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* Posts by Nick Ryan

1346 posts • joined 10 Apr 2007

Samsung and Apple BEWARE: Huawei is coming to eat your lunch

Nick Ryan
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Huawei

So how are we meant to pronouce "Huawei"? :)

But back to the plot - competition is always good when it's competent. Three years to develop the backend processes and final products for mobiles is good going.

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Big Beardie's watching: Gaze into the screen... it shall gaze also into you

Nick Ryan
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I know there's a lot of hate about/against advertising (you'll find me there as well), but this tech, as it is presented now, is actually a good idea and makes clever use of impersonal data to improve the targetting of adverts while using largely commodity hardware to perform the task.

In some ways it's easier to think of it as an automated attendant looking you up and down and either suggesting the "£1 for a bar of chocolate" or the "meal-and-a-paper" deal depending on what you look like. The serious problem comes when systems like these are enhanced and store your picture rather than just analyse and discard it and then start to link this image profile to locations and purchases (e.g. payment methods). After all, you wouldn't want to walk into a different shop/petrol station with your wife and be offered condoms because you regularly buy them from another shop using the same system would you? :)

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Not so FAST: Another discount software broker BOOTED OUT

Nick Ryan
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Re: Theft ?

They care about their own lies as much as "FACT" do.

The instances of somebody breaking into an office or other space and stealing the software is very, very low. The instances of copyright violation (*)... considerably higher.

(*) Or is it more accurate to call it "use on unlicensed software"?

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Steelie Neelie 'shocked' that EU tourists turn mobes off when abroad

Nick Ryan
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Re: There are other reasons for not using a phone on holiday

I can see you point, but how about these:

You're on holiday to enjoy yourself. If your form of enjoying yourself includes being in (near constant) touch with friends and families then there's nothing wrong with that.

You're on holiday to get away from it all and isolate yourself. Turn the phone off. Until, of course, you find that you'd like to know exactly-ish (GPS) where you are on your maps that are rather more convenient on a mobile device than the paper variety. Then the maps need to be downloaded. Then you find that you'd like to locate the nearest good taverna rather than the flea ridden cess pit you "found" the previous day. You can, of course, do things the way these things were done 20 years ago but technology is available to assist so why not use it?

Now the trick is to manage it all and exercise self control. Will finding out the local, to your home, sports results improve your day that much? Are you able to ignore or turn off the work emails so you can deal with them when you return to work, not in your free time?

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Nick Ryan
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Re: Two words

Your personal data has value, so be careful with it using it as a currency to pay for "free" services. If the data leaks, you will pay forever because you cannot change who you are.

The "personal data" that these providers tend to receive from me consists of an entirely separate and unused email address along with whatever other arbitrary and entirely fictional information I am forced to supply at the time. And I'll definitely never install their "helper" apps that appear to exist solely to fuck things up and liberate more information.

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Forget unified communications, we want universal comms, Microsoft insists

Nick Ryan
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If only...

the Lync client didn't suck balls so spectacularly.

It takes a flipping age to get around to starting up, then when you think it is finally started it turns out that it hasn't, is a minefield of impossible to fathom "icons" and functionality that all tends to do nothing useful.

Basically, it almost the polar opposite of something that should be simple, efficient and easy to use. Installing it enterprise wide is one thing, persuading users to use it when it sucks balls so badly is another.

...and that's just the client. The server side is even less fun.

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London calling: Date set for launch of capital's very own domain name

Nick Ryan
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The problem is with .com is that it is usually incorrectly used instead of .us

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Imprisoned Norwegian mass murderer says PlayStation 2 is 'KILLING HIM'

Nick Ryan
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Re: Well

No one ever does...

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Wanna use Bitcoin on your site? BitPay's open-source library wants to help

Nick Ryan
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Re: I have to wonder.

There's probably little point unless you can compromise literally tens of thousands of AMD GPU powered systems.

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Devs SLAM UK.gov's JavaScript-astic, 'shoddy' security education website

Nick Ryan
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If the site was aimed squarely at children or as an online game then the overall presentation with the parallax (layered) scrolling and cartoon style graphics is actually very good. And they even avoided using Flash.

The navigation, however, sucks balls and is very much along the level of incompetence exhibited by flash "web designers". e.g. they have no clue whatsoever about web design, optimisation or anything so they just made an all inclusive flash "site". Generally a desire to control everything and re-implement everything in a custom manner that makes no sense and is not optimal for any user or device. But it looks pretty when a screen shot is taken.

...and this is pitched both at businesses and home users???

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The UNTOLD SUCCESS of Microsoft: Yes, it's Windows 7

Nick Ryan
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Re: Keep polishing, Microsoft......

A professional developer selects what streamlines his job, doesn't try to affirm an ideology.

Nearly. A professional developer, being a professional, usually has to just use whatever software he has been given to use and often a specific version that, for whatever dumb-arse fuckwit twisted reason, actually works with the legacy mess that he's working on. Sometimes the software choice is also out of his hands for other reasons such as having to develop an application that continues to work across as many versions of Windows as possible, in which instance there's often a case for using an old version of a development tool rather than a newer version which will often silently includes later version prerequisites thereby hobbling the deployment target.

Given a choice, most professional developers favour using the tool that they are most familiar and comfortable with rather than always selecting the optimal tool for the job. The optimal tool for the job may only be optimal for this developer after a lot of new training or relearning and for a quick (haha) job the familiar is usually selected instead. There is more flexibility for new projects however corporate libraries may not be compatible and there is always, for good reason, pressure to re-use existing code rather than create new copies of the same functionality.

After all Windows development (but WinRT) is much more open than Linux one, where after all everybody uses GCC - you have more choice about development tools in Windows than in Linux - if you don't like Visual Studio you have alternatives.

I disagree with this. Firstly there is a big difference between a compiler and an (Integrated) Development Environment (IDE). GCC is a compiler and it neither claims to be, nor is, a development environment. There are alternatives to GCC as well however given the structure of GCC many additional components just enhance GCC rather than attempt replace it wholesale. This, if the structure is good enough, is a very good way of operating and this modularity is one of GCC's key strengths. There are quite a lot of development environments for Linux however your level of satisfaction will depend greatly on the level of integration that you need or desire. Unfortunately these days on Windows there are very few remaining genuine development environment tools that are not cross platform and therefore also available for Linux (and often OSX). The most "used" ("used" is not the same as "popular") development environment for Windows is, of course, Visual Studio. However this tool is very inflexible in that you will work the Microsoft way or not at all. You will use the Microsoft tool stack or you have to try to work around with the alternatives, which wastes a lot of time. Visual Studio's overall operational inefficiency and user interface leaves a lot to be desired as well (note to MS - don't ask your developers for feedback, get told it and then ignore it because you are too arrogantly stupid and have a "vision"). However it is familiar to a lot of developers therefore gets used even when there are rather better alternatives available.

As for Linux GUIs... yes, they are often appalling. While the tools available in Windows are often better on the GUI front, I assure you that this often doesn't translate into a better GUI - just one with more visual components. There is a world of difference between good developers and good user interface designers.

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Facebook adds 50+ gender options: Stalking your 'Friends' just got more LGBT-friendly

Nick Ryan
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Re: WFT

Other than the desire to label everything and everybody, it's also attempting to merge biological identification with orientation into one label.

Biologically, there are "male", "female", "both" and "neither". The occurrences of the latter two are very low in comparison but they do exist. To further complicate this, questions such as "is a female who is 'born' with no ovaries truly a biological female?". Best not to answer this one unless you want a very long discussion, but it's an example of how things are complicated.

Beyond the straight biology, for many thousands of years humans themselves have blurred the lines, starting with eunuchs and cross dressing and moving on to trans-sexuals in various applications and stages (surgical, hormonal, etc).

This is before the complication of sexual preference comes into play where the basics are accepted as male-female, male-male and female-female however these basics only take into account the two primary biological sexes. Expanding just the biological side and sticking to pairings there are ten distinct combinations. Add in those who are interested in more than just one partner type and it becomes quite a mess. Next include the non-naturally occurring "genders" and it's one hell of a matrix. Lastly, don't forget those who have no sexual desires at all and are happy that way therefore they shouldn't be identified as one of the others.

Even attempting to refactor the single label into a few becomes an exercise in pointlessness as no single label will fit all unless there are n! combinations. So in essence, it's a multiple choice list and not a single selector, after all your work colleague could be a heterosexual man during the week and a cross-dresser that is only interested in other cross-dressers at the weekend...

50+ doesn't seem too insane a number considering...

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No, pesky lawyers, particle colliders WON'T destroy the Earth

Nick Ryan
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Re: Aren't these couple of loons... @ Anonymous Blowhard

Unfortunately reality and sense have nothing to do with this as this is Religiopseudoscience that we're dealing with here and that has no truck with either common sense or reality.

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One good thing from the Flappy Birds crapp flap: It's a handy 'tech' media rating system

Nick Ryan
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Re: Saga saga

true... and that was probably the only time that I have ever called it "candy crush saga" rather than just "candy crush".

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Nick Ryan
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Me neither. And watching what my fellow tube-jockeys have been playing recently, I haven't seen a single mobile game player playing flappy birds. Lots of temple run and knock offs (temple run probably isn't the original) and a lot of candy crush saga.

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Silk Road reboot claims: Hacker STOLE all our Bitcoin funds

Nick Ryan
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Re: Words

I'm struggling to wonder even why funds had to be moved at all. Anybody?

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Object to #YearOfCode? You're a misogynist and a snob, says the BBC

Nick Ryan
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Can't agree more, especially where I am located and the frequent curses I hear about the UK first year undergraduates being so utterly useless compared to the foreign intake students. So they have to teach down to the lowest common denominator and teach the basics, boring the hell out of the more competent students and because the basics have to be taught so quickly, quite a few drop out as well.

Meanwhile schools carefully teach our children how to pass exams and look like a worthwhile statistic, teach them, parrot fashion, how to use a particular company's products and yet they entirely fail on the basics, including the combined sense of exploration and learning that teaching is all about. Now we have huge numbers of mathematically and language illiterate kids coming through school and this has always been inevitable as while the cuts and policy changes are short term, their impact is long term. It's not just that these kids have suffered with poor basics (maths and language) but they have repeatedly had all drive and exploration and creativity beaten out of them as none of that helps to pass exams. These, of course, are the same exams that our "smarter" children are getting better at every year, despite the fact that, for example, the current A level maths curriculum rather suspicously closely matches the old GCSE/O-Level curriculum of a decade ago.

Some of the most important things I learnt when I was taught Computer Science (not word processing or powerpoint bothering) was an appreciation of the history of computing, how we go to where are (or more accurately, were then) and the basic sociopolitical issues around computing in general. This provided the building blocks for the basic of how computers operate (Input > Process > Output), boolean algebra and logic, how computers interacted with humans (both input and output interfaces), how information is stored and transmitted and that was before we looked at a single line of code. Let alone code that isn't code... e.g. website markup or style-sheets.

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Google to banish mobe-makers using old Androids: report

Nick Ryan
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But it's not up google to support the old devices. However what google are doing is steadily making it harder for new devices to not run new software.

The sooner the laggard device manufacturers realise that the less crap they customise to put on their devices the simpler it is to support them the better. And this isn't aimed at the smaller manufacturers, Samsung are one of the worst with the gob-smackingly awful Kies software mess, their stack of crazy updating and other software and their often horrible taken on user interface design. And as for their bastard wifi-management mess that has made my S3 a pain to use with wifi... grrrr... no way to disable it either.

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FBI offers $10,000 bounty for arrest of laser-wielding idiots

Nick Ryan
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Re: Bah!

OK I suppose I admit that it's probably not considered officially acceptable in those places, but some of them you feel like you've just strayed into either a very active rifle range or a war zone given the number of things with holes in them.

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Nick Ryan
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The problem is this is in a country where in some states / counties it appears that shooting passing trucks or road / vendor signs is a perfectly acceptable pastime. Wielding a cheap-ish laser and pointing it at a plane is just as stupid but fits the same pattern.

Because this has to be done at a relatively short distance (while you can see the dot, having a hand steady enough to hit a relatively fast moving target is not going to be easy especially while doubtless half cut on local bootleg), it really shouldn't be hard for an auto-targeting camera system to take quite a good shot of the idiot and to maintain tracking the source while the plane flies overhead for even better shots. Next step could be a few targetted lasers pinpointing the target in response, although given this is the United States of Litigation sending murderous idiots to hospital with retina damage would have the lawyers rubbing their hands in anticipation.

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Minecraft developer kills Kickstarted Minecraft movie

Nick Ryan
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Re: Rule zero of movies - Get the rights *first*

The more serious problem was that the entire kickstarter description was specifically written to make it look like it was fully endorsed and approved by Mojang (the company that owns Minecraft). The document was even signed off with the Mojang name and copyright notices.

That's not the way to ask somebody for permission...

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Rise of the (tiny) machines: US boffins make nanomotor breakthrough

Nick Ryan
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Re: "...internal mechanical responses that no one has seen before..."

Bzzzzzzzz.... ouch.

Next time I think I'll try using a non-conducting stick for my investigations...

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RISE of the MACHINES and Bitcoin: Bill Gates' Reddit tech predictions

Nick Ryan
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While I detest a lot of Microsoft software, Microsoft the faceless corporation mired in it's own self-inflicted hell and the predatory manner in which Microsoft operated at times, I do respect what they have done and what they have built.

Bill Gates was instrumental to a lot of this and regardless of his business actions, he's still a human and while I don't agree with all of his personal views, I agree with some and respect the others or just appreciate his angle on them. In other words, just like most of us, he is human and he has his own passions, beliefs and even a sense of humour... :)

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CCTV warning notices NOT compliant with data protection laws – ICO

Nick Ryan
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Re: So the ICO...

It's just a bit ironic that the ICO - the single most useless piece of government bureacracy since the ministry of silly walks...

How dare you. How very dare you. How... oh dammit. The ministry of silly walks is one of our most respected and valuable institutions.

IT'S

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Getting documents all too easy for Snowden

Nick Ryan
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Re: It's a people problem

A clipboard is usually all the ID you require. Or failing that, just boldness as in "looking like you should be there".

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Yet ANOTHER Brit MOBE tower BORG: Three and EE ink network-sharing deal

Nick Ryan
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Re: West coast mainline

At least some of the trains have wireless.

Unfortunately the quality is almost as patchy as the mobile signal, it can be a rip-off price wise and the routing is so spectacularly weird geo-sensitive websites tend to think you're somewhere in Northern mainland Europe and not the UK a few miles North of London.

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London's King of Clamps shuts down numberplate camera site

Nick Ryan
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Re: @ T.F.M. Reader - Shared Space

Exhibition Road at 30mph feels like The French Connection

Well the whole saga of Exhibition Road was pretty comical in a lot of ways, including the desire to hide everything so blind or visually impaired people, or more nobody all, knew where the pavement stopped and the road started.

It was almost pleasant at one point when the speed limit was set to 15/20 mph and it was designated to be a pedestrian priority zone. Well, it was pleasant as a pedestrian when there were drivers who could read or just cared.

Since it's back to "normal" now, it's the usual impending death trap of diplomatic cars driving along the pavements, taxis doing whatever they felt like doing (such as u-turns in the middle of busy traffic and driving within no lights) and the bedlam of the odd speeding lunatic or just gaggles of tourists finding repetitive ways to stand in the way of cycylists. My personal favourite was the inane restiction of the delivery access to the V&A museum which made it even harder for the poor buggers to reverse a semi-artic through narrow gates while trying to get out of the main road before they were accosted by taxi drivers.

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Nick Ryan
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Re: The small ironies of life.

I couldn't agree with you more about the schools. I cycle past Pembridge Hall ("Preparatory School for Girls") in Notting Hill everyday and it's a nightmare; over-privileged parents thinking that £10,500 / year also gives them the right to park the 4x4 wherever they want, even if it causes accidents.

All it needs is enforcement - there is none. I guarantee that if every illegally parked car was being ticketed/towed/clamped then the bad behaviour would stop overnight and we'd all be better off for it.

There was a complete uproar at a school nearby that happened to be on a vital through road. The parents (following the usual rule of "requiring" the largest possible vehicles for the smallest, palest kids) couldn't possibly have their kids walk more than 30 seconds to their waiting personal-bus. It was often the case that they parked up a full hour before the school closed and waited, as close to the school as possible. Given that this waiting was on a bus stop, pedestrian crossing, single and double yellow lines, blocking private drives, too close to road junctions and so on, let alone the obligatory double parking and parking on both sides of the road, the parents were given notice that traffic wardens would visit the following week. Which they did then given the uproar of the lazy parents, the police had to be called to sort it out and the following week the police just started off escorting the traffic wardens. Then the parental health-and-safety brigade got involved and any child that walked (using their own legs for what they are designed for) more than 10 metres because they were no longer allowed to illegally and obstructively park where they damn pleased and had to walk along a, safe and wide, public footpath to where their car was parked.

In the end the obnoxious parents made it so expensive for it to be policed / patrolled that the local authorities gave up trying to enforce the laws of the road.

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University boffins build snoop-spotting snitch app

Nick Ryan
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Re: This is why....

"highly accurate weather reports"

Pull the other one.

Perfectly possible to have highly accurate weather reports.

Forecasting the weather... well, that's something else... :)

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Eurocops want to build remote car-stopper, shared sensor network

Nick Ryan
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Re: Integration

the worst I usually have to deal with is Kangaroos jumping out at me in the middle of the night on a Motorcycle

Shit, you really do have problems... kangaroos riding motorcycles.

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HELLO LENOVO. Do you really, really want to make smartphones?

Nick Ryan
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Re: Stock Android

Some of the manufacturer specific stuff I can see why it's embedded in the OS as it adds functionality at a fundamental level.

Other stuff such as the customised interfaces and other bundled applications, can just bugger right off and be implemented as a normal app.

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EU warns United States: SHAPE UP on data protection OR ELSE

Nick Ryan
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The US Safe Harbour provisions have always been useless.

They were self certified and not backed up by law, they had to be specified individually for specific purposes and datasets and had so many exclusions where the company could just do whatever the hell it wanted with the data anyway. And this is before any local or government organisation with, or without, legal direction could access or copy the data and once a copy is made by these organisations there were no protections inferred or implied.

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Microsoft veep Satya Nadella now frontrunner in race for CEO spot

Nick Ryan
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If the MS head of cloud gets to be the head of MS... how that does look for the future?

Doubtless more focus on cloud - cloud - cloud - sharepoint - cloud- subscription - cloud - 360 - cloud and no worthwhile development, innovation or anything for anything else.

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Lenovo reveals convertible Chromebook

Nick Ryan
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Re: Pics? Specs?

Agreed. There aren't even any pictures of it so we can't complain how ugly it looks or how it has rounded corners. Slack Register reporting. :)

Must be a Friday! Only one thing to do... (see icon)

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HARD ONES: Three new PC games that are BLOODY DIFFICULT

Nick Ryan
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Stop

Unfortunately there are a lot of piss poor game designers / developers out there...

Repeat after me:

Tedious is not the same as difficult.

A lot of game designers seem to entirely miss the fact that games are meant to be fun (a point repeatedly noted by previous posters) and can be social and played with friends. Take the fuckwits at uplay who have Settlers IV - a potentially fun multiplayer experience catastrophically ruined by their insistence that multiplayer games cannot be saved and that everything revolves around downloadable content, even if it is just pointless bling that makes no difference to anything at all.

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Google Glassholes, GET OFF our ROADS, thunder lawmakers in seven US states

Nick Ryan
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Re: When driving, the road is in the center of your vision

The worst car that have I ever had the misfortune to drive, a Renault Twingo (I'd be hesitant to recommend it to people I hate, let alone never to friends) had a sodding rev-meter where behind the steering wheel where the speedo is normally in cars. The speedo itself was mounted so far across the dash it was nearer the near-side rear-view mirror than the direction of travel so it was actually very dangerous to look at as it required a full shift of direction of vision and focus before being able to read it and then to look back and re-focus at what you were about to drive into.

Mind you, this speedo was less of an issue because at any speed above 40mph the god-awful suspension set the car bouncing at every smallest blip of imperfect road surface so badly that it induced travel sickness. I have never suffered from travel sickness while actually driving a car before...

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Ditch IE7 and we'll give you a FREE COMPUTER, says incautious US firm

Nick Ryan
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@Charlie Clark

"Unfortunately, they supported a standard box model that was subsequently changed."

There was never anything standard about the abortion that is the IE6-8 box layout scheme. While it was possible to apply dumb-as-hell "fixes" to work around the complete incompetence that generally revolved around the "hasLayout" attribute there were so many other fundamental failures that it was usually an exercise in hair yanking rampant insanity inducing pain just to make older versions of IE render something in any way that approached the standards or what would have been reasonably expected. I still put HTML and CSS together very defensively as a result...

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Nick Ryan
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IE is much better than it was previously...

It used to be an exercise in abject frustration, getting a website to work according to standards and then having to go back and fuck it all up so it rendered nearly as expected in IE. Of course, if you were an idiot you "designed" the website for IE in the first place... and then got bit by it's steady iteration to actually applying most of the standards in a recognisable manner.

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media.struq.com

Nick Ryan
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media.struq.com

Is anybody else suffering with frequent page lock ups on El Reg due to scripts from "media.struq.com" locking up?

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This tool demands access to YOUR ENTIRE DIGITAL LIFE. Is it from GCHQ? No - it's by IKEA

Nick Ryan
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Nearly... the NSA take on it is that you need every haystack in every farm in every country on the planet. To find a needle that may, or may not, exist in one particular farm. The needle is probably in the sewing kit, on the table.

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NatWest 'spam' email cockup got me slapped with late payment fee, says angry Reg reader

Nick Ryan
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Re: Reactive filtering: FAIL

SPF doesn't block spam... spam is technically "unsolicited commercial email".

If a company sends marketing material that you don't want but their DNS servers are configured with SPF records that correctly associate the originating server with the address that it purports to come from, then it will pass the SPF checks.

What correctly configured SPF does does do is to help to prevent the case where somebody sends mail that is made to look like it comes from a specific domain or email address where in reality it doesn't. This is usually phishing attempts but also helps to block the millions of compromised PCs out there from sending emails directly.

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Nick Ryan
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For those that have no clue what SPF is there for...

I'm not going to repeat what others above have previously stated is what it's for, and why a hard fail indicates that the mail should be junked automatically (as distinct from a soft fail where it indicates that it might not be valid mail).

Here's an example, from Microsoft even (http://support.microsoft.com/kb/2640313):

For example, a bank needs to control who can send email messages on behalf of the bank, and the email senders' IP addresses come from a narrow set of IP ranges. Because spoofing is common in phishing attacks, the organizations such as banks might use a hard fail in the SPF record.

And this is an example from the company that supplies a huge chunk of business mail exchange servers and for a long time pretended that SPF didn't exist... apparently because it wanted to foist it's own, Microsoft centric, solution on the Internet instead.

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Nick Ryan
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Re: Re:What did he expect from a bank?

That would be nice, but this is Natwest we're talking about here. The one that the "cough in your face and tell the customer that the 'computer said no'" sketch was almost certainly based on.

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Altcoins will DESTROY the IT industry and spawn an infosec NIGHTMARE

Nick Ryan
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Re: All your passwords are belong to us!

Universities are already using cheap GPUs in various forms for cluster based processing.

As far as I understand it, currently not often specifically as large HPC clusters but certainly for smaller systems with 10s of cards rather than 100s. You'd be surprised at what gets done on a limited budget and the innovation this forces.

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Globe grabbin,’ sphere slammin’, orb-tossin’, pill poppin’... Speedball

Nick Ryan
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Ah, memories...

Through being an extremely violence prone player in game, I do remember the "bastards" moment when I found that the computer team cheated through somehow summoning up more substitutes than they had available. Admittedly it may be more that the ruination of my intended tactic with getting the "hot ball" and repeatedly wiping out and generally beating their players until they had no substitutes left didn't work as well as it should have...

I still remember the shocked look when the first time I played a friend who tried to play it "nicely" and tactically (i.e. non-violently) got thumped into submission within a few minutes when I just pummelled every player of his into the floor.

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Virgin Media's 'little(ish)' book of deals contained BIG FIBS, rules ad watchdog

Nick Ryan
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Not just VM of course

...but VM, being one of the big players, are a bunch of cretins when it comes to making clear what is available and for what cost - it's always about upselling to the next price tier which inevitably gives little or no benefits to the customer.

However the worst I've seen recently is a BT fibre ad which claimed that it was something like £12.99 per month. Except when you read the small print when you find that this is excluding £14.99 line rental and after six months the price will rise to £24 per month and after an arbitrary fourteen months it rises to £28 per month - all with the £14.99/m line rental on top. (the prices and times are from memory and are wrong, but it's the cretinous principle that's the point).

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KCOM-owned Eclipse FAILS to cover up the password 'password'

Nick Ryan
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Re: I'm sure I've worked there ...

Moving from INI file to registry settings was the first mistake.

Step 1) Ask the Operating System where data files should be stored for your application.

Step 2) Write INI files there. Or even XML files, your choice.

Avoid the useless nightmare that is the registry at all costs. There are no real advantages to using it for most application purposes and it's best left well alone.

Want to be able to easily support your product? Simple with INI of other file based settings. When (not if) the computer goes down you can far more reliably and easily extract files from the file system than settings from the registry. Want to copy a customer's configuration? Easy, copy the configuration files from their system to yours. Want a user's configuration to follow them around the network? Easy, store them in their roaming profile (assuming that it's configured, but that's a different problem).

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Nick Ryan
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Re: Can be useful though

While I can accept that displaying the DSL password is a good idea, from the look of that screenshot that's the account password and not the DSL password.

However I don't use their services so have no way of knowing for sure, but it's under the section "users" and not "DSL" or "modem".

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LogMeIn: We're stopping our free offering from, errrm, NOW

Nick Ryan
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FAIL

Re: UltraVNC

Just your end. That's the nice bit about it, it's a reverse connection.

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Twitter WLTM UK-based pro lobbyist with GSOH - is ready for ads

Nick Ryan
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I actually read it as that in the first place and had to double check back again!

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