* Posts by John Robson

1118 posts • joined 19 May 2008

That DRM support in Firefox you never asked for? It's here

John Robson
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But you are a criminal - if you can format shift then how can I charge you again for the same content on tape, vinyl, cd, bluray, mp3 and aac?

What do you mean you paid me for my time when you bought it first time round?

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Mozilla to whack HTTP sites with feature-ban stick

John Robson
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Re: When I can self sign and provide the public key by DNSSEC...

Thinking about - what we need is an HTTPA protocol - authenticated, rather than secure.

So it can be sniffed and cached, but not altered (or the hash would change) - based on a DNSSEC or HTTPS transfer of the hash maybe?

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John Robson
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Re: When I can self sign and provide the public key by DNSSEC...

Only works on a per machine cache, no help to ISPs, companies, multiuser households....

Can't you already ask for "last updated" anyway?

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John Robson
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When I can self sign and provide the public key by DNSSEC...

then this is fine, assuming we don't ever want anyone who doesn't have a fast connection to be able to cache the data...

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Chill, luvvies. The ‘unsustainable’ BBC Telly Tax stays – for now

John Robson
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Re: I dont pay TV Tax

I don't pay either,

But I wouldn't mind if they slapped a PPV access charge on iPlayer, although my kids would watch alot less CBBC if they did ;)

At least in part this would be to offset the actual cost of the IP infrastructure and costs, in the same way that some of the license is to fund the broadcast infratstructure and running costs...

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Lies, damn lies and election polls: Why GE2015 pundits fluffed the numbers so badly

John Robson
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Re: "shy tory"

Tight means not plugging the phone in....

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ALIEN HUNT: Water similar to life-bearing Earth lakes FOUND ON MOON of Saturn

John Robson
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Re: Don't want to rain....

Lake Mono (mentioned in the article) is pH10, and pH11 is considered within plausible limits...

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HORDES OF CLING-ONS menace UK.gov IT estate as special WinXP support ends

John Robson
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"Best option"

Is probably a return to paper and pencil...

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Rodent rescue reckoned as remedy for cursor crisis cruelling BYOD

John Robson
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I just hope it can work on non citrix reciever applications...

'cos occasionally it's just easier, but citrix is overkill...

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Great, we all want 5G mobile broadband. Now just how are we gonna wire it all up?

John Robson
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Re: 4G is great!

Video streaming is easily accomplished over a twisted pair of cables to my house, and then some WiFi magic to the large display devices.

I can't come up with a scenario that I would want to stream video to a truly mobile device. I use 3G for audio streaming for a community radio station, and that's convenient since we never know where the studio will be much before we move in and start transmitting.

Then again I live in a world where sensible bandwidth costs more than a pint, but exceeding it is a kidney...

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John Robson
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Re: Sticks head above parapet...

On the odd occasion my tablet claims 4G I see.... no significant difference. The few kB of data might appear in 0.2 seconds rather than 0.3, but frankly I can't tell and don't really care.

When it drops to 2G then it is noticeably slower, so yes - 3G is good, but as the next post down says - ubiquitous 2G would be a good first step...

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SpaceX Dragon crew capsule in 'CHUTE ABORT drama – don't panic, no one died

John Robson
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Maybe that's *why* it's now a requirement.

They could have learned from early Apollo accidents as well, but hey...

But get satellites back...

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Boeing 787 software bug can shut down planes' generators IN FLIGHT

John Robson
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Re: Not just planes

Not quite sure why the downvote - I have always been told that much of the trains braking is active - dumping power back into the grid. Presumably at least that entire system is compromised...

Overall braking is probably maintained by conversion of brake pads into dust - but it's like a RAID array with only one drive left in a mirror - working, but compromised.

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John Robson
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Re: Not just planes

Presumably with compromised braking?

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Apple Watch WRISTJOB SHORTAGE: It's down to BAD VIBES

John Robson
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Re: NTP - to correct "wrong kind of heart"

Your heart rate doesn't vary *that* quickly - having the watch signal the "last beat" at last_beat + last_gap will be close enough to this_beat to be good enough

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John Robson
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NTP

Because synchronising regular events over a latency/jitter bound network has never been tried before...

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TomTom MyDrive brings satnav syncing to PCs and mobiles

John Robson
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Re: Google maps does all this already...

Wheel sensors are a good point - haw many built in systems use them - again I just don't know...

Then again navigation in a tunnel tends to pretty easy ;)

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John Robson
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Re: Google maps does all this already...

It'll be a long while before built in is actually in most cars - is it even in "most cars sold today"?

I genuinely don't know the answer to that - it wouldn't be on my list of things to look for (whereas a decent shelf for a tablet would be - unless of course someone gets me a Tesla Model S, in which case I'll use that fantastic screen)

Cars live for a long while on the roads - the *average* age of a car on the road is 11-12 years in the US, and 8 in the UK.

For that to be the average, given the stability of the total numbers (both the average age and total number are creeping upwards, but relatively slowly) cars must leave the road at an average age of 16 years.

To get "most" cars to have any technology takes a reasonably long time.

The biggest benefit of the in car system is the availability of power, the biggest issue is the usual lack of updates (here things like the Tesla win hands down - I don't know how many other manufacturers do the same?)

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John Robson
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Google maps does all this already...

was exactly my thought as well - although I don't need to transfer it between devices of course.

If the comms is two way and mobile then I can see a use case for fleet operation, but I can't see why this would be better than an appropriate android/iOS app...

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Samsung back on top of smartmobe market

John Robson
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Re: And in other news...

KFC - the Ivy was a real disappointment...

At least with KFC your expectations aren't high

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Google polishes Chrome security with Password Alert

John Robson
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Re: "Google promises that it won't ever share the password"

Half? I'd be surprised if it wasn't more like 90% - you only need one android device to connect.

Same for Apple (although lower penetration in some markets may have an effect)

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MAYHEM in ORBIT: Russian cargo pod spins OUT OF CONTROL

John Robson
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Re: Allowed?

Allow might not be a good choice of words, but I wonder what version of fue lis on board - that could make for a rather spectacular burn up... or not - things travelling that fast are relatively spectactular anyway...

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SOHOpeless Realtek driver vuln hits Wi-Fi routers

John Robson
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At some point a vendor will just go ...

..."You know what - let's let OpenWRT take the heat"

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WHY can't Silicon Valley create breakable non-breakable encryption, cry US politicians

John Robson
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Re: Rubbish

Because a CSR doesn't contain the private key?

It does contain the public key - but then they can know that anyway...

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Fukushima nuke plant owner told to upgrade from Windows XP

John Robson
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Re: Chernobyl fallout

I wasn't the downvoter - but maybe bercause "levels were high" says nothing..

We've already established that the typical reaction to a geiger click is a massive overreaction - was the level higher than 250mSv/year? Do Iranian sheep glow? (Do the Iranians even farm sheep???)

Levels ten times higher than berfore - when "before" was virtually nil then after is still virtually nil...

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John Robson
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Re: Please come visit Fukushima

They're displaced by fear, not radiation...

The levels in Japan are higher than background - yes, but they still don't register as significant in health terms as measured across the world - bits of Iran have normal background levels of 250mSv/year

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'Use 1 capital' password prompts make them too predictable – study

John Robson
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Re: Randomness

But since the pattern is that the first char is a capital and the number is at the end it actually doesn't change the number of permutations at all...

"Password1" is the new "password"

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Google TUGS Nexus 7-INCHER from its online store

John Robson
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Got an N7 2012...

And loved it - did much, much stuff on it, and used a BT connection to a feature phone to tether for remote access when needed.

It slowed a bit with the latest update, but recovered with a clean up.

IIRC the SSD inside was not of good quality in terms of lifespan.

Now have an iPad (changed due to availablility of audio specific applications) and it also has moments of delay - so I'm not going to berate one or the other. 2+ years of good service out of the N7, and then it got sold to a colleague who is still using it (and happy)

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giffgaff riff-raff hacked off with lift-off of cash spaff

John Robson
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Re: Has Telefonica got money to lend?

No - but they're hoping cutomers do...

And that they can slice a bit off the top.

Of course by the time you are that much in debt the problem is the banks, not yours...

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Half a BILLION dollars later and, PHEW, we're all done buying up dot-word domain rights

John Robson
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Re: no ICANN for you

So get really.sucks - then make your own subdomains...

ICANN.really.sucks

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Chewier than a slice of Pi: MIPS Creator CI20 development board

John Robson
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Re: Media Center

Because actually it uses so damned little power that I don't care - and neither do most other people.

If you really want it to be off when not in active use then by all means plug it into the TV USB port - then it will take a little time to boot and become useful each time, but that's the compromise you are making.

Personally I don't think that .7A at 5V (3.5W, although it will be less most of the time) is all that much power to get fussed over. That's about 0.5p per day in electricity (assuming it runs at full whack 24/7).

"... unless I produce a workaround that solves my personal need but doesn't do anything for anyone else?"

If it won't do anything for anyone else then it's not a common requirement, so why add the cost?

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Easy ... easy ... Aw CRAP! SpaceX rocket ALMOST lands on ocean hoverbase

John Robson
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Re: Wheeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeee........

OK - whet's the longest duration between boosts then - they are falling, but they are losing energy as they hit the (rather thin) atmosphere. The boosts make up for this energy loss.

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John Robson
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Re: Wheeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeee........

No - the record holder will be an astronaut - pretty much all of them beat 15 minutes...

Orbit is merely the act of falling, but missing the planet. So the longest ISS resident probably holds the record. Gravity is about 90% of earth surface normal up there, they are not strictly weightless, it's just that everything is falling at the same rate, so there is no apparent weight.

Interestingly of course if there weren't people and fans moving the air around then eventually everything would settly against either the "top" or the "bottom" surfaces of the ISS - because the orbit of the shell is about it's CoM, any thing (dust, paper whatever) will fall towards the "floor", anything that starts higher will "fall" towards the ceiling. Anything on that centre line will be disturbed by brownium motion and then take one of the above paths...

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Japan showcases really, really fast … whoa, WTF was that?!

John Robson
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Re: ten centimeters

There is also probably an aerodynamic effect that they are trying to avoid/exploit.

Ground effect lift maybe - makes the mag bit of the lev do a little less work.

Or maybe it just reduces drag by allowing an actual amount of air in there?

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Flying giant octopus menaces New York

John Robson
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Obligatory....

http://what-if.xkcd.com/35/

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Android lands on Microsoft's money-machine island fortress

John Robson
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No camera?

I naively assumed that would be one thing they'd want to keep - security cameras (front and rear translated to screen level and overhead) at an ATM are quite useful - keep the pictures with the transaction logs...

Otherwise long overdue.

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Help! We need to pick a platform for our desert adventure

John Robson
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Have to agree with the above comments...

There are better solutions. One of which is to get space at the other end of your "bit of string" so that the content filter isn't bandwidth limited.

Then a local HTTP caching server with a decent DNS caching server (if you want to be mean then add a half second delay to "other" DNS traffic, to degrade it's performance and improve the apparent performance of the local DNS solution - there is no way you can override the hosts file on the local machine anyway)

Of course with so much stuff being HTTPS nowadays you might find that the caching isn't as effective as you'd like...

Run something over the weak connection to ensure decent utilisation - Something like VoIPbox (which is available on titchy (replaceable) hardware) could improve the observed performance of the network, particularly if you have a good amount of "small packet" traffic. The underlying software is available on it's own, but the productised version probably has support advantages.

Heck, you could even go the whole hog and use the same vendor for a few things; CACHEbox will handle squid - potentially doing so at both ends, the remote end with a content filter (and maybe not even doing any actual caching?), the local one then doesn't need the constant filter updates; DNSbox does very well as a caching server... There are other vendors, offering similar packages...

Then you just need a firewall - and there are plenty of options there, many of which have a much nicer interface than raw iptables (which is what *I* use, but I wouldn't foist it on others...)

OK - I've just put 5 boxes in, to two locations. But they are relatively cheap, commodity hardware, with phone support and a company to post replacement boxes out (and collect the dead unit). Total space is less than 5U, possibly much less. Nice web interfaces, easy config backup/restore...

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Got iOS 8.3 installed? Pssh, you are SO last week… version 8.4 is out

John Robson
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But the developers want to see what their apps need to handle in the next release, so that they can release updated software at the same time as the OS upgrade.

This isn't beta testing, this is using a beta to test your own software...

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Scummy transients FOUND ON MARS by NASA rover

John Robson
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Re: Mars9?

Looks like an abstract reference to me - albeit very clumsily translated.

Alternatives - it's the version of mars that causes any other planet to become mars?

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The coming of DAB+: Stereo eluded the radio star

John Robson
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Re: DAB...

Yers, of course I'm looking at it through today's perspective...

In my corner...

I still have stacks of minidiscs up in the loft, as well as a minidisc car stereo, HiFi unit and USB PC drive. I still think they are a very good media - mostly due to the protection they offer the actual media inside.

Of course SD cards are hard to beat nowadays, although they are a bit fiddly...

I can't recall why I didn't go in for DAB early - there was something about it that turned me off. My comments above are what I *now* see (with the benefit of hindsight).

I also can't recall what my internet speeds were at the time - must go digging in history.

Late 90's apparently - althopugh the tech was a bit older: I had always-on dialup (and had had for a while). Offices/universities had 10+Mb connections regularly. In 1998 the ADSL standard was ratified, and BT were offering the stingray in 2000 at the latest (ThinkBroadband were talking about it then).

So very early adopters were inside the dial-up period, although some would have had ISDN for 128k ;)

It's amazing how fast the world has changed...

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John Robson
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Re: DAB...

@1980s_coder

1 - Yes, but |'m waiting until that is the case before I buy anything so speculative. We know that muxes are always squeezed to get quantity of channels over quality, I see no reason why that will change any time soon.

2 - If I'm recording it then why wouldn't I just stream it later from home?

3 - Admirable, but see my answer to 1

Where FM is dire then yes, DAB (if available) should be an improvement - but a decent FM aerial might also do the job (difficult in a car and or a portable device)

As for the freeview idea - see my answer to 1...

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John Robson
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DAB...

Nope - still no DAB sets here...

I suppose if I replace the car then one might appear as a result of that, as it has for my parents.

Since all my entertainment streams into the house over an IP connection I probably count anyway, but that's disingenuous. More interesting is the number of non-DAB radios that cannot easily be replaced (so those in cars which aren't in a nice replaceable housing for instance).

Since there is no compelling reason to change from FM - it's not as if it sounds better, and there are already more stations than I can shake a stick at, many of them are good local services - why do I want to spend silly money on a power hungry radio?

I checked for SWMBO's last birthday, and couldn't find one that sounded decent for a sane price, so I went with an older IP radio, and that sounds great. Has an aux in for the iPod dock as well...

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Atmel stoops to an 'all-time low' in Internet of Things battle

John Robson
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Re: Doesn't it need

But at least the comms test could *tell* you that the battery needs changing...

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John Robson
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Doesn't it need

to do regular comms tests?

Else "There's a fire" will fall on deaf antenna, since the comms world has moved on in a decade...

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Mom and daughter SUE Comcast for 'smuggling' public Wi-Fi hotspot into their home

John Robson
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Re: @cyke1 Hope they win.

Maybe they have already applied an appropriate discount?

"And I'm sorry, cellular providers pay the property owners to lease the small plot of land their towers take up. The same rules of engagement should apply to the wireless network that's accessible from inside my house. I'm already paying an obscene amount for their services, at the very least they should off set it should I decide to OPT IN. I should not have to opt out to have my network unhijacked."

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Ford: Our latest car gizmo will CHOKE OFF your FUEL if you're speeding

John Robson
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Re: If you need to be seen, sidelights.

Whyever not - if a road has streetlights then it is perfectly possible to see down it. In fact about the only thing that prevents me seeing a decent way along a streetlit road is the number of idiots with dazzlingly bright lights.

If you don't start a lighting war then there is no need for anyone else to continue it - and the people who are going to sleep don't get their rooms illuminated by annoying moving lights...

Amazingly the moon provides a good amount of light as well, depends on the phase obviously, but it's quite possible to travel without any other light source.

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Hawk like an Egyptian: Google is HOPPING MAD over fake SSL certs

John Robson
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Re: revoked cert

Yes, I *can* come up with a better solution.

I have suggested it here on a number of occasions, and it's generally not badly received...

SSL certs should be pulled down as a DNS record, with the DNS record secured by DNSSEC.

DNSSEC already has lookaside validation, and if the root cert was compromised then the whole world would be shouting about it...

I suggest that each browser company runs their own lookaside validation server as a default lookaside option in their browser (since you explicitly trust them anyway) and allows you to use others if you want to.

This also provides a nice way to distribute SSH host certs etc...

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First figures in and it doesn't look good for new internet dot-words

John Robson
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Re: Even more URL's

What aplan - a ".yesterday" domain, for celebrity has beens...

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Blighty's 12-sided quid to feature schoolboy's posterior

John Robson
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And how long will the "old" coins be valid?

'cos they're still fakeable while they are...

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The storage is alive? Flash lives longer than expected – report

John Robson
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Re: Advance warning?

They should be able to tell you how many blocks they've reallocated though.

And an increase in that number is taken as an early warning...

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