* Posts by The BigYin

3055 posts • joined 25 Mar 2008

Ad slingers - obeying EU snoop code is NOT GOOD ENOUGH

The BigYin
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Wrong way round

This mean I have to store a cookie that says "Do not track" and this is clearly wrong.

What each ad network should be required to do is get explicit consent to store a "Please track" cookie. No cookie, no track.

Although I realise there are other methods to rack people that do no need cookies (browser, font, OS and plugin combinations are fairly unique).

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Fast food firm fields Sith sandwich

The BigYin
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Strong with fat is this one

Much cholesterol in their blood is there

Not long for this world will they be

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Virtual sanity: How to get a grip on your home PCs

The BigYin
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Oh...

...if only there was some way to run an application on a server and have the client appear elsewhere. If only such a thing existed. And I don't mean a website, that's far too limited constrained to the limitations of the browser/HTML.

What's needed some kind of crazy mechanism for the server to "run" the application but have it display somewhere else. Not Terminal Services of Citrix, much lower level than that.

I can't believe that after all these years no one has created and tried to push - it would be the perfect solution. Some apps run on the server, some on the client. Where depends on the use-case/hardware needs.

Such a thing would be a paradigm shift in computing to rival "the cloud" and an X-cellent idea.

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The BigYin
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Good

I'm glad it wasn't just me then. I thought this was going to be some clever way of reversing a virtual image out on to physical hardware or something else.

Instead it's just bizarre-o and IMHO wasteful. Games inside virtual machines? Over RDP? Yuck.

Full consumer PCs to simply remote into an XP image? Huh?

Maybe I too a missing something, but it strikes me that most of the issues could be resolved with a lot less complexity.

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Ubuntu hoists skirt, flashes 'concept' gadget at CES

The BigYin
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Whilst I want this to succeed...

...because I want to see some actual competition and innovation, I have my doubts. I have seen stories about GNU/Linux getting on to consumer devices one too many times. Whilst it is there (routers, set-top boxes) it's always behind the scenes and unnoticed by the masses who drool over iOS.

It would be good to get some more open hardware in the TV market. Most decent TVs today are small computers (probably running some Linux flavour, natch) but they are all so crippled and locked into walled-gardens. What I want from a TV is a monitor. Err, that's it.

To that I will attach a device (say a RaspberryPi or something) and have that broker all the media requests. The TV is not the hub, it's just the display.

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Microsoft celebrates the death of IE6

The BigYin
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@Ru

Also, click on the "A" once it's done, you'll get a mini-report on other tests that failed.

ACID3 - 100/100 is ***NOT*** a pass, people!

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The BigYin
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@stim

Try understanding what 100/100 means on the Acid3 test first and what it takes to actually pass the test.

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Year of the Penguin - el Reg's 2011 Linux-land roundup

The BigYin
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@E 2

Linux != An Operating System

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The secret to getting rich in 2012: Open APIs

The BigYin
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An Open API...

...is all well and good, and a boon to integration; but if one does not also have an open implementation then final control still lives with the proprietary code holder who can hold the entire developer community to ransom on a whim.

In fact the whole phrase "Open API" is a misnomer that does nothing expect dilute and obscure the meaning of "open" (just as "open" did for "free"). What we have here is a nothing more than public APIs.

The increasing dependence of "Open API"s as people integrate their toilet with Twitter (or whatever banality they think people care about) merely entrenches proprietary code and companies. The F/OSS community should resist the urge to depend on "Open API"s unless they can also roll their own fully-operational implementation.

Failure to do so will leave F/OSS at the mercy of proprietary.

Maybe this is why MS are so keen to push "Open Surface" it's the same Trojan Horse, just a different jockey. Or maybe an "Open API" means one that can be invoked without patent infringement. After all, we have ISO "Standards" that can't be full implemented without begging for patent protection.

As for APIs for internal systems, whether over SOAP/JSON/XYZ (pref using open libraries for future-proofing and resilience), this is just good planning and should be part of any design process. The various layers should all have well documented APIs (and test sets for same) so that any one layer can be swapped/updated without the other layers being overly disturbed. If you can only access your CMS (say) via a single client and the CMS can only access a single database via a single connection; then you are a bloody moron.

No layer should care what the other layer is beyond the API boundary.

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Merry Christmas, Stratfor

The BigYin
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Two questions

1) Who the shuddering fuck are Strafor?

2) Why should I care that they can't secure their network?

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X-Men Origins: Wolverine pirate caged

The BigYin
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@irish

"What's not to like?"

I am supposed to be fixing this house up, instead I am wondering what order will tip the balance in my next Gratuitous Space Battle :-S

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The BigYin
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@Daniel Johnson

He breached the terms of his license. That should be a civil matter at best, not criminal, as a license is basically a contract.

He may have caused loss (i.e. *some* downloaders did not buy the DVD or a cinema ticket who would otherwise have done so). OK, recover that loss from him. Once it can be quantified (and remember, 1 download!=1 lost sale).

He can't pay? Garnish his wages or use other measures open to the judge.

If the media companies want their productions dealt with like a physical product (e.g. "theft" etc) then they should also assign the rights of a physical product. e.g I can do what I want with it (cut it up, re-purpose it, whatever), I can give it away, it can be inherited and so on.

At the moment they want license terms in their favour (no copying, no format shifting etc) but product terms when it suits them ("theft", jail etc). They are trying to have it both ways and are getting away with it for now - this is not something that can continue. Our culture will eventually suffer, innovation will suffer, economies will suffer.

The biggest threat to the digital economy is not the license-breachers, it's the corporate trying to legally entrench their fiefdoms and create barriers to free-trade and innovation. These are the same morons who think the Internet should have been patented! My yes, what a bloody great idea that would have been! THEY are the one now benefiting from the freedom the Internet offers and they want to lock-it down.

It's so short-sighted it's like trying to monetise collaterised debt...wait a minute...

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The BigYin
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Mushroom

Hmm...

...so copyright infringement is now a greater threat to society than burglary, theft and bodily harm?

Something is seriously screwed up.

As @Craig 12 said, they still made money. If one assumed that all the downloads were lost sales (which is highly, highly unlikely) what would they have gained? 0.001%? The lawyers probably cost more than that.

And haven't other surveys shown that the downloaders are also their biggest customers? They are not just biting the hand that feeds, now they are jailing it.

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The BigYin
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@irish donkey

"Was it any good?"

No. Never mind downloading it for free, you should be paid to compensate you for the wasted bandwidth!

"Buying 2nd hand DVD's since 2009."

I buy second-hand games, films come from the bargain-bin (I am a patient man).

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The BigYin
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This is a key point

I was at a talk where RMS mentioned an experiment Stephen King tried whereby Mr. King did a book on a "Pay what you want basis". Mr. King got US$100k profit or something and called it a failure. RMS made the point that US$100k is a success. It's a *very* nice annual wage and it was one book! It can only be a "failure" if one was hoping to gouge people for US$millions.

These big-name media types (people and companies) need to lower their expectations. I do not owe them a living, the sun does not shine out their fundament.

Support indie, support sharing (e.g. Humble Indie Bundle, vo.do, Jamendo, Magnatue [all distribution channels] also "The Tunnel", "Sintel", "Person of Interest" [all actual releases]). Screw the parasitic majors.

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ISP ordered to drop 'three strikes' rule against pirates

The BigYin
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@Blarkon

You seem to be acting under the false assumption that downloading is somehow divested from paying. It isn't, it's just that the majors can't be bothered to provide the service that consumers want, or are only willing to do so at a price-point the consumers can't stomach; so some consumers look for an alternative/

It doesn't have to e this was at all. Some of us download AND pay. Just not from the likes of Sony, EMI, WB or any other those idiots.

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The BigYin
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Ah yes, Disney

Remind me, how old is Mickey Mouse?

Who keeps campaigning to extend copyright again and again and again and again and...?

At some point people need to realise that their culture is being restricted and entrenched by corporates. There is not such thing as "intellectual property", that's just a PR buzzwords to collate disparate ideas (a bit like "the cloud" in that respect). It confuses the consumer, makes them fear legal action and erodes their rights.

Copyright needs to be cut right back (a max of 20 years is more than reasonable if you ask me). We do not need our culture held hostage by inhuman corporates.

Oh, and how do Irish pirates get an Internet connection? They must have some really cool undersea cable tech or satellite uplinks. Maybe they can help Cameron's broadband Britain scheme?

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Lovefilm buys right to stream Sony Pictures content

The BigYin
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Facepalm

Eh?

They are moving to a dying platform? WTF?

Bloody hell.

Glad I'm not a customer!

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Sony PSN class-action lawsuit ban prompts... lawsuit

The BigYin
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Small question

What does the USA say about statutory rights? Is a class action one of those? Can they be waived in a contract? Could it be considered an unfair term and thus unenforceable?

I have more sense than to use PSN, but I am nonetheless curious.

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Homeland Sec., RIAA Torrent lists published

The BigYin
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I agree

Prison is the bet place for pirates. The actions of pirates can never be condoned. Ever.

As for alleged copyright infringers, that should be a civil matter and once costs/losses have been paid that should be the end of it.

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Ten... inkjet photo printers

The BigYin
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Missing info

As others have said:

Cost per print

Cartridge type (single inks, or 3 colours in 1?)

Are pattern ink available (and in fully working cartridges)?

For the WiFi ones what band? Are they WiFi only or can then be cabled (USB or Ethernet)?

OS support? Are these MS only?

I am glad to see you did not include any Lexmark ones, I am suffering a re-badged Lexmark (Dell 964). What a hunk of junk. Can't use pattern ink, OEM ink is a rip-off, lacking in drivers for non-Windows OSs, just horrible (came with a PC, heading for the skip soon).

Next printer will have to be a laser or support a continuous ink system. And not be wedded at the hip to MS.

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The moment a computer crash nearly caused my car crash

The BigYin
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I've had my motorcycle act in a similar manner.

So I pulled over and had a look.

Thing is, my bike is carbed so it took about 5 seconds to realise fuel was low and it was running lean, flick to reserve and off to the petrol station (no fuel gauge).

And there's the thing - my bike was user servicable at the road-side, modern cars (and bikes) are now. Heck, it can even be impossible to replace a bulb without removing the front wheel on some cars!

This all comes down to poor type approval. Basic repairs should be achievable by an untrained driver by the roadside and only with the tools/manuals carried by the car. Wheels, fuse and bulb changes should all be in that requirement. If it can't be done in reasonable time (say 15 minutes) then the design fails approval and is no allowed on the road.

If one's vehicle is going bat-shit, one should pull over where safe to do so. No excuse really.

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York CompSci student pleads guilty to Facebook hack

The BigYin
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Good

We cannot have people like this going around pointing out security flaws.

Security needs to be 100% black-boxed and hidden from view.

Only via total obscurity can we ever have safe systems otherwise people will be able to work out how to circumvent them. Anyone trying to shed light on security matters is clearly dangerous, quite possibly a terrorist and should be dealt with in the most sever terms possible.

Thus the only response from the courts should be to deport him to the USA (Facebook is, after all American) when he can be tried by a military court and executed.

The world will then be a safer place for us all.

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Microsoft beaten down 16pc on software sales to NHS

The BigYin
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@AC

"...I expect they just looked at the resultant horror show when a number of German & US municipalities, school districts etc ditched MSO for Gnu/Open Office a few years back.......the financial cost of the initial migration and then crawling back to MS was terrible and, probably more importantly for negotiators, ended the careers of many involved."

Nice spin, but not the dull truth. In Germany there was an election and a power shift. The new incumbents were more closely tied to Big Business and keen to help their pals rake it in. Even the internal analysis conducted by the German equivalent of NAO seemed to show that the F/OSS solution was value for money.

I say "seemed" and I have no way of knowing how independent or unbiased that report was.

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The BigYin
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Solution?

Well, if you don't want to spend money on re-training everyone/re-writing all integrations; don't upgrade. There's a solution for you, won't work forever though.

If you are going to spend millions (probably billions the way government IT contracts go) in retraining/recoding on the same application from the same vendor, then there is a very good case for at least thinking about the alternatives. It's shame that in the NHS (heck, UK in general) that beyond a few examples such as "Open Molar" this simply does not happen.

"Open standards are a great goal, but it's the work of years to transition to them."

And it begins with one contract stating something along the lines of "All files and communications will be in openly documented standards that can be implemented by any person or vendor without fear of patent, copyright or trademark infringement. In perpetuity."

Still, we live in a country that would rather spend billions off-balance sheet, lumber future generations with crushing debt and not prosecute fraudsters than do the right thing.

Unlike the previous AC, at least you have the courage to use you forum name in the clear.

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The BigYin
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FAIL

@AC

"Training about 1m people in how to use a new office package"

So they can NEVER move beyond Office 98 or whatever they have now? Office 2010 is a big change, a F/OSS version could be made to ape the current interface to cut the training budget.

"Rolling out a new office package across several hundred thousand devices"

So they'll NEVER upgrade?

"Supporting a new office package across a user base of 1m people"

So they'll NEVER upgrade?

"Rewriting every internal application that interfaces with Office"

So, once again, they'll NEVER upgrade?

"The loss of productivity through use of an inferior product that users are unfamiliar with"

And again, they'll NEVER upgrade?

"Would represent a SAVING for the NHS?"

I'll give you a choice. You can spend millions to upgrade to a product with the same brand name from the same vendor that will cost a massive reduction in productivity, increase your training bills and force you to buy entirely new kit; OR

You can spend millions on a F/OSS solution will cost a some reduction in productivity, potentially increase your training bills but you can keep your current kit. The first hit will be the worst. After the that, the traction gained from your investment will reduce future costs and the improvements you sponsor will be available to other departments, NGOs and society in general.

You clearly have not thought through your argument as everything you state as being anti-F/OSS counts double for MS Office. That does not mean there is no place for MS Office or MS back-end software, just that it is not the be-all and end-all of corporate IT.

Once last thing AC - grow a pair. Use your "real" login and reply to me directly.

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The BigYin
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Umm...

...the NHS is a big customer. Very big. I am sure if they said "Standards only" people would have obeyed. If the NHS had any spine.

NHS.

SPINE.

Geddit?

Maybe if the NHS spent less on lawyers to attack whistle-blowers, they'd be able to afford better IT.

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The BigYin
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Windows runs IE6

This is still the standard in the NHS because they blew so much on MS-only ActiveX and IE6-only sites back in the day. If they had gone with the standards (and helped shape the standards where none existed) they would not be in this mess. The vendors would have to compete on a level playing field and on merit.

But today's economy is not about open competition.

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The BigYin
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I agree

Whilst Open/Libre Office are not perfect, I would think that it would cost less to throw money at one of those projects and having the missing/non-working parts sorted than splurge on MS.

Either that or the code used on the projects should be opened, the custom code was paid for with public money, the code should be public as well.

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The BigYin
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FAIL

So...

...they are still hostage to a single platform from a single vendor, just for slightly less?

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Jimbo Wales ponders Wikipedia blackout

The BigYin
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FAIL

@Turtle

Is everything black-and-white in your world? One is anti-SOPA so one must be pro-Google?

Do you think by being anti-SOPA, I am pro the BBC's actions on orphaned works?

Or that by objecting to Israeli policy I think the Palestinians are a swell bunch of guys who would like flower arranging?

Here is a clue: the world is not black-and-white and SOPA goes way, way too far.

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The BigYin
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The fools

They should have done an ACTA. Had it all agreed behind closed doors, then signed into law before the people have a chance. That is democracy.

Open debate and consensus is, well, communism. And better dead than red!

So bend over and take it for freedom!

Oh, I don't mean your freedom. Not personal freedom. Corporate freedom! That's the freedom that counts. We should do away with this silly idea of people voting, shares should vote. Whoever has the most shares basically calls all the shots.

It'd at least be a bit more honest than the farce we endure now.

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Red Cross: 600m videogamers may be war criminals

The BigYin
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FAIL

Not the same

It's one thing to find that piece of enemy scum, place your crosshairs over them and blow their brains out in a game. It's quite another to do it in real life where one knows someone is actually going to get hurt/killed. And the kind of person who would willingly do it IRL is so far gone, I rather doubt the game has much influence.

Are they considering "Risk" a breach of human rights as well? Chess?

This is just a piece of PR grabbing straight from the PeTA game book and it is shameful for an institution such as the Red Cross to stoop so low.

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British athlete puts self on eBay

The BigYin
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Heh

More "I sponsored this guy and 66 of his friends with by annual bonus - thanks tax payers!"

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The BigYin
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Mushroom

@AC 101

Win or lose, he's got more drive an courage than you have.

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The BigYin
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Only £30k?

Surely one of our highly-bonused financial geniuses or CEOs could spare that from their pocket changes?

Top marks to James for trying to get the funds together like this.

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Microsoft seeks to woo developers with Windows 8 store

The BigYin
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@Hoagiebot

"I was currently working on a small Windows Vista/7 sidebar gadget for the members of a small local social club that I am part of that would provide updates pertaining to the club on their desktops."

You mean like an RSS feed? I don't mean to be rude, but it reads like you are solving a problem that has already been solved. If you are doing for yucks and to learn, that's cool (I do it myself) but a more widely used app will have more features, be more stable and less of a burden to support. Just join a team and get going. Of course, maybe yours is better than all the others, in which case release that sucker as free software! Consider it a job hunting ploy. :)

"I would prefer to write and distribute my own software however I darn well choose to, just as PC developers have always been able to do"

Well, don't expect me to download it. I want to see the downloads signed, md5 hashes etc. I want to be sure what I download it what I expect to download. Which it why I use the repositories and don't download random stuff off random sites. Way too dangerous.

Unfortunately Windows is so far behind the curve that Windows users are conditioned to think this is "normal" (and that every piece of software needs to run its own update mechanism, rather than rely on a central one). Thus the culture shock when some more resilient and secure comes along. Not that repositories are perfect, just less bad.

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The BigYin
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@AC (why is it always a coward?)

Apple market share - ~6%

MS market share - ~90%

Guess which one is the effective monopoly and has to be regulated?

Not that this makes Apple's actions correct, just not a matter for regulators (yet).

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The BigYin
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@Mikel

"And of course, antitrust issues."

That's the big one. Canonical has one store that they control, but you could create your own I guess. They are a tiny fraction of a sub-1% market, so no big issue there.

Apple have one store, you cannot add you own (without rooting etc). They are around a 5-6% share (more on mobile) so no huge issue there (even on mobile, there is competition from 'droid).

MS is circa 90% of the market. If they do not allow other stores on to their platform, then I could see that being a major issue for the regulators and rightly so.

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The BigYin
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Hmm...wha?

Oh, MS rocking it like it's 3 years ago. Or longer if one considers the various package systems that have been around for over a decade.

Having used Windows 8 (yes, really, the dev version is downloadable) I have reached the same conclusions for it as for Gnome3, Unity etc. Pretty, nice on a handheld device, utterly terrible on a desktop. The other issue with Win8 is that if you want to do anything "proper" you have to leave Metro and the transition to the knobbled desktop is dreadful.

Why the companies/teams feel they need a "one size fits all" policy beats the hell out of me. Different devices, different use cases - they're different!

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Navy pays 2x purchase price to keep warship docked for 5 years

The BigYin
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HMS Victory...

...should be made ready for active duty. There's no way by 2020 that the RN will be able to afford the diesel to run their single aircraft carrier!

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LG chisels wedge-shaped Ultrabook

The BigYin
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I see a lawsuit in the offing

At first glance I thought the pics *were* MacBook airs being used for illustration.

As for UK pricing, it'll be around £1,500 (unless Apple get an injuction) given the conversions normally applied by tech companies.

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Microsoft to Aussie gov: Privacy rules stifle e-Health

The BigYin
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Ha ha ha ha!

Yes, because MS has such a good reputation for security.

If the data specification is an open standard, fully documented and can be fully implemented without infringing patents.

If MS full implement the spec as written and without undocumented features.

If the crypto/other measures are open, fully documented and can be fully implemented without infringing patents.

If the crypto is implemented if code that is fully open, documented and can be updated without infringing on patents/copyrights/trademarks.

That's just for starters and it's a lot of "ifs".

It would be far, far better for the Oz government to say "We want to solve *that* problem, lets hire someone to do it and request that all the tools be 100% open/free". Why 100% open/free? If the first contractor screws it up or goes bust, another competent entity can be hired in to carry on.

Also, they the HELL would I want my *extremely* personal data being held in the USA where is can be used and abused under laws which grant me no recourse? You want to do business in Oz/EU/Anywhere? Be beholden to local laws and shut-up.

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The BigYin
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@AC at 07:17

You have more chance of winning the lottery than of being the victim of a terror attack.

Terrorists are scum, not going to argue that, but why make the 99% suffer just because 1% are arseholes? Oh, wait, that's policy isn't it? The 1% screw the world over and the 99% pay for it (including bonuses for the 1%).

Anyway, back on point. Any freedom one loses in the "fight against terror" is a victory for the terrorists. Maybe it's because I'm a Brit but I think the only response to a terrorist is two fingers and total defiance.

If you want to "protect yourself", put down that burger and go for a walk. You're less like to peg it from heart disease (a greater risk than terrorism) and more likely to be able to outrun the bastards if you have to. Also, talk to your children and help them not fall into the 1%-arsewipe category.

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UK's first stealth jumpjet rolls off line – but we don't want it

The BigYin
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Do I understand things correctly

We have a new aircraft carrier that isn't nuclear, so has to return to port/be refuelled constantly.

We're buidling a second that will never be used.

We can't afford to buy/convert Eurofighters to put on it due to the massive over-runs of that monstrosity.

We have just rejected the other "modern" options.

We have scrapped Tornado and Harriers which, for all there ills, are the mainstay of the RAF.

We now have no viable air force or naval air presence.

Does that about sum it up?

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NHS minister's bombshell: I get emails from dead people

The BigYin
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Template emails?

I thought the House of Commons would have filters in place to deal with template emails, they're just another from of SPAM. I thought this was why lobbying groups tended to give you a list of points/ideas and ask you to write in your own words.

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US quakes before MENACING TURKEYS, snow globes

The BigYin
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Joke

*Deep fried* Turkey?

Is this story from Scotland or the USA?

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Hero dev writes the CODE that COULD SAVE THE WORLD

The BigYin
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@Pete 2

For a NEO to be of concern it's going to have to be either very big or very hard (most others will just burn-up or be of no real consequence - just evacuate the strike zone). Very big and very hard are going to be a right bugger to smash up into small enough chunks to pose little-to-no risk.

You are going to have to coordinate a lot of rockets carrying a lot of bang to arrive at the right time and strike in a predetermined manner (all of which will be compounded by the target moving like absolute buggery and tumbling whilst it does so).

So one is back to softy-softly, gravity-well-catchy-monkey. You don't have to move it out to beyond Mars or something, just stop it from passing through a "keyhole" (where Earth's gravity *will* cause it to impact at a future time; and even then you'll have a few years to try again).

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The BigYin
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You don't destroy

Because then you have *lots* of NEOs and they may still be capable of causing havoc.

You throw up a probe and then have it use its gravity to gently pull the NEO into a safe orbit. Or you coat one side in a reflective material so that light/solar wind pushes harder on the NEO. Or you land on the NEO and use a thruster to push it. All depends on the exact nature of the NEO.

All these would take years, but if you see the NEO early enough, then years one would have.

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Microsoft to offer dual upgrade path for Windows 8

The BigYin
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Makes you...

...buy a new PC?

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