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* Posts by Jason Bloomberg

904 posts • joined 8 Mar 2008

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Fancy joining Reg hack on quid-a-day challenge?

Jason Bloomberg
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Re: Pasta, pasta, beans, pasta, pasta, pasta, beans and pasta

No one in the UK would have to live on £1 of food a day.

Been there, done that and unfortunately so have many others. The cosy ideal of it should or would never happen is not always matched by the cold reality of the real world.

I agree this is mostly about third world poverty but that doesn't mean there isn't some similar suffering closer to home.

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Jason Bloomberg
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Pasta, pasta, beans, pasta, pasta, pasta, beans and pasta

It's never so much that one can't live for a £1 a day but that one can't retain the will to live for very long when doing so. I am sure that if we had to most of us could, but I'm sure a supermarket shoplift would be heading towards the top of the 'to do' list. That and a visit to the doctors for some deficiency or problem caused by cheap but unhealthy foodstuffs.

The main problem for anyone on a lean budget is trying to buy variety when small quantities are near impossible to obtain and pricing drops with quantity. It's far easier on £30 a month up-front than when given a £1 a day. That's a typical 'poverty trap' of having to live for the day and not being able to save to make your life more comfortable than it is.

Doing it for charity is a poor simulation of the real deal but it's worth the experience and if it raises money for those who don't have it so good when the week ends all the better. And perhaps consider giving the money one would have spent on food to someone more in need - That's usually quite a shock; how much you did live on against how much is usually spent!

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Red-faced LOHAN team 'fesses up in blown SPEARS fuse fiasco

Jason Bloomberg
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Re: Fuse Blown - I can fix that

It's amazing how well a hacksawed-down 6" nail works as a 13A fuse replacement and can even earn praise as an entirely professional bodge!

Without standards you are nothing.

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Bad PUPPY: Undead Windows XP deposits fresh scamware on lawn

Jason Bloomberg
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Re: Business as usual

And there are those folks who have a good understanding of the issues, risks and mitigations, and have made an informed decision to stick with XP.

It's not as if switching to something else is guaranteed to prevent successful attacks.

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Oz bank in comedy Heartbleed blog FAIL

Jason Bloomberg
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Re: Surprise!

Why is it that when we see the word "exploit" or the phrase "security problems/issues", the article is always about Microsoft.

Looks like we got ourselves another Anonymous Coward Troll -

https://www.google.co.uk/search?q=Why+is+it+that+when+we+see+the+word+%22exploit%22+or+the+phrase+%22security+problems/issues%22,+the+article+is+always+about+Microsoft.+site:forums.theregister.co.uk&biw=800&bih=506

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Apple is IMMUNE from Heartbleed, it says. But don't check if it's true

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Call of Duty 'fragged using OpenSSL's Heartbleed exploit'

Jason Bloomberg
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Re: And yet

Plain text can be pretty obvious to spot within any memory dump but I am not so sure about binary data. Those saying they can see critical data (keys, certificates, etc) being leaked probably recognise that because it's their data no matter where it appears. I do wonder how easy it is to find meaningful binary data in a random 64K block when you don't know what that data is?

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Windows XP is finally DEAD, right? Er, not quite. Here's what to do if you're stuck with it

Jason Bloomberg
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Re: Anyone else getting bored of stories about XP updates stopping?

And equally bored of recommendations to use some version of Linux instead.

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Broadband Secretary of SHEEP sensationally quits Cabinet

Jason Bloomberg
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"UKIP are the only real option in the next elections"

Perhaps; if it's a contest between dickheads and wankers which it increasingly seems to be.

Most people are disenfranchised and have given up on the lot of them save for having it ingrained in us that we really should vote because that makes a democracy and a belief that there is no right to complain if one doesn't.

It has always been a vote for the ones we dislike least and the only way to change things is to have "none of the above" on the ballot paper and for people to vote that way in droves. Only then will it become clear that what we call democracy and government is not fit for purpose. Which is why we will never be allowed that.

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Lego is the TOOL OF SATAN, thunders Polish priest

Jason Bloomberg
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Re: If He's That Bothered

I do like the idea of a "Jesus" set but then there's that difficult question of how Commander J marshals the Battle Nuns when they go fight Action Man Giganticus. Do they go with the Pirates in the Space Galleon, ride on the back of Tommy 'Tank' Tortoise, or glide in on Hudl One?

Darned kids and their ridiculous imaginations.

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Crashed NORKS drones discovered by South Korea

Jason Bloomberg
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Re: I pity South Korea

South Korea isn't an entirely innocent party in all of this; always ready to invite her American friends round for a bit of war game posturing and banging on the wall fun.

Of course it's never provocation when the west does it.

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BT befriends Google's lonely TV dongle – and saves YouView

Jason Bloomberg
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Suhalan

Don't let facts stand in the way of your hatred.

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No, Minister. You CAN'T de-Kindle your eBooks!

Jason Bloomberg
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Headmaster

Parody

For example, you can create a parody of a Dan Brown book by scribbling on every other page. Artistically, that's a perfectly valid "parody", and there's nothing Dan Brown or his publisher could do to stop it.

Brown and his publisher retain a right to redress infringements of copyright which claim to be legitimate by way of parody when they are not.

Just saying something is parody does not automatically make it so and it would ultimately be for the court to decide whether it is or is not.

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Tech giants KNEW about PRISM, web snooping, claims top NSA lawyer

Jason Bloomberg
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Re: This is UNCONSTITUTIONAL!

Much as I might agree with your sentiments, if it were so patently illegal, so clearly unconstitutional, then it should be a doddle to have it addressed. I shouldn't think the court case would last much more than half a day and the cheapest lawyer you could find would probably suffice. I imagine there would be many queueing up to have Obama and/or NSA banged to rights for free and plenty who would pay to get that if needed.

So why has that not happened? I suspect it's a lot more nuanced than you wish it were.

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GitHub probes worker's claims of hostile, sexist office culture

Jason Bloomberg
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Re: A company full of gits?

If there is a genuine claim of sexual harassment and intimidation, then the employee presumably has the avenue of an industrial tribunal, or whatever the US equivalent is and that is where the matter should be taken and be kept.

Not everyone wants compensation for a wrong or sees that as justice done. They may prefer letting people know what they experienced and having the company shamed into change.

Even if seeking compensation it is best to speak out before they place a gagging clause on any compensation arrangement.

There can also be strategic advantages in speaking out and letting the ex-employer sue for defamation and counter-claiming than commencing a case as a claimant.

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That NSA denial in full: As of right now, we're not pretending to be Facebook or Twitter

Jason Bloomberg
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Re: Journalism, whither art thou?

For every question asked there is an ambiguous answer which can be provided.

I am particularly suspicious of denials which have any paired constructs within them; "We did not spy and infect" would be true if they only spied or infected but not both, equally "We did not spy or infect" would be true if they did both. And both are true if "we" did not do it ourselves but got someone else to do that.

This is just amateur hour fare and there's always "we have no evidence of..." as the catch-all which makes any denial worthless.

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Facebook's Zuckerberg buttonholes Obama, rages against NSA dragnet spying

Jason Bloomberg
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Devil

Re: A translation

Zucks angry not because of the spying, it's because he might lose a bit of cash

More that it's the usual hypocrisy and moral relativism, another case of 'what I do is okay but when others do the same it is not okay'.

When they kill innocent civilians it's abhorrent terrorism. When we kill innocent civilians it's entirely acceptable and justifiable collateral damage.

Both of them, Zuckerberg and Obama, and many more ->

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I NEVER DONE BITCOIN, says bloke fingered by new Newsweek

Jason Bloomberg
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Re: Conflicting reports

You haven't actually read either story have you? If you'd read the AP story you would know that he has explained the exchange with Newsweek.

I read the El Reg and Newsweek articles, but not the AP article. A conflict in the reports is however evident.

DPSN says the Newsweek article is wrong, but Goodman is standing by it saying there was no confusion about the context. It may be Goodman is right but DPSN did not mean what it appears he was saying. Or DPSN could have gathered his wits and is now trying to rescue himself from what he did say. I have no idea which it is and doubt anyone else does at this time.

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Jason Bloomberg
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Conflicting reports

According to AP, Nakamoto said that he only heard of the digital cash three weeks ago when his son said he had been contacted by Newsweek.

Yet, according to Newsweek, when questioned on involvement with Bitcoin -

"I am no longer involved in that and I cannot discuss it," he says, dismissing all further queries with a swat of his left hand. "It's been turned over to other people. They are in charge of it now. I no longer have any connection."

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Apple to grieving sons: NO, you cannot have access to your dead mum's iPad

Jason Bloomberg
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Light those torches and gather the pitchforks

This is where public shaming of a company has its place. If he has to go to court I do hope he wins and hope Apple pay the cost.

Of course, it is possible that Apple are right according to law. The moral is to make sure someone you trust does know your usernames, passwords PINs and IDs or knows where they have been hidden, or don't put all your eggs in one basket, keep a backup copy of any data you want others to be able to access.

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Blimey! ANOTHER Bitcoin bleed brouhaha

Jason Bloomberg
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The costs of obtaining Bitcoins

It seems to me it is now cheaper to invest in robbery than it is to invest in mining and this will continue to be the case until exchanges and other third-party wallet holders get their acts together. I expect we will see a lot more Bitcoin heists coming soon, big grabs and slow trickle thefts.

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Psssst. Don't tell the Bride, but BBC Three is about to be jilted

Jason Bloomberg
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Re: And nothing of value was lost...

Tonight's viewing ...

19:00 - 20:00 Total Wipeout

20:00 - 21:00 Don't Tell the Bride

21:00 - 22:00 Festivals, Sex & Suspicious Parents

22:00 - 22:30 Ja'mie: Private School Girl

22:30 - 23:00 Bad Education

23:00 - 23:25 Family Guy

23:25 - 23:45 Family Guy

23:45 - 00:10 American Dad!

00:10 - 01:10 Festivals, Sex & Suspicious Parents

01:10 - 01:35 Ja'mie: Private School Girl

01:35 - 02:05 Pramface

02:05 - 03:05 Hair

03:05 - 03:30 Great Movie Mistakes

03:30 - 04:00 Pramface

There's been some very good stuff but these days it seems to be endless repeats, mundane tat and mostly crap. I'm above their target audience (16-34) so perhaps I just don't get it any more. But then I wasn't in their target audience when I thought it was good. It won't, for me, be much of a loss to see it go if it stays as it is now.

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Yes: You CAN use your phone as a satnav while driving – appeals court

Jason Bloomberg
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Re: A test case perhaps?

it would immediately make a lot of on the road police communication illegal due to them needing to use a walkie talkie.

Not necessarily. The usual reason for police exceptions is their being specifically trained and able to carry out such tasks that a mere mortal cannot.

Sensible laws will not be purely technical offences but usually have some 'greater good' defence that absolves or mitigates any crime; "Yes, I was using a mobile phone in a car, but to call emergency services to save the lives of others". That's also the grounds against creating purely technical offences in the first place as there are circumstances where absolute illegality would be perverse.

This case would presumably have parallels with "watching a TV" when that TV was acting as a Sat Nav display, where one is illegal the other is not; a question of when a TV ceases to be a TV and removes it from criminalisation.

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Flying fondleslab causes injury after plane hits turbulence

Jason Bloomberg
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Re: I suppose the Aussie transport safety board forgot...

Seems to me they are well aware that almost anything can become a dangerous projectile and hence the suggestion for securely storing such things; putting them in softer carrying cases or bags and keeping that closed, rather than having them loose and free to become projectiles.

Of course the whole kit and caboodle can come crashing down but that's less likely to happen unless turbulence is particularly bad.

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How a Facebook post by blabbermouth daughter cost her parents $80,000

Jason Bloomberg
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Playing the blame game

My guess is that Dana is currently blaming everyone but herself

If her father had not breached the agreement and told her then she could not have blabbed on Facebook. It is his problem as much as it would be if he had lent her his credit card and she had run up massive debts.

If he had told her not to do what she did then there is a failing which rests with her, but he still has to man-up as having facilitated that in the first place.

I imagine this is the conclusion the court came to in revoking the award having heard all the arguments that it was not his fault.

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Bitcoin or bust: MtGox files for bankruptcy protection

Jason Bloomberg
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Facepalm

And thus there was a great wailing and gnashing of teeth

I imagine that a great many of us, who were lamenting that we had missed riding the virtual escalator to riches beyond our wildest dreams, are somewhat relieved that, while we may have missed the bubble, we also avoided the inevitable 'pop'.

I think it was the expectation of something like this which had many of us hold our nerves and not jump on board the bandwagon. It's all well and good saying it's no worse than brick and mortar banking, pointing to other bank disasters, but we know deep down it's not really like that at all.

Let's face it - It was about as safe as giving a drug addict your wage packet to go score some gear. All promises and guarantees are as virtual as the currency.

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MtGox MELTDOWN: Quits Bitcoin Foundation board, deletes Twitter

Jason Bloomberg
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Re: Looks like a black hole

A thief doesn't benefit from a theft that results in a drop in the value of the asset.

They are still better off than they were, and it depends how long they are prepared to sit on their stash and what their expectation of value being restored is.

I am guessing these aren't 'lob a brick through the window' knuckle-dragging thieves so we cannot tell what their strategy is. Perhaps they are simply looking to force short-term value drops to facilitate cheaper investments with higher profits later?

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Another U.S. state set to repeal rubber duck ban

Jason Bloomberg
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Pint

Re: There is a chance of a major win ......

It was "Cat Food (Sheba)". House wins.

We can laugh but when people wanting their fix have it taken away the most inane things will be bet upon. I've known people to start working their way along the spice rack when short of tobacco!

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Jason Bloomberg
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Re: *facepalm*

"Only in the USA"

As satisfying as it is to say that; this is what happens when any country creates a law and an activity falls within scope of that law. If gambling is illegal, if betting on an outcome is gambling, then betting on a duck race outcome is gambling and therefore illegal. You can't really blame law enforcement for applying the law they are expected to apply.

It's not "duck racing" which is the problem; it's "betting on the outcome of a duck race" which is, and, by most definitions, that is "gambling". The problem is allowing an activity which some many feel should be legal while preventing that being exploited by those who want to engage in otherwise illegal activities.

Every country probably has laws which makes some acts illegal which many people would say should not be illegal. I recall there were similar problems in the UK where church, social club and other charity raffles fell foul of gambling legislation. I also remember some complaints that tightening up UK gun control adversely affected legitimate gun sports. Then there was that apparent need to be registered and police vetted just to look after next door's kids or drive them to school. I am sure there are many other examples.

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Top Brit docs wade into GP data grab row, demand 'urgent' NHS England talks

Jason Bloomberg
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Re: A medical researcher's perspective...

medical research has a better history of securely handling data than the rest of the public sector, as the sharing of information is based on the concept of informed consent, something that is hard to get, and even harder to regain when trust is lost.

Very true but informed consent is notably absent in what people are being opted into. Opting out is made as difficult as possible and it simply isn't being explained clearly.

You have done a pretty good job presenting a case for; so why could the government not do an equally good job? The suspicion must be that they deliberately chose not to, do not want to, and that suggests there is something we are not being told, something they don't want us to know, and is a good enough reason alone to be highly suspicious.

Private companies are not routinely going to be given access to this data... the 'Tories' are not planning on selling of the un-anonymised data to their chums in the insurance industry.

I. and I suspect others, would like to see some guarantee of that. Call us untrusting, paranoid, whatever, and that is okay, we are entitled to be. It is for the government to convince us that what you say will be the case.

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Jason Bloomberg
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OPT OUT

The best option I can see is to opt out and I would advise everyone to do the same.

Any worry that this may be the wrong option can be set aside by noting that we will be given (or can demand) a right to opt-in later. I cannot see any government saying they will leave those who did not initially sign-up for what they say is good for us languishing in that plight. That would be electoral suicide.

They can have our opt-ins when they have convinced us it is good for us.

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Fine, you can mock us: NSA spies back down in T-shirt ridicule brouhaha

Jason Bloomberg
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Black Helicopters

Re: a crime to mutilate or alter the seal of any department or agency of the United States

3. I received a phone call from the FBI stating that I had perpetrated a federal crime and that if I didn't desist then they would attempt extradition.

I take it you told them to fuck off, and continued using the seal?

I would guess he did what most people would do and complied with the request because it really isn't worth the fight nor grief. Not when you can't trust your own government to protect you and the law they impose is designed not to.

They rule and control through fear and not everyone can afford to stand up against that.

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Devs angrily dismiss Absolute Computrace rootkit accusation

Jason Bloomberg
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Devil

"we were able to make a live demo of Computrace hijacking"

If that is the case then it appears to be "case closed" and it doesn't matter how benign or safe they say their product is. Kaspersky aren't falsely crying wolf if they can actually show the wolf.

https://www.securelist.com/en/analysis/204792325/Absolute_Computrace_Revisited

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A Year of Code timeline: History of a HYPEGASM

Jason Bloomberg
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Sounds like a great conspiracy theory, but...

Don't forget the founders of the Raspberry Pi Foundation also identified a need for better computing, programming and coding skills, and that echoes what any number of businesses have been saying for years.

There is a long history of IT and 'computing' being sold as 'the future' with an acknowledged corresponding need to have people capable of working in that field. That does seem to have turned to doing something about it culminating, in part, in the Year of Code.

It's okay leaving people to join up the dots, but there seems to be a number of dots being left out.

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Object to #YearOfCode? You're a misogynist and a snob, says the BBC

Jason Bloomberg
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Re: The whole thing is silliness

I've never understood why there's this sudden fetish to turn EVERYONE into coders, or where it even came from?

From a government perspective; 'coding' is the next great thing, the guaranteed saviour of Britain and her economy, so what we need to seize that opportunity is more coders.

Simples.

And all of us can see the gravy train which will ride on the back of that.

Anyone remember those old photos with row after row of secretaries bashing away on typewriters? Replace those typists with 'coders' and you probably get a glimpse of what the government's vision is. An infinite number of coders with an infinite number of computers will write the one app which saves the nation. Honest.

In a couple of years time the next fad will come along and the government of the day will be chasing that.

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Flappy Bird's ANIMATED CORPSE may spread malware PLAGUE

Jason Bloomberg
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Re: ..

Easy to say, but without knowing what the actual cause(s) of him taking down the game were I don't know how realistic it is.

Nguyen has been reported as saying, what was meant to be a game of fun, became a highly addictive product which was giving him concern and sleepless nights.

I doubt leaving it up and giving its revenue to charity would have satisfied his conscience.

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So cool it 2.4 gigahertz: BATTERY-FREE comms for international band

Jason Bloomberg
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Re: Passive sensors?

Yes, that's just the sort of applications these things could be used in. No wires, no batteries, simply drop-n-go.

However... most security solutions aren't simply passive until activated. They will normally wake-up occasionally and send status signals to prove they are working, haven't been tampered with, and even just to prove they are still there, haven't been stolen! Most importantly to let the system know, as best as can be done, that it will work as expected when required to.

The last thing anyone wants in a safety or business critical application is something not working when it's needed to work. There is also an issue of guaranteeing delivery; a sensor would normally keep sending an activation in case the receiver does not get it. Not sure how that would work if there's only one activation and no power left for sending a subsequent alert packet.

I would expect most serious safety or business critical systems to be hard-wired, non-wireless, just to overcome the problems wireless and/or battery powering presents. I can see there might be a use in less critical applications such as self-powered TV-style remote controls and similar

The biggest issue perhaps is cost and it's questionable whether they are actually any better than the current range of battery powered but long-life sensors and controllers.

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Twitter shares tank as blabbergasm implodes in full glare of unforgiving investors

Jason Bloomberg
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Half a billion dollar loss in a quarter

An average of a $5.7 million loss per day. That is pretty impressive, and I tip my hat to them.

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ARM posts sterling revenue growth, but moneymen spank it anyway

Jason Bloomberg
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Re: Laser-focused money men

Is there really an IoT market?

A very small one at present but the potential is there. It likely will be a cost sensitive playing field and the competition isn't really Intel and traditional CPU chips but more with cheaper microcontrollers from Atmel, Microchip and the like.

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Jason Bloomberg
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Laser-focused money men

They do seem to have a point; 2.9 billion chips shipped, £95.5 million pre-tax profit, so that's about 3p a chip.

You have to sell a lot of chips to reap the rewards and have to find a lot of new opportunities to keep expanding in a saturated market. And on-going expansion is what the money men seem to favour.

Investment is not solely about how well they have done but how well they will do. There are opportunities for ARM but it remains to be seen if they can offset shortfalls elsewhere. I expect ARM will become favoured again if they can secure the IoT market. ARM is however up against a lot of credible competition in the low-cost chip sector and that's what IoT needs to really take off.

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BT scratches its head over MYSTERY Home Hub disconnections

Jason Bloomberg
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Troll-dee-dee, troll-dee-dah

http://forums.theregister.co.uk/forum/1/2013/04/08/sourceforge_defacement/#c_1785048

http://forums.theregister.co.uk/forum/1/2013/06/12/fasthost_virtual_server_outage/#c_1858502

http://forums.theregister.co.uk/forum/1/2013/08/15/github_ddos/#c_1926557

http://forums.theregister.co.uk/forum/2/2013/10/11/google_shared_endorsements_social_ads/#c_1986910

http://forums.theregister.co.uk/forum/1/2013/11/22/net_traffic_redirection_attacks/#c_2035380

http://forums.theregister.co.uk/forum/1/2014/01/24/google_plus_gmail_down/#c_2088923

http://forums.theregister.co.uk/forum/1/2014/01/28/android_vpn_vuln_also_in_kitkat_44/#c_2091175

and many more

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NSA, GCHQ, accused of hacking Belgian smartcard crypto guru

Jason Bloomberg
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Re: I thought my marching days were over

You are probably both right.

99% don't give a toss unless something directly affects their lives or the paper or twitter feeds they choose to read are telling them they should do so. We are mostly an insular and selfish lot.

But that 1% who do care are quite a large number.

Of course it's still a battle against 'whatever we do; nothing will change' resignation which has most of us fatalistically accepting however it is. Whether that's the price of milk and bread, government spying, or slaughter and ill-advised ventures in foreign lands.

Still, things do and can change over time. Many of the disinterested 99% can be moved towards dissent and even action. There's always a straw which breaks the camel's back.

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Devs: We'll bury Candy Crush King under HEAPS of candy apps

Jason Bloomberg
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C and Y

I claim trademark dibs on the phrase, "C and Y".

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Google Glassholes, GET OFF our ROADS, thunder lawmakers in seven US states

Jason Bloomberg
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risk exists in life ... but it never used to be a reason to ban things

Your right to take risks with my life does not trump my right to not have you take risks with my life.

Perhaps it wasn't always that way. Maybe society has changed and we recognise there is more to rights than self-serving rights.

You are correct, cars would likely never be allowed if they were invented today. Not unless they emerged as they are now, with all the safety features they have. How many needlessly died to make them as safe as they are now? Has it been worth the cost? I don't know.

Don't think I am in anyway anti-car; I'm not, but rights have to be balanced, and if some will not voluntarily facilitate that then the state must step in on behalf of those who face having their rights infringed. Society provides the state the power to do that and expects them to do so when necessary.

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Facebook app now reads your smartphone's text messages? THE TRUTH

Jason Bloomberg
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FAIL

The problem lies with Android

Fair enough demanding Apps be less intrusive but Android needs to be able to stop Apps being intrusive while allowing them to do what the user wants. It's no good saying an App should do this or that if Android does not support it being done that way.

If people want an App to do certain things, and that means having to ask for more permissions than that App needs, it's not really fair to blame the App developer; they are stuck between a rock and a hard place.

Some App developers will take advantage of having permissions they do not need but Android is complicit in that; if Android did not allow that they could not do so. App developers may be taking advantage of the situation but Android is allowing being taken advantage of.

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Fancy a little kinky sex? GCHQ+NSA will know - thanks to ANGRY BIRDS

Jason Bloomberg
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Re: Here's the problem

being within the letter of the law doesn't mean you're right

If it's not illegal it cannot be wrong; that's how they sleep soundly in their beds at night. They wilfully choose not to make any moral judgement on whether it is right. The legal test substitutes for a moral test.

Once that's understood it becomes crystal clear how government ministers and the like can stand there, with straight faces, telling us that something others consider bad is the right thing to do and can genuinely believe that.

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A BBC-by-subscription 'would be richer', MPs told

Jason Bloomberg
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VFM

So the BBC provides value for money, the overwhelming majority agree, and would be happy to pay the same (or more) through subscription as they do through license fee. I wouldn't disagree with that.

So don't try to fix what isn't broken. Not that I can see how the BBC could become subscription only and still fit with the free-to-air and free-to-view offerings we currently have.

Call me cynical but it couldn't be about trying to get rid of free-to-air and free-to-view could it?

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Cryptocurrencies now being pooped out by cartoon cat

Jason Bloomberg
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Thumb Down

It's to be expected

One snake oil salesman rakes in the money and soon everyone thinks they'll have a go too. Minimal risk and, should it catch on, they get very rich.

I imagine most of us would have liked to have been in on the BTC game early on, to have created huge amounts of money from nothing. Greed and envy are powerful motivators to jump on the next bandwagon that rolls by. Everyone knows you don't get rich by joining a pyramid scheme; you get rich by starting one. The promise of riches beyond our wildest dreams prevents us seeing the true game being played.

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KCOM-owned Eclipse FAILS to cover up the password 'password'

Jason Bloomberg
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Login without knowing password is entirely possible

Whether advisable or not, a good number of people leave their browser to auto-complete login pages with usernames and passwords so it is entirely possible for an account holder to login in without knowing/remembering what their password is.

That however is no excuse for displaying the password once logged in.

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Almost everyone read the Verizon v FCC net neutrality verdict WRONG

Jason Bloomberg
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Remarkably?

Because consumers have inadequate information or market power, bad things will happen to them. And when bad things happen to them, for example if they discover that Netflix has been blocked, they are helpless – and unable to switch. Remarkably, the court supports this point of view.

It is not that remarkable because it is mostly true. If service is only available from one provider it is pretty much put up and shut up or walk away. Hobson's choice.

No end of campaigning can force a provider to do what a customer wants when they have no legal powers to force them to change or where momentum for change is too little to have an impact on providers that convinces them it is in their interest to change. Market forces simply don't work where there is no market or choice and only monopoly.

It is fair enough to say they could have choice but that denies the reality that there is, and may never be, that choice. Even where there is choice there is no guarantee that any provider will actually provide. Change is simply jumping from one frying pan into another with an escape route of jumping into the fire and abandoning all providers.

There is nothing remarkable in a court recognising that consumers may never have a "win" option only "lose" options. I for one am pleased they recognised this.

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