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* Posts by Guus Leeuw

111 posts • joined 27 Mar 2008

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Why ever leave home? Amazon wants to turn your kitchen into a shop

Guus Leeuw
Joke

Re: Computer says no

Dear Hagglefoot,

I would patent that if I were you... You're onto something there for quite a number of people already!

Regards,

Guus

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I QUIT: Mozilla's anti-gay-marriage Brendan Eich leaps out of door

Guus Leeuw

Re: Baker quits Mozilla as well

Also, Trevor, this was not about equal rights, but about gay marriage, which is only a small part of equal rights.

And since gay marriage rights should be universal, my statement is meant on a global scale... And on that scale, I think, pro-gay would still be a minority. If it were not a minority, why are they still fighting for their rights? :) Q.E.D.

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Guus Leeuw

Re: Baker quits Mozilla as well

So, Trevor, thusly it means that whatever we do today, independent of any possible outcome of our future (that which we cannot see!!), in 6 years time it will hold us to ransom?

Nah, I don't think so :) Common Sense dictates that this cannot be, otherwise our fate is predetermined. And even though I'm Dutch, I don't take the Calvinist approach :)

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Guus Leeuw

Baker quits Mozilla as well

Dear Sirs,

from Michell Baker:

"Our culture of openness extends to encouraging staff and community to share their beliefs and opinions in public"

But when they actually do share their beliefs in public, freedom of speech is not wanted...

"While painful, the events of the last week show exactly why we need the web. So all of us can engage freely in the tough conversations we need to make the world better"

So without free speech it is better?

The guy has an opinion. It's not a fashionable opinion, but it's his opinion. And because a minority with a very loud voice thinks his opinion is wrong, he must go? Democrazy at work...

Wouldn't it be better to let the guy's personal beliefs be his personal beliefs? Eich is not Mozilla, nor is firefox anti-gay because of a $1000 donation way back when to a proposition (and law) that never really stood a chance... Or even let him handle the mudslinging contest privately as a private person, seeing that 6 years ago this was his personal opinion voiced publically?

Just my opinion,

Guus

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David Cameron defends BT's taxpayer-funded broadband 'monopoly': It's a 'success story'

Guus Leeuw

Re: Success Story Eh?

Dear Tyrion,

"This is the reason I don't vote. I don't support the currently representational paradigm. Get all these career politicians out of decision making."

It would be better to actually protest and vote blank...

Just saying,

Guus

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Guus Leeuw

Re: 10,000 a week

Hi Andrue,

The classic broadband package is not overly expensive, I agree. The required telephone line (which is really the infrastructure), is expensive: £50 each 3 months...

Still, on the pure broadband, many many companies out there do it cheaper than BT. O2 did it for £12 a month... More bandwidth than BT as well...

I have nothing against BT as a company, but the organisation seems to profit from things that other telco's just can't lay their hands on, and making the tax payer pay twice for infrastructure upkeep is just one of those things...

Regards,

Guus

Regards,

Guus

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Guus Leeuw

Re: 10,000 a week

Dear 27 Escape,

I count *a lot of* weeks in your year... some 520... :)

10,000 a week is 520,000 a year... so 20,000,000 homes is a project of 40-ish years. I want the PM role on that for a meager £200,000 a year contractor rate.

30M£ a year is not a huge sum of money... nor is the nigh-on £58 per home connection...

Put it this way, it is no wonder that BT's services are so crappy...

Also worth noting is that BT would get that investment 4 times over back inside the first year, from each home, so what are they doing with the money we are paying them??? Obviously maintaining infrastructure is not part of it...

Best regards,

Guus

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UK regulators: We will be CHECKING UP on banks' IT systems

Guus Leeuw

Re: "antiquated nature of bank IT systems"

Dear Anonymous Coward,

have you ever worked in a large scale organization with two camps within the business constantly fighting each other and one obviously almost always winning?

One camp is manned by people who have an interest in the service running on antiquated IT systems. The other camp is manned by people who have an interest in robust IT systems upon which services can be ran without hassle.

Take this one: a telco has to allow the transition of numbers to and from its network. Not being able to do that carries fines. So some orgs put in systems some 13 years ago *and never touched them since*. Why? Because they are too important to the business success. Not running, these systems will cause fines upon fines, and potentially the death of the organizations.

Or some banks running *critical* systems on an AIX version that even IBM doesn't know about anymore.

Have you ever heard of the expression: "Never touch a running system"?

Just my two cents,

Regards,

Guus

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El Reg's Deep Outback XP upgrade almost foiled by KILLER ARACHNIDS

Guus Leeuw

Re: Just to be pedantic

Dear Sam Bo,

what you are talking about is actually the toxin, which may or may not be harmful based on quantity.

For something to poisonous, the toxin of it must be ingested or absorbed, like your frog. For something to be venomous, it must actively inject the toxin into the target, much like your average spider which will use teeth to cut through skin and inject the toxin into your body.

I have yet to hear about a poisonous spider, bet the arachnid-eating variety of people would not like that too much... :D

Also, I would not always recommend digesting the toxin of a venomous species... Even if it doesn't enter the bloodstream immediately, the toxin may [enter eventually] by virtue of being digested and not broken down in our stomach....

So... this from the ultimate hairsplitter on El Reg...

Back to the story... if that video is shot at 6 frames per second (10 seconds elapsed per frame) and replayed at 18 frames a second, every second of that video covers about 3 minutes (10 seconds elapsed per frame * 18 = 180 seconds = 3 minutes) drive. So, given that the video is 46 seconds, it covers 3 * 46 = 138 minutes of driving. 2 hours and 18 minutes. So we don't quite know what stretch of road that video covers: 180 km at "often sat on 160km/h" is very variable... :D

Nice spiders, though!

Regards,

Guus

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Amazon Workspaces: A dish best served later

Guus Leeuw

Dear Ann,

the only reason why opex is preferred over capex is that opex has no further subdivision at higher levels, whereas capex has. That is a gross oversight, because if done properly opex for work places would almost certainly be higher through AWS than capex+opex with physical touchable stuffs. Of course, you also have to count in the minutes / hours that people have to waste because AWS is down and effects 100s rather than just the one person with a PC problem... All that detail is lost at higher level... And this, I'm afraid, is also the reason why offshoring is such a success.. Costs are hiding in places where they should not....

Regards,

Guus

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Samsung Galaxy S5 in El Reg's claws: This time the 'S' is for 'sensible'

Guus Leeuw

Re: brittle screen

Dear Sir,

hopefully the wife did not conclude that salad was too heavy to eat.....

Regards,

Guus

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Candy Crush King sees IPO go sour as stock price heads south

Guus Leeuw

Re: Over 350 years later ...

Dear Sir,

not only in Holland. But I regress...

The point is, in 350 years there'll a billion people in the Netherlands alone, all of whom eat tulips, each of which was grown in a pot on the windowsill.

Regards,

Guus

non-tulip eating Dutchman

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From corporate bod to startup star: The 10-month gig that changed everything

Guus Leeuw

Re: Interesting stuff

Dear Robert,

Back in 1997 I had my first job with Halstenbach ACT, back then a small-ish software development company with the desire to get into Eiffel. I left them after a year because the boss and I had a different opinion about getting a shed for my bike in the office building. Small beer, for sure, but "yes" means "yes"...

In 1998 I switched to CSC in Cologne, worked in 6 or 7 different projects all over Germany and left CSC because they did not want to cover inflation with pay-rise. I felt it was unfair, and I looked for a new opportunity.

3 years into my career I decided it was better to go at it alone. That was in the year 2000, August to be precise. I had no savings, no nothing...

I got a job at EMC Germany to teach Perl to some Symmetrix guys, and got into storage admin etc.

I've setup my own company in the meantime, and do only work on those contracts / jobs that I want. Currently getting to grips with Ireland for my main customer, joined a JV between 3 guys to setup a new web-based service, and that JV has now grown to 5 guys, and the next web-based service is being developed in my sparetime by me.

I do what I want, I am not accountable to anybody about my actions. I respect the people I work with, and I *love* the work I do. I always say "Cycling is my biggest hobby after work". The obvious implication is that the work I do actually is my hobby...

You don't need anything, except for self-confidence, total sense of fairness, a good understanding of your niche in the IT space, and an incredible attitude towards work: willing to take ownership and to do something about somebody else's problem / proposition. And of course, a bit of luck finding the contract / role that *you* want.

Oh, I must confess: between August 2000 and now I have been 14 or 15 months without job. Scary average, I know :D So job security reasons do not really come into play...

You want to know more, contact me privately ;)

Regards,

Guus

php dot guus at gmail

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Stop fiddling with your VMAX knobs or I'll chop your fingers off

Guus Leeuw

Re: Ex storage admin, here

Dear Regadpellagru,

blast from the past, for sure...

However there's far less danger in Symm than you may think.

The latest Symms (5 6 and 7) do offer the same level of control as the earlier Symm (3 and 4). That is not a bad thing, in itself. It allows you to give the best possible performance to the system that requires that level of performance. It also allows you to make sure that systems that do not need that level of performance are not in the way of delivering the performance to systems that need it. But one must understand how the machine works on a mechanical as well as logical level.

The bad thing comes, indeed, when people think they can outsmart a machine they do not fully understand. And that is where the pain comes in. Some Joe Local Admin may think they know what's going on, but the most important rule in storage, as you well know(!), is "It Depends...". Things one learned in one particular application of storage may not apply to some other system... Generalization of knowledge in storage is generally a bad thing, really... Remember the study I did with regards to LUN mapping and characterisation of storage through XP storage for that big DB system? Generalizations did not come into that study... Real understanding of how things were actually done was the only way to find perf issues....

Lastly, you couldn't blast away a LUN if it were mapped / masked or performs any other useful service. Only when a LUN/Device is not visible (mapped / masked) and does not have any relationships (R21, R2, BCV, RBCV, Meta Head or indeed Meta Member) to any other device will the Symmetrix allow you to delete/blast away the device. But there are ways around those problems, however those ways are far more involved than just

# symconfigure -sid <SID> commit -nop -v -cmd "delete dev <DEV>;"

Now, how is that most wonderful part of the world where we were colleagues? :)

Take care,

Guus

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Reporters without Borders confirms, yes, lots of nations are spying on their citizens

Guus Leeuw

Am I getting tired?

Dear Sir,

after another long night of migrations at the office, I read this:

"The group noted that in 2012, the UN Human Rights Council passed a resolution which asks member nations to apply human rights protections on the internet just as they would in the real world".

'The group' refers to Reporters without Borders who fret about spying on citizens by governments.

"asks member nations" "apply" "on the internet" "just as" "in the real world"...

So Reporters without Borders agree that governments are spying via internet on citizens? After all, government already does spy in the real world: That's what the police is for, traditionally. Well, maybe not so much spying but certainly looking out for people who commit crimes...

On the other hand, Reported without Borders don't like that government is spying on citizens.

I know I'm tired... but do I sense a paradox in terminus here? Maybe they said it right but it got wrongly reported? Maybe it was reported correctly, and those borderless reporters are not too clever using English?

Who cares :) As long as something is reported, and people read it :)

Regards,

Guus

PS: The icons under the editor was much better... an extra click to bring up the icons? too much work! Bring them back to the fore, I say!!

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'Amazon has destroyed the unicorn factory' ... How clouds are making sysadmins extinct

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UK.gov to train up 11-year-old cyberwarriors

Guus Leeuw

Hmmmm

Dear Sir,

so after teaching common sense successfully out of any pupil, and after making sure that the only way to get University level students is to make the exams easier, gov now wants to teach cyber security.

And they want that because their track record indicates certain success?

<ConspiracyTheory>

Gov is doing this as Step one. Step two: Declare successful network hacking by some far-away millitant group of people, preferably in China. Step three: Declare war on cyber-terror, with backing from US and Israel. Step four: Revive the Cold War, but now against China.

</ConspiracyTheory>

Nice, innit ;) Well, there must be a reason for doing what the article states is the plan...

Regards,

Guus

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Triple-headed NHS privacy scare after hospital data reach marketers, Google

Guus Leeuw

Re: Access to data

Dear Mr Montana,

may I be so free and correct a common misunderstanding that I see very often nowadays? Thank you.

And I quote "underlying server on which the data is stored or even physical access to the servers/drives its stored on". That's the whole point of storing data on the cloud: There's no underlying server, which is not even physical, and therefore can't be physically accessed.

Oh... See how easy it is to pretend that I could work for the government... Cranking stupidity is far easier than cranking up intelligence... But nowadays even stupid people must somehow be able to survive, even if they are clearly not the fittest :D :P :O

Now, as far as Google Admin access is concerned: All you nitwits who assume that one Admin goes in and mines the data... *FAIL* The point here would be that a Google Admin can create a backdoor into the data because (s)he has access as a privileged user to the virtual(!) server the data sits on. Through the thusly tampered backdoor, Google advertising experts can then mine the data for purposes of displaying adverts to patients undergoing surgery via a beamer mounted on the surgeon's back, and pointing to the ceiling....

Oh and never mind the rant about the encrypted data. Imagine this: Google has more than 1 server. In fact, they have more than 100 servers. Some of them are operated in such a way that they can spawn hosted virtual servers at the click of a virtual button. So then, imagine Google (or more likely a rampant Googler) ramps up say 1000 virtual servers. That Googler knows how to parallelize workloads and runs a decrypt attack on your stale but encrypted data. The Googler soon finds out that 1000 is not enough, and employs a 1000 instances at the premises of competitioned giant Amazon. Et voila: 2000 servers working together on cracking your uhm our data.

So... go THINK before you burn down some commentary... Oh yeah: The first part of this post is uhm sarcastic?!

Regards,

Guus

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Tata says USA rejecting HALF of Indians' work visa requests

Guus Leeuw

Re: Cheap Labour through the back door.

Dear Sir,

mind you, this is not only done by alien firms like TCS but also by English/US firms like IBM / HP / Barclays, to name a few...

I really hate the practice. It undercuts the freelance market enormously. Nowadays you get offered £400 for an architect job... For that amount of money, I can't even begin to set the alarm...

And indeed, the most appalling aspect really is that they do not even pay local Income Taxes, so it also undercuts the permanent jobs.

Not fair on anybody, even on the poor Indian who has to live in the UK on a mugger's salary, which is not easy, even given that housing is provided for the people. No wonder you see them come into the canteen with boxes full of rise, and community made lunches... Nothing against that, don't get me wrong, but their standard of living is far far away from what it *should* be (comparing to locals)... It's just too damned profitable for companies to not use this scheme...

Illegal and immoral from all perspectives... People go to jail for less...

Regards,

Guus

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Angela Merkel: Let US spies keep their internet. The EU will build its own

Guus Leeuw

Optional

Dear Sir,

OK, building that non-US data network is not too difficult. One could easily use Huawei from eh China to put that together. London (TfL) has good experience with using Huawei, so that must be no issue to use their experience Europe-wide.

Services on top of that may need programming and orchestration, but we'll get to that, for sure.

How does this EWW interface with the WWW? Everything the EWW will be liable to snooping by some non-EU government organization, I suppose.

And of course since China is now knowingly holding much of the switching and routing equipment in the EWW, and since China is the biggest world economy by the time this EWW is built, they will eh implement the ehm exact same type of ehm patriotic laws that the eh USofA implemented.

So really, nothing to gain, but billions to lose to a ehm non-EU business where the EU is not really getting any benefit at all...

Now, there's something new! Oh well: It's IT: Every ten years we re-invent the same thing under a different name... How clever, especially since we do it in such a way that nobody really ever catches on... Aren't we smart?

Regards,

Guus

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Random car shutdowns force Toyota to recall Prius hybrids - AGAIN

Guus Leeuw
Headmaster

Re: To use or not to use computers, that is the question

Are cars so intelligent nowadays that you can befriend them?

:D

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Fridge vendor pegged as likely source of Target breach

Guus Leeuw

Dear Sir,

KISS... dozens or hundreds of networks?

In your mind, then, string theory solves the problem to form one theory that covers both quantum and relativity?

The best solutions are always simple, yet elegant.

Regards,

Guus

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15,000 London coppers to receive new crime-fighting tool: an iPad

Guus Leeuw

Re: I actually like the idea...

Dear Sir,

the sales process is not there to actually try and see what you buy, but to merely put a signature under a contract in which supplier gets money and purchaser receives unknown goods to a particular quantity. This all happens in one of the backrooms of a golf or country club.

Of course they have no idea what can / cannot be done on these things, but you've got to admit that it looks good for John Doe... More policing/crime data means reduction in crime... Everyone's a winner!! Except for uhm HMRC, as surely Apple will flock the revenue stream over to some taxfriendly country... Oh well...

Regards,

Guus

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Guus Leeuw

Re: Very reassuring

Dear Sir,

not only that, but I'd feel they'd be getting paid too much if they can afford Starbucks...

Or can they sit in Starbucks for free, just like the Maffia does when there's a new restaurant in town that doesn't pay protection money?

Hmmm...

Guus

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Obama to Merkel: No Americans are listening to you on this call

Guus Leeuw

Dear Sir,

what makes you so sure the BND isn't hackable by the NSA?

Regards,

Guus Leeuw

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Anonymous and pals gather in support of girl at centre of rape case

Guus Leeuw

AC vs McD

in other news: an anonymous coward sued McD for discrimination based on the incorrect use of the stative verb "to love" in McD everlasting "I'm loving it" multimedia marketing campaign.

Now what?

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'Stupid old white people' revenge porn ban won't work, insists selfie-peddler

Guus Leeuw
Joke

Re: The law?

Sir,

with reference to Monty Python, I fixed your post like so:

"of your naughty bits flashed..."

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US intelligence: Snowden's latest leaks 'road map' for adversaries

Guus Leeuw

Re: Americans safe from... What?

Dear Sir,

Don Jefe struck a nerve (with me) when the word "fear" came into the discussion.

You see, "fear" is a very powerful and valuable method of controlling masses. Religion (in the form of churches and congregations etc) is a classic example of Management by Fear. So is Government. Both are there to control roughly 95% of humanity. Both are totalitarian in nature. Both have a limited number of leaders (one each to be exact).

1) Selling tickets to Heaven

2) Fearing God

3) Crusades

4) Cold War

5) Commies

6) China / India

7) Terrorists

We (as we are all controlled by a Government nowadays) must all be constantly fearful of something, otherwise the actual fearful people (those within that very Government) do not have a life to live. You see, the most powerful are oftentimes those people that lack a good basis of common sense. Some might actually call them stupid in a common sense way of thinking... I call them deprived of a sensible upbringing... And now you see why this problem will never go away: Religion is here to stay, some Governments water down secondary education to make sure people remain deprived of a sensible upbringing, etc etc...

Solution? Not on my radar, but the ability to think for oneself by oneself with a view of doing Good(TM) when dealing with others will give us a long shot at actually surviving.

Now what's Good(TM)? Well, compare all world religions and filter them down to their very core, and what you'll start seeing is that they all share sociological aspects that were important 2 or 3 millenniums ago, and are still important today: Don't hurt thy neighbor, Don't steal, Respect thy Elders, and there's a few more.

With the best possible regards,

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The Solar System's second-largest volcano found hiding on Earth

Guus Leeuw

Re: "Actually it's a mystery as to why the UK doesn't speak Dutch"

Thanks for that, Natalie. Gave me a nice giggle, being Dutch an'all

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Amazon's weekend cloud outage highlights EBS problems

Guus Leeuw

Forensic investigation?

Dear Sir,

the what now? Forensic investigation? To understand how it (the network device) failed?

So it's a crime now for a network device to fail? fo . ren . sic: adjective: of, relating to, or denoting the application of scientific methods and techniques to the investigation of crime (forensic evidence / forensic investigation)

OK, I can see (maybe!) the application of scientific methods and techniques (IT is a science, right... well for some it is, for others (including some in the IT field) it is magic / the stuff of gods). I can see that it is a crime in the eyes of Amazon for a network device to fail, but still to us users / observers that seems a bit Over The Top(TM).

Spindoctors / PR people: please use language that actually means something, and please stop using language to make it all sound nice... When you do a root cause analysis, just call it a root cause analysis. What's wrong with that? Forensic Investigation? Just makes me think: You've obviously got no clue as to what you are saying, you're just saying things because, to you, they sound nice... That, I would think, is showing, and I quote, not so much brains as earwax.

Best regards,

Guus

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Satnav-murdering Google slips its Maps into car dashboards

Guus Leeuw
WTF?

Re: Satnavs - The curse of modern driving

I'm actually sure, dear Sir, that the police couldn't be bothered with such a lowly offense for which they need 20 days to fill in the red tape...

They don't even come for a stolen bike... That's a criminal offense too... Sometimes they don't even come when one calls and says there's a burglar in the house... Remain and Quiet, si... Paf... Hello? Hello? Helloooo? Oh well... Click Tuuut Tuuut Tuuut....

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Guus Leeuw
WTF?

Re: wtf?

Dear Sirs,

Isn't it rather so that if the government wants us to have cellphone capabilities in our cars, that it must provide that for us? If my (considering I'd be fully employed) employer wants to me to come with 24x7 mail reading capabilities I sure as tell him/her to give me a device capable thereof. If he then says: it should also work in the neck of the woods, I sure tell him/her to get me a device capable thereof.

On the other hand, didn't Brussel win a case against Microsoft for forcing people to use Internet Explorer (or rather for not having enough options available besides Internet Explorer)? If the Automotive Industry is hoping for long lasting service contracts by reselling mobile services, they sure as hell should provide any possibility. Even one where it says: I buy a car in Belgium-, yet live in the UK, just because I can (and because it is cheaper in Belgium)...

Or is Brussels hoping that the Automotive Industry is stupid, and therefore Brussels might cream off on yet more beeeeellion dollar legislation that costs treeeeeellions of dollars to start with....

Oh well,

Regards,

Guus Leeuw

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Private cloud user in dialogue with Atmos, el Reg facilitating

Guus Leeuw
FAIL

AC And Guus Leeuw disagree. El Reg Facilitating.

"and the reg is doing a good job of letting people know."

No it's not. That's the whole point... The article has "facilitating" in its title. "Facilitating" has a meaning: actively making sure that two parties, who are in obvious disagreement, talk to eachother (without actually judging either party before, during or after those talks). I'd like to see how and what took place with that "facilitating". That's not only far more interesting then just copying two statements from two people and asking your readership for their opinion, but also better if you put "El Reg Facilitating" in the title of your article.

Have a look at "Vorsicht Kunde" from the Heise Verlag in Germany. They do facilitating stuff, and report:

1) What happened to the customer (what was bought / sold / stated in the contract)

2) Who they contacted at the vendor

3) What that (vendor) contact actually did

4) If and how the case was resolved

Much better than "Oh look here, two people have a disagreement", wouldn't you say?

Regards,

Guus

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Guus Leeuw

Affiliation with EMC

Sirs,

Just to make sure that everybody understands where I stand:

* I have been working for EMC in the past on three occassions: 2000 - 2001 for EMC Germany, 2006 for EMC Switzerland and in 2007 for EMC UK/Ireland.

* I have been working for EMC customers throughout those years and have gained indepth knowledge in most if not all EMC storage systems.

Currently I am working on a contract with HP UK Ltd for a client of theirs who needed some data migrations done on EMC arrays.

I am in no way currently depending on EMC to help me provide food for my family.

Best regards,

Guus

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Guus Leeuw
Stop

Follow-on?

Dear Chris,

"Atmos is EMC's object storage system for public and private cloud providers. It is a follow-on to the Centera content-addressed storage (CAS) product which continues in production."

Not quite. ATMOS provides a similar high-level function (store objects and get a hash for their location), but that doesn't mean it's a follow-on from Centera. ATMOS is actually quite a separate product line from Centera. The team that built Gen 1 and Gen 2 ATMOS, of which I know at least 1 in person, had nothing to do with the Centera Team. The ATMOS is not geared towards the core functionality of a Centera, namely archiving. The ATMOS is geared towards delivering BLOBs in environment where the end-user does not (need to) know where the BLOB is actually located. BLOBs may have certain parameters like store-three-times and the ATMOSphere (a number of ATMOS systems working together), will make sure that the BLOB is stored in three different arrays. One can also specify store one copy in London, one in Tokyo and one in New York. The ATMOS keeps all three copies in sync. Should the New York ATMOS have failed disks, it will ask either London or Tokyo to provide their copy instead, without the end user needing to know (so there's no referal information visible to the user).

You might wanna get some sort of confirmation of what it is that you're writing about in order to fully understand what you are writing.

I do not believe that el Reg is facilitating the communication between EMC and the customer. EMC certainly is old and wise enough to communicate with its customer themselves. El Reg is not an ombudsman or similar organization to actually try and make sure that EMC is doing the Right Thing. Neither does EMC need El Reg to understand what the Right Thing would be in this case.

EMC is clearly stating that as part of the product development, certain features were left for EMC Support to have access to. There have been discussions about these features and the Product Development Team would have said: We don't want end-users to be able to do that just yet. What is so wrong about that? We are after all dealing with data that in all likelyhood does not belong to the people operating the ATMOS systems!!! So a certain degree of care with regards to data and access to that data is actually a Good Thing(TM).

Best Regards,

Guus

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Guus Leeuw
Boffin

Re: Support Contract Lock-in?

Dear AC,

obviously you have never worked with EMC. Nor with their support, nor with their sales.

EMC products are so dear to their customers that EMC provides support with the product. During the first 3 years that support is provided as part of the baseprice of the product one bought from EMC.

EMC Support has gained most of the 10 yearly Support Organization awards between 2000 and 2010.

They are the best in the world when it comes to Customer Support. Although they have been on a somewhat downward spiral, they seem to be doing the Right Thing(TM) again lately.

As with Lee, though, one has to have worked with EMC in order to cast an opinion about EMC.

Best regards,

Guus

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Guus Leeuw
Boffin

Re: Lee Downing

Lee,

have you ever worked with an ATMOS? Have you ever set one up?

ATMOS systems come with a strict internal network that should not, or hardly change. The external network may change, but because it is relatively straightforward to change things to a wrong IP address, I can understand why EMC doesn't want anybody to just change an IP address on the system. There are upto 8 subsystems in 1 ATMOS installation, each of them having up to 4 IP addresses... Can be quite confusing if you're not really into the whole hardware aspect of an ATMOS system.

Authentication that no longer operates? Nobody said it no longer operates. The guy just wants to delete it. Fair enough. There is a risk involved in doing these operations: Deleting the wrong or the last auth source. Then what? Call EMC Support to hopefully gain access again? You might as well have called them to begin with.

I'm not saying ATMOS is the best ever Object Storage invented. It's a young product, and as such, will have to grow up in certain areas more than in others.

Still and yet, I would think that in order to cast an opinion, one would need to have worked with and understand the system that one casts an opinion about.

Regards,

Guus

2
3

England and Germany square off for FIFA goal line tech prize

Guus Leeuw

Re: deshepherd

Sir,

I quote "However this is not the case in football ... what happens in a goal mouth scramble after a corner with half a dozen players lunging for the ball which the goal keeper dives on an claim he grabbed before the ball crossed the line." and I do not understand what part of that situation has to do with either Hawk-Eye or Magnetic Field Football...

Whether the goalie grabbed the ball or not before it crosses the line does not actually form any part of "a goal was scored". A ball can be shot so hard that goalie and ball end up in the net. It still is a goal (and a vomitting goalie, most likely).

Regards,

Guus

0
1

IBM insider: How I caught my wife while bug-hunting on OS/2

Guus Leeuw

You catching your wife or...

Quote: The only way I can force myself to believe the idea that the richest corporation on the planet behaved that way is that the girl who took me is now a reassuringly expensive lawyer who was kind enough to marry me and so we have photographic evidence.

Surely that explains how she caught you, not the other way around, as the article's title seems to suggest. Anyway, there's not enough funky details on the title's proposed partial subject of you catching the olde ball and chain (expensive a lawyer she may be). Oh, and having said that, I by no means mean to indicate that your wife is comparable to a ball and chain. Just to make it clear that you/she cannot sue me for using a paraphrase :) Or maybe you/she can, what the hell do I know about lawyers and how they extract money from people.

Cheerio for the good article, though, as per usual standard.

Guus

0
0

BOFH: The Great Patch Mismatch

Guus Leeuw
Headmaster

Re: This brings me happy memories

Quote: Water and electricity do not mix

I was taught that they mix quite well. In fact they mix so well, that you should never try to be in the water while mixing it with electricity...

Just me olde 2 cents,

Guus

4
0

European Parliament votes to fight ITU internet power grab

Guus Leeuw
Holmes

Re: Nobody can regulate Internet traffic flow

Quote: I think somebody missed the fact that ICANN is a nonprofit. Sure, things like the "anything as a TLD" move are guaranteed to end in disaster but there isn't any profit motivation there.

Surely, Sir, you are missing the point that the organization is non-profit, but that the people at the helm are most certainly for-profit. Have you never seen these pensioners running charitable / non-profit organizations and creaming off to make sure that the organization is indeed non-profit?

Just saying,

Guus

4
3

Microsoft's 32GB Surface RT has 16GB of free storage

Guus Leeuw
Holmes

Where is the optional 0.80 GiB gone, then?

Sir,

converting between gigabyte and gibibyte: multiply by 1000**3, then divide by 1024**3, correct?

I f do that with 32, I get (32 * 1000 * 1000 * 1000) / 1024 / 1024 / 1024 = 29.8023 = 29.80GiB.

Meaning their rounding algorithm is off... 29.80 should read 30GiB rather than 29GiB...

Just me 0.80 cents,

(or Just me 0.00 cents in Microsoft terms,)

Guus

0
0

Apple appeals Samsung patent getaway in Tokyo

Guus Leeuw
Devil

Dear Sirs,

Why could the not? Surely google can manipulate the search results...

Apple -> Search:

Showing results for "Nexus"

Search instead for "S3"

surely, we heard that before somewhere...

Regards,

Guus

0
0

'Replace crypto-couple Alice and Bob with Sita and Rama'

Guus Leeuw
Boffin

Mythology is optional

Sir,

Why would one want to introduce religion or mythodology (which led to religion) into a scientific subject?

One might just as well go ahead and say: Sender: God, Receiver: Jesus, Eavesdropper: Maria Magdalena...

As with so many topics in life: Religion / mythodology should stay out of it.

Just my two pennies,

Guus

6
3

UK.gov's web filth block plan: Last chance to speak your brains

Guus Leeuw

Re: A straw poll to those who DO watch porn

I wouldn't opt in to nothing such madness. Having this type of filter in place at ISPs allows a multitude of things that should not happen:

1) Government has an easy to consult filter statistics and data, even though they have no right to do so

2) ISPs can (based on judiciary incentives) track certain IP addresses through their filter, and therefore people can be spotted by what they are browsing for things outside of the realm what the filters are there for in the first place.

Lastly, and most importantly, every router has Parental Guidance nowadays, most routers can block individually selected websites. Therefore, the Telco Industry has complied with government rules: They gave nearly everybody the option to make browsing safe for children.

The same problem exists here, as with the Red Light Crossers Who Tote Little Children: They don't wanna behave themselves according to the rules, and therefore everybody else has to make sure that the Toted Children are safe, which ironically has nothing to do with me, as the Red Light Crosser is actually endangering the Toted Children.

So I say: I don't want to have to opt-in or out of this. The internet should be on the basis free-communication-for-all (minus some crooked individuals, you know the "explosives information seekers"). Also everybody should behave according to their best safety-interest, and be responsible for their and their offspring safety.

That, though, is the state of society in the modern world: people think too much that they are the most important people, with little regard for anybody else (even their own offspring).

Best regards,

Guus

( I don't want to be anonymous, as I represent the industry in some way shape or form)

3
0

So, that vast IT disaster you may have caused? Come in, sit down

Guus Leeuw

Re: Fred M

Dear Fred,

lying to somebody who is sitting next to you and lying to somebody on the phone who is actually half a world away, are two completely different skillsets.

I am very happy praising people in mails, telephone calls, and the likes. Never, though, when people can see where I'm looking, or when my face or hands are visible to the listener.

I loved your post, and was glad to have had the chance to respond to it.

Regards,

Guus L

2
0

Woman spanked for dissing ex in Facebook snapshot

Guus Leeuw
Thumb Up

Re: Face it

I'm gonna sue you!

0
0
Guus Leeuw
Pint

Re: Hardly a court matter

It is a court matter. Hundred percent.

The next time somebody writes something about a Guus Leeuw and makes that Guus Leeuw do stupid things, I'll go after the author in a Spanish Court.

Because according to this lawsuit, freedom of speech is no more, if we may believe the judge. There is no mention of the ex being the subject of this brutal t-shirt-based attack...

Maybe I can go to court over the T-Shirt I bought myself: "My wife says I never listen or something like that" and get my wife some jailtime... Ah maybe not...

Or what's the other fun shirt she has? Nelson shouting "Ha Ha!". Clearly an insult...

Well, at least I know my next holiday is in Spain :D There's money to be had there.

0
0

Hey Commentards! This pre-populated 'reply to' is for you

Guus Leeuw
FAIL

Re: Re: This title not left blank.

And here's the proof that software quality assurance is often left disregarded: It works, therefore it's good...

"Re: Re: ..." Subject lines were banned from mail clients like a decade ago?

1
0
Guus Leeuw
IT Angle

This title field still had "Optional"

Re: Nothing?

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