tit for tat on this because, unlike say Boeing versus Airbus which did go to the WTO and both were found culpable of unlawful subsidies, this is not about European companies.

There are several court cases between Apple and Samsung proceeding in different EU countries. As a result the European Commission has announced its intent to look at the abuse of patents in such court cases and indicated that sanctions are likely for all. Separately, it may take time for the cases to work through and a consensus to be achieved. Currently, we have conflicting judgements in the UK ("coolness" cannot be patented) and Germany ("whatever you say Mr Apple" and this in my local court which is really quite depressing) which are clearly affecting trade within the single market: I can buy a Galaxy Tab 7.7 in England or France but non in Germany? This distortion cannot be allowed to continue, but, because we don't allow hick courts to take decisions for the whole of the EU it's going to take a while for this to work through. At no stage will the WTO be involved.

Where the WTO might get involved would be between the US and Korea if Apple succeeds in getting a blanket ban on Samsung products. Don't hold your breath on that though as such cases take at least 5 years to work through. That could only be part of a broader international attack on America's patent and court system that could be considered to unfairly hinder free trade.

5
1

Microsoft's new retro-flavoured logo channels Channel 4

Charlie Clark
Silver badge
IT Angle

I had been holding out for

<img src="http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/thumb/a/af/Prince_logo.svg/170px-Prince_logo.svg.png">

Would fit in nicely with "the company formerly known as Microsoft that formerly made software..."

Where's the whalesong icon?

0
0
Charlie Clark
Silver badge

Re: Yellow.

Obvious, isn't it?

0
0

AT&T defends FaceTime price gouge

Charlie Clark
Silver badge
Thumb Down

False premise

AT&T customers are already paying for that bandwidth

They are almost certainly not paying for bandwidth but total data use and there is a big difference between the two. It's almost impossible to provision bandwidth on shared infrastructure such as mobile networks.

1
0

LG making thin screens possibly FOR THE NEW iPHONE

Charlie Clark
Silver badge

Re: Sharp?

That was certainly the rumour a while back with Sharp due to be supplying IGZO screens for the device.

Call me sceptical but I can't see screen production starting now for something that is going to be available in volume in just three weeks. And, given Apple's recent treatment other manufacturer's, I would imagine any member of the chaebol thinking twice before getting in bed with them.

Windows 8 devices including "Surface" would certainly also be a candidate.

1
0

Apple TV: Rubbish, you don't like documentaries – I'll just flick to porn

Charlie Clark
Silver badge

Re: I like to use my brain, and they just wont let me..

How will a clusterfuck of a channel-hopper help there? Several things I like might be on at once: even if it mimics my channel-hopping I'm still going to get fucked off by losing control. A telly I could shout at might be fun but not one run by HAL.

I have 12 channels on my favourites which is more than enough. After that you just get more of the same.

As for good use of technology: Google's self-driving cars are *infinitely* more impressive.

2
0

ICO has yet to begin probing cookie violators

Charlie Clark
Silver badge

Re: @Charlie Clark

this bobbins law over a text file recording some basic information for adsense even the site owner doesent realise its making.

Spelling and grammar errors aside, Ignorance is no defence before the law.

Maybe it's about time people educated themselves about the price that some of these services exact. If shopkeepers can be held liable, say for selling tobacco or alcohol to minors, why shouldn't website owners also be held responsible? Cast the whole thing in a slightly different light and dust it with "won't someone please think of the children" and the same Daily Mail readers will be baying for blood.

0
1
Charlie Clark
Silver badge

Re: Snowballs chance in hell

El Reg is in the technology sphere, so its readers have some idea

Or maybe some of its readers have an idea as you clearly don't. Your example of a wedding site makes a nonsense of your assertion about people "hurting their competitors".

While the ICO is tardy in following up on the reports, it's approach is generally to be welcomed: the cookies that are the problem are those related to behavioural advertising and sites that employ them such as El Reg, The Economist and the BBC really are trying to follow the spirit of the law by informing users, probably for the first time, that they work with companies who "spy" on people. It would probably be best for all sites to have a common approach, I think the BBC with the granular opt-out options is probably best, but it is refreshing to see how many sites have adopted the right approach to the legislation.

Now all we need is the ICO to set some precedents by enforcing the law and fining some of the more egregious breaches.

2
1

Google loads Moto Mobility cannon, fires patent shells at Apple

Charlie Clark
Silver badge
Thumb Down

Re: Google must be scared shitless

I suppose with a new iPhone 5, a much more affordable but still excellent 4S and maybe even a 3GS

Planning to buy the set are you?

Because patents are bargaining chips Google's tactics are clear: every time Apple launches a flimsy action based on patents of dubious value, Google can launch a counter-action. With enough court cases either Apple will get fed up of keeping lawyers in coke and whores or the legislative might intervene to prevent the courts from being bogged down with nothing but patent cases.

11
0

Hard-up fondlers rejoice: Tablet PC prices plummet

Charlie Clark
Silver badge
Thumb Down

Extremely flawed

The stats were compiled using clickthrough guestimates?

The chart is misleading because the contracted y-axis suggests a disproportionate price difference between Apple and the rest and a weird average: if Apple is selling most devices then the mean should be closer to Apple's price.

The conclusion is at odds with the other's analysts: Samsung and Asus are picking up market share through higher value products. How long before Apple starts suing Asus?

Demand for high-end components is keeping prices high. Cheaper tablets are still only possible with lower spec. Apple has the first-mover advantage with a high-quality product. Wannabe's, at any price, have to have to be good enough in the criteria important to buyers, which are sadly missing from the "analysis".

1
4

Disney sitcom says open source is insecure

Charlie Clark
Silver badge
Joke

Copyright Ronnie Corbett?

Disgraceful jumper? Check

Oversized glasses? Check

Funny voice? Check

Either the producers have a time machine which allows them to use a very young Mr Corbett in their shows or they will be hearing from his lawyer!

7
0

Facebook shares hit all-time low

Charlie Clark
Silver badge
Thumb Down

Fair value

Firstly, a falling share price has little or no direct effect on a company as along as it is not preparing to raise equity or borrow. It is in no way a disaster even et 50 % of issue price Facebook is to big to be bought and the CEO still holds the majority of shares.

Secondly, $7 - $8 would be fair value in comparison with other US stocks at a 20:1 price-to-earnings ratio. So, much as I don't value the service, there is no need for anyone to worry. Apart, of course, for those who bought shares at over-inflated prices. More fool them.

16
0

Windows 8: Microsoft's tablet-desktop still painful to swallow

Charlie Clark
Silver badge
FAIL

Re: a whole hour?

It's a good, honest review that hints at what many people will do anyway: wait for SP1 to include the things that didn't meet the deadline.

As for your post - please continue to mutter quietly to yourself. If you like, I'm sure some of us will club together to keep you in White Lightning.

15
0

Ten apps to install on your Nexus 7 first

Charlie Clark
Silver badge

Re: DLNA

I was happily using Skifta on my Samsung Galaxy to run stuff on the telly. Not really necessary because the telly has a DNLA client but the Samsung has the better interface.

0
0
Charlie Clark
Silver badge

Re: Tunein Radio file size....

Size might be the database.

TuneIn is pretty good though I only use the free version to listen to the stations I know I want to - who gives a fuck about "related" or pictures. The one thing that the premium version has that is worth noting is the ability to record stuff.

1
0

Samsung to fight iPad with stylus, windows

Charlie Clark
Silver badge

Re: Is a mid-size coming?

There's the 7.7 with an AMOLED screen (1024 x 768) and the Wacom Bamboo works fine with it, though the pressure sensitive drivers may only been available for the elect AMOLED means you can actually use it outside and it's less than 400g which means it can go anywhere.

0
0
Charlie Clark
Silver badge

Re: Disappointing

What's wrong with the resolution? I've got a Samsung Galaxy 8.9 with the same resolution and a Wacom Bamboo stylus. There are very few things on a tablet where a higher resolution pays dividends, Apple's sub-pixel rendering is just smoke and mirrors for the distance at which you generally hold these things. A high resolution 2500 x 1600 is reserved for my desktop. Two windows next to each other, say e-mail and music player, perfect on lower resolution. Or shopping list and a map.

1280 x 800 with a Stylus is perfect for site engineers, etc. Handwriting recognition, of which I was long a fan is much less efficient than a keyboard but being able to sign off docs, say patient charts, contracts is worth its weight in gold.

3
0

$1bn for Instagram? Knock yourself out, Facebook - UK watchdog

Charlie Clark
Silver badge

A clear case of nothing to see here

Somebody must have referred it to them though the Office of Fair Trading is not the right department: it should be the Monopolies & Merger Commission. But as it's non-domestic the EU's Trade Commissioner is responsible. Note that jurisdictions are rather flexible as the recent fine of S&C by the New York bank regulator shows: Federal restriction so Federal regulator responsible (there basically isn't one and as S&C isn't listed in America the SEC can't investigate. But, if you're market is big enough, you make the rules as AOL, Honeywell-Bull, Microsoft and Oracle have demonstrated. Can't wait until the Chinese really catch on to the idea, ProView was just the beginning.

0
0

Android spanks Apple iOS in sales as fanbois hold out for iPhone 5

Charlie Clark
Silver badge

Re: Is it really though?

Does it really matter? It's very good link-bait and that's increasingly all that matters.

4
1

Hold onto your hats, world: Groupon actually made a PROFIT

Charlie Clark
Silver badge

Re: Two problems with Groupon for me

I think you've inadvertently hit the nail on the head: the groups that Groupon are targeting are organised around the offers rather than common interests. I know a few people who are "into" the whole thing but it doesn't seem to be creating the desired networks. Anecdotally I have heard from some people that it seems a good way to kick start a business even of the less esoteric kind, but I can't help thinking that tapping into pre-existing groups with a more standard rebate scheme would be better. You can just see how Google's Circle's are predestined for this and at much lower commissions.

Of course, Groupon's business model is almost diametrically opposed to the business it is pretending to serve: they cannot be interested in continually buying new customers (at the expense of existing ones).

0
0

Study shows half of all websites use jQuery

Charlie Clark
Silver badge

Re: And a bloody good thing too!

@toadwarrior

I agree that these libraries generally do things that should be available directly anyway. But they are not available directly. In addition, the libraries allow people to try out different things that may become standardised in JS or HTML or CSS later, once best practice has been established.

Much I disdain the copycat practice of many developers it is very Canutish to expect it to change. We have to live in the world in the way it is and not the way it ideally should be. User experience matters and the web which is now commercially driven has got a lot nicer to use over the last 5 years or so thanks to libraries like these because it affects companies' bottom lines.

2
2
Charlie Clark
Silver badge

Re: Maybe I'm an outlier....

You should check the licence to be sure but basically, yes, it is perfectly okay to rehost the library.

0
0
Charlie Clark
Silver badge

Colour me sceptical

but I don't quite believe those statistics. HTTPArchive doesn't quite go into such detail but has some interesting comparative statistics. I'll have to check the source code but I think that for statistical purposes JQuery counts as a "Google library" because it is often served from the Google CDN. This itself begs the question as to how do you identify which libraries are being used if you can't rely on the source domain. You'd almost certainly have to execute the code to test which W3Techs don't do.

JQuery certainly is popular and also supported by lots of CMSes but it is also monolithic being used for all kinds of different things. Used wisely with other libraries like Modernizr it makes cross-browser development a lot easier. I have long been sceptical of using JS in websites but it makes interactive websites so much easier both for users and developers as evinced in any kind of reporting.

0
0

Vodafone and pals can't kick the habit of cheap mobe prices

Charlie Clark
Silver badge
Thumb Down

Flawed premise

The author never explains why telcos hate subsidies so much. Inasmuch as they bind the customers to longer contracts and guarantee higher cashflow and ARPU they seem to offer quite a lot. Complicating the price is like setting the odds at the casino: the house always wins as consumers are lousy at calculating value. Comments on this thread seem to agree. Good accounting and sale-or-return deals should be able to offset the cost of inventory, some of which will not be sold. So, what are the reasons for telcos wanting to unbundle contracts from phones must be elsewhere. Note, I'm not discounting the desire: the trend towards unbundling here in Germany started years ago and is becoming the norm.

The blanket classification of Europeans as a group of people who like to live on the never-never and then provide Spain as an example is completely flawed. Household debt in the EU is considerably less per person than in the US but is far from uniform. Countries with dysfunctional property markets such as Spain, Ireland and the UK have per person debt considerably higher than the EU average. Interestingly enough even as the number of delinquents (in the economic sense) rises, credit shifts from nominally low risk, low yield secured (houses) to high risk, high yield unsecured (phones). Just because someone can't pay their mortgage doesn't mean they won't buy mobile phones, power smartcards or fags.

1
0

Google updates Chrome Flash plugin for security, stability

Charlie Clark
Silver badge

Re: Opera and Firefox

Even with the new out of process plugins for Opera? I find it a bit slower to start but Flash can no longer crash the browser.

One of the differences, of course, is that Chrome builds its own plugins.

1
0

Hiccups in Apple's iCloud after yesterday's hack of hapless hack

Charlie Clark
Silver badge
Mushroom

Obligatory response

Typical user error - he's obviously holding it wrong.

1
0

Apple patents shopping lists

Charlie Clark
Silver badge

Re: I'm getting fed up with the volume of ignorant comments on patents

It's a patent on location based services. Going to be fucking pretty much unenforceable. Given the detail I guess it's going to be hard to call it a mere software patent as it sounds very much like an end-to-end logistics solution. That would be fine but it would also be a bit like patenting bus routes. Oh shit, probably given them another idea.

0
0
Charlie Clark
Silver badge

@wyatt

You can't patent ideas.

1
1