* Posts by Yes Me

320 posts • joined 11 Jan 2008

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TRAGEDY STRIKES Vulture News Central but details remain scrambled

Yes Me
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Paradise reggained

Egged on by this story, I looked around a bit, and discovered that if you really liked the old Reggister look, you can get something similar but even simpler by using the current day's archive link, like http://www.theregister.co.uk/Archive/2014/12/20/

Not perfect but better than the continuing disaster of the front page.

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Ofcom mulls selling UK govt's IPv4 cache amid IPv6 rollout flak

Yes Me
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Re: RFC 1149/2549

No, silly, you need RFC 6214 for IPv6

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Yes Me
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@ The Vociferous Time Waster

" keep the same last 32 bits"

That is NOT how IPv6 addressing works, sorry. Your address is all fresh and new.

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Yes Me
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@Roland6

What do you mean "nothing has been done"? Actually an enormous amount of work has been done in the IETF to make IPv6 in itself very usable. The problems are all those of coexistence of an exhausted, overloaded address space with a new one, that mathematically requires v4/v6 translation at the interface. But the operators with actual experience running CGNs (especially in countries with logging requirements, which is basically all countries except North Korea) know very well that CGN is *vastly* more costly and glitch-prone than rolling out IPv6.

For the IETF's position on IPv6: http://tools.ietf.org/html/rfc6540

Ofcom have been seriously misled.

-- Still hating the Register's new look, mainly reading ZDNET now --

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El Reg Redesign - leave your comment here.

Yes Me
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Unhappy

Re: El Reg Redesign - leave your comment here.

BAD Vulture! BAD!

Um, this confirms my experience that web site makeovers always make sites worse, especially when objectives like "modern and fresher" are involved. It is now harder to spot the lead stories, harder to quickly whip down the page looking for interesting stories, and also it's visually boring. All worse, nothing better that I can see.

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Internet cash-point boss says 'no thanks' to ICANN's web power grab

Yes Me
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WTF?

Cash point?

I don't get why you describe the non-profit Internet Society as a cash point in the headline. It's true that one of ISOC's sources of income is a contribution from the non-profit Public Interest Registry, that runs the .org TLD registry. (http://pir.org/about-us/) Can that be what you mean?

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US govt tells ICANN: No accountability, no keys to the internet

Yes Me
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Re: ICANN mismanagement and nepotism

Nepotism? Really? Who is related to whom, then? (Note: I am not challenging your use of 'mismanagement'.)

Also, you seem to have missed that most of current debate is exactly about accountability, and how to make ICANN accountable to the Internet community as a whole, instead of to an arm of the US Govt. In that context, it really doesn't matter whether the job is being done by *this* ICANN, or by some hypothetical future, and much more wonderful, ICANN version 2.

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Yes Me
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FAIL

Re: Is ICANN even needed ?

This line of argument is so wrong that I don't know how to begin.

1. IPv4 - it's true that this is now effectively entirely in the hands of the regional Internet registries (RIRs), or soon will be. But we still need a central registry of the space allocated to the RIRs and of the legacy allocations to non-RIR customers.

2. IPv6 - addresses are not allocated to countries, but to providers and major (provider-independent) sites, again by the RIRs. But we stiil need a central registry of the space allocated to the RIRs and the vast unallocated space.

3. "Assign the country designators (e.g .uk for the United Kingdom) to their governments to assign." Didn't you read the stress test scenario about Ukraine?

4. "Requests for new non-country designators could be handled by a small subgroup of the ITU." I think you will find that both ICANN and the vast majority of its supporters and detractors all agree that the worst possible solution would be the ITU.

5. You have ignored the fact that most of IANA's technical work, currently performed by the IANA team at ICANN, is the registration of protocol parameters.

BTW I think the set of stress test scenarios is really good work.

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While the web stares at cat pics, the glue of the internet is being shifted from US govt control

Yes Me
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Facepalm

Scope

The article doesn't underline that this proposal only covers *one* of the three legs of IANA's work: "IANA Naming Functions." That means, basically, DNS Top Level Domains. And the naming community - the people who actually make the DNS work for the rest of us - is suggesting that they themselves are best qualified to oversee this work. Better qualified, for example, than the United States Department of Commerce. Duh!

The other two legs (IP addressing, a.k.a. "Numbering", and protocol parameter registration, a.k.a. the IETF) are also busy working on their proposals.

Tip for Kieren: http://www.ietf.org/mail-archive/web/ianaplan/current/msg01400.html

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Feds dig up law from 1789 to demand Apple, Google decrypt smartphones, slabs

Yes Me
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Re: still have a backdoor though right?

I have checked RFC 3501 and all of the RFCs that update it, and none of them requires unencrypted text that I can see. So I think you are simply wrong about that.

It's true that S/MIME has never been much use, and even PGP is rarely used. But there's nothing to stop me sending encrypted text marked as text/plain; charset=UTF-8, which would work fine between consenting adults. Or Content-Transfer-Encoding: base64 if you prefer.

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'America radicalised me!' cries Megaupload founder Kim Dotcom

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Frau DotCom

"But later, Dotcom talked about how he’d transferred the shares for his new filesharing site Mega to his wife and children, saying he was “officially broke”, which could mean still actually quite rich, as long as he stays on good terms with the wife."

But they've split up. So he may actually be short of a penny.

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UK.gov mulls three-point turn on three-point turn thanks to satnav. Weeeeeeee. THUD

Yes Me
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Coffee/keyboard

Re: "Satnavs should not be relied upon,..."

And texting while walking on a crowded footpath should be part of the walking test, I suppose. Of all the cretinous ideas civil servants have come up with recently, this must be in the top ten.

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NetMundial 'rule-the-internet' ISC project gets grudging support of civil society

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Post a comment

Yawn.

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Global Commission on Internet Governance wobbles into IANA debate

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Elite group??

I think you should check the dictionary for 'elite' before applying it to these people. Also, the other people, who waffle about an oversight group for ICANN, have yet to explain why that would be any more effective than, say the Internet Governance Forum, the GCIG, the crashed-and-burned NetMundial Internet Security Council, etc., in overseeing ICANN's Board of Directors, who themselves are appointed by a multistakeholder process in the first place.

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GCHQ and Cable and Wireless teamed as Masters of the Internet™

Yes Me
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Re: Common knowledge at PK

It's actually been common knowledge since World War I that C&W was tapped by the signals intelligence agency of the day. Why on earth is anybody surprised? This story is 100 years old. Don't expect it to change any time soon.

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First Congress, now top govt watchdog digs into ICANN's internet grab

Yes Me
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Re: Hegemony once again

Afterthought:

> ... the Defending Internet Freedom Act has served to irritate large sections of the internet community [but] it has some merits.

Unfortunately it also has at least one major error that makes it pretty useless: it fails to recognise the large majority of IANA's work, which has nothing to do with domain names.

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Yes Me
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Paris Hilton

Hegemony once again

> To recap, domain-name system overseer ICANN is paid by the US government

Absolutely not - it's a zero cost contract, not one penny of US taxpayers' money is involved, and has not been since about 1998.

> American politicians claiming ownership of a global network that is run almost exclusively on private networks

Not to mention that, although the US DoD did fund ARPANET back in history, the idea of an internet (originally called a 'catenet') came from a Frenchman, Louis Pouzin, in 1974, and a very large part of the development of the Internet after TCP/IP became generally available in 1983 was done outside the USA.

Paris, 'cos that's where Louis Pouzin studied.

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'Internet Freedom Panel' to keep web overlord ICANN out of Russian hands – new proposal

Yes Me
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FAIL

Re: Independent?

What US politicians don't seem to understand is that their laws only affect the US. Since all this stuff, even ICANN, operate internationally anyway, Congress should simply be silent. I am told this bill has only the tiniest chance of success, fortunately.

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Internet Society slams online 'UN Security Council' plan, snubs permanent seat offer

Yes Me
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Re: ...must be done!

And of course it is all very closely related to Brazilian politics, Rousseff's desire to get back at the US Govt for eavesdropping her, mixed thinking about whether Snowden is a hero or a villain, and generally confused thinking. Good on the Internet Society for telling it like it is.

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EVERYTHING needs crypto says Internet Architecture Board

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Yes, Clipper was just about dead but key escrow was still on the rampage (as in "let the Government have a copy of your crypto keys, just in case we ever have an irresistible urge to read your stuff"). Also the criminal investigation of Phil Zimmerman was still ongoing when RFC 1984 was drafted.

What's new today is that data mining of massive amounts of plain text has become practicable in a way that wasn't anticipated in 1996.

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'Tech giants who encrypt comms are unwittingly aiding terrorists', claims ex-Home Sec Blunkett

Yes Me
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Re: Breathtaking

Read http://tools.ietf.org/html/rfc1984 again.

Then consider why, as far back as 1996, this type of reaction by the letter agencies and the politicos who listen to them was entirely expected. Nothing changes, Orwell was right.

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UN takeover of internet postponed indefinitely

Yes Me
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Re: We do not need to trust these people and we should not trust them.

Rubbish. Your IPv6 prefix identifies your house, just as your IPv4 address does. There's just no difference there. The IPv6 interface identifier no longer needs to be tied to your MAC address; in fact it can be random and varying. In any case, once they've found your house, it's game over.

(Tech ref: http://tools.ietf.org/html/rfc7136)

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Yes Me
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Re: Good and bad...

Mainly good though. If the ITU ever gets control, some things you don't like will get worse (governmental control makes spying easier; monopolistic administrations make price gouging easier) and some things you do like will get worse (geographical addressing reduces competition and makes national firewalls easier; central control makes routing less robust). Off hand, I can't think of anything that gets better. Certainly not security: it's the NSAs and GCHQs of this world that hate general use of end-to-end security the most, and they plus the totalitarian governments would block any moves in that direction via the ITU if they could.

Hats off to the democratic governments and the NGOs that have beaten back the totalitarian pressures once again. But don't relax; they'll be back.

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The Imitation Game: Bringing Alan Turing's classified life to light

Yes Me
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Re: Unsung?

P.S. The ACM Turing Award was first given out in 1966. Of course, then, Turing was mainly known for computability theory and AI. It was Randell who revealed him as a cryptanalyst and computing pioneer. And it was much more recently that he was celebrated for his work on morphology.

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Yes Me
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Happy

Unsung?

"unsung hero"? I'm mean I'm a Turing groupie and all, but he's been in the public eye since the Hodges biography came out in 1983. Or see Brian Randell, On Alan Turing and the Origins of Digital Computers, Machine Intelligence 7 (1972) for the earliest hints that I know of.

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IBM, backing away from hardware? NEVER!

Yes Me
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Linux was the future [was: Re: Funny how]

"Seriously, people are still plugging that article from over a decade ago in which an IBM software group (not hardware) executive said that Linux is the future. "

Steve Mills said it, but it was Irving Wladawsky-Berger who said it first, after a bunch of people in his Internet Division team told him about Linux. But there was never a strategy to devalue AIX in 2003, just to use Linux and other open source stuff like Apache where it was the right solution. So what has changed?

As for IBM becoming more and more a services company, that's been the transparent strategy for 15 years now. (As usual, look at HP to find out what IBM was doing ten years ago.)

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The future health of the internet comes down to ONE simple question…

Yes Me
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FAIL

Re: ITU

> What ever crazyness ITU might do, it won't be as bad as ICANN

I think you have very little experience with the ITU. As I just said in another comment, many ITU voting members (telco administrations) actually hate the Internet, wish it had never happened, and would prefer it to go away. Some ITU officials, up to a very high level, wilfully misunderstand Internet technology.

Whatever craziness ICANN might do, it won't be as bad as ITU.

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Yes Me
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Re: Do we still need ICANN ?

1. IPv4 address blocks are already treated as property, so that train left the station some time ago.

2. The Internet doesn't use geographical routing, so national allocations of IPv6 space is a non-starter (first proposed by the ITU, if you need any more proof that it's a bad idea and that the ITU doesn't understand the Internet). ICANN doesn't do the detailed work on IP addresses allocations anyway; that's done by the Regional Internet Registries.

3. The ITU doesn't understand the Internet, and many ITU members secretly hate the Internet. Whatever faults ICANN has, it does understand the Internet.

4. ICANN also manages Top Level Domain policy. Somebody has to.

5. ICANN hosts IANA, and IANA manages protocol parameters for the IETF.

So, yes, we need ICANN and if it didn't exist we would have to invent it.

Finally, why would any supervisory body "above" the ICANN Board not fall into the same mode of behaviour that people object to in the ICANN Board? If there's a problem, it's recursive. (Check how the ICANN Board members are appointed. They come from the exact same organisations that would populate any such supervisory body anyway.)

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Time to test your sarcasm detectors: It's the UN's global comms shakeup extravaganza!

Yes Me
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Paris Hilton

Re: Thanks El Reg for the update.

Yes, there is the question of the many fine lunches and dinners. Unfortunately though there is the usual risk at any ITU beanfast, and especially at the plenipot, that they will accidentally vote something really harmful. And since only national telco "administrations" get to vote, all that the rest of the world can do is lobby and hope. See this link and be very, very frightened:

http://www.internetsociety.org/sites/default/files/ITU%20PP14%20Issues%20Matrix%20October%2016.pdf

Paris, 'cos I'm sure Hilton does very well out of this meeting...

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In the next four weeks, 100 people will decide the future of the web

Yes Me
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Could I be serious for a moment?

1) Kieran wrote: "This time next year, it will finally happen." No, this time next year it *might* finally happen. If the US Govt doesn't like the proposals that are made, or if certain Congressional factions get their way, the Government contract with ICANN will just be extended again.

2) The process for preparing proposals is by no means limited to 100 people. The IANA Stewardship Transition Coordination Group (ICG) has solicited proposals from the naming (DNS), numbering (regional Internet registries) and protocol parameters (IETF) communities and several gazillion people, including the usual loonies, have been part of the multiple resulting discussions.

Kieran was referring to only one of the inputs to the ICG.

All about the ICG: https://www.icann.org/stewardship/coordination-group

Its charter:

https://www.icann.org/en/system/files/files/charter-icg-27aug14-en.pdf

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Satya Nadella's $84.3m pay packet: Did he use the 'female superpower' to get it?

Yes Me
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Re: Depressing

Just an employee who knows that the more they pay uppity underlingettes, the less cash is left for his bonus. So it's better if the underlingettes keep quiet.

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Reg man has the cure for IBM storage: Just swallow 10 firms

Yes Me
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Coat

Old story [was IBM Cures]

> IBM has a lot of very smart people who would love to dominate this market but they cannot develop without funding.

Sorry but IBM has messed up this market for years. Killing AFS (twice). Utter waste of resources on DFS. Ignoring NFS. HPSS. StorageTank. Bringing GPFS to the fore ten years too late. Frankly, unless the corporate culture in the storage area (that there must be One True Blue Solution and the rest of the industry has everything wrong) has undergone a dramatic change (other than utter demoralisation which I assume continues) I don't see anything getting better.

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World govts elect Swiss big cheese as their new ICANN point man

Yes Me
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Re: Nothing good seems at all likely...

Oh? So it's bad to have someone from a small neutral country with a competitive telco market and a long record in Internetery chairing the Government Advisory Cttee? Seems to me there would be many much worse choices, given that the GAC exists at all.

My own cheesy comment is that the GAC has, fortunately, had very little impact on ICANN one way or another, and long may this continue.

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Sir Tim Berners-Lee defends decision not to bake security into www

Yes Me
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Re: HTTP or HTML?

> I'm certain that Tim invented HTML (I was with him at CERN)

And I'm certain that Tim and Robert Cailliau invented HTML together (I worked at CERN too and knew them both well). At the time, CERN's "official" text formatting method was IBM's SGML/Bookmaster so we were all familiar with <angle/> brackets already. Tim was familiar with a markup language that Robert had designed some years earlier.

HTTP was mainly Tim, I believe (essentially it started as a fairly quick hack on top of Telnet).

See the book: How the Web was Born, James Gillies and Robert Cailliau, OUP, 2000.

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Dot-gay told it's NOT gay enough – but web'll be officially .eco-friendly

Yes Me
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Re: why is using alt dns stupid?

Because that way lies a fragmented network with some people arbitrarily cut off. Why do you think China runs an alternative root? Because it prevents global connectivity, of course.

I don't approve of the pointless extension of gTLDs; never have done and never will. But if new TLDs exist, I absolutely need to see them as a seamless part of the *the* Internet. Otherwise, it isn't the Internet at all.

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Yes Me
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What's wrong with .us, apart from the fact that the USA has lamentably failed to make good use of it? There are some perfectly valid domains in there with legit mail users (I have friends/colleagues with addresses in ca.us, ma.us, va.us, and chicago.il.us).

.me is being exploited, but how can you arbitrarily block all email from legitimate users in Montenegro?

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Meg Whitman: The lady IS for TURNING. HP to lob printers'n'PCs OVERBOARD

Yes Me
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Facepalm

Re: I think this is a cunning plan

Nah, it's the same plan as always: copy IBM strategy, but several years too late.

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'Encryption will make life very easy for criminals and terrorists'

Yes Me
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Coffee/keyboard

It's clear to all

"Irreversible encryption will make it very difficult — maybe even impossible — for law enforcement to obtain evidence, and I am not sure this reality is clear to all."

Yes it is, thanks. Actually, that's the point. It's even more clear in countries with authoritarian regimes and not even the tattered remains of the Magna Carta that we have in the US and UK.

Apparently the AG never read http://tools.ietf.org/html/rfc1984

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PEAK IPV4? Global IPv6 traffic is growing, DDoS dying, says Akamai

Yes Me
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Re: Not really a dumb question

Um, it's a bit more complicated than that. The techniques that site seems to be discussing (Teredo and 6to4) are pretty much obsolete - they were useful a few years ago when very few ISPs supported IPv6, but today you should really scream at your ISP that you want native IPv6 support. That would apply whether you are a domestic user or an enterprise customer.

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Yes Me
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Go

Not isolated

> I thought that IPv6 networks were completely isolated from the IPv4

Er, no, that would have been a silly plan. The actual plan was that every ISP would go dual-stack (IPv6 and IPv4 on the same wires and boxes). That works -- it's what many ISPs do already -- but for some it appears more expensive than going straight to IPv6 and supporting legacy IPv4 by tunnelling or translation. What is sad is the number of ISPs who are now being left behind -- most of the UK, for example. What's even sadder is major players who are only accessible by legacy IPv4: shame on the BBC, and even more shame on Vulture Central.

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US stakes out 'net battleground ahead of ITU meeting

Yes Me
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Facepalm

Re: US is right, unluckily it can't sustain its position after the NSA debacle.

Yes it can, assuming the people at the other side of the table are capable of holding two ideas in their head at the same time:

1. USA was wrong to let the NSA act illegally.

2. USA is right to argue against governmental control of the Internet.

Idea 1 is of course a very strong argument in support of idea 2.

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Huawei prez: A one-speed internet is bad for everyone

Yes Me
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Re: The difference is not traffic priority....

The trouble is, that quote from RFC 791 has been obsolete since RFC 2474 in 1998. That RFC is called "Definition of the Differentiated Services Field (DS Field) in the IPv4 and IPv6 Headers" and its whole point is indeed what Huawei says: give different types of traffic a service level that suits that traffic. And it isn't about precedence (or priority) - it's about delivering an audio stream with low jitter while competing with a background download, for example. And yes, horror of horrors, some services might cost more than others.

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Swiss cops BAN MASKS at meeting of rebellious United Nations IP staff

Yes Me
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Re: Wait a sec, that's Geneva

When they are outside WIPO's site they are subject to Swiss law, except in the course of their duties as international civil servants. otoh, the Geneva police are always very careful when dealing with internationals, because they know where Geneva's bread and butter comes from. What is more important is whether WIPO is indeed riding roughshod over their staff's rights, and that's very hard to judge from outside. For the staff to appeal directly to the member states is par for the course.

btw most NGOs in Geneva are *not* tax-exempt. The UN treaty organisations and CERN are generally tax-exempt, so that the tax payers of other countries do not effectively subsidise the tax payers of Geneva. Salaries are supposed to be calculated allowing for the absence of income tax.

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Troll hunter Rackspace turns Rotatable's bizarro patent to stone

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Happy

Excellent! What else is there to say?

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'Speargun' program is fantasy, says cable operator

Yes Me
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Re: They are probably right

Especially since allegation was that the taps are in Auckland and at a location north of Auckland, whereas the S Cross cables enter the water at two different locations. Who wants to tap the whole fibre anyway? A few DAGs in the equipment racks are what you need.

However, the PM's defence that NZ doesn't have the capability of analysing a tap rings true. Most likely the relevant taps are at the other ends of the cables. That they exist somewhere is pretty much obvious.

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DEATH TO TCP/IP cry Cisco, Intel, US gov and boffins galore

Yes Me
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Yes, you could be wrong...

> if this happens i can see IPv6 never taking off

I think you're wrong for 2 reasons:

1) IPv6 has actually taken off in the last year or so. Just because you don't see it on *your* screen doesn't mean it's not there and growing fast.

2) NDN is a completely different and *much* more radical change; it won't have any impact on the need for ever more layer 3 addresses, and if it takes off outside the academic world (which is a *big* if) it will co-exist with the non-NDN network for, at a conservative guess, 25 years or more. By which time you will either be using IPv6 or runnning everything via 4 layers of NAT44.

Don't misunderstand me; I think NDN is a very cool design (and not even remotely comparable to OSI) but it's too radical a change to have an easy start.

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NZ Justice Minister scalped as hacker leaks emails

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Happy

Re: Could he consider

On the other hand, if Cam Slater was in the UK, we wouldn't have to deal with his biased selection of stories here. The whole thing is quite funny though: a left-wing conspiracy (alleged) outing a right-wing conspiracy (alleged) using (alleged) hacked emails, tweets and FB postings. The good news for the (alleged) left-wing conspiracy is that in the last few days, the Teflon (TM) coating on the Prime Minister John Key has been visibly flaking. The election might even be interesting as a result.

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We need less U.S. in our WWW – Euro digital chief Steelie Neelie

Yes Me
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WTF?

Please justify your statements with facts

"The US has recently asserted their control over the .com .org and .net domains in several court cases."

Can you please give specific citations to prove this statement?

"So I don't see ICANN's role changing much."

Since NTIA has specifically said that it wants to drop its existing contract with ICANN next year, there is certainly a good chance of significant change in ICANN's chain of accountability. And its role is mainly independent of its agreement with NTIA anyway.

"There are also agreements in place which guarantee continued US government involvement."

Again, please give specific citations.

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Oz metadata proposal: no to IP addresses, yes to MAC address logging

Yes Me
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Re: Call me naive, but ...

It certainly means you're grabbing data from an ARP cache, a neighbour discovery cache, or something in the DSLAM etc. In other words you are poking around much closer to the target machine than the normal Snowden-style snooping. Or it means that they have no idea what they're talking about....

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Why has the web gone to hell? Market chaos and HUMAN NATURE

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Stop

Thank the Democrats

"This still leaves us with plenty of room to argue about state or planned involvement in basic technology, in the funding and finding of inventions. These can be helpful, but we crucially need to have that market bit as well: we might be able to do without the state part in invention but we simply cannot do without the market part in innovation."

The reason there's a market in this case is because the US Govt, in the shape of the Clinton Administration, notably V.P. Al Gore and Ira Magaziner, took explicit steps to open the Internet up as a competitive space in 1995. It didn't happen spontaneously or by chance. The "state part" was essential. (And if the web hadn't come along when it did, some other form of information infrastructure would have filled the same role. Technology details aren't really essential.)

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