Feeds

* Posts by David Hicks

1243 posts • joined 22 Apr 2008

Pussy galore: Bubble-bath webcam spy outrage

David Hicks
Silver badge
Mushroom

Ratters

Only found out about these wastes of skin a little while ago. Hanging's too good for 'em, evil f*ckers.

0
0

Can Jonny Ive's new 'iOS Vista' SAVE the BBC's £100m BRAIN? Yes!

David Hicks
Silver badge
Go

Awesome

Truly a zeitgeisty summation of the state of the software nation!

3
0

Nokia Lumia 925: The best Windows Phone yet

David Hicks
Silver badge
Stop

Wasn't this the problem with Nokia's last generation?

"Nokia’s explanation is that all three, um, "flagships" sit at the top of the range, and each has its own USP."

Wasn't that exactly what destroyed their market-leading position in the first place? A whole bunch of models with overlapping features but no single 'top of the line' that had everything, so nobody knew what to buy?

5
0

Thousands of fingered crims, informants spaffed in web security COCK-UP

David Hicks
Silver badge
FAIL

Re: Hire peanuts, paid monkeys

LOL. And not just a little bit "Oh we forgot to renew" invalid either!

The certificate is not trusted because it is self-signed.

The certificate is only valid for facewatch-web01.dc2.iomarthosting.com

The certificate expired on 04/09/12 12:24. The current time is 19/06/13 14:16.

FAIL.

14
0

IT mercenaries and buy-to-let landlords are my HEROES - here's why

David Hicks
Silver badge
Pint

On contract 2.

So far no commute longer than half an hour, and I'm based on the South Coast. I couldn't just wait for the right one either as I quit my job overseas to come back to this miserable rock in the North Atlantic before I started looking.

Long may it continue to be this difficult.

1
0

Fifty, fired and fretful: Three chaps stare down CAREER MORTALITY

David Hicks
Silver badge

Re: Aged 41 I am worried reading this

If you have embedded experience you're probably golden. There always seem to be embedded contracts going.

Write yourself up a cv stressing the embedded stuff, search for roles on the various job websites (and give them your cv and allow it to be propagated). You should be getting pissed off with agent calls in next to no time.

1
0
David Hicks
Silver badge
Stop

Re: @David

Apple started with hobbyists and mail order sales, and grew organically.

MS started by publishing useful software and winning ever-bigger contracts with the likes of IBM.

Google started with the only useful search engine on the net and built an advertising empire on it.

Amazon... unsure, it has its roots in the last bubble, sure, but Bezos bootstrapped the thing himself.

None of these pursued the current start-up hype-and-get-bought cycle.

1
0
David Hicks
Silver badge
Stop

Re: I really hope...

Yeah I'm really not interested in the various forms of support or VC capital, or becoming one of the Old Street set, or in fact anything that can be described as "Start Up".

AFAICT anything that can be described as "Start Up" is a total, utter waste of time and money, with the caveat that if you're a "founder" it's worthwhile for you if you manage to suck some money out of angel investors or get acquired before the whole house of cards fall over.

2
1
David Hicks
Silver badge
Go

I really hope...

...that by the time I'm 50 I'm in charge of my own destiny.

A wise man once told me you'll never get rich working for somebody else. I'm mid 30s now and made the transition to contractor. By my mid 40s I want to be running a company, and make this sort of discussion moot.

1
0

Girls, beer and C++: How to choose the right Comp-Sci degree for you

David Hicks
Silver badge
Pint

Re: I'm sure there were two girls on my degree course

@thenim

I remember being a bit miffed at the time that we got the C and C++ courses as our basic intro to programming and the very next intake year were going to be taught Java, the way of the future.

Looking back I'm pretty happy the way it turned out!

0
0
David Hicks
Silver badge

American Spotted

Minor? Internship?

Dear god no. University is where you go to study one area of academic interest, and study it in depth. And then you get a graduate job that pays you properly, rather than considering it some sort of honour to slave away for virtually nothing...

I'll agree that communications skills are vital if you want to get very far.

2
0
David Hicks
Silver badge

Re: I'm sure there were two girls on my degree course

Discrete modulo mathematics (if that's what you mean, limited integer domains that wrap around and their mathematical properties) was absent from my coure at Southampton (97-00). I've picked it up recently from my crypto studies though. It is really weird.

0
0
David Hicks
Silver badge
FAIL

Re: I'm sure there were two girls on my degree course

>> The Slimelight, Electric Ballroom and the Wag in London, early to mid 1990s...

Ha! I started going to those in about '96 (though substitute Gossips for the Wag). It's just possible we met...

Fail icon because, well that's what happened to my Chem Eng. degree at IC due to a bit too much gothing. I ended up at uni in Southampton, frequenting "The Dungeon" and squeaking through with a 2:2 in compsci...

1
0
David Hicks
Silver badge
Meh

I'm sure there were two girls on my degree course

But it may have been one. My recollection is rather hazy and beer-clouded, and I spend most of my time socialising at the local goth club instead of the union.

1
0

Reg hack prepares to live off wondergloop Soylent

David Hicks
Silver badge
FAIL

Re: keen.

"IMHO, food should be merely fuel, sex should be merely mechanical procreation. I hope for a future in which we don't *need* to eat, drink, breathe, have sex. I really resent being at the mercy of my biological body, and like like to believe that humanity will be free of it eventually, turning all these things into pass-times, not requirements."

You have lost touch with your humanity. I recommend some councilling. You are not a robot and should not aspire to be one.

1
1
David Hicks
Silver badge

Wow, that seems like the holy grail of non-food. A thing you can eat that has bulk and fills you up but almost zero calories.

Though on further reading it's chewy and it smells bad...

0
0
David Hicks
Silver badge
FAIL

Re: keen.

>> Food is exactly a "gas tank refill"

And sex is a mechanical function that serves only to reproduce, right?

I pity people that think like you.

28
7
David Hicks
Silver badge
Mushroom

Re: Thanks to the intrepid Reg reporter..

>> I'm sure that there will be plenty of reports from the other end ...

Boom boom!

(Actually literally.....)

0
1
David Hicks
Silver badge
WTF?

Slaves to eating?

Eating is a pleasure. If you're a slave to it then you're doing it wrong.

And yes, even when it's salad it can be delicious.

12
0

What do you mean WHY is Sony PS4 so pricey in Oz?

David Hicks
Silver badge
Stop

@Mad Mike

Fosters?

You wouldn't be caught dead with that muck down under. You'd be turned away from the barbie if you turned up with a six pack of Fosters mate!

1
1

So, Windows 8.1 to give PC sales a shot in arm? BZZZZT, wrong answer

David Hicks
Silver badge
Linux

Re: Where do . . .

Not sure where they feature on those stats, but the Samsung Chromebook has been the topselling laptop on amazon.com for some months now - http://www.amazon.com/Best-Sellers-Computers-Accessories-Laptop/zgbs/pc/565108

And it's been number 3 on amazon.co.uk for ages too.

2
0

Google donates £1m to child abuse charity ahead of Whitehall meeting

David Hicks
Silver badge
FAIL

Politicians don't seem to understand

This stuff came up on "Any Questions" on Radio 4 last week. There was something about it a couple of weeks ago too.

Peter Hain seems to hold Google (and maybe Bing) responsible for the content of the entire internet. It seemed to be his opinion that Google - a search engine and indexer - ought to be taking down dodgy sites. He doesn't seem to realise this is like asking the yellow pages to shut down street drug dealers.

Some of the other panellists seemed to be under the impression that the smart people of silicon valley ought to have a solution to it all.

None of them seems to realise that the smart people are the ones creating the secure networks that get abused by these freaks, for reasons of protecting freedom of speech and preventing government interference in the first place.

So don't look for anything useful to come out of this. The UK government will probably blame google for not wiping their arse too.

10
0

BBC lied to Parliament about doomed £100m IT monster, thunder MPs

David Hicks
Silver badge
Stop

Must get in on this scam

£100 mil you say?

Nothing delivered you say?

Where does one sign up to be the provider of such "services" ?

0
0

HP adds 'Haswell' Xeon E3s to entry ProLiant servers

David Hicks
Silver badge
Happy

Re: I'd be interested to see the numbers

"Great little box once you stuff it full of hard drives and I cannot recommend it enough as a home NAS/server."

Yup. Got a 5-disk zfs pool going in mine, and yes they're around £100 quid on ebuyer again at the mo. I've paid more than that for far less powerful ARM NAS boxes in the past and the N40L blows them away.

I'm just hoping they do the low-price/cashback offers on the new variant too, as it sounds like it could have a bit more grunt to it and I always need more toys :)

1
0
David Hicks
Silver badge
Linux

I'd be interested to see the numbers

"Virtually all customers will want Windows Server 2008 R2 or Windows Server 2012."

I personally know of three of the N40L variants in the wild. None run windows. But then these are the toys of tech enthusiasts so may not represent SME usage.

2
0

Author Iain (M) Banks falls to cancer at 59

David Hicks
Silver badge

I don't know if this is what you want to hear but.... I considered the algebraist to be the 'light relief', almost a work of comedy, as compared to the other Iain M Banks books.

I enjoyed them all though. I plan to read the non-M books at some point.

Great, great author. Damn shame to lose him.

1
0

NSA Prism: Why I'm boycotting US cloud tech - and you should too

David Hicks
Silver badge
Paris Hilton

Been saying it for years

1. The US has even less privacy and protection on the books than we do.

2. That's for US citizens. For foreigners there's basically nothing.

3. The US has shown no qualms in the past in digging in to foreign individuals and companies' data for commercial advantage, let alone "security reasons"

4. It's long been known that various global intelligence agencies listen in on each others' citizens and trade the data, to skirt around local protections.

5. Trusting your data to someone else is *always* a bad idea, but add in the above and why the hell would you think anything you store with a US company anywhere in the world is even possibly secure against government snooping?

1
0

Australia shuts up shop for tech temps

David Hicks
Silver badge
Stop

S'alright, I've a 157...

So I'm golden. 'course the mutterings up-thread about the cost of the place are spot on.

The money's great but so are the expenses. Mind you the sun comes out more than twice a year over there.

0
0

Whitehall grants freetards safe haven until 2015

David Hicks
Silver badge
Stop

Re: Might blank CD-ROM/DVD/Blue-Ray sales pick up again?

CDs?

More likely to be hard drives full of stuff these days. I can fit a few thousand CDs on a device the size of my fingernail...

1
0

Lonely G-Cloud wanders in search of crowd o'er UK.gov vales and hills

David Hicks
Silver badge
Stop

Re: Still cynical about the cloud

>> I am surprised you haven't heard of Salesforce, Google Search or Facebook

Because internet services exist, 'cloud' has a defineable meaning?

Still not helping.

0
0
David Hicks
Silver badge

Still cynical about the cloud

I've still yet to see anything distinctly cloud-like, anywhere.

Virtual servers? Network storage? Sure. Cloud is marketing nonsense and always will be, until the next buzzword comes along. I give it another, maybe... 5 years before the local computing revolution starts, where people get excited about using their own processing power and storing their data locally themselves...

0
0

Intel unzips new Atom phone chip: Low power, fast - is that right, ARM?

David Hicks
Silver badge
Linux

Re: Intel is more open then ARM

>> In the case of the Raspberry Pi the things that aren't "open" are not part of the ARM core, they are multimedia components like the MPEG decoder and GPU.

And the bootloader. Pi is really not all that open when it comes down to it.

nVidia drivers are indeed closed, ATI/AMD drivers not so much (IIRC) and intel graphics definitely not.

0
1
David Hicks
Silver badge
Meh

Re: Intel is more open then ARM

>> Is that actually true or just something you want to be true?

If you look at (for instance) graphics drivers, then intel have embraced openness to a large extent. Some hardware never gets properly documented (one of the generations of atom IIRC) but most of their stuff is open and they even put a lot of effort into making quality drivers. Contrast this to ARM's mali stuff, which (last I looked) was in the advanced stages of reverse engineering because ARM were not publishing specs, let alone helping with driver code.

This may have changed, but graphics have been a stumbling block to truly open ARM systems for some time.

--edit-- this may no longer be true, it looks like ARM released a bunch of stuff last year.

Unsure how this applies to the likes of exynos, tegra etc etc

0
1

Jobs' 'incredibly stupid' prattlings prove ebook price-fix plot, claim Feds

David Hicks
Silver badge
Stop

Re: Costs

>> Like many works of art, I imagine a large chunk of the cost of production is in the skill and knowledge of the creator(s), not in the distribution?

>> After all if creating world class quality books (or songs, or symphonies, or films) was that simple we'd all do it ourselves.

I'm not saying there shouldn't be rewards to creating stuff, nor am I saying that anyone could do it. But rewards to the creator are not all that big a part of the book price. I have author friends and they don't get a huge chunk of the sale price whatever the medium, and my university professors would tell us that they got about 50p from a £20 book when we bought it for the course. They'd even give us our 50p back if we found an error.

Even so, what I am saying is that regardless of all that, if we factor out all of the physical reproduction and distribution costs, why the hell are ebooks *more* expensive? The only answer I can come up with is "the market will bear it", which I suppose is the basis of all pricing, really.

9
1
David Hicks
Silver badge
Thumb Down

Would be rather nice wouldn't it, if ebooks were priced according to what they really cost and what they really give you.

This short squirt of data cost less than a penny to reproduce and transmit. No printing costs, no distribution costs. You can't share it with friends unless you give them your device. If your device breaks you may be able to get another and a new download if we're still in business.

50% off seems a reasonable starting price. But obviously people will pay for the convenience, so they get away with charging more, for some reason.

5
12

How Microsoft shattered Gnome's unity with Windows 95

David Hicks
Silver badge
Thumb Down

Re: Microsoft *has* NOT won. AT ALL.

Most of the patents are likely trivial and trivially worked around, which is why a list of them is never made available.

It's a big game of bluffing and legal fees.

4
0

Spamhaus-style DDoS attacks: All the hackers are doing it

David Hicks
Silver badge
FAIL

Re: That is the trouble with security firms

Because it's far better that the exploit only ever get documented and passed around attackers, obviously.

And we've got absolutely no history of companies warned in private either ignoring security holes in their products and services, or suing people that point them out. Oh no.

Public disclosure of vulnerabilities is the *only* way we have to both warn everyone of what's going on and force the hand of the purveyors of the vulnerability. It is unequivocally A Good Thing (TM).

0
0

Ex-Microsoft man plans brand of consumer marijuana 'fine cigars'

David Hicks
Silver badge
FAIL

Re: Diego Pelican will buy smaller mom-and-pop dispensaries,

Good.

I f*ckin hate the hippy arsebags that fight *against* legalisation because it will let the corporations take over. Maaaaaan.

Sure, perpetuate the useless, expensive, senseless war on drugs because 'the man' is somehow keeping you down even when he legalises your favourite herb. Muppets.

2
0

Former Microsoft Windows chief: I was right to kill the Start button

David Hicks
Silver badge
Linux

Re: @David Hicks

Cool. I am definitely a linux guy but have held off recommending it to parents. Perhaps I will in future, but this time round it's too late -

I was at Dad's place yesterday and his hatred of the Win 8 machine he bought recently has turned him to the Apple side, there was a shiny new Mac sat on the desk in his study. Apparently "it's a bit different but it seems to work well", a contrast from the Win 8 experience - "I can't do anything with this stupid machine".

2
0
David Hicks
Silver badge
Stop

It's part of the new trend of forcing people to change the way they work because of your artistic 'vision', rather than actually helping people work better.

It forces people like my parents to relearn the interface, and dear god did it take long enough to get them to the comfort zone they were in. It forces people like me to relearn how to find programs and operate the machine.

The interface just sucks, sorry. That's why it's hated, because it's awful and it causes all sorts of trouble and extra work.

32
3

'Nothing will convince a kid that's never worn glasses to wear them'

David Hicks
Silver badge
Holmes

Re: Glasses.

Personally I'm waiting for the Google Monocle.

So much classier.

16
0

Think you're ready to make a big career bet? Read this first...

David Hicks
Silver badge
Pint

Contracting seems to be working here...

And as the salaries on offer for perm work are just insulting, I think it's where I'll stay for a while.

One sector I've noticed that never seems to dry up, ever, is embedded programming. Much of it now seems linux device-driver oriented, with QNX and bare-metal still pretty big. I've no idea if it's a growth sector, but there always seem to be roles available.

2
0

UN report says killer bots could fight WAR WITHOUT END

David Hicks
Silver badge

War No 81Q

Lets have our drones fight their drones, out over the sea, and nobody needs to be harmed.

0
0

UN to call for 'pre-emptive' ban on soulless robot bomber assassins

David Hicks
Silver badge
Thumb Down

The possibility of mass blinding of bystanders seems to have been a driver there.

It's good that laser anti-personnel weapons are banned.

14
1

Fancy some mobile filth? New logo tells you when not to bother

David Hicks
Silver badge

Yup. I opted out of orange's filtering after the time I was at a music festival and wanted to look up the lineup, only to find the site blocked for 'adult content'.

Of course the immediate solution (and I'm sure one the kids are capable of) is to install Orbot :)

1
0

Bill Gates: Corporate tax is not a moral issue

David Hicks
Silver badge
Stop

Re: Yup he's right y'know...

"Churchill as an example - NOT defending Coventry was the right decision but allowing hundrets of people that COULD have been safed to die is amoral. Yet NOT compromising ULTRA was more important. Same for bombing german cities - amoral since it killed innocents by the score yet better than the alternative"

This is not the same as what you said about celebrities and getting famous justifying whatever means it took to get there. This is also nothing to do with the situation at hand.

The coventry thing was a terrible decision to have to make and the ethics/morality would have been heavily weighed up and decisions taken painfully and with the best outcome for all people decided upon.

That you try to draw some sort of parallel between the "fuck you, I've got mine" culture of corporate multinationals, and painful decisions of wartime britain is pretty sick.

0
0
David Hicks
Silver badge
WTF?

Re: Yup he's right y'know...

"Quite a few famous people are famous because they behaved amoral and by doing so did the right thing."

So if you're famous that automatically makes whatever it was you did to get there 'right' ?

What.The.Actual.Fuck.

1
0
David Hicks
Silver badge

Re: Yup he's right y'know...

"If the members wish for uncompromised maximal profits then that is what the members want and what the directors have to aim for."

It sure is. Now, how often do the boards actually pay any attention to what shareholders want? LOL.

And if the members do actually want this and demand it of the board, then the members can also be called immoral, unethical assholes. Because all of the actors here are human beings and we can and should expect them to behave like reasonable examples of the species. When they start externalising the costs and not keeping up their end of the implied social contract, they should expect legislation.

"There is also the slight of hand anomalyof why pay £2 for something when the invoice tells you it should be £1.

If directors decide to overpay..."

BZZZZT. Analogy fail. There is no overpayment here if you abide by the tax laws as intended. In fact it takes a FUCK of a lot of time, effort and money to do what they do to avoid paying tax at the same level a company without the crazy international acrobatics would have to.

0
0
David Hicks
Silver badge
FAIL

Re: Yup he's right y'know...

"Yes, companies ARE required to do that. And have always been. It's called being profitable and companies that are not - die."

Not at the expense of all else. They are absolutely not required to be unethical or harmful to society. How these are viewed by individual people working for these companies is obviously very variable. But they are not, repeat NOT required to (for instance) use sweatshops or places they can pump effluent into the water.

People make the decisions to do these things. Regardless of the laws we can and should hold the people that run businesses to a moral standard. And we can do this holding by not giving them our custom.

3
0

OKPay suspends payment processing to all Bitcoin exchanges

David Hicks
Silver badge
Stop

Re: Bitcoin is a reaction

Nobody is really being hurt by bitcoin, it's neither big or useful enough. Take off the tinfoil hat. Actually don't take of the hat, the other bitcoiners wouldn't recognise you as one of their own....

1
2