* Posts by Charlie Clark

4306 posts • joined 16 Apr 2007

China wants to build a 200km-long undersea tunnel to America

Charlie Clark
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Re: So,an invasion route ...

If there wasn't any oil there, they might…

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Charlie Clark
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Re: Purpose

The scheme sounds a swindle, a lot like the current Nicaragua canal scheme.

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Want to be an unpaid SLAVE for Tim Cook? How to get the iOS 9, El Capitan public betas

Charlie Clark
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Since the switch to yearly releases for MacOS Apple avoids a lot of problems be doing incremental changes. It still manages to bugger up the odd thing, particularly ITunes, but otherwise there are generally few surprises for MacOS. It's usually a slew of new API calls and some tweaking of the UI. However, my experience has been not to upgrade until the first patch release is made: even the public beta-testing doesn't seem to catch many of the hardware issues .

IOS is, by all accounts, a different kettle of fish.

The Reg has covered previous betas in detail, especially the IOS fuckeries.

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Microsoft emits Office 2016 for Apple Macs (you'll need Office 365)

Charlie Clark
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Re: Rare time?

Yes, the GUIs are now very similar and okay. Particularly warty bits of the GUI like macros benefit the most from the makeover. I much prefer the GUI of Office 2011 for Mac over Office 2010 for Windows.

The new versions seem okay, though noticeably resource hungrier than 2011. Is anyone surprised?

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Feared OpenSSL vulnerability gets patched, forgery issue resolved

Charlie Clark
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Re: Wet firecracker

FWIW LibreSSL also did a patch release yesterday. Doesn't mention the CVE specifically but does refer to the BoringSSL code: http://ftp.openbsd.org/pub/OpenBSD/LibreSSL/libressl-2.2.1-relnotes.txt

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SatNad's purple haze could see Lumia 'killed'. Way to go, chief!

Charlie Clark
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I do wonder

What those 12,000 ex-Nokians are doing.

I think there's money in Microsoft for going after premium customers on IOS and Android. Apple's office suite is nice enough but pales in comparison to MS Office for most users. It would be a delicious irony if MS started making more money from SaaS on IOS than Apple. And think of the anti-competitive lawsuits it could afford to wage.

Conclusion: Go, Microsoft! Go!

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Greek PM Alexis Tsipras brings the EU to its knees

Charlie Clark
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Re: Can the Eurogroup count?

Some good ideas come out of Bruegel and there is no doubt that the IMF has been playing both ends against the middle. It's hardly owed anything now by Greece with most of the debt having been transferred to the ECB and the Eurozone. Still, not paying the money due to the IMF in June was a totally stupid decision. It has given the IMF the stick it wanted to beat Greece with.

Greece has had considerable debt relief in the form of a haircut of private creditors, artificially low interest rates, even a moratorium on repayment and very long maturities for debt. The latter two are a more politically acceptable equivalent of a debt write-off. And where have the reforms been? If Greece ever gets round to reforming its sclerotic state, relief will be easy to get. Otherwise it's going to be handouts only.

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Charlie Clark
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Re: "This live broadcast cock-up is a failure of democracy by the EU"

This is getting way off-topic but let's look at the facts.

I object to people being used as pawns and threatened in political games.

I do, too, for what it's worth. Doesn't stop it happening.

The proposal wasn't expired at the time the referendum was called.

But it was called for a time after the proposal would have expired. This is what made the referendum a farce. Clever politicking by Tsipras: "I'm doing what the people want me to do.", but a terrible way to negotiate.

There was a concerted effort by the EU to change the terms of the referendum from a vote on the proposal to a vote on whether or not to stay in the eurozone.

It was hardly concerted. I agree it was ill-advised but they were basically telling the truth: with the expiration of the bailout programme at the end of June, it would no longer be possible to offer such good terms again. Nevertheless, it would have been smarter to say nothing.

Merkel said that there would be no further talks until the referendum was over

She did the smart thing: wait for the result of the referendum and be seen not trying to affect the outcome of it.

Since the referendum it's perfectly okay for the democratically elected representatives in other countries to express their opinion of it. Nobody should be surprised if patience is wearing thin. The Lithuanian president and the prime minister of Slovakia are no longer mincing their words.

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Charlie Clark
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Re: Greek Parliament live streaming, on the other hand...

Thanks for the info. Pretty impressive but what do the cache stats refer to if not some kind of content federation?

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Charlie Clark
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Re: "This live broadcast cock-up is a failure of democracy by the EU"

Because Greece's referendum on an expired proposal is somehow more democratic than decisions of other member states? How exactly?

Tsipras knew that this would be the situation when he broke off negotiations and called a referendum in the first place.

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Charlie Clark
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Despite the huge amounts of money the parliament spends on its streaming service…

Numbers please.

Streaming video just eats bandwidth and should be handed off to specialised content delivery networks.

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Decision time: Uninstall Adobe Flash or install yet another critical patch

Charlie Clark
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Re: More Flash vunerabilites...

Jobs wanted rid of Flash for two reasons: better battery life and promoting his walled garden. Quicktime and Safari have both had more than their own fair share of bugs and Apple's speed at patching them is far from ideal.

Kudos to Adobe for getting these patches out so quickly. Flash remains far from ideal and we can thank Jobs for promoting the idea of avoiding Flash but we shouldn't be so foolish as to think the replacements are much better. If you want good performance on a device you normally want unhindered access to the hardware. This almost inevitably introduces security risks. As I'm sure we'll see ass we move from Flash and Silverlight-based to HTML DRM extensions.

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Charlie Clark
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Re: More Flash vunerabilites...

Use TuneIn or side-load the BBC iPlayer Radio apk like everyone else.

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Ditch crappy landlines and start reading Twitter, 999 call centres told

Charlie Clark
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Re: Fantastic

Don't forget the QoS that contacting the emergency services requires.

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Don't touch this! Seven types of open source to dance away from

Charlie Clark
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RedHat

As a company involved in numerous open source projects for more than 20 years, it’s safe to say that Red Hat does a fair bit of open source.

That's a very poor premise. RedHat's relationship with open source is not much better than other large companies. It talks a good talk but when it comes to walking the walk, well look at those licensing conditions.

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Charlie Clark
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Re: "Potemkin villages"

Yep, RedHat's commitment to open source is just as much lip service as anyone else's.

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Microsoft SLASHES 7,800 bods, BURNS $7.6bn off books in Nokia adjustment

Charlie Clark
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Re: And the geography?

He does in the form of the shares he still owns. He may have made a string of bad decisions but he still made a lot of money for the company and he is still the largest individual shareholder.

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Charlie Clark
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Re: That Reminds Me

It's not far from becoming Microsoft's next billion-dollar business unit.

I thought it already had the honour of being the first division to lose a billion?

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Charlie Clark
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Valuations, especially write-downs, are primarily accounting devices. Take a bet on an acquisition and it doesn't pan out then it's much smarter to write it off quickly otherwise you carry the inflated value of the assets on the books as goodwill for years.

A big hit in this quarter gets the bad news out of the door and will make next quarter look all the better. A big hit can also be nicely offset against profits to reduce the tax bill.

Interesting that Skype, which Microsoft outbid itself for, has yet to be written down.

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Charlie Clark
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Re: I'm starting to lose track of this

So how's Windows going to be everywhere if anything they do with ARM turns to crap?

It'll still run on RasPis' – no risk there for Microsoft! ;-)

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Han Solo to get solo prequel flick in 2018, helmed by LEGO men

Charlie Clark
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hm,

In contrast to the generally dreadful prequels – any scene without Natalie Portman was a waste – I can imagine stories with less epic backdrops, such as a younger Han smuggling, working quite well. Lots of scope for risky double-dealing, problems with hardware, love affairs working quite well. Doesn't mean the films will be any good, but they might be.

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Bloodthirsty Microsoft prepares for imminent 'major' job cuts

Charlie Clark
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Re: Wasting cash

Well the profits are getting wiped out by these losses,

Great, this reduces the tax burden. Shareholders have been encouraged to care more about the share price: almost exactly the same as it was a year ago and nearly twice what it was 5 years ago.

they might as well have bought Greek sovereign debt.

Nope, no tangible assets to be got in the process.

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Charlie Clark
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Re: Wasting cash

Because the Board, which represents the interests of shareholders let them. The share price has stayed up and profits have continued to roll in. Conclusion: the majority of shareholders were happy with what the company was doing.

Of course, another reason for the purchase was that the purchases were made with overseas profits which would have been wiped out if they had been repatriated. At least Microsoft got some tangible assets and some, but not much, IP with the money. And who knows, maybe some of those shareholders happy with the company had shares in the companies that were bought. Maybe they were happy because they got to cash in at a low tax rate?

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Apple Watch sales in death dive after mega launch, claims study

Charlie Clark
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Re: Life Buoy.

I don't think it really matters (and I'm no fan of theses devices). If Apple has managed to sell a couple of million then it's mission accomplished: all the R&D costs recouped and market leader in the segment. But it's definitely worth waiting for some official figures.

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Pluto probe brain OVERLOAD: Titsup New Horizons explained

Charlie Clark
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Re: This is proper engineering

Well, yes, by that definition even the edge of the universe is still inside of earth's gravity.

Gravity well != gravity. There are other massive bodies out there, you know.

Once outside the gravity well of a particular planet then a spacecraft will not fall back into it due to gravity alone.

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Charlie Clark
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Re: This is proper engineering

Not to dismiss this accomplishment, but we haven't had a man outside Earth's gravity well for over four decades now which is pretty sad considering how fast things were moving in the 60s.

Do you happen to remember the size of NASA's budget in the 1960s? It was 3-4% of GDP during the Apollo programme and has been less than 1% for most of the time since. And the Apollo programme had pretty much only one aim: get a man on the moon. NASA has since had to spread the cash around: space shuttle, space stations, Hubble, etc.

Even then manned spaceflight took up a disproportionate part of the budget as launching people means launching bigger spacecraft to accommodate them and the life support systems. So, the space shuttle continued to divert resources away from research throughout. But it's okay, because the budget has been cut since it was retired.

Of course, once in orbit you can go pretty much anywhere, as the Voyager probes have amply demonstrated. But it's a matter of diminishing returns for various reasons: firstly, it takes a very long time to get anywhere; secondly, even when you do get somewhere, Shannon's law and power supplies severely limit how much research can be done and how much data can be communicated; thirdly, space is a very hostile environment viz. the number of failed launches or deployments (Venus and Mars have been particularly cruel). The last is one of the reasons why older but more reliable computer hardware is used. Missions routinely launch with technology which was outdated at launch, but can reasonably be expected to still be working at the end of the mission. I remember hardware from the early 1990s and it was not particularly fast. We all have mobile phones with more oomph.

So, given everything stacked against it, I think space exploration continues to make extraordinary strides. Rosetta, this probe and, Spirt, Opportunity and Curiosity continue to impress.

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Awoogah: Get ready to patch 'severe' bug in OpenSSL this Thursday

Charlie Clark
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It doesn't look the availability of source code helped OpenSSL much, very few eyes could read and fully understand that code, and spot bugs.

And your point is? Peer review is the great potential advantage of open source. While OpenSSL's codebase has correctly been roundly criticised in a number of places, it also has to be noted that it has been notoriously underfunded for years. OTOH Microsoft can hardly blame lack of cash for all the bugs that keep cropping up in its software.

There is now more cash for development and review, as evinced by this announcement, though whether it is ever going to be possible to properly clean up the codebase is a matter of some debate.

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Charlie Clark
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Re: LibreSSL?

Indeed. Cross-referencing CVEs in the change logs makes interesting reading: LibreSSL has so far managed to avoid some, but not all, bugs by pre-emptively removing OpenSSL code.

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Charlie Clark
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Re: Older version safe?

Better to stick with the 0.9.8 series and patch any flaws found…

You seriously want to manually patch OpenSSL code? You're a braver man than me, Gungadin. The difficulty of doing this is one of the main drivers behind the LibreSSL project.

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Kobo Glo HD vs Amazon Kindle Paperwhite: Which one's best?

Charlie Clark
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Re: Well from my experience

WiFi on my Kobo Glo is permanently disabled. I've bought a couple of books from the Kobo store (price was fine) but most of my content gets uploaded via Calibre, though you can just do it via USB.

See comments above about PDF. It's effectively a restriction of the file format. The best thing would probably to run the PDF through a printer filter on a computer to create a PDF using a page size of your device.

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Charlie Clark
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Kobo's backend is just as flexible as Amazon's. My books come from a variety of sources so I have to manage any replication by hand.

For me, the ergonomics and device handling are paramount and the Kindle doesn't come close to the Kobo in that respect.

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Charlie Clark
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Re: PIty. Most of the stuff I'm interested in is in PDF

PDF is simply compressed Postscript, a language designed for the printed page. Going from A4 to a particular reader size is tricky. It's easiest to simply scale down but this means zooming in and out and scrolling. Reflowing can otherwise be tried but will always involve compromises.

The Sony readers used to contained software from Adobe that did an excellent job of reflowing PDFs to the device's size.

If you really do have a lot of PDFs that you want on a reader then Sony's DPTS1 is the dog bollocks: http://pro.sony.com/bbsc/ssr/product-DPTS1/?PID=I:digitalpaper:digitalpaperproductpage

I think this is kind of device that any of us with lots of technical documentation would like to have.

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'I am so TIRED of your bullsh*t...' Sprint boss flips lid at T-Mobile US CEO

Charlie Clark
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Where's the news?

I only see some fluff round some fairly random Twitter quotes. In general: if it's on Twitter, it ain't news.

Legère has shown how to use Twitter for good PR. Journalism 101: PR isn't news.

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Apple's Swift creeps up dev language survey – but it's bad news for VB

Charlie Clark
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Languages which make your head hurt and have sub-par online documentation will be significantly ahead of stuff that "just works".

Actually, that's not my experience. Stackoverflow is full of people with no idea asking stuff because they're too lazy to read the docs or try stuff out. That said, there are also some very knowledgeable people on there about particular areas.

Github suffers more from the programming fads and fashions. A lot of bit C++ stuff is never going to be on there and that's even the open source stuff.

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Windows 7 and 8.1 market share surge, XP falls behind OS X

Charlie Clark
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Re: Error Margins

The statistical flaws in this monthly meta-analysis (more a "poll of polls" and ask Peter Kellner about how reliable those are) are almost without limit. Variation with the margin of error is probably the least.

The main ones:

  • no description of the sample set – see Christian's post
  • failure to corroborate with El Reg's own data
  • failure to corroborate with source like Akamai's non-JS data. This would involve real work, not just copy & paste.
  • failure to account for a general shift to mobile affecting not just the sample size, but what's left in it
  • failure to account for the number of working days in any particular month (work days favour Windows and IE in general)

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Apple gets around to fixing those 77 security holes in OS X Yosemite

Charlie Clark
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Re: for Mac Pro owners

They will however continue to update iTunes until the end of time. Can never have too much bloat in an online store.

Bloat is one thing, the constant changes in how things are organised is another! Every new update seems to include a UI redesign.

I guess my problem is that I use it for my own music and not to buy from Apple.

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Revive the Nathan Barley Quango – former Downing Street wonk

Charlie Clark
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It's totally spurious. Everything the BBC, ITV, Sky, Channel's 4 & 5 produce is "digital". And then there's BT. If what BT and Sky just agreed to spunk on football for the the next three years isn't significant investment, then I don't know what is.

Netflix makes much less sense in the UK than in the US because the cable companies don't have such a stranglehold on people's wallets. Moan if you like about the licence fee but you get much better telly for much less than all the 400 shopping and astrology channels you forced to buy in the states.

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Charlie Clark
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Re: Scandal-mag-cum-style-sheet

I think "cum", Latin for "with"

It is. Nevertheless, I am reliably informed that it is also p0rn spelling for come…

<nostalgia>

Staring wistfully at my M21 coffee mug and chintz Chorlton coster:

Chorlton hasn't really been "-cum-Hardy" since my long dead aunt Sis was young, when it was Chorlton-cum-Hardy, near Manchester. Hardy essentially became post-war estate on the "other" side of the park… Alas Cosgrove Hall's studio behind the baths has been turned into retirement homes. And the place has been invaded by BBC people working at Media City.

</nostalgia>

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Charlie Clark
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Re: Made a wrong turning somewhere

I should have just learned to speak gobble da dick

FTFY

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EUROPEAN PURGE on hated mobile roaming charges

Charlie Clark
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It's possible to discriminate against foreigners, for example, by requiring presentation of a type of national ID that they can't easily get.

Not come across that anywhere and I can't imagine it surviving a challenge.

Existing rules already make unbundling when roaming possible. So there should soon be third parties offering deals to the minority who have "above average" requirements: single telephone number but calls and data can be handled by other partners when travelling.

The telco's are eking out charges as long as possible but the increasing ubiquity (I'm not sure if that's an oxymoron) of wireless when travelling is really eating into their margins. Worth noting that this generally affects the operators in holiday countries more than the travellers.

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Why SpaceX will sort out Sunday's snafu faster than NASA ever could

Charlie Clark
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Re: NASA inefficiency: The hint is in the name

SpaceX is building upon the years of experience of launching rockets into space. This is where most of the innovation is coming from. I'm not knocking it. There is a clear vision being well-executed. But it's not like sending a probe to Venus or a man to the moon for the first time.

The NASA culture stems from too much government and military interference which inevitably leads to feature creep and being beholden to the cost-plus military industrial complex that has a vested interest in delay and budget overrun.

AFAIK, and I'm happy to be corrected, but SpaceX launches are not yet significantly cheaper than say Ariane. Competition should hopefully lead to better, safer and cheaper launches.

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Google harms consumers and strangles the open web, says study

Charlie Clark
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Flawed study

Interesting to see Andrew touting a study by someone who came up with the term "net neutrality", which he's rightly criticised at times.

Google's value as an advertiser is heavily based on its value as a search engine. If I start getting the feeling that I'm poorly served by Google I'll be off to another search engine just like happened back in the day.

If I want to do price comparison I usually don't use Google directly. I use Google to find different price comparison sites which I then generally bookmark. Google often gives a good, but insufficient, indication of the market.

Where Google, just like Apple (and Amazon), is gaining an unfair advantage is in the add-ons to Android. Google Now, though I haven't used it very much, is very, very good at putting two and two together and getting four. It cuts out the search completely, so no competition case to answer, and may well become indispensable to many.

The solution, for both Google and Apple, will be to prevent the vertical integration they're currently building. At the moment, however, there's no doubt that Apple is far more anti-competitive.

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Android's sun sets on Eclipse

Charlie Clark
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Re: Eclipse is part of what has rendered me so cynical

Would you care to support your opinion with facts or are you just spouting?

IDEs tend to elicit strong opinions – see any vi versus emacs debate.

My own main development is mainly in Python. I've tried Eclipse with the PyDev plugin and, like Thom, completely failed to understand it and moved on to something else. This might be the plug-in, it could be my incompetence. Doesn't really matter. Having had to help someone else setup a Windows machine I know how frustrating this can be and how such impressions colour our judgement. Having said that, sitting next to me was someone happily using Eclipse on Mac.

I've also tried PyCharm, which I believe is based on IntelliJ, and while it's got that usual, "unusual" Java look and feel I could get projects set up and run tests. I managed to disable some of the most annoying default settings so I can get it to work. However, I find I spend most of my time either in a dedicated (and paid for) Python IDE called WingIDE or one of a number of text editors with better support for other syntax and tools.

Of the novices I've come across I'd say that most that use an IDE prefer IntelliJ over Eclipse. I suspect this is due to things like those I mentioned above and an apparently lack of QA around plugins. IntelliJ has the Apple advantage of being able to decide what goes in and what doesn't. And I think Google felt the same about the studio.

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Charlie Clark
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Where's the NIH stuff? It's using IntelliJ instead of Eclipse.

Eclipse may have its fans but so does IntellJ and from I've seen of them both, I much prefer IntelliJ.

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Microsoft's magic hurts: Nadella signals 'tough choices' on the way

Charlie Clark
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Re: Apps

And the masses make the sales and profit.

Actually, that's rarely the case. Volume sales are usually in low-margin markets. This is Microsoft's (but also HTC's, Sony's, and to a lesser extent Samsung's) problem.

Apple has traditionally done very well with low-volume, higher margin sales. The I-phone, and the I-pod before it, is unusual. The Apple eco-system does come with a certain degree of lock-in, which vastly reduces the size of the premium market for everyone else.

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Charlie Clark
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Re: Old rant...

I find Libre/Open Office fail to handle many documents I throw at them. I suspect it's more Word doing some crazy method to achieve a particular layout, because if I correct the document in LL/OO, it loads back into Word fine.

I suspect that's because there's "more than one way of doing things" not just in Word but also in the file formats. Done correctly things should be largely unambiguous… The emphasis there is definitely on "should".

I mainly use OO, having had LO crash just one time too many on me. Currently, on Mac OS it is not as fluid as MS Office. I think it gets a lot of things right in the UI but I can sympathise with users who prefer Microsoft's stuff.

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Charlie Clark
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Re: WinPho not doing better than before?

I thought Windows Phone was actually picking up market share?

Where? If it is, it's not enough to matter. The costs of standing still are high, especially in the consumer market.

There's certainly a demand for phones with a high-degree of integration in the Windows world. But that doesn't mean the phone has to run Windows. At some point Microsoft will have enough installs of Office for Android and IOS to be able to forecast how much money it can make from subscriptions. My guess is that this will be somewhat more than they're currently making from Windows phone.

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Cambridge boffins: STOP the rush to 5G. We just don't need it

Charlie Clark
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Re: Why does 5G have to be faster?

Well, then it would just be 4G LTE…

5G is currently just marketing. The future is most likely going to be multimode – handing off to WLAN wherever it's available. This allows for a much more flexible deployment of infrastructure and will also support 4k cat videos most of the time. If the networks pursue 5G then they will risk losing out to disruptors such as Google's "Project Loon".

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We forget NOTHING, the Beeb thunders at Europe

Charlie Clark
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Re: Lawsuits inbound

Let's keep this in proportion.

The "right to forgotten" never applied to original articles, merely their representation in search results.

At most such pages may be required to contain a disclaimer that the information was subsequently shown to be incorrect.

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Google creates cloud code cache

Charlie Clark
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Re: WTF?

This looks like the basis of an enterprise service going after the lucrative CI market.

Hosting repositories and bug trackers is easy but there is little money it, despite GitHub's success in recent funding.

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