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* Posts by C. P. Cosgrove

135 posts • joined 28 May 2008

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FBI boss: Apple's iPhone, iPad encryption puts people 'ABOVE THE LAW'

C. P. Cosgrove
FAIL

But do they not still have access to the meta-data, which telcos and ISPs are still required to supply if requested ?

Isn't this supposed to be sufficient for law enforcement needs ?

Or are they claiming to need access to the content ?

Chris Cosgrove

10
0

Le whoops! Microsoft France boss blows lid off 'Windows 9' event

C. P. Cosgrove

Reading these comments has reminded me that I have never used Win 8 or 8.1 on a touchscreen. I teach computing as a volunteer to mainly elderly learners using as far as possible their own equipment. This has been something of a learning experience for me as until I started with this group just over a year ago i had never used a tablet of any sort apart from my Mk 1b Kindle which is purely a book reader. Now I have a working familiarity with iPads, Samsungs and various other flavours of Android - but not one single Windows tablet. None of the students I teach have one.

I have used both 8 and 8.1 on laptops and desktops, none with touch screens, and it has to be said that 8.1 is much more user friendly in this situation. There are things about it that annoy me, but I agree with remarks above that it is at heart a decent operating system.

I think it must be remembered that Win 8 was an attempt by MS to unify three quite different operating systems. This at least was the design objective laid before their programmers as I understand it. Unfortunately they have yet to achieve full success. Whether or not it is possible to do this I don't know but I do know they haven't got there yet. It will be interesting to see Win 9 in the round.

But from MS's perspective, the problem is that my present Win 7 machine is working perfectly well and has all the grunt I need to do the tasks I do - so why should I change ?

Chris Cosgrove

8
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Sleepy spotless summer Sun's shock solar storm surge stuns scientists

C. P. Cosgrove
Thumb Down

Not fair !

I am going to complain - either that or emigrate !

Every time there is something like a much better than usual aurora display or a meteor shower its either 80% + cloud or 200m visibility fog here in Central Scotland.

Last night and tonight it's the fog. It's not fair. I feel cheated.

Chris Cosgrove

0
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Warrantless phone snooping HAPPENS ALL THE TIME in Blighty

C. P. Cosgrove

Question

To take a quote from the referenced 'Press Gazette' article -

"The Crown Prosecution Service ruled in November 2013 that it was not in the public interest to prosecute the three officers because “a jury is likely to decide that it was in the public interest for the events at the gate to be made public”."

Does this not suggest that the three constables were unfairly dismissed ?

Chris Cosgrove

1
1

Beer in SPAAAACE: Photographic PROOF

C. P. Cosgrove
Pint

Aahh - Belgian beer !

I have never regretted the time spent at an illegally early age developing a liking for beer - with good English bitter ( and there is a lot of good English bitter) - well to the fore, but I have to agree with Beau, they make superb beer in Belgium.

I must point out - if only on grounds of health and safety - that the Belgians do not always choose the most appropriate times to serve their beers. On sitting down in a restaurant in Brugges once, my wife and I were asked if we would like a beer while we pondered the menu. Naturally the response was 'Yes please'.

Casteel Triple was the house choice - 11% vol ! A beautiful beer, beautifully finished, but I could hardly see the menu after that, never mind ponder it. But definitely not frozen.

Chris Cosgrove

1
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Fanfare of trumpets as LOHAN reveals mission patch

C. P. Cosgrove
Pint

Like - definitely like !

Now that is smart !

It really should be South-West Europe in the background as so much of the garden sheddery - and even the Tabernamque - has been done there. Not for one minute I am suggesting that the support of a Spanish bar owner was an essential ingredient, but I don't think it did any harm.

Put me down for the stitch-on and the pint pot !

Chris Cosgrove

2
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UK.gov wants public sector to rip up data protection law

C. P. Cosgrove
Thumb Down

Oh dear !

I must be a prophet, I wrote this on another forum a few weeks ago :

"Something that might justifiably give rise to fears in the UK is that the Customs and Excise - who are responsible for the collection of sales tax - and the Inland Revenue - who collect income taxes - were fairly recently merged into one department. Fear and trembling ! After all, one man's expenditure is another man's income, and if you can measure the bit in the middle, then anything that is missing is tax evasion, isn't it ? Except their legacy systems are incompatible, the Inland Revenue's systems are, by their own admission, about 10 year out of date and they operate the biggest XP base in the UK.

I am not for a moment suggesting that the individual Civil Servant is either lazy or incompetent, the ones I know are neither, but they are totally tied down by their departmental systems. I wouldn't quite go so far as to say the frequent reorganisation of government departments is the single biggest contributor to civil liberties in the UK, but it certainly isn't the smallest !"

If this goes through, civil liberties go into a sudden and irreversible decline. The only saving grace, as pointed out by others above, is the governments record on large IT projects.

Chris Cosgrove

2
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Watch: DARPA shows off first successful test of STEERABLE bullet

C. P. Cosgrove

Non-coms ?

" it makes sense to limit casualties to non-coms"

I find this remark by Betacom (9 hours ago) difficult to understand. I thought the object of this design project was to limit casualties to justifiable military targets. Or does he really have something against NCOs ?

Chris Cosgrove

2
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Going up: Fancy a virtual flight to 30km above the PLANET?

C. P. Cosgrove

I must be missing something.

Google Earth any one ?

Chris Cosgrove

0
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Archive.org web trove hits FOUR HUNDRED BEEEELLION pages

C. P. Cosgrove
Thumb Up

Early logo

I wasn't a reader then, but I have to say that the early logo still looks quite stylish incorporating as it did both the 'R' and the vulture.

Yes, a definite 'like'

Chris Cosgrove

0
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AT&T and Netflix get into very public spat over net neutrality

C. P. Cosgrove

No, No, not Nationalisation !

With reference to the AC above, please - No Nationalisation !

We used to have a nationalised communications industry in the UK, it was called the GPO (General Post Office) and ran the mail, telephones, telegrams etc.. Those were the days !

Three months wait for a telephone line, and if you lived far back in the scenery you got to share one with your neighbours. A choice of one style of telephone (it was large, black, had a dial and the handset connected to the 'base station' by a thick brown cable). Oh, and you couldn't 'buy' a phone - you rented it along with your line, but since the design never changed, you never got a newer one.

It was only with privatisation and the introduction of competition into the industry that consumers got better service and choice. Please, do NOT bring back those glorious -happily long gone - days.

Chris Cosgrove

3
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Flying Toaster screen savers return on GitHub

C. P. Cosgrove

Brilliant, pure brilliant. I always regretted not 'acquiring' a copy in the days when it was current.

I think it was 'DownandnotOut' above that mentioned 3D Pipes. Does anyone remember the occasional joint that came up as a teapot in some versions ? I can remember spending hours watching for that bloody teapot !

Chris Cosgrove

2
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LOHAN chap hooks up with busty stratominx in cosmic pleasure cruise

C. P. Cosgrove
Pint

Never mind all the jealousy and bitching in the previous comments, and indeed to a degree in the article itself.

Has anybody noticed that a female driver managed to land on grass and not up a tree ?

Perhaps the SPB should reconsider their recruitment needs. But have a beer anyway.

Chris Cosgrove

4
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Booze and bacon sarnies: A recipe for immortality?

C. P. Cosgrove

Re : The Jon - The only known cure

That curly headed correspondent is correct ! Much to the aggravation of one of my sisters, her junior son on his 11th birthday declared he was vegetarian. This lasted about 8 months, until one Sunday she was making herself a couple of bacon sarnies.

"Mum, can I have one of them, please?"

Instant return to omnivore status !

Chris Cosgrove

1
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LOHAN chap brews up 18% ABV 'V2' rocket fuel

C. P. Cosgrove

Celebration purposes only !

I might have a pop at this myself, but I would strongly suggest that the SPB flight crew keep this for post-flight celebrations. The mind boggles gently at the thought of trying to launch a balloon containing all these electronics and explosives after a couple of these - just to steady the nerves of course !

Chris Cosgrove

0
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The UNTOLD SUCCESS of Microsoft: Yes, it's Windows 7

C. P. Cosgrove

Win 7 / Win 8 / Win 8.1

I tend to go with Cambsukguy - Win 7 is a good operating system. I find Win 8 on a non-touch screen a bloody nuisance, but Win 8.1 with its option to boot to the desktop is a good operating system. OK, some of the features are different and laid out differently, but for the little I have seen and used it for, it works quite well and it seems reliable.

Having said that, I have Win 7 on this computer and expect to keep it for at least another couple of years. Then perhaps Win 9 ?

I believe there is little doubt that it was marketing decisions that generated the negative reception that Win 8 got. Now, all i have to do is to find a screen to replace this Hanns.G that is beginning to go wobbly !

Chris Cosgrove

4
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HP sticks thumb in Microsoft's eye, extends Windows 7 option for new machines

C. P. Cosgrove

8.1's not bad

I have just had my first extended experience of Win 8 on a laptop I was setting up for a relative. Once I had worked out how to upgrade to 8.1 and got the desktop back - yes, I know it was always there, really - this has shown me that at least 8.1 is quite a nice operating system. It has its quirks, but so does every OS I have ever used.

My biggest criticism was reserved for the hardware. The left and right buttons are incorporated in the one piece surface trackpad. This required extreme accuracy in clicking or the cursor went shooting off, and after 5 minutes of this, I grabbed a mouse and control returned. Medium sized Sony Vaio - nice machine except for the trackpad.

Chris Cosgrove

5
7

Fair winds and following servers: The art of flight prediction

C. P. Cosgrove
Pint

Pack a ladder !

A splendidly bare target landscape - the highest thing in sight a large bale. BUT - given the propensity of things like gliders and radio controlled models to find trees, it can almost be guaranteed that a mighty oak will spring 'full armed from the soil' just in time.

Or, as it might be put on the Disc World 'Million to one chances are dead certs.'

I wouldn't leave the ladder at home if I was you ! But I will raise a glass to a safe flight when it happens.

Chris Cosgrove

1
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That toolbar you downloaded is malware? Tough, read the EULA

C. P. Cosgrove

Unfair to on-line retailers !

"WBT uses a custom installer, Monitor.exe, which it serves up from Amazon"

While I have no connection with Amazon other than as an occasional customer, I feel this is a little unfair to them. Unless I have completely misunderstood the Malwarebytes PDF referenced in the article, this PUP is stored on Amazon's cloud, not dished up with any software you might download from Amazon themselves.

Chris Cosgrove

10
3

Haitian snapper humbles photo giants AFP, Getty Images in $1.2m copyright victory

C. P. Cosgrove

The Economist and juries

To be fair to The Economist, the suggestion to try patent law cases without a jury is not a bad one. They tend to be very complex and last longer than the average case. Being a juror on such a case can create considerable hardship for the individual juror, his or her family and their employers.

The judges who try these cases are after all well paid by the state to be there.

Chris Cosgrove

0
1

LOHAN sees bright red over Vulture 2 paintjob

C. P. Cosgrove
Pint

Gorgeous !

From my own model building experience, all this painting and sanding - it's the dust, you know - is thirsty work. Have one on me !

It's going to look gorgeous !

Chris Cosgrove

0
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Backup software for HDD and Cloud

C. P. Cosgrove

Secure and cheap

The original poster wants safe and secure off-site back-up in case his house burns down - entirely understandable.

Apart from the initial outlay, this method is effectively free. Two external HDs of appropriate size and keep one of them in a friend's house. Do a back-up and swap it with the one that is in the friend's house.

I looked at cloud storage, and once you get beyond a few Gb it starts getting a little pricey for the private user. I've got about 450 Gb of photos alone floating around my system. It may well be a different situation for a business. A local company I worked for once upon a time - haulage and warehousing - had a fire one night which totalled their offices and the warehouse complex. Because of back-ups, they were working again as soon as they had a couple of PortaCabins put on site.

Chris Cosgrove

1
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Google patent: THROAT TATTOO with lie-detecting mobe microphone built-in

C. P. Cosgrove
Pint

Good in parts !

The best bit about this article was the mention of 'Arrogant Bastard'.

I'll drink to that !

Chris Cosgrove

1
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Cameron pledges public access to list of who REALLY owns firms

C. P. Cosgrove
Thumb Down

“Life is about to get much more difficult for corrupt politicians, arms traders, drug traffickers and tax evaders."

This is one of the finest non-sequiturs I have ever come across. With the exception of arms traders, none of these groups are set up as companies, listed or otherwise, so a register of ownership will disclose . . . nothing. And I have not heard the likes of BAE being discussed in the same fields as Starbucks, Google and Amazon.

Chris Cosgrove

0
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Do dishwashers really blunt knives

C. P. Cosgrove

Dishwasher - what's that ?

My wife has a dish washer - it's called Chris ! But that doesn't matter because I do most of the cooking and the knives are MINE !

Hot water from the tap to clean, and a rub with a steel to sharpen. The only one that shows signs of rust is the tattie (sorry - potato) peeler, and I haven't worked out how you sharpen one of them yet. Anyway, the rust comes off after the second spud and the human body needs a certain quantity of iron in any case.

Chris Cosgrove.

1
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Great Britain rebuilt - in Minecraft: Intern reveals 22-BEEELLION block map

C. P. Cosgrove

This could be useful . . .

As a fairly enthusiastic if not very competent simmer, I could see this being very useful in other games, such as building simulated railway routes. If you got the geography, all you need to do is lay the tracks, dig the embankments and tunnels, build the bridges. Wow !

The hardest part I always found was building the bloody scenery !

Chris Cosgrove

2
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DRAMA at 75,000 FEET: Our Playmonaut's TERROR PLUNGE from EDGE of SPACE

C. P. Cosgrove
Pint

Have one on me !

Superb quality imagery, and the equipment is obviously built to Victorian standards of engineering margins.

Chris Cosgrove

2
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Brazilian TV show accuses NSA of spying on oil firm based on leaked docs

C. P. Cosgrove

Employment opportunites ?

I was amused by the sits vac advert for GCHQ situated beside this article, but surely the slogan 'Explore another World' is incorrect ?

Should it not read 'Explore this World' ?

Chris Cosgrove

1
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Snowden journo's boyfriend 'had crypto key for thumb-drive files written down' - cops

C. P. Cosgrove

Ummm . . .

"Metropolitan Police Service Counter Terrorism Command is now carrying out a criminal investigation, which is at an early stage."

Fascinating. Against whom might they be preparing this (possible) case ? Against the heads of NSA and GCHQ for crininal negligence ? For breaches of the Official Secrets Acts ? For aiding and comforting terrorists ?

Or are they working on behalf of Data Protection Commissioner, preparing a case under the Data Protection Laws ?

Chris Cosgrove

2
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Happy 50th birthday, Compact Cassette: How it struck a chord for millions

C. P. Cosgrove

Compatibility

Re: LDS, above

It wasn't that the Philiips Audio Cassette wasn't stitched up with patents - it was. The genius of Philips was to say anybody could use them or make them, but they had to comply with Philips' specifications. Philips after all was, and is, a hardware company. the more cassettes out there, the bigger the market for players and recorders.

This is the way to grow a market.

That is not to say the cassette was perfect, it wan't. But it sure as hell was convenient ! Happy Birthday !

Chris Cosgrove

2
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'You've had your fun. Now we want the stuff back'

C. P. Cosgrove

It's not what you know, . . .

I could believe that some middle ranking - Inspector, Chief Inspector - watch commander at Heathrow deciding to pull Miranda off his / her own bat. Among other things, that is probably what they are paid for.

What I do find difficult to believe is this same middle ranking police officer being in a position to phone up No. 10 and the White House just to let David and Barack know what he is going to do.

After all, this was a purely operational matter for the police, wasn't it ?

Chris Cosgrove

0
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Seagate's shingle bathers stalked by HGST's helium HAMR-head sharks

C. P. Cosgrove

Why helium ?

As has been pointed out two or three times above, monatomic helium can leak through very small holes. If you can build a case to keep helium in, then you can build a case to keep everything else out. Why not evacuate the drives ? There would be even less turbulence and buffeting in a vacuum.

Just a thought - I freely admit I know virtually nothing in practical terms about how you build hard drives.

Chris Cosgrove

0
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Ultimate Radio Deathmatch: US Navy missile-defence radar vs 4G mobile mast

C. P. Cosgrove

Call me stupid

Call me stupid, but since this is a shipborne radar system unless the US Navy is planning on mooring their ships in Downtown Washington DC, New York harbour or San Diego where is the conflict ?

Last time I looked, radar and mobile phone transmissions are virtually line of sight, I just don't see the conflict unless the Navy does plan on using these radars in the above locations. Further, since these radars are anti-air and anti-missile radars, if the Navy do need them in say the upper reaches of the Potomac then there may be more immediate worries than a lack (or excess !) of phone signal.

Chris Cosgrove

0
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UK the 'number 1 target' of online gangsters in 25 countries - e-crime report

C. P. Cosgrove

Another nail in the coffin ?

Another would-be nail in the coffin of free speech and independent thought ?

I agree, crime is crime and the police should be resourced properly to deal with it and the banks etc. should report incidences of even low level fraud - otherwise how do the police build up a picture of the scale of the problem. But since when was having a different opinion from someone else, even our Right Honourable Home Secretary, an offense ?

As has been said often enough, one man's 'terrorist' is another man's 'freedom fighter'. And when I consider some of the things I did as a 16 or 17 year old - I'd get a five stretch for them now. Homemade explosives ?

If I was an active terrorist in the UK at the moment, I would be campaigning hard against the proposals of the Scottish Parliament to complete the dualling of the A9 from Perth to Inverness. After all, some 12 or 15 people a year die on this road and that is more than the average killed by terrorists in the UK since 1945.

Chris Cosgrove

0
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NASA gets red-hot shots of Sun in action as IRIS goes online

C. P. Cosgrove

24 Hours ?

It might not be foolproof, but 24 hours notice allows you enough time to, for example, ground all aircraft and would certainly allow enough time for almost all equipment to be disconnected from the mains. That's about the best you can do in circumstances like that.

Chris Cosgrove

0
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UK discovers Huawei UK staff auditing Huawei kit: Govt orders probe

C. P. Cosgrove

Not original !

Isn't this report just a little similar to the recent Committee of Parliament being assured by GCHQ that they always adhered to the law ?

Chris Cosgrove

1
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The facts on Trident 'cuts': What the Lib Dems want is disarmament

C. P. Cosgrove

I know Lewis Page used to work for the Gray Funnel Line, and even I once upon a time wore a green and brown suit and carried a rifle for Her Majesty - if only on a part time basis - but there is an old military principle of 'Honour the threat'.

I have to ask myself what threat are we honouring by keeping nuclear weapons ? I find it difficult to think of any realistic nuclear threat against the UK in the present day. It was different during the cold war - British ports, airfields and other installations were a vital part of NATO basing and reinforcement and therefore were justifiable targets to the Warsaw Pact forces, but we are no longer waiting for the Group of Soviet Forces (Germany) to come charging through the Fulda and Weser gaps.

I agree with both Lewis Page and Robert McNamara that, in terms of bang for buck, nuclear weapons are the cheapest way around of killing people in large numbers - but you need large numbers of people to kill before the investment has a potential pay back. And killing people in this sort of quantity has gone out of fashion, thank God ! Nowadays we get upset if two or three squaddies get blown away in Afghanistan.

Leaving aside the question of how fighting a war in Afghanistan is doing anything to improve our security, or further British interests, the sorts of war we are gearing up for today seem to be rather infantry heavy and the Government is reducing our establishment of infantry with a gusto. I know infantry are relatively expensive - they have to be paid on a regular basis and training them and keeping them trained is expensive, but they do at least get used !

No, I am a long way short of agreeing that Britain gains anything useful from having a nuclear deterrent. Still, I do agree with Lewis Page on the subject of carriers and catapults !

Chris Cosgrove

3
0

Click here for hot live SPEARS test action

C. P. Cosgrove
Pint

Congratulations !

Congratulations on what appears to have been a very successful flight.

Due to the timely reminder yesterday I watched it in real time and you almost managed to complete the mission before coverage of Le Tour began. One eye on a TV, the other on the computer screen. I will raise a glass to your success and my thirst !

Chris Cosgrove

0
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UK.gov's digi-by-default plan slammed: Show us the savings - MPs

C. P. Cosgrove
FAIL

Pick up the slack ?

"Instead it has insisted that libraries, job centres and other public places will pick up the slack."

This whole scheme terrifies me, not because of any great direct impact it might have on me personally but because of the 7 million or so with no experience of using the internet. As the article points out, a large part of this 7 million comprises the poor, the elderly and the sick, who are the ones who need access to the benefits system most.

I am fortunate that I live in an area where local government cost saving policies have not impacted greatly on the library service and in our nice shiny 18 month old combined library, community centre and Council office we have 12 computers available for public use. That is all well and good, but leaves one hell of a training problem for the 7 million with no internet experience. I am one of the trainers.

I teach basic computing as a volunteer in the library and at the moment I am the only such volunteer. Most of my 'students' fall into the elderly category - I have had at least one who was in her '90s and learnt quite successfully - but a surprising number have considerable difficulty in grasping that you need to log-in to the computer with one password and then - for example - log-in to your e-mail account with a different one.

I fear that people like this are essentially going to be cut off from the benefits system. And these have been people with reasonable command of their faculties. How about the seriously handicapped - my sister-in-law who is confined to a wheel chair, my neighbour who is blind ?

Chris Cosgrove

2
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How con men snatched £100,000+ in iPads and other kit from IT disties

C. P. Cosgrove
FAIL

Crime doesn't pay ?

Isn't there a zero or two missing off this report ? Even assuming that the £100,000 quoted - ignoring the + - reflects the wholesale value of this kit and therefore represents the sums that might be achieved on the bent market, over 18 months that is £ 65,000 pa.

Unless it is claimed that all this was done by one criminal mastermind on his / her own, it sounds to me like an awful lot of work for not very much return. Filing paper work; generating credit references; premises to accept delivery; finding punters to buy the gear - Nah, I'll just stick to my pension thank you.

Chris Cosgrove

1
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IT design: You're not data, you're a human being

C. P. Cosgrove

The blind

There was an interesting, almost throwaway, remark in that article on the lines of 'Considering the blind when designing web-sites'. There must be hundreds of readers of El Reg who design or operate web-sites - I run two myself and will admit I have never given anything other than the most passing thought to users with physical handicaps. Yet one of my neighbours is blind so I have less excuse than many.

How do you accommodate people with severe physical handicaps ? I suppose adding sound to your links would be a start, But how do you make a Club program readily comprehensible ? I could see it being necessary to make every date a separate 'sound bite'. How I would do this within the size constraints of a 'free' hosting arrangement suitable for a small Club, that too escapes me !

Chris Cosgrove

0
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MoD signs Microsoft mega licensing deal for 180,000 PCs

C. P. Cosgrove

One Hundred and Eighty ?

180,000 licenses. doesn't that equal 180,000 computers ?

That's getting close to two computers per member of the armed forces !

Chris Cosgrove

0
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PRISM leaks: WTF, you don't spy on your friends, splutters EU

C. P. Cosgrove
FAIL

Naive, or what

Of course you spy on your friends and allies. Two reasons. The first is that you know where your enemies are - they are your enemies, but you don't know when your friends are going to change sides. The second is that it is generally safer and easier to spy on your friends and allies - they tend not to think you are going to do it, and the penalties for getting caught are less.

Naive, or what ?

Chris Cosgrove

0
2

El Reg rocket squad poised to select Ultimate Cuppa teabag

C. P. Cosgrove
Pint

MILK ?

You put milk in it !

I just lost all interest

0
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Facebook foolishness foils (un)civil servant's squirm up greasy pole

C. P. Cosgrove
Thumb Down

" and a third got themselves in hot water by making political comments on a personal Facebook account."

Just because you are a Civil Servant you are not denied personal opinions and beliefs. Pascal Monett, above, may be right about Civil Servants not being allowed to comment about the government but a distinction can be made, I think, between 'The Government' and politics. So long as such opinions are expressed on personal accounts without identification to a government department, I cannot see where there is a problem.

Chris Cosgrove

0
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MPs demand UK rates revamp after Google's 'extraordinary tax mismatch'

C. P. Cosgrove

HMRC's reputation ?

I don't see where HRMC's reputation comes into this - their job is to enforce the ( byzantine ) tax laws that Parliament ( = MPs ) create.

And further to one comment earlier, the record shows very little corruption at operational levels in the British Civil Service. Ill equipped, under trained and under funded are different matters.

Chris Cosgrove

3
1

LOHAN team regroups for second pop at SPEARS

C. P. Cosgrove
Pint

Good luck !

And a gill of rum for the heroic replacement Playmonaut in case he decides to join the Navy and ditch again !

Chris Cosgrove

0
0

Ex-Microsoft man plans brand of consumer marijuana 'fine cigars'

C. P. Cosgrove
Happy

How's about ?

Soul Windows . . .

0
0

Fibre boosters trip the light fantastic with 800G BPS LINKS

C. P. Cosgrove
Alert

Long way for a shortcut !

I will admit I do not know exactly where BT's Adastral Park is, but Ipswich to London = 410Km ?

A quick glance at my mapping software suggests 85 - 90 miles, say 130 to 150 Km. Not that it isn't an impressive achievement - I would like a small share of that - but how are they routing it ? Via Leeds ?

Chris Cosgrove

0
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LOHAN is GO! Reg spaceplane BLASTS OFF on 14 September

C. P. Cosgrove
Pint

Good luck !

I'll raise a glass to your proposals. That's an ambitious schedule of work for a high tech garden shed operation !

All the best, and here's to the health of the second playmonaut.

Chris Cosgrove

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