* Posts by Charlie Clark

4584 posts • joined 16 Apr 2007

Why you should Vote Remain: Bananas, bathwater and babies

Charlie Clark
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Re: E(USSR)

Which might mean that the blue stealth helicopter with the gold stars is suppressing my free speech, or it might mean that you really need to re-foil your hat.

It's mind control, number 10 and not even a tin-foil hat can protect you!

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Charlie Clark
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Re: "Full disclosure: my startup OpenTRV has received funding from EU sources"

Can we hear from someone who doesn't have a vested interest? That disqualifies you, @Charlie Clark.

Oh? I have more of a vested interest that being a citizen of the United Kingdom? Please tell us more. Even better, picket my local polling station so that I can't vote.

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Charlie Clark
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You are starting to sound a bit deluded

Deluded and blowing smoke? Wow. I wonder what was the stuff you put in your tea? Enough of the ad hominem.

QMV does not apply in most areas and in any case the UK shouldn't find it hard to find allies in the council to veto anything. Thus far it's still not been required to enact legislation that it opposed.

I suppose you already know the EU doesn't actually have a free trade agreement with either the US or China? Switzerland does.

What's that got to do with it? The EU doesn't consider China a market economy. How can you have free trade with someone who doesn't compete freely? Oxymoronic if you ask me. And wasn't Switzerland forced to cede sovereignty to the US when it came to banking secrecy for suspected tax evaders?

That aside the EU trades heavily with China, the US and India (Germany exports far more to all three than the UK) under existing WTO rules, which means few areas are excepted. TTIP is supposed to mean free trade with America but is pretty much dead in the water on both sides of the Atlantic. In Europe because of the secrecy that the Americans demand, in America because an anti-trade Congress don't negotiate, never, no sir, get out the gun boats.

When it comes to who we should improve our trade relations with, I'd much rather the EU started to focus on how a more equitable trade with Africa can benefit both sides: let us please stop dumping surplus agricultural production and thus putting African farmers out business.

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Charlie Clark
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Re: @Custard Fridge: Cracking article

Err no matey, the primary reason for the state of many southern european economies is that the Euro simply does not match their economic requirements

Neither did repeated devaluations.

Greece is a special case, partly due to the massive levels of "creative accounting" by Goldman Sachs effectively defrauded itself into the Euro area. Southern Europe does not suffer from the exchange rate but from low productivity and high public debt.

At the moment all of Southern Europe is being hosed in Northern cash by holding down interest rates. This has meant hundreds of billions in savings for countries like Italy and is supposed to oil the political wheels so that much needed labour market reforms can be introduced which will hopefully help reduce un- and underemployment among the young.

Returning briefly to Greece: the country does provide an object lesson in the illusion of sovereignty. Last year the government ran a referendum against the offer from its creditors. It won the referendum but sill had no choice but to accept the offer from its creditors. This was a humiliating and unnecessary climbdown from an untenable, maximum position.

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Charlie Clark
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ooh, someone has coined a new term for us to project all our hate on! How clever of them.

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Charlie Clark
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Because we tried that…

We didn't. Call-me-Dave found he was in a spot because of a stupid manifesto promise he decided he'd have to keep (the manifesto is normally ceremonially burnt on the night of the election) and asked the other member states what they could give him quickly. Quickly meant no treaty change, so nothing substantial could be offered. Even then, there must have been some impressive arm-twisting to come up with what they did.

But for the previous 5 years the UK government had plenty of chances to push for reform. Instead it chose to isolate itself such as when it came to the Euro area fudge.

Leaving means having to renegotiate from the start most of the deals we already have with our major trading partners. Except that the UK won't have the right of veto any more. It's a bit like voting to leave the UN but expecting to keep a seat on the Security Council. Well, it's worth a try, I suppose.

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Charlie Clark
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Nicely put

It remains awfully convenient for domestic politicians to blame “Europe”

So true. Elsewhere you can substitute "Westminster" or "Washington" for the thing to blame.

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CloudFlare apologizes for Telia screwing you over

Charlie Clark
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Re: about Cloudflare

Not seen one of those for or a CAPTCHA for the Register but I have had my ip range blocked by other sites in the past, because other machines on the range were serving DDoS attacks. It happens. Who knows, maybe some kind of DDoS attack or similar (attacks on carriers are not unknown) was associated with this outage?

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Charlie Clark
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Re: about Cloudflare

What?

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Charlie Clark
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We've become so used to good service that we often fail to appreciate how much has to go right for things like the internet to work. The internet is designed to cope with having to reroute traffic but at the cost of latency.

And as the internet becomes more important to us, it also becomes a bigger risk. What this article doesn't say is that carrier failure is a fairly common (not not everyday) occurrence, however brief, in many parts of the world. Prioritising reliable Tier 1 providers is actually one way to mitigate this but even they can have their problems. I've yet to see a CDN that doesn't have the occasional wobble in one part of the world. As with all failures, when it happens good communication is key. Along with working out exactly what went wrong and whether you can prevent that happening again. The question is then: is Cloudflare's and Telia's analysis plausible and do their proposed changes sound reasonable? Or is this more like TalkTalk's crisis management?

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Three non-obvious reasons to Vote Leave on the 23rd

Charlie Clark
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Re: Remember Social Solidarity

employ minimum wage labour

And just how long do we expect the minimum wage to survive in a Bojo-Gove-Nige coalition?

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Charlie Clark
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Inside the EU, the laws being passed are proposed by un-elected commissioners

This is a gross misrepresentation.

All EU laws require the support of the member states through the body known both as the Council of Ministers and the European Council. There are now some areas where a majority vote (of member states) can lead to new laws but the UK has opt-outs for most of these.

The facts are, as Ken Clarke has pointed out, no British government has ever been forced to adopt legislation that it opposed in the Council of Ministers.

Facts, hey, who needs 'em?

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Charlie Clark
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Re: So where is the post to balance this out?

It's the battered partner's worst fear.

So, you're now stooping to comparing international agreements with domestic abuse? 'Nuff said.

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Supercomputers in 2030: Lots of exaflops and LOTS of DRAM

Charlie Clark
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Your crystal ball is cloudy

Both Intel and Micron are heavily invested in a DRAM world and it's clouding their ideas.

As systems get larger the power draw directly attributable to DRAM gets more important and should encourage research into less power hungry alternatives. It's not my field but I can imagine that people might start mulling over alternatives like a 2 ExaFlops DRAM system drawing 100 MW versus a 1.5 ExaFlops xRAM system drawing 10 MW and opting for the slower but cooler and cheaper to run system. MRAM looks good but Flash is also getting faster and faster.

Time to throw some dollars at that kind of research rather than yet another Silicon Valley service of minimal utility.

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Brexit: More cash for mobile operators or consumers? Pick one

Charlie Clark
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Re: Predatory pricing

But how much of the charge paid by the customer is the actual roaming charge, and how much is the customer's network's margin

It used to be over 50% went to the host network. The EU found evidence of collusion between networks to continue fleecing customers which is what led to the caps on roaming charges. I remember being in a room in 2000 when Fritz Joussen, then recently appointed head of Mannesmann D2, boasted about cutting roaming off to various Spanish networks in order to renegotiate terms so that it could get a bigger slice of the action, not for lower roaming charges.

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Charlie Clark
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Re: Scaremongering

Didnt I read Iceland has organised trade with China too? They completed theirs while the EU takes much longer and is much slower. I am sure a report on the EU trade deals showed it had zero improvement over what we could achieve for us but takes longer.

I don't know what you read but your argument entirely speculative and completely ignores the fact that the EU effectively backstopped Iceland and prevented bankruptcy, which would have been brought on by, amongst other things, the UK invoking anti-terror legislation to sequester Icelandic assets after the much-vaunted light-touch regulation of IceSave, etc, when so horribly wrong. EU membership is also likely to go back onto the Icelandic political agenda. I'd welcome it, it might help us sort out the CFP.

Want a quick trade deal with China? Then agree to their terms. The EU has yet to recognise that China has a market economy which is a pre-condition for any kind of deal.

I find it offensive that you claim that the EU started a war in Ukraine. When did they deploy troops? Russia was in clear breach of international law when it invaded Ukraine. Russia simply didn't like a more or less democratic government in Ukraine signing any kind of agreement with the EU but this was a) not an act of aggression and b) not illegal.

The EU writes laws about the shape of a banana.

Nope: no laws about bananas were ever written but still a tabloid favourite. However, in a sop to France, the EU does give preferential treatment to bananas from the DOM TOM but I think there are similar agreements for some of the British overseas territories.

When I talk about workers' rights I am referring to those conferred by EU legislation. Nothing to do with the ECHR. which the UK held set up. Which is why, of course, the UK thinks it doesn't need to comply with ECHR judgements.

And with the EU dictating what is an extreme party

I must have missed that. Have Jobbik, UKIP, Golden Dawn, Front National, True Finns, the Swedish Democrats, öFP, get banned from the European parliament? No. As a matter of fact, the German Constitutional Court said that the 5 % hurdle, designed to prevent extremism, did not apply for European elections.

The trade area also favours buying from within the trade area but locks out developing countries which need the trade to help their poor and lower our prices.This is a tautology.

We have long passed the recession in this country…

Under what definition? AFAIK real wages in the UK have remained stagnant.

But how can we tell the EU to do this, it is a huge lumbering Goliath but it controls these things.

If you're a member of the EU you don't try and tell it what to do. You have lots of opportunities to initiate legislation and find allies to push it through (the UK was very active in the expansion to 25 member states, including the freedom of movement of Labour). But as long as the UK stands on its own in the corner, it's not going to change anything.

Basically, you have made up your mind and are pulling "facts" from thin air to support it. I think all your points can be easily refuted but I also know that it doesn't matter what I say, I wouldn't be able to convince you because you've made your mind up.. You know what: that's fine. In a democracy you get to vote for whatever you want but stop pretending that you're open to argument.

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Charlie Clark
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Re: Scaremongering

Well, the lack of snappy soundbite arguments is one of the reasons why a referendum on EU membership is such a terrible idea. There are many things to like about the EU and a lot to dislike.

What do I like? Well, as I personally benefit from the freedom of labour then I'm all for it. But this shouldn't be taken in isolation. The ability for skilled (unskilled) labour to move around the single market allows companies to specialise (this is where the City of London profits so much). It also allows seasonal workers to work the harvests which means cheaper fruit and veg. Are there problems? Too, right there have: Germany's failure to apply the relevant legislation has led to wage-dumping in things like the meat industry which indirectly contributes to migration from west Africa. The law has been changed so people are being paid more but as long as the Germans demand very cheap meat…

My main reason for the EU is the hope that by trading and working together we're less likely to have wars with each other. Virtually everyone I know has stories of loss in the second world war and European history is replete with such senseless conflicts. We've now managed 60 odd years without one, which is impressive given our history. Wars are also such utter wastes of resources. Instead we've created CERN and ESA and many other fantastic projects. Our children now have opportunities that couldn't have been dreamt of 20 years ago. Note, Switzerland is already being frozen out of the next round of research project because of the threat of breach of contract.

The European Commission is at its most impressive when it is enforcing the single market and removing artificial barriers to trade such as subsidies to car makers and airlines. It is also powerful enough to negotiate with other countries like the US and China in matters of trade, as has been the case of airplanes or LCD screens or currently steel: the British government alone is pretty much powerless against the dumping of steel by the Chinese.

But there are also things I don't like such as the Common Agricultural Policy and the Common Fisheries Policy. Both these are vestigial policies of the origin of the EC and are effectively ways for governments to subsidise particular industries. Not that I am against making sure that farmers and fishermen can earn a living. But the subsidies should be vastly reduced and repatriated so that they benefit large farmers and landowners less. When it comes to fishing: we should ask for advice from Iceland which has managed to create a healthy fishery that turns a profit (Europe has lots of poor fishermen and not enough fish).

I also like the improved workers rights that the EU has given us. Although it's actually health and safety, the working time directive means it is far less likely that people like doctors and lorry drivers are working beyond the point of exhaustion.

There should be changes in the bureaucracy: we don't need one commissioner for every member state; the European Council gets too involved in micromanaging policy; the European Parliament needs something it can get its teeth into it. But to get any changes done we have to have a seat at the table amongst friends. If the UK leaves the EU it doesn't get to shape any of the discussions and how the EU should be changed.

The playground game theory advanced by some is sadly misguided. Yes, sometimes you can get more by refusing to budge. But, in general, it means you get less of what you want, especially when dealing with the more powerful. Should the UK decide to leave the EU it won't be able to set the agenda. With national elections next year in both France and Germany, national politics and positions are for more likely to occupy people along with Russian aggression and the slow and bloody decline of Syria, Libya and elsewhere.

Will any of this have impressed you? I doubt it very much. But, whatever happens, come Thursday this insane campaign will be over and we can look to moving on the next one.

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Charlie Clark
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Re: Scaremongering

Cameron has already said he wont and has advocated Turkey joining at one point. Maybe someone else will veto, I dunno.

Bojo is on record (2012) as supporting Turkey joining the EU. He's the one with Turkish relatives, after all.

But let's face it: you're just here to troll not discuss.

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Charlie Clark
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WTF?

Predatory pricing

In the absence of relevant regulation would [insert cartel here] indulge in predatory pricing? Surely not. Phone companies, banks, utilities are amongst the most philanthropic institutions out there.

Not only is this article entirely speculative but it is also badly so. Roaming charges are paid to the host network and the UK is not a net recipient. If they were to be reintroduced for UK citizens visiting the EU in 2019 then it would be the host networks that would stand to profit. UK operators could only really expect to profit by charging more for calls to the EU. Though, as companies like Three and T-Mobile have already shown: lower international prices can be a good way to gain market share at minimal cost.

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Fujitsu picks 64-bit ARM for Japan's monster 1,000-PFLOPS super

Charlie Clark
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Re: This is why AMD and NVidia are making ARM chips

I don't know the future. But I do know ARM will continue to encroach on Intel's territory.

While I agree with this generally I don't think this announcement has much to do with that. It's more like a nail in the coffin of the Sparc. Of course, depending on how well the build goes, we may well see other HPC setups trying ARM out. But, then again cost / core, where ARM has an undoubted advantage, is much less relevant than in the data centre.

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TalkTalk CEO Dido Harding pockets £2.8m

Charlie Clark
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Re: Revolting shareholders...

And nothing ever changes, until a single large shareholder with an agenda comes along, which requires several billions in clout.

And even then it usually only leads to something like share buyback schemes which benefit large fund managers immediately. There have been several attempts in the US to improve governance and curb executive pay but none of them have been successful.

Even the almighty VW clusterfuck hasn't led to executive bonuses being touched.

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BOFH: Follow the paper trail

Charlie Clark
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Ah, the myth of the rational person

If only we were more prepared to admit how good we are at manipulating ourselves for other people's benefits…

Yes, I think you're right: a year's subscription to your shady scanning software is just what we need and what a fantastic blouse you're wearing!

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Safari 10 dumps Flash, Java, Silverlight, QuickTime in the trash

Charlie Clark
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Re: That is all well and good but...

Something to do with OSX Safari not supporting AVC3, and HLS not allowing the full iPlayer functionality. Mac users can use Opera 32 instead to access BBC HTML 5 content, though (and I'm no expert) it would seem more sensible if Apple could tweak Safari.

Seeing as Safari on the I-Pad and I-Phone already work fine without Flash, I reckon that by the autumn the BBC and others will have switched to running whichever DRM system Apple chooses to work with: you don't think you're going to be able to save any of that HTML 5 video, do you? This might also explain the EOL for older Macs which presumably don't have the necessary hardware.

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Lester Haines: RIP

Charlie Clark
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RIP

Lester's articles really embodied the spirit of The Register and helped to make it not just another IT news website. It was the sort of clever nonsense that even us skinflints would consider paying for.

My thoughts are with his family, friends and colleagues.

Not that this is in any comfort to the family but we need some kind of scholarship to fund research that can demonstrate that bacon and beer had nothing to do with it (I think this is probably the case at 55). Lester himself was a pioneer in this area!

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Xerox lays out BPO breakup plan

Charlie Clark
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Re: The trouble is ...

I think your detector of limey irony is faulty.

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Charlie Clark
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Re: So mergers are out, splits are in

Actually the current trend is merge and demerge as exemplified by the Dow and Dupont deal but also with Dell and EMC. This is the most tax efficient way of reducing competition in the relevant sectors: less competition means higher profits.

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Charlie Clark
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Re: The trouble is ...

@boltar

Not so sure about that. I think Lou Gerstner did pretty well with IBM. Good bosses are generally good in whichever domain they work in because they work out which people to listen to.

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The Microsoft-LinkedIn hookup will be the END of DAYS, I tell you

Charlie Clark
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Meanwhile, elsewhere the sky fails to fall in

Other commentators seem to think that LinkedIn needs to merge at least as much as Microsoft with sites like glassdoor (no idea what it's like because I've never used it) becoming more and more popular for recruitment. Microsoft has yet to demonstrate that they can handle such an acquisition without completely bungling it.

For techies I think things like StackOverflow and GitHub could become more relevant. LinkedIn's endorsement and skills stuff just doesn't cut it but the connection metadata is useful, though the idea of being able to live solely from the network effect is starting to be debunked.

As with most recent deals, existing shareholders stand to benefit most from the debt-financed deal with income taxpayers standing to lose out. Sigh.

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Apple WWDC: OS X is dead, long live macOS

Charlie Clark
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I don't think I've ever not called it MacOS and I'm going to stick with it. I seem to remember them dropping that soubriquet a few years ago and nobody cared.

Wonder how long they'll try and force through the small letters: macOs, tvOs, watchOS only make sense in the echo chamber of the nonventor* strategy boutique.

Note to "journalists": there is no need to try and ape branding when writing copy; branding is always a combination of typeface and style and usually with requirements not to use the style in copy but to assert the trademark.

*I'm sure I've seen this before but just in case I'm claiming it as my commentmark™

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Charlie Clark
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Re: If just I could have 10.6 back

10.6.0 was a dog. I don't think they fixed some of the most serious bugs until 10.6.2 but it was then, indeed, pretty stable.

Mind you, I'd have to say that all of the subsequent releases have been stable: I've probably had about 10 system crashes in 10 years. But it's the random stupid bugs (Bluetooth, USB, graphics, etc.) in each new release that are so annoying.

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Google doesn’t care who makes Android phones. Or who it pisses off

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PC market sinking even faster than first thought, thanks to Windows 10

Charlie Clark
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False premise

Windows 10 isn't helping matters either, because lots of people are availing themselves of free Windows 10 upgrades rather than buying a new PC

This suggests that sales should pick up once Microsoft ends its magical upgrade offer. If so, why are sales projected to decline even more?

Consumers have PCs that are good enough and do more and more stuff on their phones. Businesses are happy with Windows 7 and are busy moving towards "thin" clients and BYOD. Microsoft has also realised that it might make more money from Office 365 and Azure than from supporting the PC renewal cycle, though it has also done a deal with Intel over the support for newer chips.

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Get ready for Google's proprietary Android. It's coming – analyst

Charlie Clark
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Re: Why devs choose Android

According to Goldman Sachs, as of last year 75% of Google's mobile search ad revenue came from iOS, less than 25% coming from Android!

While I don't have access to any figures I must say that claim looks a bit suspect. I don't have any skin in the game so I don't really care either way. I was just reporting the gist of several articles I've read.

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Charlie Clark
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Re: Why devs choose Android

I suspect most of them still write apps for iOS first, since that's still where the money is.

Only for paid apps – there are other business models where the size of the Android market matters more. Indeed I've seen several articles including here on The Register that suggest that the Golden Age of the paid for app is over. Sure, there are those still making a lot of money but it is getting harder and harder to break into the market because there already is at least one app for everything.

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Charlie Clark
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It's a very tinfoil hat argument. One of the main reasons that Google uses so much open source stuff is that it means it has to do very little customer support. Going proprietary would change that completely and would open Google to new legal challenges such as monopoly which could lead to Google being forced to choose between Play services and other stuff. It can conveniently sidestep such challenges at the moment by rightly pointing out the choices for manufacturers and users.

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Microsoft has created its own FreeBSD image. Repeat. Microsoft has created its own FreeBSD image

Charlie Clark
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Re: Just another good example...

How are they going to close FreeBSD up if the licence is more permissive than GPL?

Who should want to close it up? FreeBSD? Microsoft? Can't see it appealing to either. The permissive licence allows MS employees to work on the code without a lawyer present as is unfortunately the case with GPL code which counts as "tainted".

Microsoft has supplied source patches for running FreeBSD on Azure and they've been accepted. It's akin to providing hardware drivers. Really a case of "move along please, nothing to see".

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Capitalize 'Internet'? AP says no – Vint Cerf says yes

Charlie Clark
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Re: Very simple

So why not capitalise the 'I' when referring to the big Internet which spans the globe.

Because it is only notional and virtual?

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Charlie Clark
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Re: Very simple

An "internet" is multiple networks linked together by routers.

The "Internet" is the global public network.

But the "Internet" is made up of all the internets, which makes it an internet itself.

It is very, very difficult to enforce prescriptive language use. General usage tends to follow conventions and the current one (from some time in the 19th Century) is not to capitalise generics. So, we generally write the sun, the sea and the earth but will capitalise them at will when we feel a need to emphasise or differentiate.

Split infinitives, sentences that end with prepositions are perfectly correct grammatically but that doesn't stop people saying this isn't the case. Add proper nouns that are lowercased to the list. Fighting against this is like commanding the sea. But whatever floats your boat.

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Q: Is it wrong to dress as a crusader for an England match?

Charlie Clark
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Does an England match have to be football?

I'm sure crusaders are a regular appearance at cricket matches. I believe the Headingly Test Match saw Mexicans, Trumps, foxes and hunters. A crusader would hardly raise an eye brow.

As for the England football team: when they stop playing predictable crap then I might get round to wishing them well again. In the meantime I'll leave it to the ABU hordes* who don't follow a local team and are such an embarrassment at the international tournaments. Anyway, at the ground, they might be forced to change because the crusader garb offends one of the sponsors, as happened to Dutch supporters wearing Lederhosen in Stuttgart in 2006.

*I'm sure there is the odd long-suffering faithful among them, but well, you probably know the arseholes better than anyone.

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Charlie Clark
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Re: Could be worse...

Yeah, but I think he wanted to take a live one.

What's wrong with that? How about a goat? Long established tradition in Cologne

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Why Oracle will win its Java copyright case – and why you'll be glad when it does

Charlie Clark
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Re: Multiple points

Open source software is also about NOT HAVING IT STOLEN.

No it isn't: ideas don't get stolen, they get shared.

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Charlie Clark
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Re: Multiple points

Having said all this, AO's article has a fair point that GPL and free software needs strong IP laws

Agree with you on the rest but not on this. The GPL is becoming less and less relevant because the FSF is fighting yesterday's battles.

Open source software is about co-operation not copyright.

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Charlie Clark
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It is fair use. And a court just ruled it so after an exhaustive case. Oracle has the right to appeal but it's an uphill battle. And long term Oracle loses anyway because Android is moving away from Java.

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Charlie Clark
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Re: According to Mr. Orlowski

Well, SAP tends to think you do, But then again, between them SAP and Oracle have pretty much carved up the enterprise software market between them. Did anyone mention cartel?

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Kraftwerk versus a cheesy copycat: How did the copycat win?

Charlie Clark
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Re: What the court did examine, though, ...

Yes, the whole genre of "derivative works" from Marcel Duchamps to Warhol and Joseph Beuys has already been canonised and legally validated.

I was actually very surprised to see the case make its way to the Constitutional Court but I guess it makes a change from the political suits and the Court does get to choose which suits it hears.

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Microsoft sells 1,500 patents to Chinese mega-phone biz Xiaomi

Charlie Clark
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Xiaomi is one of the fastest-growing smartphone manufacturers in the world

Not any more it isn't. Maybe the deal will help it expand outside of China.

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Google is the EU Remain campaign's secret weapon

Charlie Clark
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Re: Fixit

Should not Google include some sort of damping to the google rank system…

Worth pointing out that Google is not a public utility but a private search and advertising company. As such it is largely able to do what the fuck it wants with search results. As long as it is not favouring its own products over competitors…

PS. Yahoo uses Bing

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BBC's micro:bit retail shipments near

Charlie Clark
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Re: It's rubbish

The ecosystem for the micro:bit is getting there

True but the hardware could do with a bit more RAM, say 32 kB, and maybe a WiFi radio.

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Cavium arms ARM bodies for fresh data centre compute charge

Charlie Clark
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Go

Just the ticket

for the network data centre. That is some serious throughput for anything where the CPU isn't the bottleneck, and this is a lot of applications.

I was told a few years ago that a lot of the ARM chips would go straight from 28nm to 14nm and this looks like being the case. Now with the emergence of standard server API for ARM chips I can see demand for this kind of chip.

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$10bn Oracle v Google copyright jury verdict: Google wins, Java APIs in Android are Fair Use

Charlie Clark
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Re: The saga goes on

Of course Oracle will appeal but Google does not have to do anything while they appeal. And the case has been extensive and the verdict unanimous, highly unlikely that the appeals will be successful.

In the meantime Google will continue to move away from Dalvik/Java towards native. Not sure whether the case played a role in that decision, but it is part of making Java less relevant to new developers. If Oracle had played this differently they could have made Java, or a particular flavour of it, a key component of Android.

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