* Posts by Charlie Clark

3086 posts • joined 16 Apr 2007

Apple Watch: HOT WRIST ACTION plus slim $1299 MacBooks - and HBO TV

Charlie Clark
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Re: The only reason

So, let's get this straight: it's okay for you to hate? Just not anyone else? What an exciting life you must lead!

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Charlie Clark
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Re: Apple Watch (BS) Sport Edition

discovered/invented/created (not sure what the correct term actually is)

"serendipped" is the right word I believe.

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Charlie Clark
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Re: How much?

Apple's buyers have traditionally proven to be pretty insensitive to price. Indeed for some the high price is part of the appeal and Apple is certainly right to keep out of the bargain basement section. If any of the segments sell well then Apple stands to make a tidy profit. Otherwise it's likely to be forgotten quickly like coloured I-Phones.

That said, I personally think it's poo.

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Charlie Clark
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Game of Thrones already holds the record for the most torrented program. Can expect a new record this year.

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Charlie Clark
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Re: hahahaha

I use a Mac but I'm not fanboy (use a MacBook from 2009, no I-thingies). A single connector like a phone is great, though a second port would be nice. Presumably £50 gets you a hub. But a mere 1 kg is very, very impressive for the size. I can see Apple selling shedloads of these. The colour and the weight may also appeal to the ladies.

At some point I'm going to have to replace my machine but fortunately I don't have to do much travelling for work.

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Chewier than a slice of Pi: MIPS Creator CI20 development board

Charlie Clark
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Re: Media Center

I use the Pi as a media centre and it plays HD (MKV/MP4) fine. Along with the absence of a real power button and attendant warning about not being shut-off properly or needing several new starts, my biggest beef with the Pi is the piss poor NFS client in userland. DNLA sources work wonderfully, though it can take a while to initialise, but you need NFS if you want to take advantage of the media database functions. Hardly a deal-breaker at the price and there are possibly bits I could fix myself.

For kicks I also set it up to do CI and was pleasantly surprised at how well that worked, just as long as you don't need to compile anything. A Pi-2 setup could be quite good for CI work and might even integrate with the media centre – get notifications that tests have passed while watching your favourite programmes.

MIPS is going to struggle to get the critical mass of developers to write drivers for stuff. Pi has done this well by masquerading as being an educational device (and Scratch is popular).

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UK Supreme Court waves through indiscriminate police surveillance

Charlie Clark
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Indeed, everyone is always guilty of something.

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Charlie Clark
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Re: As Treasonas May is fond of saying...

@Hans 1 detention without charge is possible for up to 28 days in the UK thanks to "anti-terrorist" legislation: https://www.liberty-human-rights.org.uk/human-rights/countering-terrorism/extended-pre-charge-detention

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Charlie Clark
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Re: UK Govt are idiots

ECJ is in Luxembourg and the ECHR in Strasbourg but your basic point stands.

This will go to the ECHR and the UK will lose. Unfortunately, the ECHR doesn't have many ways of sanctioning viz. several outstanding judgements that the UK has yet to enforce.

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EU court: Mobe makers not liable for users' copyright badness

Charlie Clark
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Re: Copying

They used (and may still be) a levy on recording media. In Germany it applied to blank CDs as well as tapes and also photocopying. I think they may have extended it to SD cards. It never applied to devices. The music royalty collection agencies are usually swimming money so why should they care about the artists?

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Office for Mac 2016 Preview: This letter will self-destruct in 60 days

Charlie Clark
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Re: Surprised at the requirment for Yosemite

Why? I'm pretty certain that over 90 % of users will be on Mavericks or Yosemite. Those numbers will only look better when it gets to the release date. (I'm annoyed because my second machine is artificially restricted to Lion but it is my second machine and from 2006). Apple will have the numbers from software updates and is quite happy to splash them around and the hints to upgrade for free aren't exactly subtle. Yosemite has the highest integration between MacOS and IOS making it easier for vendors, such as Microsoft, targeting both with its software.

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Charlie Clark
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Re: I'm puzzled

I thought every Mac that running Mavericks is eligible and able to run Yosemite as well?

Does that mean that they should? Every new OS version brings changes, some for the good, some for the bad. Yosemite includes a lot of pointless UI fuckery. Though to be fair, under the hood it seems to contain mostly improvements. Notable exception: I-Tunes seems to get worse with each new release.

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Charlie Clark
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Re: The aticle needs to be re-written a bit

And I upvoted him as he often makes good points. Office on Mac even with the fucking ribbon is a damn sight prettier than on Windows though I prefer OpenOffice's fixed palettes.

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Charlie Clark
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Re: So, so happy ..

I would be too, if it did not require Java for full functionality on OS X.

I prefer OpenOffice over LibreOffice for stability. LibreOffice is busy getting rid of the Java but I'm pretty sure it will have to stay for the database connectivity: nothing else has such a wide range of database drivers.

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Why Wi-Fi won't solve mobile telcos' data dilemma

Charlie Clark
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Re: Why is it ...

Radio frequencies were long ago realised as a scarce resource so the ITU was set up to let states manage them. This has let to rather mixed results: sometimes auctions or leases have worked well in that they earned a lot of money and were efficiently used. In most countries there are only a few unlicensed bands such as those used for wifi. It's possible to argue that this is both a good thing: wifi has become ubiquitous and is undoubtedly useful; but it's also a pretty shitty standard that was rushed to the market and has huge problems in areas of high density (an example of the "tragedy of the commons"). There are other ways of looking at this situation.

I don't know the pricing in the UK but I'd expect it to be restrictive. In general, countries with relatively high population density will experience problems of congestion. Conversely, there will also be more commercial interest in providing services to the large, dense population making auctions more likely.

Fibre really is the best thing for backhaul. Various radio technologies may indeed help bridge the gap where FTTH may be prohibitive, though FTTK should now be possible to anywhere with a water supply. The problem with bespoke solutions is less likely to be the cost of licensing spectrum as in knowing you can keep the kit updated and maintained. Femto cells are emerging as the industry standard approach here. They have the added advantage of extending the range of the mobile network.

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Euro ministers ditch plan to ban roaming charges

Charlie Clark
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Ain't over yet

This is very eleventh hour and, therefore, a bit late. My network started eliminating roaming charges last year and any company that doesn't have a strategy to survive the wholesale rollout next year is not going to survive anyway. Most of the industry has already prepared for the change (billing systems don't usually get changed overnight). More changes mean more disruption which a mere two-year extension of the existing rules is unlikely to make sufficiently attractive.

The ministers can decide what they want, they'll still have to go back to the parliament to get it approved. If no agreement can be reached in time (and that's possible) then existing provisions will apply. The proposed changes are, therefore, merely a bargaining chip for talking to the parliament. In the meantime more and more consumers will continue to educate themselves on how to make the best of the situation. I, for one, am not going to hold my breath on this one.

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Mummy, what's the point of Evgeny Morozov's tedious columns?

Charlie Clark
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Morozov can certainly make his arguments better than Worstall who presumably has the column on El Reg because he's mates with the owners.

I don't agree with everything Morozov says but he does make some good points and even when I don't agree with him he has made me reassess some of the positions I do hold. For example, one of his main points in The Net Delusion is how entertainment (in the broadest sense) for the masses is equivalent of the Roman panem et circenses in this day and age: a distraction that among other things serves to prevent political opposition forming. I don't think either Facebook or YouTube were founded with this is mind but as long as people are arguing about what someone's wearing, what's the best or worst, they are <bold>not</bold> engaged in political action.

Worstall on the other hand just spouts bar room clickbait. Is it any surprise that he has already stood for UKIP?

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FREAK show: Apple and Android SSL WIDE OPEN to snoopers

Charlie Clark
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Re: IE10???

Firefox uses NSS instead of OpenSSL. This just means different bugs, though I doubt that NSS's internals are quite as hair-brained as OpenSSL

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Windows XP's market share grows AGAIN!

Charlie Clark
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Re: As usual

I am not defending the result of netmarketshare, I just don't think that El Reg's stats would be meaningful in determining whether or not XP increased market share. But, as you say, without evidence of the figures then this conversation is arguably pointless, although I welcome your well reasoned arguments. It could be that El Reg's figures show an *large* upsurge in XP takeup which would certainly shoot my expectations down.

You might be surprised at what the numbers reveal if only we could see them. Unfortunately, we'd then have to do some real statistics to point out another glaring problem with the numbers that El Reg reports: desktop is steadily losing marketshare to mobile devices. This skews desktop stats to older machines and also makes them more volatile as the sample size decreases.

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Charlie Clark
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Re: As usual

Collect another badge of fail. Your assumptions 1 and 3 are the same and number 2 is very similar to them both (if A is more generalised than B then B must be more specialised than A. You only qualify this by indicating where the specialisation may be). It doesn't really matter because the assumptions are only relevant in a hypothesis that you are going to test empirically. Which you can't because El Reg doesn't provide the numbers. This is logic, we haven't even got to the statistics.

Furthermore, you might want to get out your dictionary and look up corroboration. El Reg's numbers don't have to be the same as either of these two services to provide corroboration. However, in the past the numbers have *not* been corroborated by data collected by Akamai to which I have repeatedly referred.

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Charlie Clark
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Re: As usual

Thing is, El Reg is a tech site so any stats are going to be skewed to the readership base so you wont corroborate with general stats.

That's a remarkable conclusion to draw in the absence of the evidence. What is the readership for the statcounter / netmarketshare?

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Charlie Clark
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FAIL

As usual

we ask for corroboration based on El Reg's own stats. As usual silence.

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Google's 'encrypted-by-default' Android is NOT encrypting by default

Charlie Clark
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Re: it's a shame...

or they could just, you know, license it?

Google doesn't decide which chips companies use in their devices and, therefore, it doesn't pay for the licences. Maybe this will encourage more companies not to use Qualcomm's chip which might not be such a bad thing considering their close relationship with the US military.

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Charlie Clark
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Re: I don't really like Apple/iOs

However, this might get me to change, and I should probably be thinking about an upgrade on my 2+ year old Android phone anyway.

Or you could just enable encryption yourself (if it isn't done already). Personally, while I think encryption of data on device by default is good, for most people I reckon it's more important to encrypt network traffic. Apple and Google will happily encrypt your device and just as happily read your address book, calendar, e-mail, text messages, etc.

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3 spectastic Lumias for price of 1 rival flagship: Microsoft sells biz on cheapie experience

Charlie Clark
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Shurely shome mishtake?

You also get 60 landline minutes a month and 1TB of data

Sounds like a torrentor's dream and would probably burn through even Microsoft's vast cash pile pretty quickly.

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Acer enters Windows Phone fray with cheap Liquid M220 mobe

Charlie Clark
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Re: Backing the underdog

And look at how well Sony and HTC are doing with Android phones. They may be selling them - but they're not making any money. The only company doing well with Android is Samsung.

Xiaomi seems to be doing quite well with Android.

Google didn't buy Motorola to get into the hardware business but to get the patents.

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Charlie Clark
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Incentives

The claim falls far short of reality though, with fewer apps available, and often worse implementations of apps that are on the market. Still, the arrival of the M220 shows that Microsoft is making some impact with its universal app strategy, which will make it easier for developers to target Windows desktop, tablet and phone with the same code.

How many crack pipes did you smoke to draw that conclusion? There aren't any universal apps at the moment. The reason for doing the phone is: they already have compatible hardware; the OS is free; MS will no doubt offer marketing support; and sales of their Android phones are disappointing. This is simply a case of try it and see. The reason every other company stopped making Windows phones is that the sales weren't enough to justify even this minimalist approach to diversification.

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Microsoft working on 'Nano' version of Windows Server for web-scale ops

Charlie Clark
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Re: Wow

It looks remarkably like docker for Windows: hypervisor with runtime. The licensing model will be interesting.

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Phabba-dabba-do: Samsung hypes up Galaxy S6 and S6 Edge

Charlie Clark
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Re: NSA and GCHQ will be very happy

Don't forget to shake your head when you're outside so the cameras only get blurry images of you.

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Charlie Clark
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Re: Built in battery, no SD slot, no waterproofing?

/I'm curious, what do people need SD cards for? The lowest of the low phones comes with 16GB nowadays, and I only use 10.

For me it's mainly pictures, audio books and offline maps. I've got quite a few apps with their own beefy storage requirements meaning that the phone's own storage can start to look a little small. And it also makes a lot of sense to put certain kinds of data on separate media.

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Don't pay for the BBC? Then no Doctor Who for you, I'm afraid

Charlie Clark
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Re: Just stop there.

Surely it is far easier and far more efficient to remove the license fee and recover the money through fiscal drag on tax thresholds?

Sure, but the problem is that all tax goes to the treasury and this would make the BBC directly beholden to the government of the day. The licence fee guarantees a certain amount of independence from the government of the day.

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Charlie Clark
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Headmaster

Re: Trickle it in

licenses

tsk, tsk

To license but a licence. Same for practice and practise. Except in America which takes English spelling irregularities and makes a mockery of them. Sigh.

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Charlie Clark
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Coat

Greg Dyke

Anyone prepared to hold my coat while I give him a good kicking? I'll then hold yours while you have your go. He's the guy responsible for dumbing down the BBC.

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And the buggiest OS provider award goes to ... APPLE?

Charlie Clark
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Re: Android

Your statutory rights are unaffected by manufacturer's interpretations. You are perfectly within your rights to insist upon repair or replacement if you can demonstrate a defect in the product. IANAL but a known security vulnerability should count. Mention this and a possible to trip to the small claims court the next time you speak to them.

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Google deal means game over for mobile payments firm Softcard

Charlie Clark
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Re: So what exactly did Google buy that they didn't have before?

There isn't such a thing as an NFC payments infrastructure: NFC is the infrastructure. Apple did the unusual but smart thing of adopting it as opposed to trying to replicate it with its own. Clearing still has to be through the banks.

We'll have to wait to see quite what Google got but presumably includes indirect access to the network's customer base is part of it.

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Google opens 'Inbox' heir-to-email trial to biz users

Charlie Clark
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Re: If it ain't broke

@Robert Grant

Blaming e-mail for spam is like blaming the telephone system for cold callers.

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This one weird script continually crashes Android email

Charlie Clark
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Re: One thing isn't clear to me

It doesn't really affect anything because it's about on old version of the OS on a particular device. Sloppy article though.

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Charlie Clark
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Move along, please. Nothing to see here.

Doesn't really matter. I have a non-branded S4 mini and even before I put CM on it (about a year ago) Samsung had released OTA's beyond 4.2.2. Other people I know with carrier-branded devices have also been on 4.4 for quite some time.

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HTTP/2 spec gets green light: Faster web or needless complexity?

Charlie Clark
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serve the ads from the same server as the content

So why aren't they doing that already?

Two reasons: data aggregation and latency. Data aggregation: if Doubleclick can track users across websites with its own cookies it's arguably in a better position to serve up better targeted adverts which helps drive up their price. Latency: Doubleclick will hold a realtime auction for the ads based on the personal data it thinks it has, this will be faster if it already has a dedicated slot in the page and can serve directly from its servers otherwise it has to arrange for the advert to be proxied by the original website.

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Charlie Clark
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Re: i can see myself

using http/1.1 for the next decade.

Which is to suggest that there is nothing wrong with HTTP 1.1

This is quite simply not true. However, as long as it was good enough nobody could be bothered touching it. Google worked on SPDY, submitted it to the IETF and agreed to changes even though SPDY was getting adoption as a proprietary protocol. I'm pretty sure the work isn't finished with 2.0 but it is important that standard's bodies are open to suggestions from outside.

Kamp is not the only one involved: Mark Nottingham has been working with HTTP for a long time as have others on the committee. The best way to deal with any concerns is to do what Google did and come up with some working code and a relevant specification.

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Critical 0-days in open source? The problem isn't code, it's CASH

Charlie Clark
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Talking shop asks for more money

Remind me again what the Linux Foundation actually does? Maybe they could give Mr Zemlin some English lessons: "remedy" is also as a verb: "remediate" would be to "re-mediate".

The OpenSSL bug is interesting. Why did the Linux Foundation not get on board with the LibreSSL project – OpenSSL suffered not just through enough peer review but also being poorly designed. From my own view perspective I can see more and more acceptance of open source software by companies as long as they understand the costs associated with their own customisations and can be reassured that the software is actively maintained. The "free as in free speech" is an unwanted and unnecessary distraction in such discussions so it's good to see it coming up less and less.

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Qualcomm, ARM: We thought we had such HOT MODELS...

Charlie Clark
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Re: There could be some dangers to ARM

The problem with ARM is that it's not a common hardware platform.

This is pretty much true for the competition apart from perhaps, Intel. But there still isn't a common x86 for mobile platform and Intel is just as interested in lock-in as anyone else. And, until Intel can deliver an SoC of comparable power/performance at a competitive price to ARM, things are unlikely to change. All Intel's recent "wins" have been at a significant expense. Granted, with the money it makes selling x86, Intel can afford to keep subsidising SoC side but is this ever going to make sense in China where they're competing with the likes of Mediatek?

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Charlie Clark
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Re: What I Took From the Article

Since most Android programs use bytecode rather than native code, other chips more similar to ARM

This is a myth. The (current) move is more and more to native, which is why Intel has been so busy trying to optimise Android for x86 and support cross-compiling.

SPARC, PowerPC, MIPS, et al. can be easily licensed. Of them only MIPS really has any history in the small device space. IBM, the main force behind PowerPC, has made it clear that it's only interested in the data centre. Oracle, who own SPARC, is interested in selling complete systems. MIPS hasn't been that successful recently because it doesn't offer the right products, which is why Imagination (fuelled by Apple's cash) was able to buy it. It has yet to come up with credible SoC for mobile.

But ARM's competitive advantage isn't just the CPU, it's the eco-system: switching SoCs while painful is possible within a reasonable period of time ("native" code is essential for drivers) which is what you sometimes see with different revisions of the same device. Switching to a completely different architecture really isn't an option.

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Charlie Clark
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Re: Missing risk for Qualcomm

but everyone knows Intel is the only company that will have 10nm ready in 2016

We'll believe that when we see it. Recent geometry shrinks have all been hit by delays.

Intel only wants in on large margin business. Even the 250 million units you're touting is nothing like enough to cover the costs of a new fab. And switching to making ARM chips would send quite a signal to markets about Intel's faith in its own designs. If Apple were to go with Intel on mobile it would be x86.

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Charlie Clark
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Straw man

The history of mobile device processors is that of two companies, Qualcomm and ARM

This may be convenient for your argument but is very inaccurate. Lots of companies are involved in the history of mobile processors including, but not limited to, TI, Siemens, Alcatel, ST Thomson, Ericsson, Broadcom. Typical filler from Rethink though Wireless Watch is generally more readable than Faultline.

A comparison of Qualcomm and ARM based on their history might be interesting: Qualcomm growing out of the US military industrial complex which guarantee both lucrative research projects and, er, help when licensing them. CDMA didn't become the dominant standard in the US and, er, Korea by chance. ARM grew out of the failure of European manufacturer to compete in the high volume PC business.

In comparison to either Qualcomm or Intel, ARM is a minnow that shouldn't really survive. It's done well because it's viral done right: license ARM for a known quality at an incredibly low price. It's also done well by not diversifying that much. It talks the necessary talk to get journalists to cover it but spends most of its time developing what its vast customer base wants.

Qualcomm continues to supply the US military, where spending is more than then next 20 countries combined. Like Lockheed Martin, Boeing and the rest, no real danger there as long as this continues.

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Hey Apple - what's the $178bn for? Are you down with OTT?

Charlie Clark
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Re: BBC Death

where we all worship Jobs, Cook and Ive.

Assuming you mean Peter that might include me! ;-)

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Charlie Clark
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FAIL

Re: BBC Death

The controversial point (in the UK anyway), is that this also removes the need for the BBC license fee model.

Utter crap. Oh, and it's licence by the way. The reason why the licence model has been so successful is that it provides a certain degree of independence from the state, commerce and special interest groups (which would be the echo chamber of your subscribers).

This doesn't alter the fact that the BBC has somewhat lost its way over the last decade (I still blame Greg Dyke for the dumbing down) and the problems the universal model (inform, educate and entertain) has when having to bid for things like rights to show football matches and, thus, diverting money away from other areas. But that is mainly a political issue with parliament able to decide which events should be universally (free to view) accessible.

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Lightbulb moment for visible light networking: 200 Gbps without a fibre

Charlie Clark
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Re: What's the use case for 100 Gbps wireless?

100 Gbps is just for the headlines. Anything that increases the real throughput in any particular situation will have its uses. 100 Gbps is only 50 Gbps duplex with only two members of a network, in optimal conditions. Real world situations might be closer to 10/20 Gbps or less. Plenty of situations where that would be nice to have.

WiFi is reaching the limits of its because of the bandwidth available at the frequencies at which it runs and contention with other networks. Research into alternatives is essential. And that is what this is: research.

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Microsoft's patchwork falls apart … AGAIN!

Charlie Clark
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Re: What do you mean "some?"

I guess it depends upon the nature of the patch. If the patch has security relevance then it needs applying as quickly as possible. Of course, more testing is required but the closed nature of Microsoft's software development makes this difficult.

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Patch now: Design flaw in Windows security allows hackers to own corporate laptops, PCs

Charlie Clark
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Re: @Charlie "unfixable on Server 2003."

@big_D: all clickthrough EULAs are unenforceable. It has to be informed consent and whether this has been given or not can be contested in court.

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