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* Posts by Charlie Clark

2590 posts • joined 16 Apr 2007

Nokia's PHAB-ULOUS comeback attempt: Huge WinPho 8 mobe rumoured

Charlie Clark
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Re: Nokia Tablet

Android is not Linux. You are comparing apples with moonrocks.

If it's so compact why isn't Windows NT running on my television, my router or my Raspberry Pi? Because the Linux kernel although monolithic, incidentally just like NT since v 4 IIRC, can be stripped down and optimised for a particular hardware configuration. Why is Microsoft still peddling Windows CE for embedded devices if NT is a low memory solution.

Of course, Symbian stomps on both Android and WP when it comes to running a full multi-tasking OS in little memory. As does QNX when it comes to it.

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Charlie Clark
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Re: Same old nonsense from dismissive journos.

It is also quite popular in India and Russia… Yes, the low margin System 40 phones are popular. What aren't selling so well, and this is visible in Nokia's bottom line, are the Lumias.

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Charlie Clark
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Re: Nokia Tablet

And it's miles more secure, responsive and efficient than Android - and works better with low memory amounts...Well over 99% of WP apps and games will work even on the handsets with the smallest amount of RAM....

Oh do fuck off! NT scales no better than any other modern OS, it's not more secure and, as a kernel it uses more memory. Android can use more resources because it can put an app in a VM. This makes the whole system more secure but all systems are open to abuse.

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Charlie Clark
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Re: Nokia Tablet

WP8's GUI probably won't scale to tablet just like Android's didn't initially. I've got so confused by Microsoft's strategy but I think that RT is WP8 for tablets (ARM architecture, all kinds of code and app restrictions).

Can't see Nokia funding a tablet themselves. But the "Surface 2" could be be badged and rebranded as Nokia as MS tries to get away from the tarnished image. In that case expect the OS to get a lick of paint at well and be either WP for tablets or some such, even if it is RT 8.1.

Wait and see, I guess. But it's going to be increasingly hard to catch up with Samsung's UI innovations on large phones / tablets: split screen is probably already patented.

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HP hammered in servers, storage, and PCs in fiscal Q3

Charlie Clark
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Re: HP still makes money...

Yes, but it would have made a lot of more money without those write downs.

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Charlie Clark
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What software sells

I've lost track of what HP bought in the last few years. After the Autonomy write-down we can assume it isn't driving sales, so what is?

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Charlie Clark
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Re: If Dell is making ProLiant machines now, HP is in worse trouble!

Yes, it's a bit of slip, though you could infer from the first sentence that ProLiant = industry standard.

In any case, Dell also isn't making any money from the sales even if it is stealing market share from HP. This is one reason why it is taking itself private. PCs, servers, etc. have reached saturation point which is why there is no money in volume anymore. You have exceptional products, like Apple's, to get any decent margins. I've been looking at some of the newer notebook pondering a move from my MacBook but the cheap ones are all underspecced, particularly the screens and come with Windows 8 (no thank you), the high-end waste their time with touchscreens, and there seems to be no middle ground (good but not touch screen, > 4 GB RAM, light) for € 500. If things don't improve my next machine may well be another Apple.

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Delta Air Lines makes mass Windows Phone 8, Lumia 820 buy

Charlie Clark
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Ancillary sales

The news gets better for Redmond when one considers that its Dynamics ERP software sits behind the in-flight ordering app that will run on the smartmobes.

I suspect that the software is the real $$$$ purchase and the phones are the cheapest that will run with it. Doesn't really matter if it's 1000 or 20000 phones if the software is $ millions. Seeing as you want the GSM/UMTS radios of the devices switched off probably all the time this probably just another example of commodity phone hardware with custom software replacing custom hardware and software.

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Kim Kardashian's bosom pal in bling snatch Instagram unpleasantness

Charlie Clark
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Re: Wow, too bad...

Reminds me of the spate, or at least reported spate of muggings of I-Pods when the white headphones came out.

I'd have held his coat…

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Jolla's first Sailfish phone preorders 'fully booked'

Charlie Clark
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Re: Nokia submarines

If there is a hardware bootlock then removing it is illegal in many countries. Another thing we have to thank the DMCA for.

OTOH who's likely to find out? Unless you send it back for repair? Where they're just likely to tell you the guarantee is void.

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Battery-free e-ink screen grabs screenshots from smartphones

Charlie Clark
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Agreed the screenshot is just to demonstrate effectively random content. The principle will be of great use where you want autonomous devices with securely updatable display information.

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Barnes & Noble booked for running out of £29 Nooks

Charlie Clark
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Re: Surely Fire Sales Are Always Limited?

The rules for promoting sales are well-known to all retailers. It's consumer protection to prevent customers being hoodwinked by incredible bargains only to be told that "they have all sold out, but we do have XYZ", with XYZ being a different product that is not discounted.

However, this is more a matter for trading standards than the ASA. Quick word with them or threaten small claims usually does the trick.

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Green German gov battles to keep fossil powerplants running

Charlie Clark
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This "the possibility of synthesising transport fuel using renewable power is starting to look cost effective" will be one of the most important discoveries ever. Electricity + CO2 + H2O = O2 + fuel

Currently, it is not cost-effective because all the power produced by renewables can be sold on the market. Once renewables become competitive enough to have to compete then dealing with any surplus (unsold) production becomes economical. This might well start to happen before 2020 because LPG is likely to remain significantly cheaper than petrol.

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Charlie Clark
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Re: nuclear is not an option

@mmeier

A law to prevent the import of electricity generated by whatever means would contravene the Single Market and, therefore, never pass. However, what is increasingly likely is getting consumers to buy from utilities that do not buy, say power from French nuclear plants. This is much the same as labelling food as not being genetically modified.

Of course, there are scandals related to this such as hydro-power generated from water storage pushed uphill by nuclear plants. But, over time, the push-pull effect dumping cheap surplus renewables and refusing to buy surplus nuclear power is likely to have a significant effect on surrounding markets: the build-out of both solar and wind in France in the last couple of years is impressive as EDF realises it has to adapt, it is already buying German solar power in the summer which means it needs to worry less about the problems finding water to cool its nuclear stations.

Now that the row about solar panels has been solved with China we can expect continued expansion especially in the areas suitable for solar South of the river Main. By 2020 we could be looking at regular shutdowns of power stations in the summer months. though we will need more for those cold, dark, calm winter days.

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Charlie Clark
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Re: What I don't understand ..

The initial policy was well-intentioned and reasonably sane (the industry happily signed up to it). It was then sabotaged by the current government pandering to the industry only to have the same government rip the new agreement in a fit of populism months later, which will lead to massive payouts to the energy companies, independent of what kind of energy is produced. There has been a political stand-off about the future which may well not get resolved by the election in September. Whichever way that turns out, nuclear is off the agenda for the life of the current plants and given the time it takes to build new ones that means no new nuclear capacity before 2030 by which time Germany will have had to find another solution anyway.

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Charlie Clark
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The sad situation is that Germany must now import power that is much less green than before.

Yes, but this has been going on ever since energy became tradable across borders. You're also neglecting to say that on sunny, windy days Germany is exporting cheap, clean energy to its neighbours with similar consequences for the conventional fuel plants there.

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Charlie Clark
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Re: Ramp up hydrogen creation

Electrolysis of water and CO2 is currently too expensive to be competitive with gas as gas, but more than competitive with petrol and diesel when sold as LPG because of the difference in tax treatment. Source, in German pp.5 Of course, tax treatment will change quickly if we all start switching to be LPG!

Also, if shale gas takes off in Europe, or even if the Americans get around to exporting it, the calculations will change again. But often, just the existence of other possibilities is enough to drive down prices: such has already been the effect of shale (and Norwegian) gas on long term contracts with Gazprom. These kind of changes are at the core of dispute of the power oligopoly in Germany: new technologies strongly favour smaller, decentralised production but their business models favour large, centralised production. Expect more propaganda from all sides as this rolls on.

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Charlie Clark
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Mushroom

The costs for nuclear plants always leave out the massive subsidies routinely given to the industry and largely ignore the costs of decommissioning and dealing with the waste. Even then they overrun massively and seeing as you cite Finland: how about the clusterfuck of the recent reactor build there?

The current noises coming from RWE, E.ON, et al. are timed to coincide with the German election and also as part of the ongoing fight about lost profits as a result of the current's government decision initially to extend the lifetime of nuclear power only to turn 180° within a year.

Renewable energy is far from a fairy tale; it is simply a requirement in countries without their own energy reserves. German industry is largely being shielded from price increases which are pushing consumers hard. Indeed some German companies are taking advantage of the situation to produce their own energy. German policy will no doubt be reformed after the election but nuclear is not an option. As retroactively adjusting feed-in tariffs would most likely be legal, electricity is going to continue to get more expensive (at € 0.25 / kWH it's already eye-watering) but plenty of adjustments can and will be made. Shale may well become an option in Europe but even without it, the possibility of synthesising transport fuel using renewable power is starting to look cost effective and would be a good way to handle the surplus production on windy, sunny days.

Furthermore, it's worth noting that even with such expensive electricity, inflation in Germany is significantly below that in the UK, where the chances of the lights going out are even higher despite the pro-nuclear lobby.

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Microsoft shoehorns Skype into Outlook.com - we quickly kick the tyres

Charlie Clark
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WebRTC

This looks like an attempt to sabotage WebRTC by keeping chat proprietary.

The use case is just bizarre. OTT communications like Skype work best as standalone apps on mobile devices - why is the call not from the seedy tattoo studio with the guy half-pissed? That is surely closer to reality!

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Microsoft announces execution date for failed QR code-killer

Charlie Clark
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Move along, please. Nothing to see here.

Just a PR stunt of a cartoon (monkey?) boy going under a bus.

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Does Gmail's tarted-up tab makeover bust anti-spam laws?

Charlie Clark
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Re: CAN-SPAM is toothless

Unfortunately, this is on a corporate mail server with Outlook as the client so I have no Bayesian learning filters. E-mails have been reported upstream as spam and, guess what, they still keep coming.

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Charlie Clark
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CAN-SPAM is toothless

I've been receiving e-mail from a US company (Grainger FWIW) for a while. Of course, I've unsubscribed but to no effect.

I read up on what I can do to stop it: the answer, as far as I can tell, is pretty much nothing. CAN-SPAM seems to be largely about running mail servers and little to do with consumer protection. Can't say I'm surprised.

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Peak Apple? HOGWASH! Apple is 'extremely undervalued,' says Icahn

Charlie Clark
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Talking to the board

I guess it's borderline. He is perfectly within his rights to demand more debt (and, therefore taxpayer)-funded share buybacks or anything else and to solicit support from others for this. But to suggest that you have special access to the board or are privy to future plans is naughty. I guess it comes down to interpretation: is here implying influence or are we inferring it? Icahn's no fool and has enough cash to pay lawyers to fight any possible case. Then, unfortunately, there are the facts: Apple is probably slightly undervalued based on the p/e ratio, and, it has more than enough cash in the bank to justify payouts either in the form of tax inefficient dividends (taxed as income) or buybacks (taxed as capital gains).

Apple will have to tread carefully on this. If Icahn can ally himself with another couple of investors he can force the board to consider his proposals officially. Even if a vote on the issue were rejected, the whole process would be highly disruptive as can be seen at Dell.

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Chipzilla Atomises fondleslabs with new reference designs

Charlie Clark
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Re: Biggest issue for Intel

I think having a fully-featured LLVM backend is more work than anyone is so far prepared to do. Of course, Intel has the resources to help make a difference but in doing so it would have to do work that would also benefit other architectures. And, of course, LLVM requires more memory on a device and isn't a win in every situation.

Anyway, for games isn't access to the graphics system more important than CPU? How compatible are Intel's graphics with Mali, et al.?

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Charlie Clark
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Not just power

Atom, a product they've mostly ignored today because its previous incarnations couldn't match ARM-derived rivals for power consumption

To be honest, Atom chips have been pretty close to ARM in power / performance for a while now but they are still significantly more expensive. In a tablet retailing for € 150 - 200 how much is actually available for the processor over say the screen, the radios and storage? And if the target market are developing economies then drop the retail price by € 100, even less budget for Intel's premium silicon.

Things might improve once Intel has SoC's but the competition isn't standing still: both Samsung and Mediatek are sampling 8-core ARM designs and Qualcomm, nVidia and TI can't be far off.

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Leaked photos of iPhone 5C parts portend ugly Google legal battle

Charlie Clark
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More like Mattel

Or whoever made the "Simon" toys with the same colours: coloured buttons that's got to be patentable.

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Waiting for a Windows Phone update? Let's talk again next year

Charlie Clark
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Re: Nokia's Fall from Glory

Just back from a week in blighty and I was surprised by the amount of Nokia ads on the telly. Must be costing a pretty packet. I think they've given up here in Jormany.

Nice kit but doomed.

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Charlie Clark
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Long tradition

Can we assume that, just like WP 7 phones, the current generation won't necessarily benefit from any update when it does come? Assuming things like multitasking are improved the hardware bar is likely to be lifted and some people might just be left holding "landfill Nokias" and wondering why they didn't just go with Android (landfill or not) in the first place.

Not that most people ever really want to update the OS on their telephone and, in a perfect world, they shouldn't really need to. But as this article points out Windows Phone is deficient in a number of areas.

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Microsoft loosens strings on Office 365, drops kimono on upgrade options

Charlie Clark
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Re: NO THANKS

Admittedly, I've not looked at Office 365 but it seems to me extremely ambitious to try and shift such a key component of many people's business software onto NSA sponsored servers. I can imagine companies might buy into their own hosted versions (give them more control and cut out file-servers) except that they won't trust MS to deliver anything usable in the browser if they've had previous experience of something like Sharepoint.

But at the moment I don't think the technology is really there for large scale browser apps that can also save to local file systems.

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Peter Capaldi named as 12th Doctor Who

Charlie Clark
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Good call

Adds some gravitas to the Doctor and gives Capaldi the chance to distance himself from Malcolm Tucker - a role in which he is fucking brilliant, but like all roles ultimately limited.

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Microsoft cuts Surface Pro price by $100

Charlie Clark
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Definitely not like Apple

This might be part of a cunning strategy to differentiate themselves from Apple.

When Apple has had unsuccessful product launches in the past it has just unceremoniously and silently buried them: the last Apple cube. They never discount and that's even without OEMs who might be pissed off by the competition.

By contrast, over the last couple of months Microsoft has managed to tarnish the Surface brand by keeping the RTs in the headlines. Yes, many of us think that they are still overpriced, but that's also because we think they're crippled. The impact on the "Surface" brand is worth a lot more than the write-off of the inventory not least because it can't be handled tax efficiently.

During this time OEMs who were either burned by the RT fiasco or, wisely, decided to sit it out have been launching interesting an competitive Windows 8 devices* at prices with reasonable margins. The market is still confused by Surface RT and Surface Pro and Microsoft comes along and after sticking the fire sale label on RT proceeds to do the same with Pro. This is immediately going to put downward pressure on prices and margins of other devices. Way to go, Microsoft!

* As I have to lug a Windows notebook around between docking stations I am truly interested in anything lighter.

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Charlie Clark
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Re: Firesale - best to wait

Even then it's questionable how useful it is with a locked bootloader.

It's fine for anyone who wants a full-fat Windows machine. There are only a few of us who would just want the hardware and the freedom to install our unix of choice.

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Samsung brings back clamshell phones with added Android

Charlie Clark
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Real keys are great

Physical keys to accept and reject calls, dial numbers, adjust the volume and take pictures, please. It's not that I don't like some of the clever software approaches (swiping contacts to call or speech recognition) it's just that more often than not I'm a just hairless ape with muscle memory. It's like remembering awesome keyboard shortcuts to your editor-of-choice.

Just been roadtesting my XCover 2 on the hottest days of the year: swiping the screen to answer a call whilst on your bike is not particularly practical.

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Nokia sidles up to Qualcomm, hands over bulging map package

Charlie Clark
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New DRS technology?

Is Qualcomm hoping to profit from the recent controversial decisions and peddle marvellous, mechanical technology to the ICC?

"Howzat?"

"No, you mean IZAT!"

Mine's the one with the copy of Wisden one pocket and WG Grace mask in the other - icons currently disabled.

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People really liked our Xperia. Throw in a weak yen and KERCHING - Sony

Charlie Clark
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You should have threatened CPW with Small Claims Court. Within the first six months it is the supplier's duty to demonstrate problems were caused by misuse. This clearly was not the case. Threatening with Small Claims is normally enough for them to cave and provide a replacement. At the end of the day they will get it from Sony for free but they just don't want to do the paperwork.

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So, who here LURVES Windows Phone? Put your hands up, Brits

Charlie Clark
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Good sales in UK and France?

Looks like Orange has been doing a good job then (can't be O2 or Vodafone as the Lumias are virtually invisible here in Germany). Probably still not sufficient volume for Nokia to be really happy but it's a start. Of course, if the majority really are the low margin phones then Nokia is not going to be able to survive, though the ODM actually making the phones might.

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Microsoft Surface sales numbers revealed as SHOCKINGLY HIDEOUS

Charlie Clark
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Re: Too bad

@TeeCee

I'm not sure that's true. Given the money Microsoft was throwing at the project adding some kind of x86 translation hardware à la Transmeta would have been doable. There would, of course, be a big performance hit but real performance isn't that much of an issue for most notebook applications. I used to run Photoshop for PowerPC via Rosetta on my MacBook which wasn't that much more powerful than the PowerPC equivalent. It was slow to start and to do certain effects but the GUI remained responsive and I think that's key for many people.

So, if Microsoft had released something with some form of x86 compatibility, albeit with provisos, and waved the prospect of future native apps or more powerful devices, the story might have been a bit different. I think, however, that one aspect that is not being looked at closely enough is that RT was dead on arrival. Microsoft obviously has significant problems supporting different architectures with their current codebase and an upgrade of the OS was probably not on the cards. Windows Phone owners be warned.

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Intel's homage to Raspberry Pi: The much pricier Minnowboard

Charlie Clark
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Who is this for?

For hobbyists and embedded systems people?

Hobbyists don't need either the power nor the IO of this board and will not pay USD 200 just to have something to tinker with. But not I'm not even sure that the embedded developers would find it an attractive proposition: that heat sink and the rods indicate that it needs quite a bit of clearance and cooling. In fact the whole thing is the size of a Mac Mini which was impressive when it came out, what seven years ago, but has since been successfully copied and improved upon.

That said, I think the real point of this product may be in open sourcing all the hardware design. It can't have been easy to get past some managers and does probably open the doors for similar but less powerful boards costing significantly.

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Intel wants to reconstruct whole data centers with its chips and pipes

Charlie Clark
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Becoming IBM?

All in all this sounds similar to the noises that Microsoft is making: the only way to survive is to become IBM and offering turnkey solutions with some engineering wizardry.

Some of this stuff sounds very nice but the software for it is not going to be easy and I am not convinced that the benefits will outweigh the investments. Current clouds benefit significantly from the low-coupling provided by redundant but cheap hardware. Efficiencies will be gained by having smaller (ie ARM) units. Low coupling also means more independence. Can't help but think that anyone who buys these systems is going to be entirely beholden to Intel.

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SPEARS joins the 19-mile-high club: Intimate snaps

Charlie Clark
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But what happened to…

The second playmonaut, the really brave one stuck on the side of the launch vehicle?

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British boffin muzzled after cracking car codes

Charlie Clark
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Re: A bit of a difference

Yep, though I think the judge is probably using the MPAA inspired legislation to take the correct legal decision. Of course, this kind of discovery cannot be kept under wraps for long but vehicle immobilisation technology has been one of the main factors in the significant reduction in car crime over the last decade.

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Do you really want tech companies to pay more tax?

Charlie Clark
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Re: Dividends?

Apple and Microsoft because they pay reasonable dividends…

Apple only just started paying dividends this year. Hoping that share prices will continue to rise until your retirement age has not been justified by returns the last ten years and current bond yields seem to suggest that it isn't going to happen again soon. We're in a sustained period of low returns.

The article should concentrate on what companies do with the cash piles they generate through tax avoidance. The evidence is that they make poor investments with it: Microsoft buys Skype, aQuantive and produces lots of devices no one wants; Apple buys its own shares using another tax avoidance scheme.

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REVEALED: Hungry termites nibbling at Oracle's foundation

Charlie Clark
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Oh dear

This is a poor piece.

unstructured data Unstructured data is noise. What you probably mean is data with no pre-defined schema.

"NoSQL" leader 10Gen, which stewards the development of MongoDB, said it has moved "over 100 companies off RDBMS technologies in the past six months" according to its business development veep (and former Reg scribe) Matt Asay. Oracle's revenue share of the worldwide RDBMS market was 48.3 percent in 2012, according to the soothsayers at Gartner, so we can safely assume a significant proportion of these 100 migrations came at the expense of legacy Oracle systems.

This is a very flawed conclusion. Moving companies from relational does not in any way imply that they are being moved from Oracle. And, giving the known problems with scaling MongoDB who's to say whether some of these companies won't be knocking on Oracle's (or IBM's or Microsoft's) door in the future.

Oracle's strategy obviously isn't to everyone's taste but it's pretty clear: improve the low end MySQL and offer increasingly expensive options to customers who think they need it and ignore the rest. It's great that this provides opportunities for third parties to pick up custom from those who can't or won't pay Oracle's fees.

The times for really big migrations can be pretty big: I think Enterprise DB talks of six months plus as not uncommon. Obviously, any company faced with that kind of investment is going to think long and hard about it and this is what Oracle is banking upon.

or have developed capabilities that while irrelevant to much of the database market

I'm not sure what those would be. Data integrity, performance and reliability should be on everyone's shopping list.

I'm sure Oracle doesn't really give a shit about the low-level stuff going from MyASM to one of the key-value or document storage engines.

At the end of the day, while licences are important, any company that is storing business critical data needs to spend enough money employing DBAs who know how to manage whichever systems they have. Outages, corruption and loss are what really cost.

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PHWOAR! Huh! What is it good for? Absolutely nothing, Prime Minister

Charlie Clark
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Censorship is wrong

By all means stick advisory labels on things but leave it at that and use good old-fashioned police work to go after the makers of sick flicks.

Censorship imposes a considerable cost (the bureaucracy) and risk (the chance that it will become political censorship) with unclear benefits. I'm sure that official bullshit rhetoric like "the war on terror" cause more problems than anything people "stumble" across on the internet.

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Apple earnings slip, but numbers beat Wall Street estimates

Charlie Clark
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Upgrade cycle versus new carriers

The point regarding the upgrade cycle needs to be tempered by the greater reach into the market through new carriers: I-Phones were not available a year ago on all US networks, they are now.

All in all, however, the figures demonstrate the same trend as other manufacturers have: the market for smartphones is becoming saturated.

Tablets could be more interesting: the market clearly isn't saturated. A breakdown of the various models would cast some light on whether the lower margin I-Pad Minis helping to maintain market share albeit with lower margins. This might indicate how Apple may move in the future: if lower (but still very healthy) margin products are doing well then we can expect something similar for the phones.

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Nokia flops out its 4G, 4.7-inch WHOPPER: The Lumia 625

Charlie Clark
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Looks like another quarter of +30% smartphone growth for Nokia Lumias...

At current sales volumes that's never going to be enough. Anyway, this device is just as likely to cannibalise sales of other Nokias as it is to take sales away from similarly priced but higher-specc'd Android phones.

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SkyDrive on par with C: Drive in Windows 8.1

Charlie Clark
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Re: End game is to completely eliminate local storage of files on device altogether.

To be honest this is exactly what Apple, Amazon, Pandora, Spotify, Google et al. are doing. But they are all very carefully managing the user experience by providing what are essentially glorified backup services. Pandora and Spotify have been testing the water with non-essential data such as music files in a clear value proposition; Apple and Amazon offer to take the work out of synching between devices. The exception would be Google with e-mail and calendar and docs but then it is trying to build these out into an outsourcing offering. But this is all still toes in the water stuff. The regulatory hurdles will go up: what happens to my data if provider X goes bust or gets taken over?

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Charlie Clark
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How not to listen to customers #445

Out cycling on Sunday a friend of mine listed her woes with Windows 8 including the cloud stuff which she found very confusing. I think her notebook is due to go back to the shop with a request to install Windows 7 on it. Adding uncertainty to disorientation is not usually going to win many friends.

Online backup services can be a boon but they must be backup first, as I think Apple is doing things. What could possibly go wrong? Well, you could realise too late that you need a fat internet connection to access stuff you use on a regular basis. More urgently and potentially a killer for Microsoft, in Europe at least, is that the NSA shenanigans could very likely jeopardise the safe harbour agreement between the EU and the USA which allows the data of EU citizens to be stored in American data centres.

The justification for the whole thing that onboard storage can be reduced is also not really that appealing. Storage, even with the move to SSD, is not really the major price point for modern devices. For those with anyone nous they will ensure they have a backup service under their own control, possibly complemented with some online services from their ISP or similar and some freebies stuff à la Dropbox / Google Drive.

Microsoft's strategy here is remarkably similar to that of Bing, Maps and Skype: coming late to the party and spending heavily to try and buy success. This did work with things like hard-disk compression, simple LAN, internet browsers and possibly the X-Box. But since then Microsoft have started amassing white elephants and discouraging their partners.

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Android MasterKey found buried in kiddie cake game on Google Play - report

Charlie Clark
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Re: What about the operator packages?

Another good reason to move to Windows Phone...

Ah, yes. Because if there are no apps, they cannot be infected. Except, of course, for the exploits that successfully target the browser / OS / MS apps.

Tell you what, why don't you move to North Carolina where you can live happily among others happy to deny reality.

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Surface RT: A plan worthy of the South Park Underpants Gnomes

Charlie Clark
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FAIL

Re: So to summarise...

Full USB support

No wonder you keep posting anonymously as this is drivel!

What do you think full USB support is supposed to mean? Because it most certainly does not mean: will support any device that is plugged in. USB defines some mechanical and electronic stuff plus some baseline driver specs (eg. HCI for mice, keyboards, or an equivalent for mass storage) pretty much everything else requires drivers to be written and compiled for the particular OS and why you almost always have to install some software when you connect say a USB TV receiver.

We're very happy for you that you like your Microsoft gear but please stop pretending that you are: a) everyman and; b) know anything technical.

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