* Posts by Kristian Walsh

985 posts • joined 10 Apr 2007

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Tim Cook: I'll give just a THIRD of what Gates gave to charity last year

Kristian Walsh
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Re: @Gordon 10

Tim Cook, the private citizen, has made a very generous gesture and should be applauded for it.

However, Tim Cook, the CEO of Apple, could do a lot more to meet the social responsibilities of the corporation he leads*. Things have improved since Jobs died, and the company reversed his policy of never giving to charitable causes, but for the size of the company, the amount of corporate citizenship spending is pretty shameful.

* Okay, you can argue that a corporation has no legal duty to fund charitable causes, but it's also true that if I see someone standing on a bridge rail about to jump off, I have no legal duty to stop and try to talk them out of it...

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Force your hand: Apple 13-inch MacBook Pro with Retina Display

Kristian Walsh
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@Norphy Re: no Ethernet

I think you've misunderstood how media access works on ethernet switches. Every client gets its own private, dedicated link to the switch, and the switch dynamically connects these links together as required.

Any half-decent 1000 Mbit Switch used in an office environment can maintain several parallel Gigabit transfers: the aggregate traffic through even a cheap a 24-port 1Gbit/s switch can be well over 20 Gbit/s. To a user, this means that your file transfer from Server A does not starve someone else's transfer from server B.

By contrast, Wifi makes every client share the same medium (even in 802.11n Multiple-In/Multiple-out networks you will have multiple clients accessing the same contended medium). Packet collision is common, and the aggregate throughput of the network is limited to the capacity of the shared medium. If you start to generate lots of traffic, then other users on the same accesspoint will suffer.

But it's not just performance: Wired networking is also inherently more secure than wireless, and that's the bigger reason for corporate IT managers preferring it.

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Kristian Walsh
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Personally I hated the way the "full screen" feature has been implemented in OS X - the animation lasts far too long, and is distracting in itself, but the real sin was putting it on a global hotkey (ctrl-Command-F) that clashes with so many applications' special-case "Find" functions. (Yes, the app's hotkey overrides the default, but only if its window is focussed: if the app you were looking at doesn't have keyboard focus, something else that you weren't looking at takes over your screen)

If this annoyed you as much as it did me, do this:

Open System Preferences › Keyboard. Click the Shortcuts tab, Select "App Shortcuts" entry in left-hand list. Press [+] to add a new application shortcut.

Choose "All Applications", and "Enter Full Screen" as the menu title. Then use any hard-to-press combination of modifiers and keys as the shortcut, and press "Add"

This technique also works for wresting the easily-hit Command-M away from the evil hands of "Window › Minimize"

(I wonder, has anyone ever deliberately minimised a window this way in OS X? Minimizing in OS X is a user-experience disaster that only exists because Steve Jobs wanted to show off how OS X allowed affine transforms on windows; hold down Shift while you click, and you'll see the "Slow-mo" animation is still there)

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Ford: Our latest car gizmo will CHOKE OFF your FUEL if you're speeding

Kristian Walsh
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Re: Drove a Ford 3 years ago with something similar

"One of the many reasons the English speaking think Europe is a bad idea (note the lack of national assignation)."

Apart from being ill-informed about both the presumption of innocence and jury trial under the Napoleonic legal systems, you're making another big sweep with that statement.

You don't have to travel far from England to find an English-speaking nation that has always been highly positive towards Europe, in the form of the Republic of Ireland. Even within the supposedly Euro-sceptic United Kingdom, Scotland and, to a lesser extent, that bit of England that was historically under the Danelaw (or "up North" in modern terms) tend to be pro-European. Only the South-East of England is home to strong anti-European views.

Further afield, Canada is quite a bit friendlier to the EU than the United States is, but neither are as suspicious of the EU as the average Southern English voter.

So, kindly don't label the rest of us with your own prejudices. Thanks.

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Kristian Walsh
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If it includes GPS, it'll know the difference between km/h zones and mph.

...except around the Northern Irish border, where the Republic's signage (km/h) and Northern Ireland's (mph) are so close to each other that they often share the same mounting poles.

As for reducing speed by cutting the fuel supply under software control, this isn't exactly new: it's how Cruise Control works on a car with electronic throttle control. All they're doing is limiting the user throttle input to that determined by the cruise set-speed (normally the pedal throttle setting overrides the value produced by the cruise-controller). Goods vehicles already have this system to limit them to 80 km/h or 100km/h (but there are many common ways to defeat it...)

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Hey, Woz. You've got $150m. You're kicking back in Australia. What's on your mind? Killer AI

Kristian Walsh
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Re: No wonder Apple won't talk to El Reg

Woz made a lot of money from Apple: about a quarter of a billion dollars by the time he "left" in the early 1980s. He then proceeded to spend as much of it as possible, on the logical grounds that he wasn't going to be able to use it when he was dead, and on the admirable grounds that dumping an un-earned fortune onto his kids would, on balance, be a gross dereliction of his duty as a parent.

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Windows 10 apps to rule them all – phones, slabs and PCs: Microsoft pulls out 'universal' tool

Kristian Walsh
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Re: The folly of a single user interface

(I meant "the ViewModel", of course. Great idea, confusing name... )

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Kristian Walsh
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Re: The folly of a single user interface

"Responsive UI" is just the same principle as "Responsive Web" - the top level container controls in your layout respond to the screen dimensions and lay their content out differently, so that the same "markup" produces a different UI (This already happens in Windows Phone versus "Metro" to a limited extent - "Hub" controls fit one column per screen on phone, but on tablet they're shown as a free-form multi-column layout).

Right now, you need to maintain separate layouts for Tablet and Phone, but with smarter container controls, it might be possible to use the same UI file. Personally, I think that'll only go as far as "get it to run" - for proper UI, you will always have to tweak each device's UI, but hopefully the bulk of the layouts will remain the same. As it is,the code that handles your app UI interaction (the ModelView) remains constant across all layouts (and all platforms, if you've thought ahead).

The other visual problem is of scale: put a touch app directly onto desktop and you'll see that every control is about double the height that it needs to be. However, "Metro"/"Phone" apps use a scaled co-ordinate system, so there is some scope for changing that scaling factor depending on whether you're using mouse or touch. Fix that, and they become fairly well navigable with mouse and scroll-wheel.

The devil, however, is in the details.

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Intel's cheap and Android's free: Not any more, says TAG Heuer

Kristian Walsh
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Fundamental mismatch...

... between the length of time people use watches for, and the length of time mobile phone APIs are supported for.

Some of the highest-priced watch models are more heirlooms than gadgets, but even a £100 watch will give you five to ten years of use. So, cast your mind back ten years in the mobile phone industry, and think of what "future-proof" OS choice a device maker would have made then. Now, go buy a phone running Blackberry, Symbian or Windows Mobile 6 today...

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German court slaps down Uber's ride-sharing app

Kristian Walsh
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Re: Innovation meet .... regulation or why Free enterprise is now a fairytale

Horseshit. If your "better mousetrap" involves exposing its users to higher risks so that you can make it cheaper, then you're not competing, you're cheating.

Taxis started out as unlicensed businesses in every part of the world. Why is it that nearly every part of the word imposes strict regulations on who can operate a taxi?

Predatory criminals haven't disappeared just because some super-entrepreneur has invented a JSON API or whatever techno-flimflam argument is put forward. Human nature is pretty much constant. Technology is only an enabler for what's already there.

Libertarianism is just as stupid an ideal as Communism. Both assume that people only act rationally, and in the best interests of society...

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Internet Explorer LIVES ON, cackle sneaky Microsoft engineers

Kristian Walsh
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Re: @ someone else

United States vs Microsoft Corporation was settled in 2001, three years after the case was brought. But lets stay in this century, shall we?

As the events of 2001 are so relevant now, let's run though what other things were news in 2001: well, beleaguered computer manufacturer Apple launched its portable music player "iPod", and the first release of OS X, its BSD-based replacement for MacOS 9, to very mixed reviews. Also the Linux kernel 2.4 was finally released. Windows had no releases that year, so you had "2000", "98" or "Me", as MS-DOS had only just been discontinued (last release in late 2000). Phone giant Nokia also launched the first phone to run their new Cross-platform OS, called Symbian.

Online, recent tech startup Google was continuing making a name for itself in search, with many predicting that even after just three years it might outdo AltaVista and Lycos in share of searches. Netscape continued its slow self-destruction - we'd still have to wait another two years for Firefox, the only good bit of the horrible Communicator package, to be made available.

For people who produced the stuff that hadn't yet been labelled "content", you could still get a GeoCities account back in 2001. There were no "blogs" by that name. YouTube's trip to the zoo wouldn't happen for another four years. Facebook was three years away, Twitter five. If you wanted to watch video online, you downloaded RealPlayer first. The Dot-com bust might have been over by then, but some players lingered on: If you lived in the selected metropolitan areas that it served, you could still buy your groceries from WebVan.com until the end of the year. If you were rich, you could get a T1 or ISDN Primary Rate line into your premises and reap 1.5 or 2.0 megabits of throughput. Mobile was GPRS at best, with most of the telcos too broke to roll out 3G after overspending for their operating licences.

So, lots there that's still relevant to today's computing industry, I'm sure you believe. Well, except that 2001 was also, like every year this century, the year when Linux on the Desktop was going to make it big.

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Angry Austrian could turn Europe against the US - thanks to data

Kristian Walsh
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Re: Whatever the outcome...

"David" has paved the way for an outstanding legal career!

I suspect this was always his goal. Rather than working with an Irish-based group, he absolutely insisted on being funded to go and live in Ireland for the duration of the action...

That's not to say I think his case is wrong...

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Should online pirates get the same sentences as offline ones?

Kristian Walsh
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GPL

You might read the actual text of the GPL licences sometime. It'll stop you accusing people of violation when all they've done is read, and followed, the conditions that are actually written in it, not the ones you imagine should be in it.

Curiously, your list of evildoers did not include Google, whose entire business is based on modified GPL software.

I'm not saying that Google is in violation of the licence terms, only that, just like those companies you don't like, they got a legal advisor to read the licence and tell them how they could remain compliant with it without needing to give their source-code away.

Personally, I would never release anything under GPL - the default clause of "or any later version" makes a mockery of the agreement, and allows for restrictions to be placed on the use of my works in future solely at the whim of whoever writes the next GPL.

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Kristian Walsh
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Re: The term "pirate" is a propaganda coup

Copying a song, book, or using a patented idea doesn't hurt the creator in any way whatsoever.

As an obvious expert on the concept, can you describe for me how a person goes from having an idea in their head to having a song, book or patent that is of use to other people? If you could identify the exact point in time at which the person gets some money to feed themselves during this process, that would be great, thanks.

You might also ask yourself how we ever got to the situation where you get to read a book that took its author two years of full-time writing to complete for less than the price of two shitty Starbucks coffees when it cost the author a hell of a lot more in lost wages to write it, even at minimum wage levels.

You wanted the work enough to obtain it, so why did you then make the conscious decision to obtain it in a way that gives its authors nothing in exchange?

And "exposure" comes under "nothing in exchange". There's no number big enough to turn zero cents per reader into a living wage.

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Apple Watch: Wait a minute! This puny wrist-puter costs 17 GRAND?!

Kristian Walsh
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Re: Need a bigger laptop bag

To be fair, it is innovative since nobody else has designed such a thin light laptop yet

This shows a shocking lack of knowledge of what the industry outside of Apple is doing.

Microsoft's like-priced Surface Pro3 is thinner, uses a more powerful CPU (Core M is optimised for low-power consumption), includes touch and is lighter if you attach a touch cover. Screen density is comparable, and personally I prefer the 1.5:1 ratio to 16:10 (Ideally, I'd prefer 4:3 for a work device, but nobody does that) If Apple are supposed to be the greatest hardware designers of our age, then why are they being outdone in "innovation" by what Microsoft did last year?

MS does stiff you for a keyboard accessory, but you do get a full-sized USB 3 port, and you can charge the thing, drive a display and use a peripheral at the same time without another easy-lose dongle. (If you think that's not important, you've never given a presentation - a major use-case for MacBook Airs, by what I see)

ASUS will do you a traditional laptop with a 1920x1080 screen display (not as sharp as the MacBook or Surface's 1440-line display), at the same thickness as the MacBook. ASUS mustn't have got the memo from Cupertino about what's possible on small metal enclosures either, because they also include multiple USB ports shave another millimetre off the thickness (12.3 vs 13.2 for Apple), and the whole thing comes in a US$699, or just a shade over half of the Apple product's price. [ Zenbook UX305 ]

I'm not telling you that you shouldn't be buying Apple - it is your money to spend, but do so knowing that what you're getting is not any better than anyone else's offering, just more expensive and less capable.

I currently use a MacBook Air for my laptop. I won't be considering this thing as a replacement for it. Had it offered three USB-C connectors, I could live with its other problems, but as shipped, this is nothing more than a $1200 Facebook receiver.

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HAPPY 20th Birthday MICROSOFT BOB

Kristian Walsh
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Re: Microsoft didn't understand the appeal of Program Manager...

I disagree: one of the things that I have found to be very handy about Windows Phone is the alphabetical listing of applications. Visual memory is easily confused by creating many identical "spaces" with different contents.

Maybe I'm just used to using terminals, but for stuff I don't use, it's a lot quicker to tap on a letter heading, choose the first letter of the app I want, and then launch it, rather than spasm through twenty screens of other crap to visually locate it*

I also launch applications by name in both Windows 8 (Windows-key then start typing its name), and in MacOS X by using a DragThing dock filled with the thirty-or-so things I'll ever use (DT supports type-to-select, and unlike Finder, its implementation is not brain-numbingly stupid).

(* Yes, I know iOS has a search-by-name function by swiping left from the app panel, but by the looks of it, I'm one of the few who does)

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Kristian Walsh
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Re: Comic Sans

Comic Sans is of great use to me socially. If I meet someone who claims to be a graphic designer, I ask them what they think of it. Then I ask them about Helvetica.

If they claim Comic Sans is irredeemable while holding Helvetica up as the flawless pinnacle of type design, I change the subject entirely - life's too short to listen to second-hand dogma.

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Hackers' delight? New Apple wrist-puter gives securobods the FEAR

Kristian Walsh
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It'll have the Apple logo

Look at it again. There's no Apple logo visible anywhere on the Apple Watch

— which I think is its fatal weakness in terms of sales.

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Kristian Walsh
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"Given the fact that it is a high profile device which will have wide adoption, "

That's a pretty big claim to just take as a given. How many BYOD iPhone users could have spared the retail price for their current phone, up front? Only people with that disposable income are in the market for an iPhone accessory that costs the same as a high-end SIM-free phone.

(The claimed parallels with iPad are specious. iPad was and is a product that could exist independently of other Apple gear.. I know several people who own iPads and not one other Apple product)

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Storm in a K-Cup: My SHAME over the eco-monster I created, says coffee pod inventor

Kristian Walsh
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Re: Bah ... philistines

French press = one of these: http://www.brookstone.com/webassets/product_images/700x700/750746p.jpg

To use: 1. Boil water, then LET IT COOL for 2-3 minutes; 2. Pour water over coffee to cover grounds; let stand for 10~20 sec. (grounds should foam a little) 3. Fill to full level and stir. 3. attach plunger top and let stand for 1-2 minutes. 4. Push down plunger and DECANT the coffee into a flask or jug.

If you use boiling water at step one, you'll burn the coffee and it'll be bitter; if you don't decant it you'll stew the coffee and it'll be bitter.

Regarding plastic-pod espresso, I much prefer the Lavazza "a Modo Mio" pod system - they've got more coffee in each pod than the smaller Nespressos.

I also like the Aeropress - I've had coffee from one several times, but I don't own one (I've so much coffee gear it's hard to justify getting more). I'm also a fan of good-old fashioned pour-over with filter paper: Chemex make some beautiful jugs to go with their filter-paper system...

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Nokia boss smashes net neutrality activists

Kristian Walsh
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" ill-informed political activism"

Well-informed political activism is the exception, not the rule...

Personally, I support the engineers' view of Net Neutrality, the one that most pro-NN posters here espouse, where performance differentiation within a given service class is forbidden.

... but I'm against the kind of Net Neutrality we'd actually get, the one that most anti-NN posters here describe, where differentiation between service classes will be forbidden too.

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HTC One M9 hands on: Like a smart M8 in a sharp suit

Kristian Walsh
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Re: Android hardware is good....

No, with Apple you always get one update beyond what that the hardware is capable of running.

Whoever signed off iOS 8 as suitable for iPhone 4S was living in a dream world... or deliberately trying to force customers to ditch the 4S and buy the 6 instead.

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Kristian Walsh
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According to the usual factory hobby-photographers, there's also a larger M9 on its way. Also, not a hardware change, but it's been widely "leaked" that this phone will be sold in a version running Windows 10 Phone when that OS becomes available later this year.

Not surprised they didn't change much. First, HTC aren't exactly swimming in money, and second: M8 was already a beautiful phone - especially the design and engineering of the antenna and rear casing, which makes Apple's later efforts with the iPhone 6 look clumsy by comparison.

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Google deal means game over for mobile payments firm Softcard

Kristian Walsh
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Re: Wow...

Yes, there's a strong whiff of anti-trust about this one. Google just bought a direct competitor to Wallet and shut it down.

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Denmark tops European tech table, two other Scandis right behind

Kristian Walsh
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Re: Scandis

Scandinavia comprises the countries of the Scandinavian Peninsula. Historically, that included Denmark as one-time possessors of Skåne (roughly "skaw-neh") in Southern Sweden, the region after which the peninsula is named. That little "å" in the name Skåne is a good signifier: if your language uses it, you're Scandinavian; if not, you're not.

(Wikipedia tells me that by this rule, Bavaria is in Scandinavia, which goes to show you shouldn't try to reduce things down to single rules ;) )

Based only on the views of people I've met, the Finns do not consider themselves to be Scandinavian, although the large minority of ethnic Swedes in the country may differ in that view. Icelanders consider themselves of "Scandinavian descent" rather than being Scandinavian per se. I've never met anyone from the Faroe Islands to ask them.

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Bloody TECH GIANTS... all they do is WASTE investors' MONEY

Kristian Walsh
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Sadly, it doesn't really matter what you'd pay money for. The only people whose opinions matter in the phone business are Telefonica, Verizon, AT&T, Vodafone, Hutchison, Orange, etc...

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Redmond boffins build coffins for exploit kits

Kristian Walsh
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Re: This:

"So, at a stroke, their tool has been rendered useless even before it's been used...."

It's feasible to build a space elevator. It doesn't mean we've got one, or that it'll be cheap or easy or likely to get one.

As it says in the article, the tool works precisely because current malware authors do not extensively use polymorphic code. Modern malware is far more complex than the kind of 1980s viruses that used this technique, and unlike back then, virtually all malware is written in high-level languages, with little visibility of where the machine instructions lie in memory.

What this technique does is make the job of making malware unidentifiable an order of magnitude more difficult: re-packagers can no longer rely on a simple change of their delivery script's obfuscation technique. Making malicious acts very hard to perform is the essence of computer security.

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Apple forks out nearly $2bn for two ripe, green data centres

Kristian Walsh
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Re: Servicing that demand?

If you made a panel that could convert squally drizzle to energy, Ireland's the place for it, but solar? no...

Wind is the only readily available renewable/"green" in Ireland, and that's not stable enough for a data centre. Power to serve the facility's base-line load has to come from somewhere, so I'm curious about whether they'll surprise the world and have their contractors address this reality with a technical solution (there are a few storage options, but they're expensive and untested at this scale), or go with routine and deploy the usual eco-hogwash of compensatory planting, carbon credits and technology funding.

I also can't help but think that when you scale applications up to the point where they're burning a Terawatt-Hour of electrical power every year to run, there's scope for optimising software to conserve energy, not just time or storage.

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Kristian Walsh
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Servicing that demand?

I wonder where they're going to find the generating capacity for this centre. The projected consumption will be equivalent to the current domestic demand of the Greater Galway area (about 160,000 people).

Ireland does not have a lot of spare generating capacity, and despite what you might think if you've ever "enjoyed" a walk along the Cliffs of Moher, the wind doesn't blow 24 hours a day, 365 days a year, which rules out the most available "green" option in this country.

I expect Apple to be sold pretty much all of the little "green" energy that's produced here, while the providers buy in nuclear-generated power from France and UK to meet the resulting shortfall. (I have no issue with nuclear power, btw; just find it ironic that this will be the likely outcome).

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Kristian Walsh
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Re: WHAT Fields ?

The Liverpool supporters' song has different lyrics, and its chorus substitutes "Anfield Road" for "Athenry", so no...

However, you only need to assemble around ten Irish people at a sporting event involving Ireland before the probability of the original version of this song being sung reaches 1.

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Marconi: The West of England's very own Italian wireless pioneer

Kristian Walsh
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Re: Splendid ties

I suspect that's more to do with the description "Italian radio pioneer".

I still agree, though. The reverse-snobbery of the tech industry when it comes to personal appearance is depressing: reacting against the "corporate" suit-and-tie has just resulted in Technology becoming its mirror-image where anyone who looks after their appearance more than is "necessary" is judged to be shallow or incompetent.

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Raspberry Pi, meet face: You're probably NOT Blighty's biggest PC maker!

Kristian Walsh
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British manufacturer, or British-manufactured?

Raspberry Pi is a British company, whose computers are made in Wales, a country that is part of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland

Amstrad is a British company, whose computers were manufactured in Taiwan, a country that is pa— um, actually, let it just suffice for me to say, "is not in the UK", rather than get into that particular minefield.

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Apple Watch 'didn't work on HAIRY FANBOIS, was stripped of sensor tech'

Kristian Walsh
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Re: People will still buy them

But it won't have an Apple logo

...You know that even the real Apple watch doesn't actually have an Apple logo on it?

I think this, not the price, and not the battery life, is the product's Achilles Heel. Without the conspicuous Apple logo, how is everyone else sitting in Starbucks going to know that you've got a real one?

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Kristian Walsh
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Re: Progression

That's who Apple seems to emulate on the conspicuous consumption spectrum.

Apple's marketing and retail owes much more of a debt to Chanel or Dior than to BMW.

Sadly, past experience tells me that I now have to explain that I don't mean this as a put-down: when it comes to marketing what is a fairly everyday product (again, relax - "smartphone" or "tablet" is an everyday product) and achieving a high retail price for it, there's nobody to touch the cosmetics business.

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Gov.UK begs Google 'n' U.S. tech pals: Forget Ireland, come to Blighty

Kristian Walsh
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It's not just tax...

The one thing the UK government could do to undermine Ireland's attractiveness to American companies would be to join the Euro.

It's not just a tax-wheeze that these companies are looking for. They want a base in a major trading zone, where people speak English, and there isn't so much veiled hostility towards the USA.

(That latter point was made to be more than once by American colleagues about why they didn't like travelling to the UK, but I'd say it counts for more than any amount of tax schemes...)

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Microsoft makes 'business case' for marriage equality

Kristian Walsh
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Re: Poly?

Polygamy is irrelevant in a discussion of coupled relationships. But at least you didn't mention bestiality, I suppose.

Personally I support marriage reform because I want governments to recognise relationships that are consensual, stable and mutually beneficial to those who form them, regardless of whether they're male-male, male-female (like mine) or female-female.

I don't believe that real polygamous relationships meet the standard of being both "mutually beneficial" and "stable". To put it a different way: in any relationship of n people, happiness is an O(n) function, but trouble is O(n2).

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Microsoft: Even cheapo Lumias to get slimmed down Windows 10

Kristian Walsh
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Re: Developer... sense... tingling...

For phone apps, the store submission script is where you'd enforce version capabilities.

Also, the phone store doesn't have to serve the same app binary to every user. You can submit different packages under the same "application", and which one the user sees is determined by their device and/or locale.

My experience is that maintaining two branches of an application is far less messy than having all the possibilities encapsulated in one source-file, or worse: all in one executable.

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RIP Windows RT: Microsoft murders ARM Surface, Nokia tablets

Kristian Walsh
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Re: @AC: There is simply no need for the RT edition

Another RT 2 user here. Chosen for the same reasons: light weight, small form factor, long battery life SEPARATE USER ACCOUNTS (hello, Apple) to be kept in the living room for email, casual browsing and Netflix/YouTube video watching (hence 16:9 display being important).

The "Phone" branch of Windows 10 is getting previewed soon, and that may give more clarity on what happens for ARM devices in general. I don't think "full" Windows 10 really works on a screen of 10" or less, but the market often wants things that sound better than they really are in practice (c.f. Netbooks)

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Kristian Walsh
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Re: Surface 2 with Win 8 RT-edition

Instructions on how to achieve Ad-blocking on Surface RT are here:

http://www.edandersen.com/2012/10/28/adblock-alternative-on-windows-rts-ie10/

... even uses El Reg as the demo site.

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Wham, bam... premium rate scam: Grindr users hit with fun-killing charges

Kristian Walsh
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Re: £1 per second? I don't think so.

Not bollocks. Note that it says "£1.53 per call and £1.53 per minute". How short can you make a call? Just connecting and hanging up will incur the "per call" charge.

(Phone billing systems always show a completed call as being at least 1 second long even if it's shorter... customers complain if they see themselves being charged for "00:00:00" durations on their bill)

There are two parts to a phone call charge. The first is the setup charge: the amount you pay just to have the connection established. The second is the duration charge, levied per minute. Either of these can be set at zero for a premium number (but not both, obviously).

Some services charge extremely high setup charges with no duration charge - e.g., voting lines for those TV "talent" shows: your call might be only 5 seconds, but you're charged £1.00 for it.

This is often presented in the advertising as "calls cost no more than £x.xx from a BT Landline".

Because these numbers are short-duration calls (the remote end plays you a canned message and then hangs up very quickly), they're ripe for automated-dialler scams.

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Horrifying iPhone sales bring Apple $18bn profit A QUARTER

Kristian Walsh
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Re: So what happen to Peak Apple?

Some credible sources for "nigh on a billion" would be welcome considering that total cumulative sales for iPhone from 2007 to date are around 600 million (the discussion of how many iPhone 4 and earlier are still actively working is perhaps better left for another day)

Now, I didn't think that billion high-rollers would be so stuck that they'd need to share their phones with each other, but maybe there just aren't enough iPhones to go around. And it's odd how so many of these world's wealthiest consumers would need to queue up for unemployment benefit every week, or shop in discount supermarkets, or still be in school, but who am I to question the ways of the super-rich - I don't even have an iPhone.

@Loyal Commentator - No problem. I used to be one, still know some, and Apple employees are just like any large company's, except that there are fewer Apple fanbois: what Bismarck said about sausages holds true for iThings.

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Kristian Walsh
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Re: So what happen to Peak Apple?

You need to grow a thicker skin. A news site picking on a multi-billion-dollar corporation shouldn't get to you as much as it does.

We've seen "Peak iPad" already from those sales figures. iPad was meant to be insurance against a failure of iPhone revenues, but it's not going to work out like that: cycles are longer for tablets, and people buy them with their own money, up-front, which makes them more price-sensitive. Now Apple is once again dependent on a single product line for most of its revenues.

You don't want to base your future on a one-trick pony, no matter how good the trick is. Ponies don't live forever.

In Apple's case, the biggest possible threat to iPhone revenues would be any reform of consumer law in Japan or US that would reduce or remove operator handset subsidies.

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'YOUTUBE is EVIL': Somebody had a tape running, Google...

Kristian Walsh
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Yes. He's been campaigning on this issue for a long time.

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Does Big Tech hire white boys ahead of more skilled black people and/or women?

Kristian Walsh
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Re: Pinteresting employees aren't whiter than white

Actually, here's an surprisingly enlightening map, showing the ethnic plurality (i.e., who makes up the largest slice of the pie) for every county in the USA. Not so much a "melting pot" as a mixed grill, and it's an answer to why you don't often see black faces in the South Bay Area:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Race_and_ethnicity_in_the_United_States#mediaviewer/File:Census-2000-Data-Top-US-Ancestries-by-County.svg

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What's that, Microsoft? Yep, a Lumia and Surface SALES BOOM

Kristian Walsh
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Re: Wow....

The MacBook Air is cheaper because you're getting less.

The Surface Pro matches the Air's CPU, RAM and SDD, but adds touch+pen input, a higher display resolution (2160x1440 vs 1440x900), and is significantly lighter (just under 1.0 kg with the keyboard, versus 1.35kg for the Air).

The MacBook Pro "Retina display" is more expensive and heavier again - not really in the same class of device as Surface.

(I currently use a MacBook Air when travelling, but I'm seriously looking at how I could work with a Pro3 instead)

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Kristian Walsh
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Re: It's not so bad

": it's seemingly impossible to forward an image from email by text or any other medium;"

Step by step (takes much longer to read than to do):

1. Tap the image in your email. It will open full screen

2. If no toolbar is visible at the bottom of the screen, tap the image once to reveal it.

3. Tap the leftmost icon in bottom toolbar ("Share" - the one that looks like three tadpoles swimming in a circle)

4. Choose the method by which you want to forward the image from the many, many choices. For MMS, choose "Messaging".

5. (Optional) Compose your message text

6. Tap the send icon.

The only way "Messaging" would be absent is if your network operator forgot to provision your SIM for MMS - in this case, you won't be able to send any other picture messages either. Request the settings from them.

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Your anonymous code contributions probably aren't: boffins

Kristian Walsh
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Re: @ Kristian Walsh (was: object orientated)

You haven't even looked at the code, have you? There is no C compiler in existence that can compile the projects I cited. That is because they are written in C++.

For the record, there's is also a difference in the output of "C code compiled with a C++ compiler", and "C code compiled with a C compiler". If something is written in C, we will use a C compiler to compile it, because that preserves the other assumptions about C code (particularly symbol naming, but there are other, more subtle differences).

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Kristian Walsh
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Re: @ Kristian Walsh (was: object orientated)

You can't tell the difference between C++ and C source-code, though. Hardly a good starting point if you're going to pronounce on the advantages of one over the other.

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Kristian Walsh
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Re: @ Kristian Walsh (was: object orientated)

Ha! Does your voice get muffled when you sit down, jake?

We mere mortals don't have your custom build of K&R that can compile namespaces, the 'this' keyword, variable instantiation within sub-scopes, default-value initialisation, function calls using the dot and pointer operators, and templates.

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Why Microsoft's 3D HoloLens goggles aren't for Google Glassholes

Kristian Walsh
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Re: Hololens hype

...me too, and one of them (highway surface inspection and maintenance) does indeed involve someone wearing them while driving, or at least being driven.

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