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* Posts by Charlie Clark

2498 posts • joined 16 Apr 2007

PlayStation 4 is FreeBSD inside

Charlie Clark
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Re: @M.B - *looks at Eadon and laughs*

Unfortunately the more liberal license is the reason we're all bickering here about Linux almost forgetting the BDSs

No, the licence had nothing to with it. AT&T took UC Berkeley to court at the same time as Torvalds was cloning Minix. Until the court case finished, and this being America it took a few years, BSD was considered tainted so there was an incentive to use something else, Linux was around and the rest is history.

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Microsoft: Half of all organizations will use 'Facebook-like' tools

Charlie Clark
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Re: A letter to the shareholders

Massive success for Microsoft - and a significant market opportunity to connect companies with customers now that it is integrated with Lync.

Where's the payback on the $ 8 bn? Keep taking the tablets.

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Charlie Clark
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Re: Yammer-schammer

+ lots

Incidentally "jammer" (same pronunciation) means shame in Dutch and for some reason I can't avoid thinking of it every time I read about it. Seems fitting.

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Charlie Clark
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A letter to the shareholders

Sorry, after aQuantive, Skype we fucked up again and spent oodles of your cash on a fashionable company. If you sell quickly you won't be affected too much by the write down when we announce it. In the meantime we're going to run a smokescreen campaign telling everyone how wonderful everything is and how our customers love Jabber

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Eye spy future HP Moonshot server nodes

Charlie Clark
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WOW!

If you want double precision, it drops down to 691 teraflops per rack.

Admittedly this is probably for specialist applications but that is still fucking impressive. We are starting to see how see these systems are going to really shake up the market. This is probably why IBM wants out of the x86 racket, or even out of the business altogether. Though if IBM hasn't got something ARM-based in the closet then I'd be very surprised. They've already done much of the leg work with cell designs.

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Vodafone coughs up £6.5bn for Kabel Deutschland

Charlie Clark
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Re: Quads aren't for everyone

Nobody wants to split the phone bill with the Brazilian guy who spends all night on the phone to his girlfriend back in Rio.

Why not? With the right package it shouldn't make any difference. It's pretty much all VoIP now anyway so if your provider starts taking the piss, just provide and OTT solution and set the router up correctly.

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Charlie Clark
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Possible bidding war

I think LibertyMedia is also considering buying at least a slice of Kabel and as they are less geared this could have legs.

4-play is largely irrelevant in the UK due to the dismal level of investment infrastructure and the subsequent dependence upon on BT's wires and a captive regulator.

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Charlie Clark
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Re: Hmmm...

Good report in the most recent c't about how the market is being carved up. Got Unitymedia here with fibre to the kerb 50 Mb/s downlink 4 Mb/s uplink with telephone, telly and mobile for € 35 a month. Even with the € 17 compulsory connection fee it's still more competitive than the DSL offerings.

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Our week with Soylent: Don't chuck out your vintage food quite yet

Charlie Clark
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Re: FYI

Cooking your own food is always cheaper than junk food. If you budget really is stretched then it can be a bit bland or boring but things like lentils are hard to beat on a price/nutrition basis.

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Charlie Clark
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Re: @TechnicalBen

but chemicals is chemicals however you get them.

You obviously don't know your chemistry. There are an awful lot of molecules out there that are easily available from biological sources but extremely difficult to synthesise: left-handed and right-handed isomers for a start. And that's only the start - finding out which substances work together is even more difficult. Add environmental and biological factors - does your body have the right enzymes for this?

That there is a market for this kind of pseudo-science is obvious from all the comments for people looking for a silver bullet solution. But there really is no substitute for a varied diet with lots of fresh fruit and vegetables.

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El Reg rocket squad poised to select Ultimate Cuppa teabag

Charlie Clark
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Go

@Lester - love the new mouseover on the SPB logo!

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Charlie Clark
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Re: A nice mug o' rosie

The blenders used to blend tea to suit various parts of the country. It sounds like you've got Tetleys suited for hard water and PG for soft. Try making both after using a water filter and then compare, I've always found Tetleys distinctly lacking in taste even when using soft water.

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Charlie Clark
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Re: Tetley put the T in Britain

But who put the C*** in Scunthorpe?

Don't know but I wish he'd stay there.

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Charlie Clark
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PG Tips here - I prefer the dry Assam taste over classic builder's brew. Yorkshire tea is also good and I'll have to give the hard water blend a try next time I can pick some up. The water here next to the Rhine is hard as fuck: great for beer, shit for tea, filter is essential and you have to stop the Jormans giving you luke warm water with a teabag and condensed milk.

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Nokia Lumia 925: The best Windows Phone yet

Charlie Clark
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Nail on head

Even though we know Mr O. loves these phones he identifies the two problems facing Nokia: it's confusing the market with too many "flagships". Samsung can afford the spraygun approach, Nokia can't. It should be adopting a very clear Apple-like approach: entry level, last year's and extremely desirable. But at the end of the day there is only so much Nokia can do: if Microsoft doesn't pull its finger out and update the OS then the fleet is sunk. And, even if Microsoft does come up with the goods, who's to say that Windows Phone 8.5 (presumably to avoid confusion with the x86 only version of Windows 8.1) will run on all the current hardware.

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Charlie Clark
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Re: At sea, things move slowly...

Yes, ships do tend to sink pretty damn fast.

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Wake up, Uncle Fester! Huawei’s nattering about BUYING Nokia

Charlie Clark
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No legal ban possible

Nokia's in the EU and it is not possible to ban foreign takeovers the way they are done in the US. That said some kind of joint venture is more likely than an outright takeover. At the moment it's all just posturing and rumours from Wall Streeters hoping for fat commissions.

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Charlie Clark
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Re: @ Mikel - Nokia's value is impaired

Nokia's patent portfolio has come up in some recent spats and doesn't look as compelling as it once was, especially as we move towards LTE. Obviously, there is still a lot there but much of the useful stuff is already FRAND so trying to hold the competition to ransom is not really an option as many recent court cases have illustrated.

The maps business is still worth something and they obviously still have some great product designers and engineers.

Markets are all a bit frothy at the moment due to the money printing (credit is cheap) and financial repression (bonds have negative real returns). All told Nokia should be worth more than Skype but could find itself bought for around the same price especially if cash is in involved. Definitely make or break year for Nokia.

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Huawei muses on Nokia's future

Charlie Clark
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Re: Apple will buy Nokia first...

Apple doesn't have much of a record for this kind of acquisition: buying a large company, stripping out the IP and selling or closing the rest. You don't need engineers for that but lots and lots of beancounters.

Other manufacturers would never let Apple go it alone. Much more likely for a joint bid, presumably led by Microsoft who we can assume to have already assured itself with preferential rights, with the IP going to a patent pool as happened with Nortel.

If we're lucky Microsoft will get in a bidding war with itself again like it did with Skype.

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Charlie Clark
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Seeing as the vast majority of handsets are made in China by contract manufacturers your fears are misplaced. Anyway the spooks want, and get, backdoors in the networks so they can listen in on everyone. The reason why the US is worried is that Huawei is probably not prepared to give them access to the backdoors in its equipment.

For a large Chinese company Huawei is reasonably well run with established centres of development outside of China. ZTE on the other hand is still largely controlled by the army.

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Nvidia stretches CUDA coding to ARM chips

Charlie Clark
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For the HCC crowd it doesn't really matter as they buy, build or have built whatever hardware best suits their requirements at the time. Both CUDA and OpenCL have increased their options in this.

Academics with the necessary skills will no doubt continue to push for architecture neutral systems. I think nVidia understands this which is why they will be pushing chip + compiler, using the added value to promote their products in a commodified market which will at some point no doubt include clusters of AMD and nVidia based chips tuned for different tasks.

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Charlie Clark
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Re: Why don't they...

Why? because it's inefficient. Many use cases don't need FLOPs which is one of the reasons why ARM chips are so small and popular.

nVidia isn't building systems so it doesn't do any BIOS. Not sure what you mean by a "nice operating system". Choice is all that matters.

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Soylent days and soylent nights

Charlie Clark
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Re: Feet, stones, pounds...

Indeed: how do elephants fare with this muck?

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Charlie Clark
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No one cares

Of all the pseudo-science projects you could get involved with this is both the least interesting and the least amusing.

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Foreign keys, JavaScript support on deck for MySQL Cluster update

Charlie Clark
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Foreign key support is also available whether the application accesses the database via SQL or …

There really shouldn't be any qualifications there and this shouldn't really be news: enforcing relational integrity is a sine qua non for relational databases.

Apart from that, even as someone who likes neither MySQL nor Oracle, it is good to see these improvements. Of course, you can also see the way the path is being paved for users of a reasonable RDBMS to get to high margin products such as Oracle or support contracts.

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Microsoft lures buy-curious vixens, corduroys with a cheap fondle

Charlie Clark
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Re: Does this heavy discounting

Shall we start taking bets on whether RT will get Windows 8.1? and whether this is what will be used to enforce obsolescence?

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Charlie Clark
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Happy

Re: same old routine

Looks like he's been well and truly trout-slapped. Oh well, maybe he should get on his pike.

We'd better close this thread before Andy Zaltzmann gets any ideas! ;-)

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Samsung plans LTE Advanced version of Galaxy S4

Charlie Clark
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Those well-known marketmakers

Goldman Sachs, Morgan Stanley and JP Morgan wouldn't be involved in proprietary trading again, would they?

We should soon have some firmer figures about sales from iSuppli, Canalys, etc. It wouldn't surprise me if the very high end of the market is starting to cool: smartphones are becoming standard so the novelty is starting to wear off and you can get pretty good devices contract-free for well under € 250 (ie. around € 10 per month on a two year contract) even if Mr Orlowski considers them landfill. For me, I reckon the XCover 2 looks good for bike tours with SD card and separate camera button. I've already got a Galaxy 8.9 so I don't need a high end phone.

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AMD lifts the veil on Opteron, ARM chip plans for 2014

Charlie Clark
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Re: Good to hear

Some interesting points - I agree with Bronek that it's Microsoft who has to come to the ARM party and not the other way round - Warsaw sounds like a good option for Exchange servers for the immediate future. Windows Server 2012 can't be expected to be done for a new architecture anyway, so nothing before end of next year. By then MS will probably have a new CEO and may seriously be thinking about rejigging its infrastructure to suit the market. Who knows.

AMD's coming to the party brings 64-bit, hypervisor and Open-CL experience which will make a big difference if ARM gains traction. The key point is that things like OpenCompute are all about commodification and price and interoperability over absolute performance. AMD becomes and added value reseller of ARM cores, chips largely comparable to mid-range Intel but at a tenth or less of the price.

Apple isn't really interested in high performance - it wants just enough performance and endurance on consumer devices to keep the creatives loyal and dumb servers in its data centres for storing and mining their data.

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Charlie Clark
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What Intel doesn't want to hear

It takes the process of making a CPU down from three and a half years and $350m and $400m down to 18 months and $30m

He's not wrong on that. Kudos to AMD to understanding just how commodified the market is becoming. On the face of it the Warsaw, Berlin, Seattle models seem to have something for everyone.

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Samsung Galaxy Note 8: Proof the pen is mightier?

Charlie Clark
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Yeah someone like you - not like most people…

Are you Eadon's cousin by any chance?

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Bjarne Again: Hallelujah for C++

Charlie Clark
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Re: Yapping, baying, and mixing in without barbed wire interfaces

Don't know who voted you down without an explanation. It seems that inheritance is much misunderstood. I could add "like so much in programming".

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Charlie Clark
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Multiple inheritance

Are there readers out there who own great farms of mixin classes, yapping and baying from within their barbed wire enclosures?

Multiple inheritance is reasonably common and painless in Python and gets used where it's appropriate. I'm personally not a great fan of "mixins", which I would define as classes that have no standalone instances, per se but they have their uses. At the end of the day you have to be able to understand your object hierarchy and delegation patterns in order to be able to debug it. And if you can remember that you might be debugging somebody else's code then you might be tempted to write more verbose but clearer code, including class genealogy.

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Red Hat to ditch MySQL for MariaDB in RHEL 7

Charlie Clark
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Re: Long overdue.

The entire point of RH Linux is stability.

Don't confuse stasis for stability. The entire point of RH Linux is reassurance: "don't worry if software X is no longer supported by the developers, we will continue to look after it for you…" . RedHat is like the Microsoft of Linux by promising extremely long support cycles for its software. While this doesn't work for me (I prefer the BSD approach of a stable OS and software ports) it obviously does work for a lot of CIOs. Long term the approach is similar to other vendors: dependency by deskilling.

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Charlie Clark
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Re: One unique feature

Thanks for the info, I didn't know about it. I'm sure you'll agree it's not a terribly common requirement and not the sort of thing that beginners should be confronted with, unless they pick it up as a practice and start designing for it!

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Charlie Clark
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Re: PostgreSQL

It depends what you want it for. Perhaps RI isn't important because its used as a content cache.

Sure, but then it isn't a relational database but a datastore that supports SQL.

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Charlie Clark
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Three-way split

There really isn't much to see here: RHEL is a commercial offering with companies apparently happy to pay RedHat to support software versions ad infinitum; Oracle is pushing ahead with improvements to MySQL (5.6 really does look to be getting quite usable) and happy to favour paying customers over "freeloaders". Both are pursuing vertical integration strategies.

Postgres is filling the niche of a full-fledged RDBMS with no strings attached, with commercial support for those who want it: Enterprise DB has a nice model for companies wanting to get off Oracle and 2nd Quadrant has just announced "platinum" support.

I must admit I've never really understood the value proposition of MyASM beyond its apparent ubiquity and some niche use cases, where speed is valued over integrity at all costs. The ubiquity lowers the barriers to entry for newbies but at the cost of encouraging poor design practices.

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Surprise! Intel smartphone trounces ARM in power trials

Charlie Clark
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Re: W = V x I

Don't forget to add time to that. Even knowing the power draw is of limited value if you don't know how long the processor is doing anything. Spinning up and spinning down are important, too.

I'm sceptical about these results. AFAIK x86 beats the pants off ARM for rendering web pages but itself is soundly whipped when the GPU gets involved, as on the I-Phone. This is why the SoC with the right silicon for the right task is so important and why big.Little will only start to make sense when the compiler and scheduler have had a few generations to get it right. Intel does not do the heterogeneous computing environment of modern mobile devices anything like as well as ARM or even AMD.

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Report: Cloud could slash biz software energy use by 87%

Charlie Clark
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FAIL

Re: Energy savings directly proportional to an efficient OS kernel - e.g. Linux

Linux code is so tight it is 4x more efficient than Windows corporate bloatware. Windows is intrinsically slow due to bloated Win 32 and crap like COM and .NET and "undocumented" API's

Eadon, stop spouting shit you know so obviously know nothing about.

I'm not sure what you think you mean by "tight" code but, with relation to performance, code density refers to the machine code that runs on the processor and is dependent upon the instruction set of the processor and the compiler. Windows MFC was a bag of shit but If COM didn't exist, programmers would invent it and indeed they have, several times, for un*x. Same goes for .NET - used properly it makes everyone's life easier or do you think that application programmers should go back to the days of writing their own video and printer drivers? And undocumented APIs don't bloat anything, they just make life as a developer harder.

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Nokia, Microsoft put on brave face as Lumia 925s parachute into Blighty

Charlie Clark
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Re: Obligatory

They still do make good handsets - this looks great and ticks all the boxes except for the OS.

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Charlie Clark
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Looks good, sounds great but…

does it have Öffi, The Economist, Podcatcher, Fritz!Fon, etc. for it? (feel free to add to the list). No? Then I'm not interested, Mr Microsoft.

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AMD announces 'world's first commercially available 5GHz CPU'

Charlie Clark
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Just wait until they start to "synergise" after "touching base".

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Charlie Clark
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Re: Def

Post for Mr Bates - from Syrup & Figs, London

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Magpie Apple plunders the competition for cosmetics, as egos run wild

Charlie Clark
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Oh my eyes!

I can see the teenies going for this bubblegum shit but as for the rest of humanity… well, I for one would rather wield a Motorola Indecipherable from the late 90s than one of these.

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Charlie Clark
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Re: Copying

Yes, but who goes around sueing everyone else for their flattery?

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Apple at WWDC: Sleek new iOS, death of the big cats, pint-sized Mac Pro

Charlie Clark
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Re: @Charlie, Innovation?

@Kristian - thanks very much for the additional background information. I haven't looked at the new stuff in any detail but from my first impressions and what you're saying, it sounds like there is a deliberate element of fashion being introduced into the UI - you can imagine cases and themes automatically adjusting. A usability nightmare but I can see the fashionistas lapping it up.

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Cold, dead hands of Steve Jobs slip from iPhones: The Cult of Ive is upon us

Charlie Clark
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Re: Not quite as pointless as I thought.

Good points. Of course, Apple is now playing catch up. By autumn the next version of Android will be out, multiuser support, especially on tablets will be the next multi-tasking. Innovation is something Apple used to do quite well.

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Apache devs: 'We'll ship no OpenOffice before its time'

Charlie Clark
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Re: I just want ONE feature introduced..

On MacOS I use both LibreOffice and I even recently bought Office 2011 for Mac, mainly for testing openpyxl but it's actually much nicer to use on Mac than on Windows. NeoOffice isn't going anywhere fast I reckon.

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Charlie Clark
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Initially I stuck with OpenOffice as LibreOffice did a lot of political flag-waving but they seem to have got their act together now and are concentrating on the code. But I recently switched to LibreOffice after reading one of the OO's devs? comments about not supporting .xlsx. LibreOffice isn't everything but it is out there and being worked on.

Time-based releasing has a lot going for it as long as there is sufficient test coverage.

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Airbus imagines suitcases that find themselves

Charlie Clark
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Re: They would still lose it.

Carry on luggage is definitely something that "budget" airlines are looking to get rid of. The aim is to get everybody used to paying for checking every bag.

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