* Posts by Tim99

416 posts • joined 24 Apr 2008

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Right Dabbsy my old son, you can cram this job right up your BLEEEARRGH

Tim99
Unhappy

Re: Desk name plate and worn name ID for all

Presbyopia has crept up on me and I can't read without glasses. My choices in the chestal area are to either go in close so I can peer at their name within the focussing distance of my glasses or if I am looking above the lenses I can move quickly backwards and squint. Neither option is likely to inspire the confidence of the owner of the chest.

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Tim99
Coat

Re: Memory for names

I now live in Australia - It's easy (Monty Python).

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Telstra builds trans-continental land bridge for data

Tim99

Re: Living in Perth....

@Steve Davies 3

I use Ghostery, Adblock, ClickToFlash and a custom hosts file. You do know that some adblockers just stop the ad from being displayed? Some of the content is still downloaded.

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Tim99

Re: Living in Perth....

True. but traffic within Oz is often OK. The problem is offshore data. Even the onshore sites tend to load their website pages with advert and framework stuff that has to come from halfway around the planet. So does that mean that our experience in Perth will be further degraded to support Melbourne and Sydney?

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Microsoft points PowerShell at Penguinistas

Tim99
Windows

I've wrestled with MS software for nearly 34 years

It is a trap.

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Spotify springs bloody leak as losses grow to $197m – report

Tim99
Coat

Re: 40% headcount increase!?

Subordinates multiply at a fixed rate regardless of output.

Professor Parkinson

Unless something else is going on here as well, it is unlikely to be Parkinson's Law - The formula for which generally only gives 5-7% staff increases per year. Oh dear, maybe the extra staff are lawyers?

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SOD TABLETS, if you want to get anything done travelling get a ... yes, a LAPTOP

Tim99
Gimp

I know that I'm a bit dim...

...but wouldn't most of the upload problems have been trivial if your iPad took a SIM card with a cheap plan? Even if you had a laptop, how were you going to get the photos off your SIM card and back to base, unless you sent them by post or courier?

The last time I was in the UK, I got a rechargeable SIM card with 6GB of 4G data for £17.00 - Most of the hotel WiFi that was available was slow and expensive - 4G worked almost everywhere that we travelled.

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Tesla Powerwall: not much cheaper and also a bit wimpier than existing batteries

Tim99

Re: Could work for me

Hi Neoc, I'm (semi-)retired now so I am at home for much of the day near Perth and get full advantage of solar power. Short sleeve shirts are OK here, and when I was working I kept a tie in the office/car for the 3 meetings a year I might need one. Before I retired, we set the aircon to come on at about 10:00am so we had free sunshine cooling the fabric of the house for when we came home.

Before aircon some people used to sleep on the beach here because their houses were too hot at night. It could be worthwhile to look at how well your house is insulated and if it is worthwhile getting ventilation or additional insulation/heat reflection for your roof-space - We found that putting up some solar screening on our exposed window helped (deciduous trees are good if you can spare the water).

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Tim99

Could work for me

Richard,

I live where it is hot and sunny. Most of us don't start our day with "flipping the switch on 1,200 watts of air-conditioner and fire up the 2,400 watts' worth of iron to get the wrinkles out of shirts". The house is usually cooler in the morning, and we would be unlikely to have the single 5kW "cool only" split system air conditioner in your link. What we would have is solar panels which would be generating power when the sun came up and the house started to get hot. If we had bought our aircon in the last year or two we would be more likely to have two modern 2.5KW systems which would draw a maximum of 0.42KW each, but we probably would not have both of them running flat out at the same time.

If you live somewhere really hot, it is also unlikely that you would be wearing a long sleeved, crisply ironed, shirt with a tie :-)

Would a single 7kW or 10kW system give me all the power I need with a maximum draw of 2kW? Probably - Except for a few days in the middle of winter where it might be a bit tight, but I could always look at running a cheap 4kW petrol generator for a few hours to charge the batteries. I would also look at putting a "soft start" power supply on my fridge, or paying the extra for a DC powered one.

Would I buy one now? No, but I might in 5 years where the cost is likely to have come down by half.

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London Coffee Festival: Caffeine, tech and martinis on show in Shoreditch

Tim99
Thumb Down

Wot no Aeropress?

Can be a bit of a faff, but it makes really good coffee: Wikipedia link. It's cheap too.

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Why should I learn by ORAL tradition? Where's the DOCUMENTATION?

Tim99
Facepalm

Trainers

A long time ago, I was put in charge of computing in our large research group and charged with running Novell 2.0a training courses for some of our scientists, engineers, and support staff. We employed an external trainer to teach the courses. The first one lasted 4 days and it was all going well, I thought, until near the end of the second day when at the request of the trainer I brought in a 40cm long boxed set of the Novell documentation. I expected protests from the trainees that they could not be expected to read all of this; but after me spending a few minutes showing them the main index all seemed well.

At the end of the afternoon, just I was congratulating myself as to how well it was going, I was approached by the trainer who asked me if he could borrow the manuals. "Sure" I said, "Didn't you bring your own?". His (paraphrased) reply taught me a valuable lesson: "Oh, the company does not allow it's trainers to have access to the manuals. If they did we would read them, learn the subject, and get a better job actually using it. We only have access to the company's own training materials that I have here to teach the course". I told him that I had spent a few hours reading the Novell documents and had successfully installed the several networks that we were using for the courses, and he said that he had never actually used Netware except to log in and run the course materials. Hopefully this was an exception...

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Turnbull's Digital Transformation Office is actually working!

Tim99

@Big-nosed Pengie - iOS

A few nights ago the head honcho of Centrelink was interviewed on TV. Among the more interesting things he said was that they will not (be able to) increase staff numbers, so if the punter wanted service without waiting, they should go online. A brief discussion followed about young mums; and then when asked about older pensioners (a large portion of their users) having difficulty with computers he said that they should use Apps on tablets. He particularly praised the iPad.

I'm a volunteer teacher for seniors, and I would agree. I have posted before about this: here and here: It's all to hard for some people.

I suspect that unless the punter has significant PC experience, or cheap access to a techie type person, that this is also true for a significant portion of younger people too - Most of whom can't afford a regular payment of the $150-250 that they will be quoted to keep a malware riddled PC working. Whether they have an iPhone or not is another matter...

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C++ Daddy Bjarne Stroustrup outlines directions for v17

Tim99
Joke

Re: C++

Now all we need to do is take that object-oriented stuff out...

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Love-rat fanboi left bobbing for Apples in tiny Japanese bath

Tim99

Re: Shakespeare was right..

Please celebrate Shakespeare's birthday, but the quotation is "Heaven has no rage like love to hatred turned - Nor hell a fury like a woman scorned." William Congreve, The Mourning Bride, 1697

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GDS monopoly leaves UK.gov at risk of IT cock-ups, warns report

Tim99

Re: Government technocrats

@localzuk

I gave you an upvote.

I agree that people don't engage with systems that are clunky and complex. A simple easy to use interface, if well designed, shields the user from the data store which can be as complex as required. COBOL is still used in a lot of systems, for instance I believe that it still lurks within DVLA systems. A lot of legacy banking type applications use old z/OS and/or COBOL but the punter sees a web-based front end.

Facebook, I think, uses their own customized Linux across much of their systems Being old, I consider Linux to be a *NIX, although I admit that I might be biased towards systems that have a BSD legacy.

You may believe that I might be discounting new technologies, but I have developed stuff using them until very recently. One thing that I have noticed is that putting system logic in the interface almost always causes many problems, particularly with maintainability - I have seen several JavaScripted applications that do this.

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Tim99
Unhappy

Government technocrats

I have worked in the Scientific Civil Service (a long time ago); then as a science/technology specialist and advisor in a very large public organization; then as the senior technical bod in a high tech private company; and then, until I retired, as the MD and major shareholder of a tech/consulting/software/science company. I have a radical idea. Why not go back to the old days when the UK science/tech civil service used to be "a job for life".

They used to oversee all of this stuff. For a large project you would have a (very) few (very) short term technical consultants in to teach/mentor the full time civil servants. The government types knew that, short of gross moral turpitude, they had a job for life - So they tended to make decisions based on their long term careers inside the service and (I can say this with a straight face) for the general good.

This tended to avoid the responsible people choosing whatever technology was new and likely to gain them employment outside the service. I have personal knowledge of a large public service contract in the late 1980s that was awarded because it used the new, shiny, coming-thing that was Sun kit. The project was implemented, and then the staff left for private enterprise. Something similar happened with Java in the mid to late 1990s...

It seems to be a mind-set issue - Way back then if you asked a public servant what they did they would tell you that they were employed in the public service. They did not say that they were a network engineer. This stuff worked really well until the commercial and political fiddling and cronyism that came in later. To encourage good people to stay, salaries were at least comparable with those outside (not now)."Special Merit" promotion grades were available to skilled people - If you were good at your job you were promoted, but you still did similar technical work. A "normal promotion" generally meant that you stopped doing what you were good at, and became an administrator (which many techie types are very bad at). Obviously there were the typical project creep/budget and implementation problems that you would expect, but there was little perception of practices that tended toward subornation.

Anyone who says that the old fossils that might result in the decision making process would mean that progress will stall, probably does not understand the basic problem. It is not all about RoR and Javascript and whatever is new and cool - What works, and is still probably needed, is mostly large *NIX systems, z/OS and an infrastructure to handle generic web traffic. So more open source, HTTP, and COBOL please.

I am expecting a lot of down votes from people who do very well with the current, broken, regime...

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America was founded on a dislike of taxes, so how did it get the IRS?

Tim99

Re: It is a natural consequence ...

... of having many state employees. You have described a consequence of Cyril Northcote Parkinson's Law. He was one of the first people to formulate the inevitable increase in the public service in a 1955 article in the Economist. Describing this as a state/government problem is, perhaps, unfair - This phenomenon can be observed in any large organization including private companies.

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Philip Glass tells all and Lovelace and Babbage get the comic novel treatment

Tim99
Coat

Headline?

I thought that Mark might have been reviewing cartoons featuring Linda, not Ada...

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The Walton kids are ABSURDLY wealthy – and you're benefitting

Tim99

Re: Fallacy

Tim,

" A 3% net profit margin is excessive now?"

I too have run businesses, I would be more interested in what sort of return the principals were actually getting - You know the ones that include "salaries", "fees", "rentals" "charges" etc.

Before I had a company where I was the main shareholder, I ran a high-tech business for a banker who could always adjust the books by paying himself a very large salary whenever the net started to look too high. He also charged the business for the rentals on a Mercedes 600 saloon and a coupe, etc. Just before I left he sold it, but removed these charges so the net look a lot bigger...

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Tim99

Re: Problem?

Charity actually doesn't bring that much benefits since in the US people seem to just deduct them (up to 50%) in income taxes, and which percentage of the money is actually used to help people in need?

After being on the Board for a number of years of a medium-sized but respected charity, I came to a regretful conclusion: Stop tax relief on all charities. That includes relief on donations and on charities' operations.

Most charities are run as a "business". They are not. They almost always seem to morph away from their core purpose and to increase their overheads by expanding the number of paid staff that they have (Volunteers are much harder to manage), or they subcontract their core activities to real businesses.. After a while, to ensure reliable revenue, they tend to expand to encompass more work that is done by a "real business" which does not have the tax break; or they do work that was previously done by governments, often with public money.

Large donations are often used to drive the donors' personal, political or business agendas. This can be potentially even more damaging when the charity is set up by wealthy "philanthropists".

Alternatively, if we are going to allow tax relief, how about relief being dependent on the charity being wound up after, say, 5 years - Any excess monies being directly given to the beneficiaries - Failure to comply would cause a full audit and any tax deficit to be paid by the directors...

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Because the server room is certainly no place for pets

Tim99
Joke

Re: No really, wire recorders have a much warmer sound.....

Actually, two very ancient and knackered Ampex machines were eventually stolen from deep storage. The insurance settlement bought four new PCs with audio software!

OK, BOFH, so what did you do with the ancient Ampex machines then?

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Bonking with Apple is no fun 'cos it's too hard to pay, say punters

Tim99
Gimp

Alternatively

A link with a bit more meat from the Pheonix article from Macalope at Macworld last week:

Reading comprehension: Misunderstanding Apple surveys continues apace

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Linux Australia hacked, warns personal details exposed

Tim99
Joke

Linux?

Linux Australia notified Australia's Privacy Commissioner about the breach and has tightened the screws on the rebuilt server. It has committed to better patching regimes.

The group has welcomed assistance from Computer Emergency Response Teams in identifying the exploited unknown vulnerability.

Or Theo could lend them a server running OpenBSD?

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To defend offshore finance bods looting developing countries of their tax cash

Tim99

Re: To put it simply....

Ossi,

Good point, but governments don't want increased productivity - They say they do, but they really don't. A nightmare for a government that has to pander to a small vested interest, is a high productivity economy that allows their population lots of free time. You can have only so much of bread and circuses before the proles start asking questions instead of being safely at work, or travelling to it.

This might be one reason why we have created so many "non jobs' since industries were off-shored. The last thing that our rulers want is a lot of over-educated people with spare time. The other effective mechanism of high levels of un(der)employment, or forced leisure can only be held at a certain level before the rioting mobs start setting fire to stuff.

I wonder what we will do when the current Indian, South American, and Asian work force is too expensive; and they too are replaced by automation and workers from still cheaper countries? I remember the 1970s and 1980s, when I was one of the people tasked with increasing productivity by means of automation - We were told that everyone would only have to work 2 days a week, and that would apply to our children too, who we should encourage to go into service and leisure related jobs...

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Tim99

Re: Must be like Quantum Mechanics

A. "Yes, because it's the workers in those countries who would pay corporation tax if it were collected. Thus tax dodging raises local wages".

Tim,

One of the things that could effect this is whether the supplying countries are sufficiently powerful and organized to set up an effective cartel.

I think that local wage taxation only fully applies when you go tax and price shopping between developing countries. If there was a similar cost for a raw material in all the developing (lesser developed) countries that could supply it, and the tax rate was the same for all of those countries, wouldn't the tax have be paid by the corporations and thus their shareholders and customers in the developed world, and not the local workers? Obviously some developed countries supply their own raw materials, and export their production surpluses weakening this potential effect.

I note that Australia (and Brazil) were/are major suppliers of tantalum - Did the destabilization of world prices cause the war lords of the Congo to become significant suppliers (up to 10%) or was that an effect of them effectively enslaving their workers and undercutting Australia and Brazil?

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Microsoft drops Do Not Track default from Internet Explorer

Tim99

@AC

They could look up Yahoo while they're at it: "Yahoos are primitive creatures obsessed with "pretty stones" as Defoe considered them...

Lemuel Gulliver, Gulliver's Travels Part IV: A Voyage to the Country of the Houyhnhnms (1715) by Jonathan Swift.

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Firefox, Chrome, IE, Safari EXPLOITED to OWN Mac, PCs at Pwn2Own 2015

Tim99
Joke

I will be (nearly) secure

OS platform fan boys, you are not secure.

I have a computer that I can set up with only the default install of OpenBSD on it and curl.

Then I can curl the websites I need and download them; then transfer the files that I created to a computer with a browser. Now, what can I use to do the transfer? Maybe SFTP; copy to floppy; burn to CD; transfer to USB - Oh crap, they are all potentially insecure.

I suppose I could always write my own compiler and OS and browser...

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Ex-cops dumped on never-hire blacklist for data misdeeds

Tim99

@45RPM

I worked with police officers in the 70s and early 80s. Trust me, Life On Mars was closer to being a documentary than dramatic (science) fiction.

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Oi. APPLE fanboi! You with the $10k and pocket on fire! Fancy a WATCH?

Tim99

Function and cost

My Longines watch was bought by my father in 1942 for £5 - Or a nearly 2 weeks wages for a working man. It is now worth about £1,000 or nearly 2 weeks wages.

It has been cleaned/serviced 5 times in its lifetime. The last one was 2 years ago and was £150. The total cost of ownership, so far, in real money is about £0.20 a week. I think that I can afford that for something that tells the time, looks good, and of course has a certain reverse-snobbery chic.

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The secret of Warren Buffett's success at Berkshire Hathaway

Tim99

The Three Threes

My father was an accountant/senior local government officer, and one of the early people who invested local government money in OTC Spot Markets. He said that for much of his working life retail/high street banking was the "Three Threes" - Borrow at 3%, lend at 3% more than you borrow, and be on the golf course at 3:00pm.

Fortunately he had retired when we all started paying ourselves too much for too little, Then came deregulation and the Big Bang when merchant bankers started playing with the money that little old ladies had put into retail bank investments.

I remember when interest on my mortgage was 18% and everybody was in an inflating market (partly due to poor tax practices and high brokerage commissions). One of the upshots was that when inflation was high, mortgagees were encouraging people to trade-up based on their apparent increase in collateral on their homes.

Before that period mortgage lending was almost sensible, a mortgager would expect a 10% deposit and only lend a first-time buyer 3 times their salary (or if you were a couple 2-2.5 times their combined income) - But only if they had a secure job. How the hell did we get to people being lent 8 times their salary in times of apparently low inflation? This seems to drive relative house prices higher, and pushes all linked prices up. This might be a reason why many younger people will be unable to purchase their own house - Whether that is a bad thing, or not, I don't know, if we compare, say, the relatively high rental property share in Germany to that of the UK.

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In assault on American values, Lockheed BLASTS PICKUP with RAYGUN

Tim99

Re: @Chemist (again)

I admit in my first reply to your original post I should have really just pointed out that the use of 'energy' instead of 'power' was the problem I had with it.

Yes, my use of "energy" was unfortunate. I should have qualified it with the word "destructive"; but as I said, I am possibly senile; and I believe that I was using the term loosely. As you have gathered I was (am) a chemist too, and have been for 44 years with Chartered status for over 30 years, so I do actually know this stuff.

I suspect that you (perhaps like I would have done before I worked with high explosives) looked at the numbers inferred by my post and thought that they could not possibly be correct - Largish amounts of energy liberated in a very short period of time is outside normal experience for most people - Hence your incorrect assumption that you would need a RPG with a 20 tonne charge.

HP, as you know, to be relevant, requires a time unit. That is why I included the car calculation in my reply to you - This shows a larger energy over a much longer time - If the petrol was mixed with a stoichiometric amount of a condensed phase oxidizer (a Sprengel explosive) and then detonated it would also give a large GJ/s result because the detonation velocity would also be in the order of Km/s and the time taken would be similar to a military HE.

Energy is the ability to do work - An explosive is powerful because it does that work in a very short time.

Regards, Tim

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Tim99

@Chemist

"a RPG delivers very roughly a million times that amount of energy" ... kW is a unit of power not energy... If you meant 90 kJ are you seriously suggesting that a RPG delivers 90E9 J ? For comparison TNT has an explosive yield of ~4 MJ/kg.

Please show your workings ! (90E9 J is the rough yield from > 20 tonnes of TNT) That's some RPG. Shoulder launched ?

***********************************************************************************************************

I am old now (and possibly senile), but when I did this sort of thing as an explosives chemist for MoD over 40 years ago the rough rule of thumb was 1 cubic inch of composite HE generates 7million HP when it goes bang.

Many of us get confused about energy power and and the rate of doing work. I can get confused with units because when I was at school, we learnt ft-lb/sec, then c.g.s, then m.k.s; and then, when I was working, SI units. So, to see if I am in the right ball park, a few numbers:-

Petrol (which is a lot more energetic/Kg than TNT as it has no oxygen contained within it) has 8 MJ/L or 44.4 MJ/kg - In a 90 Kw car, that 1 kg would allow it to travel very roughly 15 km in 15 mins - The engine uses that 44 MJ in 900 seconds or very roughly 0.05 MJ/s (It doesn't because petrol engines are ~30% efficient).

TNT only has 4.7 MJ/kg. The more powerful composite high explosives would have >5 MJ/kg. A RPG warhead contains ~0.2Kg of explosive so that would be ~1 MJ. The velocity of detonation of composite is ~8000 m/s, and the maximum distance the detonation front has to travel within the charge is ~0.1 m. So the explosion takes 0.1/8000 sec or 1/80000 sec, therefore the RPG warhead explosion generates 1 x 80000 MJ/s or 80 GJ/s. Your 90E9 J value (90 GJ) has no time units.

The calculation based on the MoD rough rule of thumb:-

1HP = 7.46 E-7 GJ/s, so 7 million HP = 7E6 x 7.46 E-7 GJ/s or ~5 GJ/s. The warhead contains roughly 0.2kg of explosive with a density of ~1.5 which is ~130mL or roughly 8 cubic inches, so the total yield is 8 x 5 GJ/s or ~ 40GJ/s - Obviously this is about half of the "theoretical value" but allowing for differences in explosive material, velocity, and energy transfer; it is pretty close.

The secret of the large amount of destructive power in a small device is the very short time that it takes to be generated (The velocity of detonation within the charge being 8000 m/s). So, no you don't need >20 tonnes of TNT you only need 0.2 kg. RPGs can be particularly effective as they rely on the "shaped charge" effect, where most of the charge's energy is used to project a similar mass of copper in a jet with a tip velocity of ~10km/s and a temperature of ~500C into the target.

High explosives are generally classified as such if they have a detonation velocity of >3000 m/s. Gunpowder (black powder) as used in fireworks only has a deflagration velocity of 600 m/s and does not 'explode' unless confined.

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Tim99

@beast666

My Renault Scenic outputs 90Kw.

Good point. To put the directed energy weapon prototypes in perspective a RPG delivers very roughly a million times that amount of energy from half a mile away at a very low cost.

The main point of expensive weapons system is to funnel tax revenue such that a large amount of money finishes up, via corporations, in the control of a very few individuals.

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Office for Mac 2016 Preview: This letter will self-destruct in 60 days

Tim99
Gimp

Re: So, so happy ..

So, so happy ..

.. with LibreOffice.

That's all.

I would be too, if it did not require Java for full functionality on OS X.

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Telly behemoths: Does size matter?

Tim99

A bit of Social history

A woman down the road, who was "on the social", yet had a TV set with doors on.

As far as the "social" was concerned a TV with doors was "furniture", which the social services could supply to their clients. If it did not have doors it was classified as a TV or an electrical appliance which the social was not able to supply.

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To beat Oracle, find jurors who care about Leisure Suit Larry not Larry Ellison

Tim99
Coat

I've posted this before

I have written stuff that uses Oracle going back to version 4. A truth that should be repeated:-

Q. What do you call Oracle customers?

A. Hostages.

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BOFH in mugnificent return to Cash'n'Carrion

Tim99
Coat

@Jim 48

I agree, size matters. In an emergency your mug may be the only LART to hand.

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And the buggiest OS provider award goes to ... APPLE?

Tim99

Re: Apples compared to Oranges

@Britt

These are client systems, not minimal Debian or OpenBSD server installations that can do useful stuff without a browser - Have you tried running OS X or Windows without their bundled browsers? You can't uninstall the core components on either machine, but you can uninstall a lot more of Safari. I note that Chrome and Firefox also have more high level vulnerabilities than Safari, so if you were using OS X you might not bother.

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Tim99
Gimp

Apples compared to Oranges

OK, I admit it - I read the original article. Not the best headline unless Betteridge's Law applies?

The original article states that Windows 8.x and Internet Explorer combined have 278 vulnerabilities including 242 High Level vulnerabilities. OS X and Safari have 217 including 67 High Level vulnerabilities...

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Google opens 'Inbox' heir-to-email trial to biz users

Tim99
Devil

Open source

Google - We use "open source" so that you don't have to. E-mail is obviously far to much trouble for a business to do, so we will do it for you, and monetorize you to our real customers. You are not a customer of Google even if you pay them, just a resource to ber mined.

"Don't be evil", unless it helps us become more powerful and earn even more...

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It's not easy being Green. But WHY insist we knit our own ties?

Tim99

Re: @Tim99

Good point Chris. Have an Upvote, although I don't think many El Reg readers work 35 hours a week or less, and few don't commute, unless they work from home. Working from home was great for me when I was self-employed - It allowed me to work a 60+ hour week ;-)

I'm retired now, and have learnt a truth that you may hear from other retirees "Im so busy, I don't know how I ever had time for work".

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Tim99

Re: Let me get this right:

@Chris Miller

"Rich" meaning having free time, in modern times, tends to apply to those who are wage slaves.

We know that people in many hunter-gatherer societies only have to spend a couple of hours a day obtaining food and servicing their basic needs of procuring tools, accommodation and security. It was not until humans developed agriculture that most of us have had to work for much of our waking hours. Free time for many of us in the developed world is now quite limited after the time spent at work, travelling and sleeping. On the other hand we have a greater life expectancy and toothpaste.

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Tim99

Specialization and Corporatism

An interesting article Tim, you might have overdone this bit though:-

By splitting up tasks so that different people do different parts of them, each person can become better at that specific task. We can thus get more production for the same amount of labour. And as living standards are going to depend on what we can get from human labour (as Paul Krugman has said, productivity isn't everything but in the long run it's pretty much everything) then increasing the efficiency with which we turn labour into products will raise living standards.

As far as I can see, many larger businesses have effectively simplified jobs by making them more limited. This applies particularly in service industries, which are apparently where most of us will be working - Each "skill" is being de-skilled such that it can be easily and cheaply taught, such that the worker is easy to replace. I suspect that this is deliberate as each worker becomes the supplier of a fungible service - Eighteenth century industrialists understood this, so this is not new - Although it might seem novel to people growing up after WWII, before the deregulation revolution of the 1980s.

This, and a deliberate increase in structural un(der)employment may be a significant mechanism that will have the affect of making many people in the developed world worse off, with less free time.

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Why 1.6 million people will miss Microsoft's Windows Server 2003 date with fate

Tim99
Coat

@dogged

... related to embedding Java in it, which I suspect was done as proof that even Oracle can be made more obnoxious, obtuse, unfriendly and expensive if you try really hard.

As someone who was writing stuff with Oracle databases since Oracle V4, I can assure you that it did not need Java to make Oracle more obnoxious, obtuse, unfriendly and expensive - They managed that perfectly well with C...

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Developers, developers, developers! But WILL they support Windows 10?

Tim99
Joke

Re: Hmm

There was this Write Once Run Anywhere language... I've been using it for years... Very popular in the enterprise. Lots of work and lots of devs. Now what was it...

I think you meant C.

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Tim99
Windows

Re: we're already developing for Windows 10

@dogged

I was recently discussing software interfaces with a large manufacturer of a range of very expensive precision scientific instruments. Traditionally they are using Windows PCs for this (a long time ago they used VAXen or PDP11s).

They said that they were so annoyed with the uncertainty of Windows 7: 8; 8.1 and tablets that they were looking at a complete change of approach. One of the things that they are considering is to make each instrument with its own configurable internal web server. Its control parameters could be entered on its web pages by a PC, tablet, phone, terminal etc. There would be sufficient storage on each device that the data it had acquired could be transferred with a simple get after it had run.

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Turnbull says big telcos should subsidise bush comms

Tim99
Joke

Command and Control?

If only Australia had a publicly owned communication structure then the Government could mandate what was built...

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'It's NOT FAIR!' yell RICH KIDS ... and that's a GOOD THING

Tim99

Cutting the cake

A definition of "fair" that always seems to work is a cake that is divided between two people. The rule is that the cutter picks their piece of cake after the second person has chosen.

In a non 50:50 split there may be altruism shown by the first picker, so that the cutter benefits if they have not been "fair", but not in most cases (unless the chooser is on on a diet, or doesn't really like cake).

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