* Posts by Guus Leeuw

183 posts • joined 27 Mar 2008

Page:

Rivals feel power of EMC's storage software bite

Guus Leeuw

Correction?

Dear Sir,

"As for Big Blue, it does not have an equivalent back-up product range that EMC or Symantec ..."

How is TSM not equivalent in terms back-up product range?

Regards,

Guus

PS: Please issue a webpage / forum where one can upload corrections...

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REVEALED: Apple fanbois are 'MENTALLY UNSTABLE' - iShop staff

Guus Leeuw

To be fair, we don't... For one, I don't!

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Smartphones, iTunes and the White House on Vulture News

Guus Leeuw

Sound mixing is not optional!

Dear El Reg,

it is quite hard to hear Regina over the music background... Can you please remix, and lower the volume of the music?

Regards,

Guus

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UN: Fossil fuels should be TERMINATED 86 years from now

Guus Leeuw

Quoting ad infinium

Dear El Reg,

you quote: "There are multiple mitigation pathways that are likely to limit warming to below 2°C relative to pre-industrial levels. These pathways would require substantial emissions reductions over the next few decades and near zero emissions of CO2 and other long-lived GHGs by the end of the century."

The linked report states this:

"There are multiple mitigation pathways that are likely to limit warming to below 2 °C relative to pre-industrial levels. Limiting warming to 2.5 °C or 3 °C involves similar challenges, but less quickly. These pathways would require substantial emissions reductions over the next few decades, and near zero emissions of CO2 and other long-lived GHGs by the end of the century."

The sentence that was removed actually is the reference for the words "These pathways"... Even though they are similar, the removed sentence makes the whole quoted report less juicy (because IPCC foresees that less warming might start later)...

Now, in the whole I don't think the report or the setup of the IPCC is perfect, as there are a lot of areas that would require clarification for the report to be of proper scientific use or origin, however the quote put forward by El Reg seems a bit unfair as well...

Regards,

Guus

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Forget eyeballs and radar! Brits tackle GPS JAMMERS with WWII technology

Guus Leeuw

Dear Detective,

this goes to show that Britain is still leading the world...

Regards,

Guus

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Curious to know if the UK's Tory-led government is a MEGA SPY? Answer: Yes

Guus Leeuw

Re: I say good

Dear Phil,

Dude.

"Bay guys will do bad things no matter what laws you pass - that's why they are outlaws...

The easiest way to catch them is to the fact that they are often not very bright, which should be self evident."

Can I freely conclude that you are an outlaw? The number of typos make me think that you're not all that bright yourself... but heyho, that's just my gut feeling...

:D

Regards,

Guus

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Sony borks fanboi funboxes with dodgy PS4 update

Guus Leeuw

Yeah, but what is forgotten is that PS4 is essentially a known platform. There's no PS4 with this graphics or that disk, or such operating system patch level...

Therefore the number of regression tests is fairly well defined, and should be possible to automate...

I don't get why so many walled-garden-software has to be soo buggy these days...

Regards,

Guus

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Keep up with the fast-moving world of flash array storage

Guus Leeuw

Dear Chris,

"existing disk array suffer from latency". Really? Sure, if the cache is full and no intelligent pre-fetching is implemented. Ie not very often...

"Virtualising servers and threading application software makes the servers much better at keeping their cores busy processing application code than the old inefficient multi-tasking operating systems such as Windows NT and Unix." The same old inefficient multi-tasking algorithms that live nowadays within the same old operating systems such as Unix are now performing far better, due (in large) to the way modern CPUs are designed and implemented. Virtualising a server does nothing towards making that server run faster. In fact, virtualising a server vs putting that server on the same physical hardware as the hypervisor would logically dictate that the latter will outperform the former!

"Effectively, a two-socket, 12-core server has 24 cores running in parallel" - How is it that a two-socket 12-core server has 24 cores running in parallel? The fact that there is a socket doesn't mean that there is a CPU which may have 12 cores... Be precise, and you will see that in your own head things all of a sudden actually make sense... It has been said before: Don't use one word to mean something else than its very definition. Socket != CPU...

"and imposing a storage array access burden that is roughly 24 times greater overall." In the past we had 24 single CPU single core servers running those applications. Inefficiently, but still the workload was there. The fact that this workload is now centralised on one server that has 24 cores doesn't make a difference in terms of workload for the storage array... The workload may come to the array more densely, but just saying that a 24-times more powerful machine will request 24 times more data is cutting the corner a bit too finely, Chris!

"CPUs access data from main memory in nanoseconds" CPU access data from a storage array in nanoseconds as well, Chris. What you mean to say is that internal memory is accessed far faster than external memory. Accessing external memory that sits on mechanical drives and is accessed directly (by by-passing caches on the way) is slower still.

"In the time it takes for a disk array access, say 7 milliseconds, a waiting CPU core could execute 7 million instructions." 7 milliseconds = 7000 microseconds = 7000000 nanoseconds. Gigaherz stands for the number of cycles in billions per second. so 3 Ghz executes 3 billion parts of instructions per second. Therefore in one millisecond, 3 thousand parts of instructions are executed. Thusly, in 7 milliseconds, 21 thousand parts of instructions are executed. Why "parts of instructions": not every assembler instruction takes just one cycle to complete. 1 nano = 10^-9, 1 milli = 10^-3, one GHz = 10^9, one Mhz = 10^6... just dropping or adding 10^3 is a bit of a leap, IMHO.

quoting Flash array supporters: "and that means your servers can do more"... No, it actually means that your servers do less waiting for data than when compared to traditional storage arrays. Why would one want to put the word "can" in there? "Can" is a statement of uncertainty: they can, but they also cannot... "coulda woulda shoulda; didn't"...

"as you move up the list" - you mean, as you move down the list?!!

"applications such as financial trading and mass online sales" - Please clarify, what are mass online sales? amazon-mass, where a billion people by one product each? resulting in tiny storage transactions, but a whole lot of them, and where each transaction is "old" after 1 month? How is financial trading stacking up against flash-only? Is it jusitified?

What you see a lot of the time, and flash unfortunately helps in this regard, is that people write bad software, that uses a badly designed (and sometimes worse implemented) database, all of which sit on a number of servers not designed for the job at hand, all of which want storage.

Keeping all your data in live tablespaces, and not having appropriate indices, and not managing existing *and* minimising the impact of slow queries, not appropriately paging answer sets, etc etc all make it look as though faster storage is the solution. But let's not forget that faster storage in 80% of the cases will only ever give a 20% better performance for the end-user (if that...)! And for the 20% where faster storage actually makes a big impact: well, that's very often to do with over-saturation at the storage end, so badly managed capacity and system usage...

Flash helps, but let's not just throw flash at a badly written application and make it run faster... It's better to get a good team of people to write and operate good software/databases/servers, than to just chuck millions at a randomly generated problem because some dope forgot to put an index on a textual column somewhere...

I don't quite agree with your conclusion. Flash arrays are good, for sure, but should be implemented where justified, and just across the board because somebody doesn't want to actually fix the software...

Just my two cents,

Guus

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The 'fun-nification' of computer education – good idea?

Guus Leeuw

Re: Why shouldn't coding be for fun?

DrXym,

how would you teach them to move a zombie / hamster? It would be necessary to have one at the ready. Which basically means that you'd have one set of people preparing all the class material. Which is exactly what the quangos hope to get out of this... Is it good? No not at all. The teacher is not interested in the subject, so (s)he will not teach it well... Result: meeellions of minions even less interested in whatever could give them a job...

Education standards driven by politcal connections are a *bad* idea, no matter what...

Also bad is to make the guy who hated maths head of maths education standards...

Passionate people at the fore.. And I mean really deeply passionate people.. Them for whom it hurts in their brains when they are not allowed to do it... Those are the best, because they know why something is fun... why they love it so much, why it gives back so much... Stuff that nobody else understands... :) Because passion is not a job! :)

Guus

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Forget passwords, let's use SELFIES, says Obama's cyber tsar

Guus Leeuw

Re: Works a treat!

petur,

That's rather weak, auto-unban after an hour...

My system: You're stupid enough to get auto-banned after 3 failed attempts, you have to explain why you failed, what went wrong etc etc, before I manually unban your IP and un-deactivated your account...

Just saying,

Guus

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Microsoft, Docker bid to bring Linux-y containers to Windows: What YOU need to know

Guus Leeuw

Hi,

it largely depends on the job at hand... If it is a user-land application you're developing, a container would be OK. If it is some sort of driver / kernel module / whatnot, a virtual machine would be much better...

Regards,

Guus

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Uber, Lyft and cutting corners: The true face of the Sharing Economy

Guus Leeuw

Re: Not to be left out...

Dear Sir,

Hailo can hate it all they want, but they can't actually do anything about.

They can maybe make the taxi driver keep the app switched on and be logged in. Hailo cannot force the taxi driver to accept jobs.

"Ok, you didn't accept my last 5 jobs I sent you... So you're out of Hailo..." Doesn't sound like a good idea for Hailo.

Hailo is a free-for-all type service: They correctly use a free app for the passenger. They correctly use percentage-of-the-fare to get money from the drivers who use their systems. Nobody is obliged anybody anything. Nobody is out anything either...

It will be hard for Hailo to start demanding things.

Driver: "You think I should switch on my app / be logged in in the weekends? OK, you have to provide me with 10 jobs each night then"

Hailo: "In that case you need to pay a subscription fee."

Driver: "In which case you need to also guarantee a minimum amount of fare, so that I can be reasonably assured that I can pay my subscription fee."

The End...

Hailo can start hiring taxi drivers directly... In which case they become a private hire firm, and will have to abide by local arcane-ish regulations no matter where they operate...

Or, as happens at least in Dublin on Saturday&Sunday morning around 04:00AM: You get no response from Hailo... It sucks as there are no cars to hail on the street either... But then again: they didn't guarantee me a car for everytime I need one. No, Hailo guarantees nothing, promises to contact a number of close-by cars, but even then, it is up to the driver to accept / refuse the job... So I can be all upset about not being able to Hailo a car, but hey... The app / Hailo does what it says on the tin.

If Hailo would start using unlicensed drivers, I would immediately stop using it. Simply because a rape/kidnapping/murder by a "cab" driver hasn't happened in God knows how many years, doesn't make it so that it never happened... The arcane-ish rules about needing a license to taxi driver are there for good reasons, as fellow commentard pointed out: Somebody always pays the price... It's just so sad if that were a person ending up dead...

And do they not warn about dodgy minicab drivers? Don't get in a car where you can't know / trust a person... Sure, Uber uses rating systems... Never had a bad rating from anybody... Sure some rides weren't rated, but yeah feck how could they... Poor unfortunate gobshite ended up dead before rating the driver...

Guus

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BOFH: The current value of our IT ASSets? Minus eleventy-seven...

Guus Leeuw

Re: This is actually true...

Are you suggesting, Travis, that CAPS is actually your first name then?

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We need less U.S. in our WWW – Euro digital chief Steelie Neelie

Guus Leeuw

Dear Sir,

would you care to dig out which actors are pushing those radical changes, and which radical changes these are?

I would like to propose radical changes to the way acting is performed as well. Less of the multi-million dollar payouts (so that I can go to the cinema for a fiver rather than a tenner) and more time spent in class while not acting (so as to keep these people off the streets). I have no notion whatsoever about acting. I am assuming that actors have no notion about governance of the world wide web or internet.

Regards,

Guus

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Banking apps: Handy, can grab all your money... and RIDDLED with coding flaws

Guus Leeuw

@LatinWanker:

It does, but only in the quick and cheap parts...

It even fecking said to pick just two...

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The police are WRONG: Watching YouTube videos is NOT illegal

Guus Leeuw

Re: They've got you...

Dear Sir,

under section e) I would mount the defence that the user is not transmitting it, but rather requesting somebody else to transmit it to his/her computerised-viewing-equipment-of-choice via whichever technologically available means... Therefore it is YouTube (Google) who falls foul of the law, and hence they want to remove / are removing / have removed the referred contents.

I wholeheartedly agree with the sentiment of the <opinion> piece. Well done.

Regards,

Guus

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e-Borders fiasco: Brits stung for £224m after US IT giant sues UK govt

Guus Leeuw

Re: Fings ain't what they used to be

Dear Admiral,

if that statement were indeed made by Government, it would have been a quote and should have appeared in quotes.

The mentioned proof-readers / editors / stone editors / whatsits would have caught the error and would have requested a retype.

Henceforth, it is indeed time that Internet newspapers start to be more intellectual and actually use language rather than just make things up as they go along.

Just my two cents,

Guus

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Govt control? Hah! It's IMPOSSIBLE to have a successful command economy

Guus Leeuw

Success of the iPhone?

Dear Sir,

May I take this opportunity to indicate that any rational planner would have not been aware / capable of coming up with new gizmos? His/her area of expertise is optimising that what the economy is taught to deliver, not adding to the uncounted factors that alter the outcome of the predictions!

Effectively planned / command economy means and is largely equivalent to stagnism: if it takes us a hundred years to built a computer capable of calculating and commanding today's economy, then we must not alter *anything* to said economy lest we need longer to build a computer that can model our changes. Also, once that computer is there, it is geared to one task: raise the efficiency of the economy that existed 100 years ago...

Just saying,

Guus

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Password manager LastPass goes titsup: Users LOCKED OUT

Guus Leeuw

Re: Lastpass

Uhm, noshitman, KeepAss' software is perfectly open: one can download the source code right from their website...

Or, maybe I'm mistaken, and you mean something with "KeePass keeps the data locally but the software is closed so as you say you're boned."

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Today's Facebook fury: Coppertone-like baby pic ban baffles US mom

Guus Leeuw

Why extreme?

Hi Bristol,

why is the original commenter's comment a bit extreme? I seem to remember a case where such pictures were printed and made available online by a newspaper in Denmark. Journalist / Editor etc could have been beheaded by mentioned operatives.

Similar happened to a Mr Bin Laden in Afghanistan....

Just saying...

Regards,

Guus

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Microsoft's Euro cloud darkens: US FEDS can dig into foreign servers

Guus Leeuw

Re: US Tech Companies

Oh but Trevor, you are threat. I feel threatened, for one ;)

Also you're a mean drunk, so when you have a few beers, you're bound to hit somebody.

Lastly, you're a magician who has (you say so yourself) the ability to make beers fuck. That scares the shit out of me, so I want to detain you, just because.

It's a joke, alright... But this could be how the USofA border patrol reacts to seeing you post something on a website that is hosted by a US organization called Rackspace. Therefore, they (the US Gov) have the right to make sure you're a nice and good citizen and eat the crap they (the US Gov) feed you about such nice things as Patriotism and War Crimes and TerrorIsm

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Guus Leeuw

What if

What if the US would all of a sudden uphold the law of the UN Security Council and started to attack Israel for bombing the Gaza strip and innocent citizens.

That would certainly correct a morbid image loads of people have about the US, including about spying on data that really should be off-limits to the US, even for national security reasons. And if it there legally should be reason to believe that the data should be made available to the US legalese, than international law and order should be enough to request foreign help in such matters. Pretty much like Interpol: I have a criminal who is currently in your country. Please catch him for me. As opposed to: "I have a criminal who is currently in your country, and because I'm the US President, I will send people of my country to your country to commit a crime in your country, but because they are combatants of the US, these people cannot be detained by your country, because if you do, you commit a war crime..." (I'm writing this, dear NSA, as a piece of fiction. I do not express my own views here, merely state what a ficitve character who plays the role of US President in my upcoming book might say to a faraway Government.)

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Guus Leeuw

Re: Doom for US tech companies

"I really do want to see him worm his way out of the fact that the US feels it has sovereignty over my data"...

Granted it is your data. However, because it uses communication technology operated by US companies, the US government feels as though the can snoop on it. So they don't give a monkey's behind that it's your data. All they care about is to incriminate you, should you ever have something against the US. And for that, my man, they need to know what you think, write, talk about...

So they spy...

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Guus Leeuw

Re: Doom for US tech companies

Trevor, Trevor, Trevor....

How would that come to happen, then? Are you saying that the not-so-gullible Europeans could possibly make up by themselves for not doing business in the US? Not really...

Or are you potentially suggesting that the shear markets in China and India are so great for (there) non-local businesses? No, I didn't think so...

Hmm, let's look at what really matters: money, and monetary policy. Most of the world's financial institutions count / compute / save their money in what is normally construed as US dollars. China may be an exception, however that is just one (albeit very large) country. And then even they report on the basis of US dollars. So doing business with / in a currency that is largely accepted seems to be advantageous.

And even apart from that stuff: Who would come up with gmail completely on a non-US basis? Not a smithereen of IT equipment anywhere in the middle may be in the US, or else they can legally intercept the communication / information.

So, the US says: Hey you're using the newly created European Internet? Tough! We don't trade with you. Do you really really think that uhm a lot of companies will jump on the European Internet? Tiny small businesses who couldn't really be bothered with the US, still might jump onto the European Internet, but other than that? You wanna facebook page / twitter account for your tiny European Internet based company? Good Luck!

If the US really would be afraid of losing business and having their throats cut, why would they fine non-US banks for crimes(?) against international law? Barclays didn't seem to mind paying up, because apparently the benfit of US customers outweighs the fine... UBS, similarly, didn't seem to mind paying up... Neither will BNP Paribas... so, your point, my dear Trevor, will largely be overlooked by the US, because there is absolutely no reason for them to be so paranoid...

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The Register is HIRING technology hacks for the WORLD

Guus Leeuw

A tabloid journalist for El Reg with Fluency in English eh

Dear El Reg,

in case you are not aware: a tabloid is generally considered to be printed press on paper that is about half the size of a broadsheet. Therefore, it would seem that it still is not technically possible to be an online-publishing-only tabloid press.

Also, in case you weren't so aware, a tabloid press / outfit, is generally associated with sensational news. Not in the sense that the reporting is sensational, but in the popular sense of "sensational press".

Being that as it may, I wonder why El Reg would require fluency in English, seeing that it has a limited amount thereof itself.

Yes, I am the son of a retired hack who also performed the role of stone editor in his days, so I'm *very* picky when it comes to language ;) Oh and my primary language teacher was very picky as well, so... I learned from what I consider the best.

Regards,

Guus

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Guus Leeuw

Re: Open an Office in Amsterdam..

Why would you want to report on the bleeding edge of technology from Amsterdam of all places? You are aware that the Dutch in the Netherlands are actually not really great with IT, are you not? And I worked both there, and in the south of Limburg... On both occassions there were tons of people around the place who were either too bleedin' lazy to get the work done, or didn't even begin to come close to required brain functionality to understand what they needed to do... Loads of bullshitting and hot-air-selling, though!

Yes, I'm Dutch. Yes, I'm a Software-developer-trained-storage-administrator-project-manager-enterprise-architect-what-not. Yes, I don't give a rat's ass about the Netherlands, or indeed (apart from 3) Dutch people who live there or anywhere else :)

Now, come on with them downvotes

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Fiat Panda Cross: 'Interesting-looking' Multipla spawn hits UK

Guus Leeuw
Pint

Just some loose comments

Dear Sir,

I stopped reading after page 1, so haunt me.

1) Being a cyclist who goes cycling in the weekends, why would you need a car? And if not not a car, why a 4x4? A bike ain't heavy, and a bike is perfectly suitable to get you to where you want to go cycling... OK OK... If you want to trek on the other side of the country, that's a bit far...

2) "Haul it up the hill" meaning as in the Fiat is so lightweight, two cables and a bit of leg power will get it uphill? If that's the case, why can't the engine do it? :-D I know...

Have a beer... Or maybe not...

Regards,

Guus

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ICANN can't hand over Iran's internet, bomb victims told

Guus Leeuw

Re: P2P distributed Nameservices?

"distributed DNS" - Technically, I'm not sure if that is at all possible... But then I operate as a Project Manager nowadays...

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Another 'NSA-proof' webmail biz popped by JavaScript injection bug

Guus Leeuw

Corrections

Dear Sir,

the thing you call Results PDF, merely is a certificate of passing security tests. A results PDF would have info like: Description of test, execution time, results, detailed results in case XPASS or FAIL or XFAIL.

That would also indicate that the tests would be regressive, and that indeed when not using SSys GmbH, one can rerun the same tests.

Different subject: Who scrutinised the tests? They don't seem too clever or inclusive...

Regards,

Guus

PS: I know about the correction link and stuff. I just wonder why I must fire up all sorts of infrastructure just to give an email about corrections... A Webform would be much easier...!!!???!!!

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Manhattan drone pair cuffed for NYPD chopper near miss

Guus Leeuw

Struck

Dear Sirs,

never mind that police reports are always exegarated and never really state any facts, I would hope and assume that the coppercopter has vidfeeds that clearly show the oncoming quadcopter nearly colliding with said coppercopter.

Also, it would seem unreasonable that a flimsy (in comparison) quadcopter can do serious harm to coppercopter. I'm obviously no aviation expert here (or anywhere else for that matter - apart from in my dreams maybe, I don't remember them too often) so I might be wrong to assume that the quadcopter would be demolished by coppercopter without the coppercopter so much as noticing that.

Oh well, police ey...

Regards,

Guus

PS: I opted for the non-word coppercopter instead of copperchopper, simply because writing copperchopper might already be a crime nowadays.

PPS: No, I do not intend for coppers to be chopped

PPPS: Did you see my PPS? Get me off that list!!

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Islamic terror peril hits US giants' phone wallets

Guus Leeuw

Re: ISIS's name confuses me anyway

have an upvote for the last bit of your post ;) Dark humor always gets me

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You 'posted' a 'letter' with Outlook... No, NO, that's the MONITOR

Guus Leeuw

Re: But these are actually intelligent people ....

Probably because carburretor doesn't exist as a word...

Oh well ;)

Good point though!

A.D. made a good point too: call things by their name, and be very consistent about that... Then all of a sudden one word has a limited number of meanings, and it will be easy to grasp for everybody...

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Girl gamers sexism row: Top e-sports federation finds reverse gear

Guus Leeuw

Re: Doesnt look like equality to me.

I like the way you got that one in: "liklihood" talking about females... Well done, Cheshire Cat... !! :)

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Use Tor or 'extremist' Tails Linux? Congrats, you're on an NSA list

Guus Leeuw

Re: Whither the mission creep?

Uhm? You're not European by any chance? Have no (grand)parents who lived the world wars?

SS patroling the streets? Ever heard of Jewish people being picked up, even though they were well hidden, because some dumbfuck neighbor told some nitwit police guy about the abnormal amount of food the 4 people household next door bought every week? CCTV is harmless! Stasimen/KGBguys following you around the streets? Doing your house up after DDR and Germany re-united only to find about 3 kilometers of tapping wire in your walls??? Mafia guys sitting in your restaurant by the boat load drinking tapwater because you didn't pay protection money?

Dude... Seriously... The tools are different, I'll give you that, but the scope is not creeping at all.

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Guus Leeuw

Re: Whither the mission creep?

Make that 81 and you'd be right... Especially regarding Germany... :D

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Guus Leeuw
Joke

Re: Enemy of the State

So then explain the move to Tokyo... You couldn't be further from GCHQ if you wanted... That seems *very* suspicious...

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Guus Leeuw

Re: Terminate with extremist prejudice.

Well sure, but consider what else we would have done with all them babyboomers??? Those kiddies deserved a job, no?

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Guus Leeuw

ll vs ls -l

Dear Kiddies,

do not dispair...

There are no hidden files in Linux, or Unix. ;) There are such files that start with a dot, but they are not hidden, they are simply not shown when one runs 'ls'.

In most Linux installation there's this alias:

ll='ls -l' (sometimes / oftentimes followed by --color=auto)

In good (IMHO) installations you also have the alias 'l.' to show you those .* files only ;)

if you want it all just put alias la='ls -la' in your shell profile and away you go...

seriously, just running 'alias' at the prompt may indeed give you a number of life savers / keystroke savers that you weren't quite aware about...

Regards,

Guus

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Guus Leeuw

Re: they're a spy agency

Dear Tom,

I'd rather think that the point made was along the lines of: If they are allowed to spy on us, then we should be allowed to spy on them. And that is obviously not the case (see posts about unlawful combatants).

Equally getting US spies in front of, say, a German judge will proof impossible, as normally lawful combatants (include the Big Chief Himself) are considered above any law by Themselves.

And that is why, I guess, everybody is up in arms about the whole US... Two rules: one for us (US) one for you...

Regards,

Guus

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'I don't want to go on the cart' ... OpenSSL revived with survival roadmap

Guus Leeuw

Re Dan 55

Dear Sir,

the linkage of code to a library *cannot ever* take care of precompilation statements in that code.

Just saying...,

Guus

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ISPs haul GCHQ into COURT over dragnet interwebs snooping

Guus Leeuw

Court case

... closed

All in accordance with the law... Ref Patriot Act, ref Communications Data Bill.

Whether we like it is a question the court cannot legally rule on... So: waste of money...

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Cambridge Assessment exams CHAOS: Computing students' work may be BINNED

Guus Leeuw

Re: Ledswinger

Dear Leds Winger,

Have you looked at the two course works the article is about?

Software development requires "good memories for arcane detail". Otherwise you'll miss a null pointer dereference or you won't free up memory and all that nice juicy stuff.. Also logical maths is not something you can take leaps across... missing a part of the logical computation normally implies that a piece of code is missing, and you derive the wrong result.

How would you propose to fix continuous examination? Just saying that we should do that is not quite good enough for a serious post about the subject... ;)

regards,

Guus

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BT at last coughs to 'major outage' after broadband went titsup across UK on Sat

Guus Leeuw

Few Areas

Dear Sir,

not knowing the full extend of these problems, 2 semi-nationwide areas being affected is the same as few areas being affected, seeing that 2 really is only a few... There were some people in those few areas of which BT knew that they had problems. All the rest (of the people) couldn't shouldn't wouldn't report the issue... So all in all, "some people in a few areas"...

No, I'm a not a spin-doctor, but I've seen so much crap coming out of Gov / Big Orgs that I kinda know what they're saying when they're saying stuff... Also when they're not saying stuff :D

Regards,

Guus

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Boffins untangle why your software builds fail

Guus Leeuw

Consider this

Dear Sir,

since google gave what 26 MEELION records to the data set, the analysis is a bit skewed.

If the main conclusion is that there is a "dependency hell" out of this massive data set, then my conclusion must be that the developers at google aren't all that smart.

Regards,

Guus

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What is it with cloud computing? Engage VM, disengage brain?

Guus Leeuw

Wow :-)

Dear Sir,

unreservedly I agree with you. On the whole, and in detail.

Good job, and about time that somebody points this out clearly.

TheRegister, please make it so that this same article appears every other day as a new article on your site, so that all your MEEELIONS of readers will see it... Make it so that your analytics *knows* who read it (all three pages) and that you, TheRegister, thusly can hassle those readers who haven't bothered *yet*.

Thanks, Trevor,

Regards from,

Not-your-biggest-fan,

Guus

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Microsoft's Online Exchange fixed after going titsup for NINE HOURS

Guus Leeuw
Joke

Re: 2 hours - wimps!

That took all of 10 minutes, then, being a contractor and easily bored...

Yes yes yes me contractor

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Bankers bid to use offshore temp techies

Guus Leeuw

Re: Interesting on who is and who is not on the map....

Dear TopOnePercent,

my remark probably is a bit too straight... Individual shareholders are not at fault here any longer (although they contribute, some more than others; and yes, there are exceptions)... It's the collective gambling that happens with futures of sooo many people that just isn't right, especially when things like jobs are being toyed with.

Regards,

Guus

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Guus Leeuw

Re: Guus Interesting on who is and who is not on the map....

Dear Matt,

Are you at all in an (half) off-shored account within IT? Do you know that Indians (and God bless them, I would do the same) are job-hopping all the time to get a better deal? We've lost 75% of our offshore DBAs just a while ago, simply because Oracle India is prepared to give the "guys" a better deal. There's huge turnover of staff in IT in India. So what you're describing is already happening as it is. So not a big problem.

My point, though, is more about local people being forced out of a job, for the sake of some gamblers making a bit more dough on the side... I, for one, cannot work as a permanent employee: the amount of people I would upset (in untold ways) would be countless... The fact that appraisals are used more of an assessment as to whether or not to fire a person, rather than actually appraise a person just makes the hair on the back of my neck stand up. Now, if my next role is in India / China / Philippines, I'll gladly accept. However that is unlikely because they have billions of people and are ingrained in IT as it stands, so they get the knowledge already, and wouldn't need me, even on local (India) wages.

Similar to Starbucks / Amazon / Google wriggling themselves out of taxpayments and some laws just because they are financially powerful and hence have friends in high places... That in itself doesn't mean that they should be allowed to run rough-shot over John Doe and friends...

Regards,

Guus

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Guus Leeuw

Re: Interesting on who is and who is not on the map....

Dear Mark,

are you serious? The game of politics dictates that you try and do The Right Thing at first, leave it open enough to enter new parties at a later, so that there can be no bad intent at first, because, well, India is not privy to the party. Then when dust has settled, somebody will quietly allow India to become part of the TISA deal, and voila your helicoptered-parachuted 12-month contracted IT "specialists" all of a sudden are everywhere.

While that practise is already happening, Barclays does it for sure, it is in fact not always very legal, in that it utilises some gray areas in income tax law. This regulation will make those gray areas very white and clear.

The downside is that a lot of contractors will be marketed out of the market at first, as they would be way too expensive. At second, a lot of the permanent staff could get in trouble here, because "temp" in TISA will be interpreted as "temporarily onshore" limiting the time to say 6 or 12 months, whereupon there will be a clause that requires people to be offshore for about 30 - 90 days, and then they can come back for more of the 6 - 12 months... So all in all, not so "temp" as the politicians hope it will be.

What I do not understand in all this, and yes I am a migrating / vagabonding IT expert, is that western countries are so willingly giving away everything that made the western countries so great in the first place. Blue collar work: mostly in China nowadays; white collar work: Eastern Europe (Financial Services) and India (IT)... They will give away more and more of what is left (Service Industry) until such point that all the locals are forced to work in Hospitality for all the "temp" "offshore" guys to get food. Oh wait, they can't afford that, so no need for Hospitality business either... Oh well... Hey let's start another war and kill 16 of the 17 million locals... That'll safe huge amounts of money on dole payouts every bleedin' week...

I wish they copped on to real reality, rather than shareholder (gambler) reality...

Just my €tuppence,

Guus

9
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FBI arrests claims NullCrew hacker in Tennessee takedown

Guus Leeuw

Re: Double standards

Dear Paul,

It's not a double standard at all, Paul.

Government is effectively above the law as government is the law-maker. We also have police and justice which are effectively the enforcers of the law and the guardians of the public respectively.

Now, what nobody really understood is that 2 of the 3 in the trinity are paid by the other one, so the whole idea of separating enforcers from justice from politics / government, really, never had any chance. But it is a nice thing to say to the masses who will not bother.

So, again, it's not a double standard, it's the way the system was designed to begin with. Justice and Police should have their taxation rules so that can exist separate from Government. If that were the case, they would finally become the real enforcers and guardians that they are meant to be...

Until then, no double standards, I'm afraid...

With Best Regards,

Guus

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