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* Posts by The BigYin

3048 posts • joined 25 Mar 2008

Punters hate copyright, says Steelie Neelie

The BigYin
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Ummm....

I would have thought that "preview" in the URL for a *very* well known shortener would have been a bit of a clue. It goes to TechDirt.

http://www.techdirt.com/articles/20111114/02034116758/gema-once-again-demands-royalties-creative-commons-music-it-has-no-rights-over.shtml

Happy now?

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Have everything. Own nothing. Learn the difference

The BigYin
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It's simple

It's a "property" when in favour of the company and you are a piece of dirty scum who should be pursued to the maximum extent of the law and equated with those who would commit rape and murder.

It's demote to a "right" as soon as you try to exercise any action you would normally do with a property. You are a piece of dirty scum who should be pursued to the maximum extent of the law and equated with those who would commit rape and murder.

And this is why the whole IP thing is screwed up.

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The BigYin
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I will agree

Which is why using services like Amazon Kindle, iTunes etc is stupid. You are paying near-full-whack to "rent", not "own". If you understand and accept that, then fine - it's your choice.

Me? I'll keep buying my books/CDs/DVDs/etc thankyouverymuch

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Think your CV is crap? Your interview skills are worse

The BigYin
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Can I summarise?

"I follow basic personal hygiene and can read a watch. I will happily work with others, but don't always need my hand-held. I understand the limits of my knowledge and not adverse to reading a book or asking for help to get things done."

Hey presto, perfect candidate.

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Windows 8 aims to make security updates less painful

The BigYin
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@Def

I thought it was down to the new file being created at a different inode, and the executing program continuing to use the original inode. Or maybe that only happens in some cases?

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The BigYin
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Indeed and agreed

But Windows seems to be much more prone to *requiring* a full restart as opposed to other OSs. Even installing an entirely new app causes it to want to reboot (that might be a fault of the installer I guess).

Any idea what happened with KSplice? Not heard much about it after Oracle swallowed it.

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The BigYin
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"correctly in the first place"

What an idea! Let's just do things properly from the beginning!

Cars will no longer burst into flames after a crash!

Planes will no longer drop out of the sky due to failure!

Building will not longer fall down!

Bridges will no longer collapse!

Pencil tips will no longer snap!

Glass will no longer break!

DO IT RIGHT FIRST TIME! My god! It's a paradigm shift! You should patent that *RIGHT NOW*!!!! You'll be bloody minted you will!

What did no one think of this before? WHY?????????????

(idiot)

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The BigYin
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@AC at 09:44

*sigh* The same is true on Windows as one is not forced to restart. I assume you are the same AC as before - you clearly do not know how non-Windows updates work, I suggest you do some research before commenting further.

In enterprise systems, one would be using some kind of management system (e.g. Puppet) to push and control updates (i.e. only applying them after testing them).

For office systems there would (should!) be a policy about when reboots happen to suck in the updates.

For home/end-user-controlled system - it's up to that user. In the vast majority of cases, simply bouncing the service (e.g. Samba) or stopping/starting the program is enough.

MS's way of doing it is, IMO, the worst one as it leads to people disabling the whole thing to stop the bloody nagging. I also despise the way Win7 sneaks in updates with little when I go to shut down. I want to know what the updates are and why they are being applied, I may have very good reasons for NOT wanting an update (e.g. compatibility with other systems).

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The BigYin
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@AC at 09:44

I think you might be misunderstanding (assumption: OS X behave like GNUN/Linux and given the Unix heritage of both, I think this is a fair bet).

When a file on a Unix-like system is updated, it can be moved to a new inode (a point on the disc). Anything using the "old" file can carry on using the "old" inode and see that version. When the program closes and then opens, when it gets the file it will get the "new" inode and thus the new version. (This is not quite technically correct, but good enough for now).

The upshot is that you only need to reboot when some critical system (kernel, vital system service) gets file updates and needs to stop in order to grab the new files. Even then, there can be ways to restart critical systems and grab the update without doing a reboot.

Windows cannot do this as its file system works in a fundamentally different way.

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The BigYin
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That was y thought exaclty

The only person in a position to decide what is critical is the user (be they an end-user of a sys admin). No one else. Often my PC site here 'idling' but as far as I am concerned Samba is a critical app as I am sat in front of the box watching a movie off the HDD.

If it chose then to reboot (which it wouldn't, but if it did) I'd be one pissed off geek.

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The BigYin
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Linux

Err...

...you mean enact repositories like in the GNU/Linux world, but do a really bad job of it?

Join the dark side, we have fishies. Err....cookies.

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The BigYin
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@AC at 05:21

Windows shares all drives by default. I have just checked my Win7Pro install and I can indeedy see C$ and D$ as shares. Fair enough, you need to know a password for an admin account (or of a local user who is admin). But the fact remains - all your content is on the network for anyone to (potentially) see.

Compare that to other operating systems that actually implement security.

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The BigYin
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Mushroom

Translation

"MS lawyers have not managed to get the patents approved for mechanisms that are used on other operating systems to ensure that the OS and applications are updated in a coherent manner. Once the patents are approved, we will sue the F/OSS operating systems into oblivion and then have a big PR campaign about the new paradigm we will have 'invented'".

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The BigYin
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It doesn't

Linux has no centralised way of updating software, nor can it ever have one. GNU and it's ilk do provide such systems - "package managers" (apt-get, pacman etc.). Even these have limitations though. One must either have originally installed the software from the package managers, or installed it from some kind of approved package (e.g. ".deb") so that the package manager knows about it. If you are using software that you have just downloaded as a TAR or something, then it will not get updated unless you do it yourself. This is why GNU/Linux users are urged to use repositories rather than download random crap off the Interwebs like Windows users are. Repositories and their downloads are also often signed to prove that they are legit and thus not malware (it's not perfect though, nothing is).

However the package manager finds out about what you have installed, it will periodically check the version currently installed against the version in the repository. If the version in the repository is newer, that fact is remembered and at some point the user will be asked if they wish to download and install (or some job will update the system or whatever).

Once the download happens, things update and no reboot is required due to the way the file systems work. When an updated program closes, the next time it starts it will be running the new version. The only time you need to reboot is if Linux itself (the kernel) or an in-use module (e.g. graphics) gets updated. And even then you only need to update if you want to use the new version right now. Bar one message at the end and perhaps an icon changing, there is no nagging.

The actual details of the above will vary slightly from distribution to distribution, but the general ideas remain the same.

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Microsoft moving embedded systems to Windows 8

The BigYin
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Unhappy

What you do not want...

...when you are in the operating room, lying on that bed, lines and needles going into your arms...is to look around and notice that the machine which will help hold your life in the balance for the next few hours is running Windows!

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NEWSFLASH: Chips cheaper than disks

The BigYin
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@Tomato42

Windows? Oh, in that case you're looking at around 20GB minimum before you even add applications.

Looking at the system I have here, the full OS install is about 500gb, 482gb-ish of which is my personal files (settings, media, virtual images). The actual OS portions is only 18gb and of that 9gb-ish is games related executables etc. So that's about 9gb for actual applications and important stuff.

Just because Windows doesn't do a decent job of separating executable/configuration/data files doesn't mean that every OS is like that. :)

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The BigYin
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Well....maybe

75Gb is about ten times what one needs for a full OS with applications.

All the rest is logs/swap/datafiles and they can go on to a RAID array.

Thus one can get the speed of SSDs for the binaries (which will change little) and the reliability of an HDD for other files (which can change a lot).

Of course, the actual balance will depend on the individual use case.

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My home is bugged ... with temp sensors to save me cash

The BigYin
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Simple

Turn the rads in the bedrooms down/off?

Or look at increasing the insulation between the floor?

Or close a few doors?

Hard to say without knowing the layout of the house.

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The BigYin
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Dammit!

I've just have the bloody plastering done. Damn you to heck! :)

I had some polystyrene-backed boarding used as was told that they did not qualify for any relief. Hey ho, at least my bills will be lower. I was aware of Areogel but the contractor had never heard of it and I struggled to find any products - now I know which names to use I might be able to find them the next time the plaster falls off.

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Diaspora co-founder dies at 22

The BigYin
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This is a real shame

He was part of a talented and dynamic team that "inspired" Google+.

(That is my opinion, yer honour)

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Israeli air raid vs Iran nukes boardgame out in time for Xmas

The BigYin
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Exactly

And why would Israel even have to do it - they'll just get the Yanks to blow Iran to hell.

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Why your tech CV sucks

The BigYin
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Indeed

But who didn't get the interview offer, you or them?

This is why it's your problem.

Not that I agree with the situation...

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The BigYin
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Flame

Top investment bank, eh?

I know COBOL, JCL and am not 65 years old which means I'll be around for quite a while. Let's face it, you still use COBOL and training people is expensive. The old COBOL engineers are dying and there is not a lot of young-blood around, is there?

Send me your company's annual statements for the past decade and I'll see if you are good enough to employ me.

I could put any number of other TLAs and buzzword into my CV and pass quite a few other check-lists. And you know what? It's pointless. Totally and utterly pointless.

For a tech company (e.g. a software house) it's worthwhile, but a bank? Get real. Most actual dev work will be off-shored/outsourced to an actual tech company, your tech work will be applications or infrastructure support. Any decent dev can learn any high-level language well enough to do applications support. The big trick is is finding one who can learn the problem domain, work with others, think fast, follow procedures, define procedures, unit test, document, mentor, train and do all those other things that do not have buzzwords and do not feature in your pathetic little check list.

Also, when I say I do not what a job in region X or I only want a job in region Y; I really do mean I DO NOT what a job in region X or ONLY a job in region Y so stop fucking calling me about shit that is in X or not in Y!!!

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The BigYin
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@DRendar

Well, that adds a new spin to "dumbstuck".

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Barnes & Noble complain to DoJ over Redmond nobbling

The BigYin
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Umm...

...the Android kernel may share some ideas with Linux, but the rest of it (i.e. the stuff you directly use) has nothing whatsoever to do with Linux. That credit goes to GNU (and quite a few others), the world would be nowhere without the GNU C Compiler.

Sorry if this seems pedantic, and I have nothing against Linux or Torvalds, but credit where it is due please.

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Old apps must die when you migrate to the cloud

The BigYin
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If the apps were open source...

...there'd be less need for the teams to re-invent the wheel.

Your company's worth is in the business process and rules that the programs follow (which should get loaded from config files) not in the code you write.

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If thine brown eye offend thee, blast it with a laser

The BigYin
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Umm...

...the brown is caused by pigmentation, the same as the skin generates to protect itself. So wouldn't brown eyes be more resistant to sun damage? And isn't this why blue eyes are more prevalent in the Northern (and I guess Southern) latitudes? There being less harsh light there? Ok, so in the very extreme North/South there is snow glare to deal with as well.

I guess this procedure might help the David Bowies of the world...but really...get a grip people.

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Maude: Open data is UK.gov's 'new way of operating'

The BigYin
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So...

...all data on missing smartphones and laptops will be open?

Oh I forgot - it would cost too much.

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Kids! You get back in front of that Xbox right now

The BigYin
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I would say...

...it depends greatly on the game. Also, if kids spend hours in front of the tube we'll end up with an army of obese creatives suffering from myopia, weak bones and poor social skills.

All things in moderation. Unless it's chocolate - pile it on! :-)

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Crime-fighting Seattle superhero unmasked, fired

The BigYin
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@Jedit

"is because it's the police officers who should determine who is and is not a criminal"

I think you'll find it's the courts that do that. Officer can only determine who is a suspect or is to be accused of a crime. It may seem pedantic, but I think the differences between suspect/accused and criminal are being increasingly watered down and eroded. innocent until proven guilty, remember?

At least, that's how it used to be.

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The BigYin
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@AC - 18:15

Depends on the crime. Legislation only bans one from working with kids if the crime is in some way related to harming children. Would you expect a convicted speeder to be banned from working with children? No, of course not. And remember, speeding *IS* a criminal offence.

His employers may simply have taken the view that he's brought them into disrepute or otherwise set a bad example.

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Disk prices double after flood - and could 'double again'

The BigYin
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They were...

...not so much now,

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The BigYin
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Weren't whne I posted

Amazon (to name one) had reasonable prices.

Now? Take that reasonable price and multiply it by silly.

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The BigYin
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Hmmm

Where are these prices coming from? I can buy a 2TB drive for £78 without much trouble. A 1TB is about £55. Prices are slightly higher, but not double.

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UK.gov threatens to 'pull plug' on smart meter rollout

The BigYin
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@Nick

Err...this account is in no way as critical as my gas meter, so a reasonable password is good enough. For a gas meter I would expect it to be using signed keys protected by passwords and physical access being required to update the keys (which will be amusing as most gas meters are external to the property).

And even if that were done, I rather doubt the majority of the pubic are educated enough to use such a system properly.

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The BigYin
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@Nick

"Also it would be possible to allow the consumer to configure their smart meter"

DANGER! DANGER! DANGER! Do you really want your meters web accessible? Really? No way in hell, buster. There is no way I would trust them to have enough security to make things safe.

"to switch between alternative generating sources (i.e. renewable, nuclear, coal, gas) according to the relative spot price of each source rather "

Ah-ha-ha-ha-ha-ha-ha-ha!

It's an ironic post! Oh, that's a good one Nick!

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The BigYin
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Flame

They want me to have a smart meter...

...OK. Show me the source code.

I want unlimited indemnity from the meter being hacked and reporting false reading.

I also want unlimited insurance from utility should the smart meter cause any problems with my own equipment (depends on how it is networked).

The utility also must pay 100% of the costs of installing any cabling needed to the house.

Until such times, go and meter a darkened orifice.

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The Register Guide on how to stay anonymous (part 1)

The BigYin
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I the ads...

...did not flash, pop over/under or otherwise distract from the content, I wouldn't block them so hard. Advertisers and ignorant content providers have made this problem. If they play nice, it will go away.

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Why can't civil servants keep a grip on their BlackBerrys?

The BigYin
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Umm...

...surely they have tracking software installed? PreyProject seems good (I've mucked about with it a bit). Unfortunately they don't offer support for RIM, they probably could if the government punted them a few notes.

Or maybe RIM offer this service already. Dunno.

Either way, unless they were mugged the civil servants should be made to pay for a replacement.

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Solar power boom 'unsustainable', says Gov

The BigYin
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@Rolf

This - in spades.

The calculators are generally trivial. And like any good maths teacher will tell you "If you do not show your working, you may have arrived that the answer by fluke."

I do not expect to get a 100% accurate answer, but I want to see the working. I want to know that it's in the ball-park. I do not what to have 10 sales-drones at my door (I can bet they will not be qualified engineers) as I have been bothered by too many target-focused, pushy, arse-wipes in the past.

The data is out there, but it is a PITA to find and the government does not make it clear.

For those stating that the return is circa 8 years, I think you are being woefully optimistic. It's a shame that the data is so hard to come by and the information hard to trust; because roofs are wasted area and turning them into generators is a good idea.

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The BigYin
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I did not install panels

I have a perfect southerly facing roof and the funds available. There's a few reasons that need to be addressed before I would consider installing:

1) What information that is available is crap. More understandable data is needed on panel cost, performance, installation fees, maintenance, mean-time-to-failure etc.

2) The ROI is over 15-25 years. So unless you are staying put for that time, you'd be an idiot to install. Unless...

3) Do panels add to a home's value? Who gets the feed-in tariff after sale? Again, this information is not available.

4) Current panels are not efficient enough and there is no information on the dust-to-dust impact of the panels (i.e. do they make-up for the eco cost of their own manufacture?)

5) It is basically impossible from the easily-digested information how much power one can generate, and calculate the ROI. It can be done, but it's a PITA

6) Getting prices is nigh-on impossible

7) Have I mentioned how hard it is to get clear information?

8) Like "peter 45" I do not trust the government to keep-up the FIT, so the panels must be able to pay for themselves within a reasonable period. From what I can tell, if you do some basic energy saving (i.e. unplug stuff, good insulation) they simply won't. I define a "reasonable period" as 5 years or less.

9) The tech is not new (almost every house in Germany has solar collectors/cells) so why are they so expensive over here?

10) Getting clear information is hard. I think I've mentioned this.

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'Ghost hunter' set to become Tory Euro-MP

The BigYin
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Oh great

Another MEP with zero understanding of science or basing decisions on hard evidence.

They'll fit right in.

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Canonical: Mobile OEMs are going to love our Linux

The BigYin
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So...

...will Canonical have to pay a feu to MS, or will MS go after the OEMs?

Canonical does not have the funds that Google has, so there is a good chance that MS could hit them with patent lawsuits.

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'Mental act' computerisations no longer automatically unpatentable

The BigYin
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@AC

Who's talking open source? I never mentioned it.

The fact is that, even without looking at other source and "copying it", programmers come up with the same answers time and time again. These got given the trendy name of "Patterns" a while back and various people coined it in providing consultancy, frameworks, libraries, tutorials etc and nary a patent in sight. This is how it should be.

Can you imagine the Internet or the World Wide Web if ARPA, Sir Berners-Lee etc had patented all their ideas, rather than throwing them out there to be improved upon? You can't, and that's because it probably wouldn't exist.

"You linked two networks? PAY YOUR LICENSE FEE!"

"You used a hyperlink? That will be $0.01 per link as a fee, please. PAY UP OR BE SUED!"

There are dating sights graphical suites and a whole host of other software that is patented when they are nothing more than a jumped-up mathematical operations (usually a matrix transform of some kind). This is a patent on pure maths - can you see how monumentally DUMB that is?

Then we have patents infecting other things such as standards. If OO/LO wish to compete with MS, they need to support the "Office Open XML" standard; which they cannot do without breaching MS's patents. This means no one bar MS can fully implement an ISO standard without breaching patents or MSs covenant [not] to sue. Can you see how STUPID that is?

Patents are the wrong tool for protecting software. Just as a hammer is the wrong tool for stirring tea.

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The BigYin
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Mushroom

Translation

"The UKIPO will now be as useless and counter-productive as the USPTO".

Seriously people - NO SOFTWARE PATENTS!

Copyright and trademark laws are pretty much all one needs.

Software patents are just far too dangerous as all they do is stifle innovation by allowing the majors to bully (or sue into bankruptcy) smaller developers. They do NOTHING to help the IT industry. All they do is help lawyers and one only has to look at the recent headline about Samsung/Apple to guess at the millions being wasted in patent suits and technology stagnates as a result.

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Facebook flashplodders lose appeal against 4-yr jail stint

The BigYin
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So...

...the get 4 years. OK. Rioting and public disorder are bad.

So are ABH, GBH and abuse of a public office.

I would go as far to say that, depending on the public office, the abuse of it is as bad as rioting or public disorder.

When then are we not seeing MPs serving 4 year terms for expenses fraud? All they get is a quick slap on the wrist and made to promise not to get caught again...err...not to repeat.

One rule for them, another rule for us.

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Blow for McKinnon as extradition treaty ruled 'not biased'

The BigYin
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@laird

To add to Richard 81's question, have you considered that the UK simply makes sure it has evidence of an actual crime before extraditing?

I am sure out military security is equally as bad, but the kind of holes that McKinnon found have been there since the 80s! If 25+ years is not long enough to secure your system, then you deserved to be hacked!

Read "The Cuckoo's Egg" by Clifford Stoll and see just how little has changed.

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FSF takes Win 8 Secure Boot fight to OEMs

The BigYin
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FAIL

To the spelling/grammer fascists

Have you considered the possibility that that OP's first language is *not* English?

Their English is a damned sight better than my Mandarin, Spanish, Portuguese, Urdu or anything else for that matter.

Or ever considered that they suffer from Dyslexia? Not all browsers have spell-checkers to help (not that they may be much help to someone with severe dyslexia).

Or any one of umpteen other possibilities that could be impairing them.

No, guess you didn't. If you feel you must correct someone, then at least be polite about it.

In short: grow up.

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The BigYin
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The problem is...

...people who don't know any better will swallow the marketing that "Secure Boot" is great and not realise there is a problem. These are the very same people who buy a whole new PC just to get a new OS, rather then trying a different OS or a few key upgrades.

These people are the vast majority and for that reason, it's up to use who (in this one case) happen to know better to defend their freedoms for them.

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The BigYin
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Think...

A vendor can sell the same hardware twice. Kerr-ching!

A "consumer" board with the ability to update/disable UEFI missing and a "pro" version with them present.

Beyond that the two boards are identical (bar one jumper or something) and they can charge a massive premium for the "pro".

Also, if not providing the feature saves 0.01p, then that feature will no be provided as the monopoly player doesn't need it and will be rather happy to know that the feature is missing.

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