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* Posts by Nick Ryan

1364 posts • joined 10 Apr 2007

Psst. We've got 400Gb/s Ethernet working - but don't tell anyone

Nick Ryan
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Re: Entire article fails to mention the other factor...

Distance

Please restate your question using proper and correct measurements. It makes a lot more sense in Linguine.

For your reference and correctional education: http://www.theregister.co.uk/2007/08/24/vulture_central_standards/ or for the slide rule shy (*): http://www.theregister.co.uk/Design/page/reg-standards-converter.html

* I'll be buggered if I know how to use a slide rule either.

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PICS ON GROUND: Cabbies PARALYZE London in Uber rebellion

Nick Ryan
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Sympathy?

Yep, they've generated just as sympathy much as the tube drivers who are already paid more than most people for sitting in their cabin, pushing buttons and occasionally ranting at the paying passengers. The same tube drivers who decided that on top of their ordinary and extraordinary overtime they would also need further extra money during the olympics because, err, honestly: the excuse was so wafer thin I can't even recall it now.

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I am NOT a PC repair man. I will NOT get your iPad working

Nick Ryan
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Re: IT and conferencing

My solution to the presentation problem was to fit a dedicated PC, configured and locked down to the resolution of the projector. Audio went through dedicated speakers, all connectors were screwed in place.

Users could either access their presentation across the network or plug in a USB stick, which is usually daft when they've saved the presentation to a network location, and with non-embedded embedded content always causes fun and games.

I still had some users busily unscrewing everything in order to present a high resolution (aka stupidly large amounts of small text) presentation using a low resolution laptop. They could have configured a secondary display with the correct resolution, or even aspect ratio, but then they wouldn't have been able to see the presentation on the small screen at the same time. Staring at which defeated the entire concept behind delivering a presentation in the first place, which is to present, not to sit there mumbling at a laptop keyboard. To make it worse, I even had a dedicated external connector which users who couldn't understand that they could use a dedicated PC for the task, or were external visitors, could use... but this didn't stop the attempted disassembly of the main system at times.

All this and there's still the point that's most often forgotten: PowerPoint is not a presentation; PowerPoint is merely a tool that allows you to enhance a presentation. [but frequently used to kill one]

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'CAPTAIN CYBORG': The wild-eyed prof behind 'machines have become human' claims

Nick Ryan
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I "dodged" that one as well... specifically the cybernetics course at Reading. In the end I avoided AI as much as I could because I quickly considered that none of what was being taught as AI was in fact AI: at best it was Logical Reasoning.

As for Professor Warwick, I consider that he's a very good promoter of the subject, rather over-enthusiastic at times, and he does, in his own way, raise the profile of a lot of interesting problems that could do with being raised - for example the boundaries between human and machine. Eccentric, out-spoken, often technically wrong but largely harmless.

It would be interesting if after all this time he could be persuaded to directly speak with El Reg...

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SLOW DOWN: Insecure-by-design software on road

Nick Ryan
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I'm pretty sure that this default display of FOG is not truly random and your assertion that they avoid showing this when it is actually foggy would back this up. In my experience they seem to target bright sunny afternoons more than any other time of day.

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UK govt preps World War 2 energy rationing to keep the lights on

Nick Ryan
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Re: Actual preparation for the future

Unfortunately that's a sensible plan, and not something that will have been dreamed up by a politician or parcelled out by accountants therefore it will never happen. Just like the good plans of building canals to ship heavy non-time sensitive goods up and down the country and to shift water from where there's lots of it (I'm thinking of you, Manchester) to where there isn't so much.

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Nick Ryan
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Re: Our MPs

In Oxford it was always regarded that PPE is a bullshit waffle degree where you can write whatever you want as long as you make up some half arsed justification in your text. It was rumoured to be pretty much marked on word count... [I didn't do PPE]

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Nick Ryan
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Worse to come is the water / food crisis:

1) Sell off the resevoirs so houses can be built on them.

2) Sell off prime agricultural land so houses can be built on them.

3) Look confused as to why concreting over enormous amounts of land causes drainage problems.

4) Look confused as to why with increasing oil prices food becomes even more expensive when most of it has to be imported.

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Nick Ryan
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Re: Yup..

It's not necessarily pandering to the green vote, it's pandering to the oil vote. Shutting down nuclear reactors benefits non-sustainable power sources.

What we really need is good energy storage. Renewables can become useful then.

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Could you make a Google-grade data center OS? For $10.5m?

Nick Ryan
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Is it me or do these kind of systems blur the difference between a system running many processes and many processes running on a system?

A virtual machine is little more than a set of processes (with communications and storage), how much of the unnecessary junk can be removed from a virtual machine before it becomes hard to differentiate between it a group of processes running on another system?

Just a lunchtime thought, may even make sense tomorrow

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Ukrainian teen created in lab passes Turing Test – famous nutty prof

Nick Ryan
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Re: AI is harder than Turing expected

Yes. You're so obsolete that you don't even know it yourself.

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Nick Ryan
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Re: AI is harder than Turing expected

Intriguing read about the "Halting Problem". But it goes to justify why my loosely held general belief that mathematicians should stay clear of programming still runs true.

I've had countless arguments with mathematicians pretending to be programmers... from those that claimed that "5g" languages would make programmers obsolete to those that can't grasp that while small parts of a typical application can be represented in a mathematical manner, it quickly becomes pointless trying to apply such an unsuitable technique to wider applications or algorithms. While it is of course possible, the dataset rapidly becomes a ludicrous set of multi-dimensional possibilities and while the analysis can be streamlined the sheer processing power requirements to model and validate the entire thing renders any attempt pointless. In the end the algorithm effectively degenerates into a simulation. In many ways this is similar to computer chess.

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Nick Ryan
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Re: AI is harder than Turing expected

That's the problem with, in this case, a historical lack of understanding. The brain isn't a binary device and while any individual component doesn't run especially fast, they do run in parallel. The concept of a machine fooling a human in a blind test is still a clever device, even if the understanding and predictions were out.

This kind of historical take on something is often quite interesting, for example Asimov's robots could not speak but could understand. It was later advances in technology that lead to the "artificial voicebox" in his books. From a biological point of view it was correct - babies and toddlers can understand much more than they can speak, however from a technology point of view it's reversed as speech synthesis is simple compared to contextual comprehension.

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Nick Ryan
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Re: Hmmm...

Pretty close to the "reviews" many goods, services, holiday locations or restaurants receive. It's almost uncanny how many always include the same key points.

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Compare Apple's and oranges: LaCie's hi-vis jacket-wearing disk is not for hipsters

Nick Ryan
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Re: Worth every penny

The difference between these looks to be the IP rating (no note of this on the ebay item, IP54 for the lacie) and I'd hope that the interior circuitry / connectors would be more rugged in the lacie than the ebay item.

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China puts Windows 8 on TV, screams: 'SECURITY, GET IT OUT OF HERE!'

Nick Ryan
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Re: "This gets messy with code signing involved."

Yes and no. Hence messy. For example, online file streams do not contain metadata.

All of the metadata (file streams) attached to an individual file would have to be verified to ensure consistent operation on the off chance that code within that module, or any other for that matter, checks the metadata and changes behaviour as a result.

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Nick Ryan
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Re: What's the point of having access to the Microsoft 'source code'?

The test is that the provided code must compile and be binary identical to the publicly available deployed files. This gets messy with code signing involved.

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We present to you: 840 fine, upstanding young disks stuffed into a rack cabinet – DDN

Nick Ryan
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The vertical deployment of the drives looks sensible from the purely spatial point of view as it means all the non-drive space (power, data, cables and support) is put into one plane which should optimise the use of space. Vertical stacking would remove the need for cables in the same way that commercial removable external HDD units work (if you're in the business of swapping out HDDs, these kind of exposed external HDD "caddies" are invaluable).

I can't see any details from the picture, but if I were designing this I would combine the cooling and support elements into one form, a thin metal (e.g. thermally conductive) caddy that ensures that the drive sits true on the connectors and doesn't topple or otherwise shear or twist the connectors. It would effectively make the caddy a part of a monster heat pipe.

They will be a bugger to deal with though, particularly when you need to swap a drive in the top unit at the top of a 42U rack. Servers are annoying enough, any although these probably don't have a lid case on top to content with, the drives would have to be carefully removed to not interfere with the operation of adjacent drives.

EDIT: Just googled the SS88460 user guide and aside from the unit looking different to the datasheet model and the image here on El Reg, it has slots for pairs of drives and enclosed caddies for each HDD.

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Londoners urged to cut landlines and take up wireless broadband

Nick Ryan
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Exactly. How many wifi channels are there? How would this interact with private wifi which will operate on the same frequencies and standards.

With the shared wireless bandwidth where every additional connection reduces the overall available bandwidth due to the coordination required between them, 4G connections that are fine as long as you happen to have a good signal, i.e. you're not indoors, moving and don't have pesky bags of water standing in the way.

And then there's the network route from the mast wifi/4G to the Internet...

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Get ready for Europe's ROBO-BUTLERS: Billions of €€€s pledged to electro-slave dream

Nick Ryan
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Re: Agricultural robots?

I saw or read about this or something very similar a few years ago where the facility was in the middle of a few fields and it also controlled access to these fields for field rotation purposes. It's a phenomenal setup, but I hadn't realised that it had gone any further and was in actual use, particularly given the likely cost.

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Queen's Speech: Computer Misuse Act to be amended, tougher sentences planned

Nick Ryan
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Re: Computer Misuse Act needs more of an update than that

The progressive ones use fax machines now? Wow. Most seem incapable of progressing beyond photocopies of photocopies and 2nd class stamps.

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Nick Ryan
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Re: WTF are 'paedophilic manuals'?

Why no legislation on burglary manuals? Or Murder manuals? Armed robbery manuals? (Maybe it's the programmer in me, but why not create an abstract law regarding the dissemination of criminal techniques in manuals and then have a concrete implementation for each crime?)

Because that would be sensible and would not pander to the idiots / daily mail readers / voters (delete as applicable). A sane lawyer, yes, I couldn't believe one still existed, recently stated that having more and more specific laws was a bad thing. Unless you are a lawyer. And guess what's the background of a lot of the top MPs...

There were also some statistics about the number of new laws introduced recently compared to historically. The rise is phenomenal, and it's not because there are a great many new or novel crimes being committed. Creating new laws is very different to enforcing them.

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How I poured a client's emails straight into the spam bin – with one Friday evening change

Nick Ryan
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There is an attachment to the idea of Outlook + Exchange + Public Folders that no force in the universe is ever going to dislodge.

Microsoft is working very hard on this.

1) They've been steadily depracating Public Folders with every release of Exchange and Outlook (including refusing to fix decade old bugs) in favour of... sharepoint.

2) It's cloud, cloud, cloud, cloud all the way. Or, more accurately, subscription services under Microsoft's control.

Luckily, Microsoft hasn't been entirely successful in killing off Public Folders yet.

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Former Microsoftie becomes US ambassador, opts to swear in on KINDLE

Nick Ryan
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Re: Up the river

Is the use of a Kindle in this way one of the accepted, licenced uses of the device, deviating from which invalidates the warranty?

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Quantum teleportation gets reliable at Delft

Nick Ryan
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Re: Star Trek Transporter

It was created as a cost saving device, not a time saving device.

The cost of the effects of the ships, shuttle, and so on landing at each new location would have been prohibitive. However a static(*) scene overlaid reveal process (i.e. the teleport animation) was very cheap regardless of the setting.

* You'll notice that with very few exceptions that the scene the characters are leaving or arriving by teleport was always static, clever cuts and edits disguised this very well. Much more recent examples changed this of course.

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SCIENCE explains why you LOVE the smell of BACON

Nick Ryan
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Re: Can I just add..

I curse you, you vile carnivores..

I'll have you know that I'm an omnivore, not a carnivore. (Just like almost every non-vegetarian/vegan).

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Nick Ryan
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Re: Streaky Bacon

In general I wouldn't touch USA bacon with a shitty stick, nor anything else pork based, unless it's organic or similar. The last stuff you want to eat is any US mass produced pork.

It only took me three days to teach staff at a US hotel how to cook bacon properly, possibly prompted by my queries as to how many injury claims they receive regarding shards of US style cooked bacons shattering and exploding when prodded with a fork...

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The hoarder's dilemma: 'Why can't I throw anything away?'

Nick Ryan
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Re: Platters as mug mats

That's just the pace of modern progress isn't it? We used to use 3 1/2" floppy disks as mug mats and these days nothing less than a multi-Gb coaster will do the job.

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Google TOO WHITE and MALE, says HR boss, looking in mirror

Nick Ryan
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Re: Diversity is bollocks

Can discrimintation ever be positive....?

Occasionally, yes. For example, police "liaison officers" (or whatever they've been rebranded this week) need to have representatives for any of the isolationist communities that they need to deal with. On the other hand, you could put this as part of the job description role rather than the selection process.

If we're not careful, we'll have 78 year old male pole dancers... :)

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Nick Ryan
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Re: Feminists: they are idiots and to blame!

Little boys are encouraged to be bold, girls are encouraged to be quiet and behave. Boys are considered to be better at rational problem-solving, women are presumed to be more empathetic, and so each type of behaviour is drilled into tiny brains until it 'takes'. It seems as if it must be Nature, doesn't it-- we are born this way. And society actively polices this.

Oh FFS. Males and females are different. We are genetically distinct, we generally have different body structures and shapes and our brains are generally wired up differently. This doesn't mean that there aren't exceptions to the rule and that there are crossovers on the physical or mental level, but that in general males and females are predisposed to certain activities. This doesn't make this wrong, just a recognition of the facts. Visit any human trash area or, more accurately, areas where it is common that parenting is considered something for somebody else to do, and you'll quickly notice that it's not a rule that boys are bold and girls are quiet.

Ask any woman (hi) who has walked into a male-only work environment. Or watch the dominant group (white, male, straight) gang up on the 'outsider' (woman, or gay male, or non-white.)

Here we have the usual racist, sexist response. This is very rarely a racist or sexist issue, it's a grouping, "gang", if you like, issue. It doesn't matter if you are black, brown, white, male, female, gay or straight, intrude into an area dominated by a distinct group of people and if you don't fit in, you will be isolated and, often, abused in some manner. This is, unfortunately, how such groups work and you can either adhere to the group's predispositions or work, socially, to break down barriers. I've personally seen an office of "brown" female co-workers mercilessly taunt and abuse a "white" male co-worker, a group of "brown" make workers abuse a sole "black" co-worker, a small group of mixed-sex "brown" co-workers isolate themselves from a larger group of mixed sex "white" co-workers and then cry discrimination when they weren't included in social events yet excluding the others from what they considered to be their "own" events.

It's a crude generalisation, but some of the most racist people I know are "minorities" who have appalling views on the "majorities" and mountain sized chips on their shoulders to match. The worst case was some trash on twitter who claimed that "it wasn't possible to be racist to a majority."

(and in case anybody cares, the use of black, brown or white here is just descriptive and it's a hell of a lot easier than recording "Irish, Welsh, Cornish, English, Brittany French, Scandinavian, Andalusian, Spanish, and every other national / identity grouping that you care to think of).

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Google's driverless car: It'll just block our roads. It's the WORST

Nick Ryan
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Re: Built for America

There are a few choice European locations that I'd like to see them handle... the Arc' De Triomphe roundabout being one, along with pretty much anywhere in Rome.

Further afield, the mountain roads of Poland where it's considered normal to a) park on a blind corner and b) overtake on a blind corner, and that's just one example of perpetual lunacy on the road.

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Nick Ryan
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Google maps (navigation) knows about tunnels and handles them appropriately, not whining about a lack of satellites and even switches the display to night mode. The sensors do get confused if you stop in the the tunnel but will pick up again when you regain a satnav signal.

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Nick Ryan
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Re: Stuff it can't hope to deal with

And if you've ever my my mother-in-law on the road, she's even worse than white van drivers... she ignores cyclists and pretends that they're not there and therefore drives past giving them no space. She also believes that "it's ok to drink drive if you're a local".

She's ideal google car material.

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Amazon's cloud reign may soon come to an end, says Gartner

Nick Ryan
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Re: This Just In

The only interesting thing with gartner "reports" is guessing who paid for the report. Sometimes even this isn't very interesting as it's too obvious.

Gartner: Telling you want you want to hear since 1979.

or more accurately:

Gartner: Telling your prospective customers what you want them to hear since 1979

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Rich bitch sorority girls actually more likely to put out than low-class 'sluts': Study

Nick Ryan
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Pictures or it didn't happen. Or at the very least a playmobil reconstruction.

Sometimes I wonder if the journalistic quality of the esteemed El Reg is slipping...

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Microsoft's 'CEO of no' on Xbox: NO SALE

Nick Ryan
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Re: They can't sell bing off

The trend will be to use an "online personal assistant" to perform the search. That's the next big thing therefore they will be pushed heavily and we'll all get to enjoy the product placement and unfeasible search results and accuracy demonstrated.

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Nick Ryan
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Re: Bing

Agreed. Microsoft really need Bing. Ignoring the stupid name and poor search results (although they are much better than they used to be), having a large, backed competitor for Internet Search is important for the industry. "Google It" is already a generic term for Internet Search, it's important that there are genuine alternatives as otherwise a company in a monopoly position will not improve and will instead exploit the situation. Microsoft should know this...

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Microsoft Cortana EULA contains the Greatest Disclaimer of ALL TIME

Nick Ryan
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Re: is it just me?

At least the xbox/halo Cortana has a vaguely realistic human body shape. Reading up on it (like you do), apparently the latest version was designed by a female designer which may go some way to explaining why there's a hint of reality there.

Now if MS were to redesign the windows phone Cortana to be red and perhaps give it a theme song. Something appropriate like "Daisy, daisy..."...

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Tech that we want (but they never seem to give us)

Nick Ryan
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And add a contextual language filter to messaging on the device as well. That way certain words, phrases or message meanings could be avoided being sent to friends, colleague, boss, wife, mistress, mother-in-law and so on.

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Nick Ryan
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Re: Without needing any new technological development

Desk phones that don't require a forgettable training a course to use despite having a millionth of the functionality of a smartphone requiring no training

Hahaha.. so very true. I'm looking at one now and I'm in IT so ought to be able to figure out how to use it but between button icons that are largely meaningless even when you know what they do, side of screen buttons that don't line up with the screen and an interface menu scheme that just makes no sense at all I just don't bother.

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Nick Ryan
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Hmmm... where to begin?

* Super capacitors - on the power infrastructure side a big problem we have is the mismatch between the generation of electricity and demand, particularly for renewables. Smaller super capacitors would also help massively when it comes to electric cars and mobile devices.

* Efficient Operating Systems / Software. You know, ones that don't spend 99% of their time not doing anything useful and instead getting in the way. It's frustrating when you know that the sheer increase of processing power and capacity over the recent years hasn't resulted in systems that respond consistently and efficiently, instead we get massive hang ups and freezes and systems where it's considered "acceptable" that they take 2-5 minutes to be fully ready to use. That's use, not just at a login prompt or showing a desktop while another 10 applications slowly load. Couple this with common software that at every release is somehow 50% larger and 200% slower than the one before. Optimisation <> Newer, faster hardware.

* Sealed keyboards that are still good to type on. Tip your keyboard upside down, tap a few times, admire the pile of dirt that has accumulated and the amount that is still left in the keyboard...

* The complete removal of EA from the face of the planet. This way there may be some "new" games that aren't sequels of existing games that were sequels of the ones before... and, more hopefully, the severe culling of piss-taking in-app purchases.

* Fast refresh / state change (as necessary), high tonal range, full colour reflective displays.

* Vertical stacked camera sensors (current camera sensors waste a majority of the available photons, killing low light performance). I know these are on their way, but can't remember the search term...

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Nick Ryan
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Re: Never Mind Flying Cars...

From what I remember the chief current problem with Gallium Arsenide chips is that they are currently very expensive compared to Silicon chips, the manufacturing processes are not up to scratch yet, and then there's the marketing "problem" with the word "Arsenide". From the technical point I seem to remember that there were some chemical / thermal stability issues to overcome as well.

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Oculus boss: True virtual reality is 'a decade or two' away

Nick Ryan
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Re: 20 years from now

That's true, but it's probably more accurate now that the technology for it is getting closer. Or more accurately, the technology for a reasonable experience is getting closer. The more research and effort put into it, the more fine details there are that need to be resolved.

The eyeball tracking for the small point of focus and depth perception (generally regarded as only truly accurate within roughly arms reach, beyond that it's a guess involving visual clues in the environment).

The "lean problem" e.g. navigate through a VR environment, approach a wall and lean closer to get a better look at it - what happens when you lean further and effectively pass through the surface?

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Look, pal, it’s YOUR password so it’s YOUR fault that it's gone AWOL

Nick Ryan
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Re: Website policy stupidity

The other "security" function is that these dumb sites force you to record a memorable place, date and name. All in the interest of security of course. Anybody sane in security (can't be many left) knows that this usually leads to a less secure system than a more secure one.

And as for "Verified by Visa" (or the equivalent for MC), I have never, ever, entered my password correctly on that. Every time I click "Forgotten Password", enter some trivial details, enter another junk password that I'll never remember and that's it. Does this aid security in any way? No

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You know all those resources we're about to run out of? No, we aren't

Nick Ryan
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Re: I would argue the situation was even worse

I'd rather that there was a box labelled "none of the above".

At least this way the politicians won't decide that with a majority of returned results in a voting area, that they have a mandate to do whatever they feel like and screw the entire electorate. Given that a winner may have only 40% of the votes and only 40% of the people in an area might vote, that means that only 16% of the voters in the area approve of them.

So mandatory voting and a box labelled "none of the above" please. We shouldn't have to vote for the one that we least dislike.

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Boffin fights fire with EXPLOSIVES instead of water

Nick Ryan
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Re: @Evil Auditor (Was: Re eucalyptus weeds)

"Back when I was picking coffee beans in Guatamala..."

Is there anything that WonderJake can't do?

Be truthful? :)

I just find it entertaining...

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JJ Abrams and Star Wars: I've got a bad feeling about this

Nick Ryan
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Sci-Fi is just a setting

Sci-Fi is a setting - in general the more it is treated like this, and not an effects-laden crutch for poor script, dialogue and ideas, the better the film is.

The first Star Wars film (ep:IV) succeeded because it took commonly used story elements and a relatively standard plot line and set these elements using a Sci-Fi setting. The effects weren't cheap for their time, therefore they didn't detract from the plot. Likewise the effects weren't the focus of the film either.

The second film (ep:V, The Empire Strikes Back), continued more or less along the same lines and while there was greater emphasis on the technology and effects, they generally didn't feel like they were shoved in just because they could be, and a plot was fitted around them afterwards.

The third film (ep:VI, The Return of the Jedi), showed a bit of promise but on the marketing (merchandising) success of the previous two, piled in with merchandising features often to the detriment of the film. It still worked as it wasn't too grossly overdone, but it did detract from the film.

The recent films (ep:I, II & III) were built from working out what (and who) to merchandise, fitting special effects around them and then trying to shoe-horn any form of plot but only only if there was space available.

The "Star Trek" relaunch was very much similar, but more from the point of starting with pointless special effects, incompetent plots and then throwing in a few "popular" actors and topping it off with a few nods to the original to keep some "spirit" of the originals in there.

The entire concept of films and where they come from is often lost, for example Impossible Mission was all about a team of people working together, not one single "super character" (played by a famous actor) where it became a more effects driven copy of any James Bond film.

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Apple haggles with ISPs for fast lanes to its own websites – industry guru

Nick Ryan
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Re: How long till bandwidth maximum?

While you have a point regarding the "last mile" bandwidth, it's getting the data from the Content Delivery Network (CDN) that is the problem.

In principle there should be no problem streaming 17 HD films down your 70Mb link itself. However those 17 HD films have to get to you from the content provider's network. If 1000 people in your city are also concurrently streaming 17 HD files, then that's 17000 HD films that need to be delivered concurrently, with no or minimal loss of packets and no pauses (buffering during playback); a short amount of buffering is always in place with streaming and this happens as you start the video. That's a hell of a strain on an infrastructure to deliver that.

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Nick Ryan
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Net Neutrality is a weird one

While the principle that a company, certainly one that is the originator of a lot of content, can, or should, pay more for better delivery of their content, is fair, it's potentially problematic.

Any company can arrange for a high speed link to the Internet. Throw more money at it and you will get better a better link - lower latency, higher throughput, burst capacity provisions and so on. If a business relies on getting content onto the Internet, then it should have a high level of redundancy internally and should also have redundant (physical) Internet connections, therefore multiple arrangements would be made with different ISPs. This redundancy could be used a a fail-over or even to load balance content, or anything in between.

Few would argue that the above is a bad thing: The company is paying more to provide the amount of content it delivers, which is fair.

In order to improve efficiency, a company can pay even more money to get closer to the core of an ISP's networking setup. Cutting out a few network hops here and there may not seem that important however every network hop adds latency and slows things down overall and when you talk about a high volume of content, this adds to a lot of potential loss of overall speed and a customer's perception of quality is often dictated by speed, or more accurately the lack of (which makes it outstanding that many set top box manufacturer's still push cruddy, low spec, badly programmed kit). An additional point in favour of this arrangement is that by bypassing network hops that the content provider shares with other companies, it will help to optimise throughput and should improve the experience for these other companies.

Again, few would argue that the above is a bad thing. The company is paying even more for its connection and optimising the route is sensible on a lot of fronts.

All this is wonderful if you happen to be a customer that uses the same ISP, or one of the ISPs as the content provider. The delivery of content is optimal and the customer gets a great service. However there are many ISPs and if you're not with one that the content provider uses then you will get a worse service than the content provider would like to deliver.

A natural solution to improve this situation is to enhance the peering infrastructure that ISPs already have between each other, and it's at this point where it starts to get murky and less than ideal. ISPs are not equal, in size or capacities and the choice of ISP is usually constrained by physical location. On the one hand, it is arguably good that a heavy content delivery company would pay for additional peering from their core ISPs to other ISPs - after all they are using a huge amount of bandwidth. On the other hand, this starts to get into the problem of selecting the ISPs to peer with, which will usually disfavour the smaller or regional ISPs, and the actual implementation of the additional peering... if the content provider pays for additional peering bandwidth, then there are few that would argue that this is bad, however if the content provider starts taking a higher share (or priority) of existing bandwidth then there are definite downsides.

In the end, it's all down to implementation and control. I believe that a company should be able to pay for better delivery of their services but that it should be in a controlled and regulated manner, should not disfavour smaller or regional network providers and should not impact other content provider's share of existing bandwidth.

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Microsoft Surface 3 Pro: Flip me over, fondle me up

Nick Ryan
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Re: "Surface ***3***. i.e. this is our 3rd attempt after 2 dismal failures"

The phrase "Bing it on my Zune" still raises a smile from me. It just sums up perfectly the quality of Microsoftness, like the kid who is trying so very hard to be cool.

Or more like the politician who's trying so very to be cool, or down with the masses, or whoever they're targetting today who isn't a political donor.

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