* Posts by Blitheringeejit

198 posts • joined 25 Apr 2008

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Hey, folks. Meet the economics 'genius' behind Jeremy Corbyn

Blitheringeejit

Just askin'

Given the massive unpopularity of all politicians with the general public ... if Labour becomes sufficiently unelectable, would that mean they might get back to being a popular movement...?

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BOFH: Why, I LOVE work courses. Please tell me more, o wise one!

Blitheringeejit
Pint

Box ticked

Now that I've read this excellent summary of a leadership course, I am presumably properly qualified and thus excused from going on any such courses for at least 5 years.

Now that's the kind of service I (don't) pay my Reg subscription for - pint for Mr T!

(And that's T for Travaglia, not the other much less scary one.)

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Pentagon email hacked, Russia already blamed

Blitheringeejit

Likewise I'm sure

The skill I developed from email admin was how to outsource. I'll do anything for money, but I won't do that.

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Crackpot hackpots pop top of GasPots

Blitheringeejit
Coat

Jerking the knee

I fundamentally agree, it's unreasonable to hold execs responsible for the criminal activities of those who would do harm to the execs' businesses. Modern blame/litigation culture has left us somewhat fuzzy about who the bad guys actually are.

But there is a real issue to be tackled around security and IOT, and sales pitches are (as ever) quick to crow about the convenience of IOT while failing to make customers aware of the risks which might accompany this convenience.

So perhaps we need to instigate a baseline security spec which designers have to sign up to before they are allowed to sell ANYTHING which connects to the internet. Of course there will be problems - for example, putting a firewall in a fridge might adversely the performance of both. But if there is a baseline, then at least users know how far they can pursue the designers/manufacturers on some basis of negligence when they get hacked, and when they should drop their class action and just go after the hackers with a pointy stick. It's all about clarity.

If anyone's interested, I also have in my coat pocket a similar programme of baseline tests and qualifications which I believe should be a prerequisite for people being allowed to have children.

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Disaster-gawping cam drones to be blasted out of the sky in California

Blitheringeejit
Big Brother

Re: We should, but for now it is simple

The issue at hand is firefighting and interfering with rescue operations. A demonstration does not come anywhere near these terms and there is no way to confuse the two.

You've clearly not been following how police powers and public order legislation has been used in the UK in recent years. Powers granted to public officials under anti-terrorist legislation are routinely used to monitor individuals suspected of (among many other trivial offences) fly-tipping or failing to clear up after their dog.

Not that I'm against this, you understand - I think inconsiderate dog-owners should be shipped off to Gitmo without trial - but the point remains that "to confuse the two" is extremely easy if you're suitably empowered at your own discretion, and it serves your purpose to do so.

And of course the areas of real concern are where this gets entangled with freedom of speech or assembly. In London at least, the situation with regard to the use of discretionary police powers is very scary, and the local force is considered by many who live there to be out of control.

Note - I'm not anti-police either, I live in a rural part of England well away from London, and the police here are absolutely brilliant. But the Met (the London force) scares the crap out of me.

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SpaceX's blast shock delays world's MOST POWERFUL ROCKET

Blitheringeejit
WTF?

Confused about the re-useables return path?

Having watched the lovely launch video, I'm intrigued as to how the reusable bits all come down nicely on the same site, and I wonder where that site might be.

For one thing, the launch supposedly takes place from Canaveral, and presumably heads east, in the normal rocket-heading-for-orbit way. This means that the first stages would detatch somewhere over the Atlantic - so after they detach and spin round, in order to return to what appears to be a land-based landing platform, they must be carrying enough fuel to burn off all the eastward velocity and then fly all the way back west to Florida. That's in addition to the fuel they need to burn off the westward return velocity when they reach the landing site, and the fuel they need for the soft descent.

Hmmm.

Even wierder is that the middle reusable stage burns for much longer than the outer two, so it detaches waaay further downrange - yet it returns to the same landing stage.

I guess we're not supposed to get picky about something which is essentially a sales video, but they must realise that anyone interested enough to watch this stuff must have at least the most basic acquaintance with them pesky laws o' physics.

Either I'm a total muppet, or they are...

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Account at HSBC? BAD LUCK, no iPhone bonk-banking for you

Blitheringeejit

I was going to leave HSBC, but now I'm not so sure....

If they are going to boycott the insane trend to enable bank account access from horribly insecure mobile devices over which we have no admin control, as far as I'm concerned that's an upvote for them.

Of course it barely registers against the massive downvotes they get for money-laundering and generally being a bunch of bankers - but as there's no real option for ethical banking left since the Coop went titsup, I might as well stick with the devil I know...

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Why the BBC is stuffing free Micro:bit computers into schoolkids' satchels

Blitheringeejit
Happy

Essential introduction to computing

Interesting to note that in designating the i/o ports, the designers have decided to be up-front about the confusing-to-civilians fact that the computers start counting at 0, not at 1. Even if that's all that the yoot learn from using this device at school, it could save millions in bug-fixing and patching over the next 50 years or so.

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Windows 10 is due in one month: Will it be ready?

Blitheringeejit

Looks suspiciously familiar

May I suggest that the authors of Cinammon's UI in the current Linux Mint distro get some lawyers to look at the Win10 screenshots in this article?

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Why OH WHY did Blighty privatise EVERYTHING?

Blitheringeejit
Flame

Key point inevitably overlooked

Various commentards have correctly pointed out that rail privatisation is widely regarded as a failure because the rail system continues to receive massive public subsidies, while services don't improve.

But the same is true of all the utility privatisations. Public subsidy may not be so clearly evident, but it certainly delivered in spades via the welfare budget. Most people who are in receipt of benefits (NB not just the unemployed, but also the tax-credited, the winter-fuel-allowanced etc) use a substantial chunk of those benefits to pay their water, gas and leccy bills. The big difference post-privatisation is that this money is now flowing into the back pockets of the privatised company's executives and shareholders, instead of back into the public coffers. The privatised utilities are deliberately configured to siphon money from the taxpaying public to the corporate elite.

For those reading the news, the same dynamic is very much at work in Cameron's stated plans for cutting the welfare budget. In his fundamentalist monetarist zeal, he overlooks what nobody mentions but every sensible person knows - that the main objective of tax credits which subsidise the low-paid is to enable their employers keep wages unrealistically low. This keeps costs down and profits up - so tax credits are really just another subsidy paid by the taxpaying public to the corporate elite.

It's a well-worn axiom of every TV cop show, but it's true - if you want to know why stuff happens and who is making it happen, you follow the money.

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Post-pub nosh neckfillers: Reader suggestions invited

Blitheringeejit

Re: Au contraire. mon brave, have an upvote...

One small life-regret is that I've never made it to the Far East to experience any of this stuff in its native form.

But as with any Japanese soup/broth with noodly option, I'm sure you can feed your meat frenzy by adding slices of pork, and/or use chicken stock - I haven't tried it, but it shouldn't affect the magic.

To acquire full wisdom on these matters, Tampopo is compulsory viewing.

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Blitheringeejit
Pint

Au contraire. mon brave, have an upvote...

Amidst all the bacon, potato and deep-fried options on offer here, there seems to be a subtle prejudice that people who might enjoy healthy food, and even (whisper it softly) your actual vegetablarians, are far too worthy to enjoy a punishing night out, so never have to deal with the consequences. I beg to differ (see icon) - my body is a not a temple but a playground (it's my wallet that's a temple). So for those who share my tastes and want to feel better the morning after an extended session on whatever intoxicants float their boat, may I present "magic" miso soup, so-called for it's remarkable curative properties. Amounts of everything to taste, it's more a framework than an application...

WHAT:

Dashi stock made with kombu if you can be bothered, otherwise water;

Mix of fresh veg such as spring onions, carrots, celery (including green tops) - all sliced quite finely, aim for about 3mm thickness at thinnest point, carrots best done as sticks if your knife skills are up to it;

Mushrooms (shitake if your consultancy dayrate can stand it, otherwise chestnut), in larger chunks;

Spinach - fresh or frozen, if frozen thaw in microwave before adding (or use lettuce, mizuna, or other greenery of choice);

Tofu - some like it silken, I prefer the chewier ones;

Dark miso of your choice - I like barley but rice is fine, guess at about 2tbsp per litre of soup;

Other dried Japanese seaweed of choice - hijiki, arame etc - if you wish;

A sheet of nori seaweed, toasted but not burnt under grill or over flame (the only difficult bit in this recipe, watch it like a hawk - the window of toasted but not burnt lasts about 250ms).

HOW:

If using dried seaweed, soak in water according to instructions;

Bring water/stock to a simmer, add veg, shrooms, seaweed etc in vague order of hardness. Max boiling time for any of it shouldn't exceed about 6 minutes - this is foreign food, so no Brit-style mush-boiling (though if you're using shitakes they may need a bit longer);

Dilute miso in jar/mug with hot (not boiling) water, so it can be easily poured;

Turn off heat, then add diluted miso progressively, stirring and tasting as you go until it no longer tastes like you need to add salt;

Ladle into bowl, then crush and sprinkle toasted nori on top;

Consume, and be magically revived.

Option - if you need carbs to aid your recovery, cook noodles and place in bottom of bowl before adding soup.

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Naked cyclists take a hard line on 'aroused' protest participant

Blitheringeejit
Joke

El Reg falling down on the job

Kent Online made a much better job of exploiting the pun-ability of this story than the usually-unsurpassed Reg subs. Particular favourite: "Shannon Walters, who lives nearby said: "They claim they are protesting about safety but hardly any are wearing helmets."

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Forced sale of Openreach division would put BT broadband investment at risk, says CEO

Blitheringeejit
FAIL

Re: Doesn't make sense

>> Why would the New Openreach board be less willing to invest in broadband infrastructure than the current BT board is

Because the current BT board has decided that it's sexier and more profitable to be a pay-per-view content provider than a connectivity company. They answer a question about Openreach with a comment about their sport TV revenues, carefully avoiding any mention of their well-documented failure to deliver their promises on (taxpayer-subsidised) rural broadband rollout. (And please note that in my case, "rural" means "less than a mile outside the boundaries of a unitary authority" - we're not just talking about remote Scottish islands here.)

Given that the money's coming out of the taxpayer's pocket anyway, I'd rather we nationalised Openreach than just forced BT to sell it to some other capitalist bastard. I realise that talk of nationalisation is pissing into the current political wind, but stop and think for a moment - how much cheaper would it be for the government to intercept all our communications if the government already owned the communications infrastructure! Think how many more nurses/tridents/ministerial Jags (delete according to your political leanings) we could buy with the money we'd save!

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Volkswagen Passat GT 2.0-litre TDI SCR 190 PS 6spd DSG

Blitheringeejit
WTF?

Re: Heated steering wheel???

Heating the car up before or after you get in, OK I understand that. My car has heaters.

But the steering wheel is IN the bloody car, so why does it need heating separately?

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Blitheringeejit
Coat

Heated steering wheel???

The world has gone completely mad. I'm leaving.

/coat

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'Tough' UK public sector blamed in BT sales hiccup

Blitheringeejit
Holmes

Re: WHERE'S MY FTTC?

Believe whatever your political bias requires you to believe, but back here on planet earth, a quick search reveals...

http://www.ispreview.co.uk/index.php/2014/11/bbc-watchdog-scalds-bt-openreach-new-home-install-delays.html

...and more. Many, many more.

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Blitheringeejit
Mushroom

Re: WHERE'S MY FTTC?

Our local cabinet is listed by BT as "imminent" for FFTC conversion.

At the time of writing it's been "imminent" for about 18 months.

Meanwhile they're spending all the money the taxpayer gave them to improve rural broadband on football rights.

For those of us old enough to remember the promised benefits of privatisation in the 80s, BT was, is and ever shall be a pertinent lesson - and on election day, perhaps it's one we should bear in mind vis-a-vis the NHS.

Double-GRRR!!! with knobs on.

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TomTom MyDrive brings satnav syncing to PCs and mobiles

Blitheringeejit
FAIL

"Pathetic OSX support"

You think you got problems....

https://en.discussions.tomtom.com/map-installation-43/tomtom-home-linux-version-92435/index1.html

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Apple Watch WRISTJOB SHORTAGE: It's down to BAD VIBES

Blitheringeejit
Coat

throbbless jazzbangles???

Wasn't Throbbless Jazzbangle a minor character in Lord of the Rings?

<Mine's the one without a single item of iCrap in its pocketses...>

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NASA spies weird glow from Pluto's FRIGID pole

Blitheringeejit
Headmaster

Re: "The US has been the first to flyby every planet of the Solar System"

They didn't say they were the first to fly by each individual planet, just that they were the first to fly by *all* of them. This is true - if slightly confusing when stated in the context of a Pluto fly-by: one could wish that they would make up their minds.

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Apple BIGGER than the U.S. ECONOMY? Or Australia? Or ... Luxembourg?

Blitheringeejit

For those who don't get the reference...

One of Douglas Adams's most perfect pieces - historically and economically informed and intelligent, with a generous sprinkling of brilliant oneliners. Should be on every GCSE set book list.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nEI19kJ5GfU

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El Reg offers you the chance to become a Master Investor – for free

Blitheringeejit

Opportunity

Would it be OK to combine the hands-on bit with the Nigel Farage bit? With hands firmly clenched?

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Saudis go ape, detain Swedish monkeys at border

Blitheringeejit
Mushroom

@goodjudge

>>It's pretty much gone Pete Tong ever since,

Doesn't that rather depend whether you're in the arms business or not? Some would say it's getting better every day...

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Blitheringeejit
WTF?

Where does the money lead when you follow it?

One thing which puzzles me about the ever-increasing military horrors being visited on almost everyone in the region, from Aleppo to Aden - who is making and selling all that ordnance?

I know who supplies Saudi, Kuwait, UAE, Qatar etc - that would be "us", the UK, US, France, Sweden and the rest of the "West". Given that all the regimes we're selling to are despotic, this is blatantly hypocritical in terms of anything we might call an "ethical foreign policy", but it's irresistably lucrative, because that's a LOT of hardware, with accompanying profits and jobs, and it's politically acceptable in the supplier counties because none of their folks are being shot at.

But who makes and sells the bullets that ISIS, the Houthis etc are firing back? What are the manufacturer's stamps on that ordnance? There seems to be no shortage of supplies, so if it's us selling to them too (albeit via circuitous and anonymised routes), how immoral is that?

And if it isn't "us", how rubbish are "our" arms salesmen?

Morality makes my brane hurt.

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Osbo: Choose a f*cking IoT fridge. Choose spirit-crushing driverless cars

Blitheringeejit
Thumb Down

Re: 100Mbps? Heaven

Likewise, my biggest speed problems are in areas which aren't really rural (like Cornwall or the Hebrides, where I understand connectivity is excellent) but are on the edges of urban areas - say places with a ~5Km copper run to the exchange. At one site I work with, BT have listed the cabinet down the road as "Imminent" for FFTC, which should make a world of difference - but this "Imminent" status has been in place for over a year, with no sign it actually happening. Grrrr...

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Blitheringeejit
FAIL

Fridges schmidges

"Osbo was tight-lipped about exactly how the government would bring in broadband download speeds of up to 100Mbps for most Brits if re-elected in May."

We already know - from what they did with rural broadband strategy. He'll throw taxpayer's meeellions at BT, who will say they'll use it for broadband rollout, but will actually spend it on shareholders dividends, executive bonuses, and foopball rights.

But at least that puts urban broadband strategy on an equal footing with rural broadband strategy - "we're all in it (=fucked) together".

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Price slashed on Reg-branded Swiss Army Knife

Blitheringeejit
Stop

But what use is it...

..without a thingy for getting boy-scouts out of horses' hooves?

(Or should that be "horse's hoofs"..? You can never find a pedantic grammar nazi when you need one...)

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Rosetta probe to try contact with Philae lander on Thursday

Blitheringeejit
Coat

Don't see the problem...

...can't they just ask the lander to send them a GPS fix?

No, wait - erm...

/coat

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Fight back against illegal GCHQ spying with PAPERWORK!

Blitheringeejit

Re: So they want...

The location itself would of course be the bottom of a locked filing cabinet stuck in a disused lavatory with a sign on the door saying 'Beware of the Leopard'.

I believe this is a legal requirement for such disclosures.

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BY JUPITER: The science behind Friday's Solar System light show

Blitheringeejit
Headmaster

A moon with no view?

>> 67 moons – although not all are visible

Are you sure? If so, I believe you may have solved that ol' Dark Matter problem....

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IBM details PowerPC microserver aimed at square kilometre array

Blitheringeejit
Joke

It's a fine line....

...between watercooled and hosed. Mixing electrickery and water can only end badly - that's why I don't keep my data in the cloud.

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Jellybean upgrade too hard for Choc Factory, but not for YOU

Blitheringeejit
WTF?

So is Firefox safe or what?

I'm confused - I use Firefox on my Android 4.4.4 phone, so am I using Google's flawed Webkit, or a different Webkit installed as part of Firefox (which I understand is a webkit browser)?

Boffinaceous expertise please!

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Future imperfect: A UK broadband retrospective

Blitheringeejit

WiMax - yes, what DID happen to that?

>> In PCW, we boldly asserted that WiMax would start to be more widely available in 2008. Still waiting for that one.

Areas which get a really bum deal from ADSL include those on copper runs >3Km from the exchange, or indeed areas which HAVE FFTC but where the cabinet is > 1Km from site, so ADSL speeds are stuck around 2Mb/s. WIMAX really ought to be the best option for the last hop in areas like that. So what did happen to it?

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Did rock-hard aliens turn young Earth MOIST? New probe data emerges

Blitheringeejit

What I've never understood about this comets and water business is...

...the assumption that just because the earth was "too hot for water to exist in a liquid state", that all the water would therefore disappear completely from the planetary aggregation, and need replacing from some other source like comets. Assuming that the original matter from which the earth accreted did contain water (would that be the case?), then as the planet was (or became) too hot for that water to be liquid, the water would vapourise - but if the earth's mass was roughly the same as it is now, surely the vapour would simply have hung around in an atmosphere within the planet's gravity well, rather than disappearing off into space - just as water vapour stays within the gravity well now, because only hydrogen and helium are light enough to disappear off into the great black yonder.

And then when the planet cooled down again, the water vapour in the extended atmosphere would have condensed into liquid on the surface, and formed the oceans.

Any astro-boffins out there care to explain why this shoudn't be the case? Genuinely interested...

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So this Saudi Prince calls and asks why he can't watch movies ...

Blitheringeejit
FAIL

For once, the tech support boot was on the other foot - I called them.

Couple of years ago HSBC's online business banking service started nagging me to install their security software to make my online banking "safer". They offered installation options for Mac OS and Windows - but I use linux, not least because I'm concerned about online security. So after a few weeks of being nagged at every login to install software which doesn't exist, I phoned their Internet Banking tech support line and asked them if it was possible to stop the nagging.

When I'd explained the situation, their *Internet Banking tech support operative* replied "What's linux?".

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Brit smut slingers shafted by UK censors' stiff new stance

Blitheringeejit

Re: Come again?

>How can female ejaculation be "life threatening"?

Maybe something to do with proximity to an electrical socket?

In which case we should ensure that all electrical installations are clearly labelled with graphic illustrations of the potential hazards...

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Blitheringeejit
Coat

Fscked already

May I be the first to grass up El Reg for hosting a picture of me fisting my coat..?

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Pity the poor Windows developer: The tools for desktop development are in disarray

Blitheringeejit

Re: Assuming an application is an application .....

>>We do multi-PC networked control systems. They can't be web (though they are networked). They don't make much sense mobile.

So you don't want to run your control apps on tablets which people can carry around the shop-floor with them? Mobility can be useful on a LAN too.

So you might want to look at Cordova, using JS sockets for the network comms. Such stuff can't work on t'internet, so doesn't fall into your definition of "mobile" - but it works nicely for control apps running on a LAN, and gives you the kind of socket-level comms you'll be used to.

And the same code will run (or only need minor tweaking) in a desktop PC browser.

Network sockets are an oft-overlooked feature in JS, because everyone thinks of it as an internet thing. Shame it's such a bastard to develop in. :)

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Toyota to launch hydrogen (ie, NATURAL GAS) powered fuel cell hybrid

Blitheringeejit

Dreaming

If research into hydrogen-powered vehicles eventually results in a massive uplift and cost-drop in hydrogen storage and management tech, doesn't that have some potential to solve the storage problem which besets renewable leccy? So rather than building massive tidal lakes or pumping water up mountains with spare capacity when it's windy/sunny, you just electrolyse water and store the hydrogen locally, then fill your car up (or run your central heating) when you need to?

Just askin' ...

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EU battles over 'anti-terrorist' passenger records slurper law

Blitheringeejit
Flame

@btrower

> The state exists at our pleasure.

This must be a usage of the word "pleasure" of which I was previously unaware...

> It has no legitimacy otherwise and should be opposed if it continues to exert authority beyond its mandate. This battle has already been fought and won and our rights were paid for with the blood of our forefathers.

No they weren't. As you say yourself, "At the end of the day, 'might makes right'" - power has accrued among the mightiest, or in more recent cultural parlance, the richest.

> The power of the state has a limit and that limit has long since been passed.

I wish I believed this.

>There *must* be some avenue whereby people who disagree with the government of the day can organize, protest and if need be make their wishes plain with civil disobedience.

Yes - but there are laws against engaging in any and all such activities. These are largely enforced at the discretion of the police, but given that for anyone to notice, such activities would have to happen in London, and therefore the police in question is the Met, it's bound to end badly.

> If no such avenues exist, then we exist in a tyranny which does not have legitimate authority over us.

Well spotted, full marks.

> The representatives of the state break the covenant whereby they gained their power in the first place.

As above - they gained their power in the first place by being bigger and badder (and more recently richer, and therefore able to subcontract bigness and badness out to lowlier grunts), so no convenant applies.

> A portion of our fundamental laws are designed precisely to ensure we are still able to regain control of our government.

No, a portion of our fundamental laws are designed precisely to prevent this (RIPA, Official Secrets, Terrorism legislation, and the tacit understanding that standing in the street holding a placard constitutes a breach of anti-terrorist legislation if the plod on the ground decides it does). There is a second portion of our laws which were designed precisely to make us *think* that we have rights, but these are always secondary to the first portion, and are meaningless in the absence of a proper constitution anyway.

>We still have the power, by virtue of our numbers, to enforce our will.

Depends on whom you mean by "we" - most people think and vote the way they do because the rich people control their world-view in a way which keeps them scared and stupid. So they vote for the lizards because they're afraid that the wrong lizards will get in (pace Douglas Adams).

I, of course, am not stupid - heaven forefend - but since being not-stupid makes me a member of a small political minority in the modern British world, I AM pretty fucking scared.

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Yes, Virginia, there IS a W3C HTML5 standard – as of now, that is

Blitheringeejit
Joke

>> So in general, it's now a requirement that IE (all curent versions), Firefox, Chrome and Safari are fully supported by any public-facing website.

Damn. I was hoping that this announcement meant that my websites only had to pass the W3C validator, and as long as they pass, I can blame any browser-specific display issues on the browser developers, and walk away whistling a merry tune.

Isn't that the point of having standards - correct allocation of blame?

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Comet Siding Spring revealed as flying molehill

Blitheringeejit

Re: 450m molehill?

>Do you need it spelling out?

No. I just wanted to use the phrase "intergalactic mega-moles", because that's exactly the kind of thing the internet was invented for.

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Blitheringeejit

450m molehill?

Very relieved that I don't have moles like that in my garden.

Unless El Reg is trying to tell us that all comets are really spaceships used by intergalactic mega-moles to travel around the multiverse..? I do hope so.

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Spammer uses innocent hacked blogs to punt NAKED PICS of JLaw, McKayla Maroney

Blitheringeejit
Facepalm

Am I the only one here...

...who has never heard of any of these people?

Thank god someone is providing engaging entertainment to distract us from all the war, pestilence and grinding poverty that a lot of the world has to live with every day (some of it generously funded by my own tax-pounds).

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Bruges Booze tubes to pump LOVELY BEER underneath city

Blitheringeejit
Coat

Infrastructure

This is encouraging - but can't boffins come up with some way of transporting BEER over an internet connection? Not only would this solve the inter-plant transport issue (using VPN) but it would also enable us to buy our own BEER directly from the brewery, by adding a sparkler tap adapter to a spare router ethernet port.

This new technology would dispense (sic) with transporting "packets" over the network layer, and transport "bottles" instead - and there might be problems with compatibility between European brewery BEER streams (in litres) and UK router output, which would have to be in pints.

But these are just engineering problems - surely if we can build a Large Hadron Collider, an internet-based Beer Transport Protocol shouldn't be beyond us? We could call it BTP/IP ...

(Mine's not the one I'm nicking the wallet from in the icon...)

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Blitheringeejit
Pint

Upvote ...

sir/madam, for use of the excellent and under-used word "trub".

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Tripadvisor site coughs to card data breach for a potential 800k users

Blitheringeejit
Holmes

Some mistake surely...

>a possible flaw in its mobile application

Really? A mobile card payment app with possible security flaws? Blimey guv, whodathortit?

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What does a flashmob of 1,024 robots look like? Just like this

Blitheringeejit
Pint

I think you ought to know...

....I'm feeling very depressed.

I wonder what sort of real people personalities (TM) would be appropriate for the botling hordes? Perhaps suitable neuro-patterns could be harvested from London commuters, or Glasto-goers..?

Beer, partly because it's Friday, but mostly because

a: if all goes according to plan, things like this will be doing my housework in a few years time;

b: if the plan goes horribly awry and the botlings take over, I'll need a feckin' beer.

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Why your mum was WRONG about whiffy tattooed people

Blitheringeejit

Would it work on...

...shaved hamsters?

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