Feeds

* Posts by Ian Michael Gumby

2315 posts • joined 11 Apr 2006

Internet-of-stuff startup dumps NoSQL for ... SQL?

Ian Michael Gumby
Silver badge

Meh.

At the scale they are talking about Mongo shouldn't have had a problem.

Their problem? Using a tech because its the latest hot buzzword without understanding the basics of the technology.

There's nothing wrong with a relational engine. But you need to make sure your problem fits in to the relational model.

In NoSQL, you need to think more in terms of a hierarchical model and not many people understand this.

7
1

OpenSSL Heartbleed: Bloody nose for open-source bleeding hearts

Ian Michael Gumby
Silver badge

@Gene Cash

You must not be very experienced.

Look, there are some very good people writing very good code, however, that's a very small subset of all of the code that is being tossed out in to the public.

Then you have Apache were depending on the project, visibility and money tossed behind it... YMMV.

1
0

Oracle smacks JD Edwards help site with cease and desist order

Ian Michael Gumby
Silver badge

@Dutch Re: You are looking at it from the wrong perspective....

Not confusing anything. Oracle is making both arguments in their cases. Not to mention that they have sued to shut down other support sites.

I'm not judging Oracle only saying is that their actions may not be 'evil' but more than likely guided by the bigger picture.

0
0
Ian Michael Gumby
Silver badge

You are looking at it from the wrong perspective....

The issue isn't so much JD Edwards... but that if they let the site exist, it weakens the argument that they are using in their lawsuit. So the have to take an even heavy hand to all perceived threats to IP.

After all, there is a lot... a really big pot of money on the table.

The license fee argument would be Oracle going after chump change.

1
2

Samsung's thumb-achingly ENORMO Galaxy Note Pro 12.2

Ian Michael Gumby
Silver badge

Meh, Apple has them beat.

Why stop at 12" ?

Apple is rumored to be sourcing 65" panels.

Now that would be awsome except that it would be hard to fit in to your back pocket or backpack...

0
0

Rumour: Next Apple iThing to feature 65-inch screen. Four-limb multitouch, anyone?

Ian Michael Gumby
Silver badge

Re: It's just a 4k screen

If Apple can corner the market on 4K or 8K screens, they will have a leg up.

Its not just resolution but the material behind the pixel (LED vs OLED)

0
0

LaCie bigs up 2big, 5big, 8big... WHOMP: Lands big data on your desk

Ian Michael Gumby
Silver badge

Re: amateur option but...

Raid 10?

But you need 4 drives.

If you're going with LaCie, you will want to use raid.

0
0

How much data must you have before you need Cleversafe? If you have to ask ...

Ian Michael Gumby
Silver badge

Chicago?

You have UIC (University of Illinois, Chicago Campus) UC (University of Chicago)

Depaul, Northwestern, Illinois Institute of Technology, among others.

It could have been either IIT or UIC.

0
0

Intel just installed itself in Hadoop guru Cloudera – and why their rivals should be worried

Ian Michael Gumby
Silver badge

@AC ...Re: MapR

While you're an informed consumer who chose MapR, I do need to point out something.

MapR's FS is proprietary. Its not open. It does however support the open source HDFS APIs so that anyone can write and port their stuff to the MapR environment and MapR will run all of the Hadoop products on top of their cluster. So if you want Impala and Tez, you can do it. Don't ask Horton or Cloudera to do that. ;-)

While that's a small nit, its an important one. Horton and Cloudera have made marketing campaigns against MapR because of this. That was, until they partnered with Wandisco to do HA.

MapR built a better mousetrap. I agree that anyone who wants a commercial grade product to look at MapR, however they are not without their faults. They may have a superior product, but that doesn't guarantee them success. (See Informix). Oracle won out because they had better marketing and sales. Not a better product.

MapR also trounced the benchmarks on Cisco kit. While its public knowledge... its not a well marketed message.

I am Hadoop vendor agnostic and I do see things that I like in all of the three major vendors. (As much as I see things that I don't like....)

And yes, I've built solutions on top of the three main vendors. ;-)

0
0
Ian Michael Gumby
Silver badge

@jkestelyn

Back in the 90's ORDBMs was all the craze.

Phil White bought Illustra and thought it would be easy to integrate it in. Rather than manage investor's expectations... He cooked the books. Pretty much killed the company.

It took Informix 5 years to recover and integrate ORDBMS in to the product as datablades. Oracle countered as did IBM with their add ons.

Nobody used them because they were complete and utter garbage. But they existed well enough to be a check off in terms of marketing and sales.

So to say Apache has HA, that's not the case. If it were, then why does Cloudera and Hortonworks partner with Wandisco?

I'm not suggesting that Wandisco is a bad product, its not. Its a very interesting product.

But what I am suggesting is that you need to do your homework before you make statements when the market data doesn't match what you're saying. ;-)

BTW, Illustra was a Stonebraker company. Mike Olson worked for him and was part of the company. This was before he did his other companies. Just thought I'd toss in that little fact to tie this all back together.

0
0

Apple patent will see Siri remind you to keep taking your meds

Ian Michael Gumby
Silver badge

The scary part...

They are filing a patent.

It's not patentable because the concept isn't new or novel.

The sad thing is that it will be patented....

12
0

Seattle pops a cap in Uber and Lyft: Rideshare bizs get 150-driver limit

Ian Michael Gumby
Silver badge

Re: Never quite so black and white

No wonder you post anon.

You make sweeping generalizations.

Poor people don't take cabs. they take public transportation.

0
0
Ian Michael Gumby
Silver badge

@ Stu Re: @Ian Michael Gumby

That wasn't the point of my comment.

The truth is that 150 doesn't do anything but try and find a compromise.

I dont agree with their position, because I believer the number should be 0.

As I stated in my post. Uber doesn't carry the right type of insurance, nor do their drivers.

By law, you must be insured in order to drive a car. I believe this liability insurance is required in all 50 states. (It is in IL. Uninsured drivers get arrested.)

But the personal insurance is not the same as commercial insurance.

Ask yourself why cities limit the number of tokens/ medallions in a city to taxi services.

And then there are car livery services...

0
0
Ian Michael Gumby
Silver badge

@frank-lee Re: Shocking! and stealing/pirating

No,

The analogy doesn't suggest that at all.

You want to get from point A to point B you have a set of options:

1) Walk

2) Ride a bike

3) Get a friend to drive

4) Public transportation

5) Taxi

6) Hired Car Service / Limo

7) Fractional rental cars (aka Zip Cars)

8) Rental cars (Hertz, Avis, etc ...)

9) Lease

10) Own a car

You are free to choose your mode of transportation.

You choose to take the taxi, you're not their property. They however, have a legal obligation to get you from point A to point B in a safe and lawful manner for which they collect a fare.

They are providing you a service. Not sure how you feel that you're a slave.

1
0
Ian Michael Gumby
Silver badge

@Future... Re: @ Dave ..The same-old same-old

I'm a bit older than the average reader... ;-)

It isn't just the driver rating system. I mean there are checks on regular cabbies and many on further inspection some of them should never be driving.

The strongest argument against Uber is the insurance and liability.

That accident did happen and while we haven't seen the end of it, I'll wager the driver is going to end up filing for bankruptcy because he couldn't afford to pay the family's medical bills. They will most likely sue Uber and win or get Uber to settle quietly, putting a gag order on the family.

Since Uber is still private, they wouldn't have to disclose how much they paid to settle lawsuits arising from accidents, or even report the number of accidents.

0
1
Ian Michael Gumby
Silver badge

Re: Shocking!

Actually change the third to be steal their IP not pirate.

So a company writes an app to do X, and Company B copies the app and sells it for a fraction of the price.

1
6
Ian Michael Gumby
Silver badge

@ Dave ..Re: The same-old same-old

No, this is not exactly a protectionist thing.

1:tax revenue, for one. Uber and company don't pay taxes like taxis.

2: safety.

Uber and company do not carry the proper insurance that professionals (limo, taxi, etc) must carry. Drivers may/may not have commercial license. Cars aren't inspected.

That's a big thing.

A driver hit pedestrians in a sidewalk. He wasn't paying attention and was instead looking at app to find his next fare. Uber... No coverage because there was no fare in car at the time of accident. His insurance? No coverage because he was moonlighting as a gypsy cab. Read commercial use voids non-commercial insurance. Who loses? Pedestrians who did nothing wrong, driver for being a dumb Schmuck for trying to make a quick buck.

Not to mention that uber's insurance probably won't pay out because it only pays after driver's insurance pays. Driver's insurance doesn't pay, then Uber is off the hook.

3: No recourse for passenger if something goes wrong. I'll leave it up to your imagination...

And to top it off... Not really a disruptive innovation.

Radio car service... Oh I press a button on a phone instead of dialing?

And I used the term Gypsy Cab? Been around for years.

Taxes?

It's what pays for the services you take for granted. Think of the infrastructure projects that could be done if the trillion dollars hid offshore (legally) if apple and company paid their taxes that they would owe on the profits they made over the years.

9
6

Chinese boffins ginger up Hadoop with OpenFlow funnel

Ian Michael Gumby
Silver badge

Meh.

Its a solution looking for a problem.

In terms of 'Big Data' aka Hadoop, you don't have a bandwidth issue.

Your cluster is homogenous on the internal corporate network and is isolated as much as possible.

If you're running your own data center and are running hadoop, you should have layer 2 VLAN capability as well as high speed switches.

Sorry, but if you're going to be spending millions on a Hadoop solution... (think hundreds of nodes), you're going to be spending $$$ on real ToR switches and serious networking hardware.

Of course, you'll see FB doing something stupid spending $$$ to save $.

0
0

Watch the MIT MER-BOT – half droid, half soft 'fish' – swim by itself

Ian Michael Gumby
Silver badge

Meh Re: Biology

Didn't you pay attention when you watched Futurama?

Just ask Fry about Lucy Liu ... ;-)

0
1

Facebook's Zuckerberg buttonholes Obama, rages against NSA dragnet spying

Ian Michael Gumby
Silver badge

@MonkeyScrabble... Re: A translation

When you're worth billions, you can be a big donor to the DNC's pockets.

Money talks, so they say...

0
0
Ian Michael Gumby
Silver badge

@G E Re: Although

"You can largely avoid Farcebook if you choose to. No such luck with GCHQ/NSA"

Actually you can't.

Nor Google. Unless you want to act like Stallman who doesn't use his own PC on the internet, goes to 'public' PCs at MIT, and tires to hide who he is at all times.

The issue is that even if you go to these extremes, you can't hide from FB or Google.

You have friends, right?

If they use Google or FB, and have any of your contact information... they know who you are.

You would be surprised at how much information that these companies capture, regardless of your precautions and saying no thank you.

You want to get out, you can't. They slurp everything. Every microbe of your digital footprint, no matter how small.

0
0

Five unbelievable headlines that claim Tim Berners-Lee 'INVENTED the INTERNET'

Ian Michael Gumby
Silver badge

Yes, fear the wrath of Al Gore! Re: Idiots

It won't actually be Al Gore, but his publicist who will contact you and correct your misconception.

The funny thing is that Al Gore claimed to have sponsored the bill that gave money to DARPA to fund the R&D for the internet. If memory serves... I don't believe he was the bill's sponsor but a co-sponsor...

(A bit of a big difference.)

1
1

Intel and pals whip out 1.6Tbit/s cable: Come on baby, light my fibre

Ian Michael Gumby
Silver badge
Thumb Up

Disruptive tech

Unfortunately, its going to take a lot for this to catch on...

What it potentially does is reduce the network as the bottleneck within the data center.

It should drive changes in the Open Compute project, and force a major re-think on computer design.

Those low powered chips aren't going to cut it in the near future.

0
0

Google's mystery barge flounces out of San Fran, heads to Stockton

Ian Michael Gumby
Silver badge

Re: The Barge is...

Offshore data center?

Ok, so how fast can you pump data in to it?

Is microwave fast as fiber?

0
0

Dell charges £16 TO INSTALL FIREFOX on PCs – Mozilla is miffed

Ian Michael Gumby
Silver badge
Pint

Mozilla is going to have a rough time with it...

Q8: I want to distribute (outside my organization) executable programs or libraries that I have compiled from someone else's unchanged MPL-licensed source code, either standalone or part of a larger work. What do I have to do?

You must inform the recipients where they can get the source for the MPLed code in the executable program or library you are distributing (i.e., you must comply with Section 3.2). You may distribute any executables you create under a license of your choosing, as long as that license does not interfere with the recipients' rights to the source under the terms of the MPL.

This is from the Mozilla web site.

While what Dell is doing seems like a rip off.... It doesn't appear, at first blush, to be against the law or against the Mozilla License.

I too used to charge beers for helping friends, but I no longer drink and while my friends are mad.. my liver thanks me. :-)

7
0

IBM's megabrain Watson to make mobe, slab apps smarter? Not so fast

Ian Michael Gumby
Silver badge

@Andrue Re: If IBM was smart...

Yeah... I think when you get to The cat who could walk through walls you hit the end.

And yes, if memory serves it was Fear no Evil however, it does provoke some thought about what if you could do a brain transplant.

I also do agree that Niven is a better read, however totally different and deals with more physics instead some of the social issues or questioned raised by Heinlein. Heinlein seemed more into Hippie movement.

A lot of the Sci-Fi Fantasy was written as a way to discuss social issues that could have been considered 'taboo'.

0
0
Ian Michael Gumby
Silver badge
Boffin

Re: If IBM was smart...

Typical marketing hack didn't get the reference.

In terms of 'hero who could do no wrong' that would be more L. Ron Hubbard 's style which plays in to his Scientology stuff. (You can replace stuff with harsher words if you'd like. I was focusing on the author's literary skills.)

In L. Ron Hubbard, the protagonist is the perfect Uber Mench. Always right, can do no wrong. I would say its probably due to his growing up on movie serials where the hero is alwasy a hero and has no flaws.

Robert A. Heinlein's main characters aren't perfect and do have some 'morale' flaws. But they tend to be smarter than the average bear, able to figure things out ahead of the rest of the crew, of course they do have help from friends. More of an adventure series but again the hero isn't flawed like today's Batman and others. (Choose a character out of Gibson's novels.)

To your point, I guess one could do a masters and even a PhD on the evolution of science fiction writers and their protagonists. But what do I know? ENG meant college of Engineering and not English. Although the only English class I ever got an A in was intro to Science Fiction.

1
0
Ian Michael Gumby
Silver badge

If IBM was smart...

They would rename the machine from Watson to Mike.

1
0

Bitcoin bank Flexcoin pulls plug after cyber-robbers nick $610,000

Ian Michael Gumby
Silver badge

Re: I'm telling ya..

But which state?

2
0

Data Centre World: It's hard work cooling off those hot racks

Ian Michael Gumby
Silver badge

What no bio fuel?

Yeah, power those cooling generators using Sage grass churned into bio fuel.

And build your data center to take advantage of the earth's thermal properties along with some basic science... like using a tall hollow tower and vents down below to help create natural drafts and air flow to help remove waste heat.

0
0

Traditional RAID is outdated and dying on its feet

Ian Michael Gumby
Silver badge

Meh!

IBM is old news ...

You want a distributed file system... talk to Cleverssafe.

0
2

Anti Gmail data-mining lawsuit hits possible stumbling block

Ian Michael Gumby
Silver badge

@James ... Re: Log analysis

"Google has argued that the identity of any non-Gmail users can only be found out if someone goes through all the non-Gmail users whose addresses are on file in its systems and then sifts through the responses - a Sisyphean task that would be totally unworkable."

You didn't include the whole text.

To your point... yes Google can do it as can anyone who has a large enough cluster of machines.

You can even run a k means clustering algo to see patterns of who talks with who. Both internal and external to Google's Gmail services.

As to the case's merits, it has enough to go forward.

Its going to be interesting because of the edu addresses.

If Google didn't harvest info from the EDU group... then their practice of spying on everyone would be saved until another lawsuit.

1
0
Ian Michael Gumby
Silver badge

Re: Lucy Koh again

Sure, but the judge you get is going to be based on the court (district) where you raise the case and where the judge sits in the queue and gets the lawsuit.

0
0

Google Glass: Reg man tests tech specs

Ian Michael Gumby
Silver badge
Coat

@Jake Re: Lexical extension

"Glasticle" is sexist.

There are women in IT. ;-)

But then again, if Bikini Babe Kate Upton was walking down the street in a sexy outfit, wearing a pair of Google Glass, what would you call her?

Or rather more to the point, would you even notice that she was wearing a pair of glasses?

(and on that note. I am being sexist! But did you see the vid of her in the Vomit Comet?)

1
1

Dropbox erects sueball shield with new T&C and privacy legalese

Ian Michael Gumby
Silver badge

@ hammarbtyp Re: Law is a mystery to me

Barring class actions is a double bladed sword.

While the judgements against the company will be smaller, the fact is that if enough of the smaller cases win, then the odds of later cases winning will be greater and evidence from an earlier case will be available for the other lawyers to use.

The downside with class actions is that only the lawyers win. They get the big payday.

Trying to force arbitration is also not a bad thing.

What's interesting is the following... looking at what their product does... why would they take this draconian position?

I mean what could happen that would force a class action lawsuit against them?

0
0

Software needs meaty cores, not thin, stringy ARMs, says Intel

Ian Michael Gumby
Silver badge

Re: Rubbish

Can you say Hadoop? (Cloudera,Hortonworks, MapR, Intel, IBM , Pivotal(EMC)) all have distros

Can you say Cassandra?

Can you say Accumulo?

Can you say Mesos?

The list goes on...

2
1
Ian Michael Gumby
Silver badge
Boffin

@Trevor Pott

Maybe its because your work load is lame and not CPU intensive? :-P

To your point, when the Intel talking head says:

"Intel has offered another reason it doesn't think ARM processors pose an enormous threat to its high-end chip business: software isn't written to run across multiple CPUs."

I guess he hasn't heard about this thing called Hadoop? (There's more , but if you don't grok Hadoop then you probably don't know anything about Mesos and spark)

CPUs can be the bottleneck depending on what you are doing.

And yes, memory and disk are the major bottleneck today...

1
0

Ghostwriter: Assange™ is NARCISSISTIC and UNTRUTHFUL

Ian Michael Gumby
Silver badge

@Tromos Re: That's who you need @Ian Michael Gumby

So far he's been a prat but not a felon in Ecuador.

Jumping bail and the pending rape charges will get him booted from the UK and Sweden.

It could spread and make him an undesirable in several other countries as well.

We see celebs who have had drug convictions in the past... (US convictions) be turned away from Japan and the UK. So I could imagine he could be banned from a lot of countries when the dust settles.

Based on the author's comments, I would wager the saddest thing for Julian would be to be sent to the boonies in Australia and no one gave a damn. He wants to be the center of attention but his 15 minutes of fame are long gone. If he had been more mature, he could have at least milked it like a Kardashian...

3
0
Ian Michael Gumby
Silver badge

@Adrian, Re: Don't be distracted

"What about the snivelling excuses for government that murdered people and tried to cover it up ?"

Uhm which government are you talking about?

There are so many to choose from.

Egypt, Libya, Syria, Iraq, Iran, North Korea, Viet Nam, Cambodia, Japan, Germany, Russia among others.

I'm sure if we wanted to, we could accuse Great Britain of it as well.

4
0
Ian Michael Gumby
Silver badge

@Sebastian Re: Character assassination doesn't change anything

Dumping data en masse and taken out of context doesn't help anything.

Egypt is still a mess and if you had to ask the Egyptian people of they felt that they were better off today than when under Mubarak, what do you think they would say?

Honestly, I don't know the answer to that...

4
0
Ian Michael Gumby
Silver badge

@Psyx Re: Wow

I have to agree that its attention seeking...

The interesting thing from the article is that Assange didn't want to talk about his own personal life, yet wanted a world with no secrets.

I think that what the author wrote makes one want to feel sorry for Assange. There's a reason why he doesn't want to open up about his home life and his childhood. His mum was paranoid and either its an inherited trait, or a learned behavior. (Or Both)

The dude is royal messed in the head. He seems like he comes out of a Dostoyevsky novel.

He justified his alleged 'rape' of women, in fact how he treats women.

There's more, but you get the idea.

If he were smart, he'd go to Sweden. Maybe while in jail he can start to get therapy. Of course he would first have to admit he has a problem... but that won't happen.

6
0
Ian Michael Gumby
Silver badge

Re: That's who you need @hollerith

"No give him a fair trial for breach of bail conditions and apply proper legal process (probably already done) between UK and Sweden and send him back to the Swedish justice system to process as appropriate. Even dickheads get fair trials."

No trial in the UK.

He's caught... he goes to jail then cuffed as he's carted off to Sweden where he then goes in for his formal questioning, faces charges, then off to jail to await trial. (Ya think they'd be dumb enough to give him bail? That's never going to happen.)

After the shit in Sweden is done, then maybe... he might come back to the UK to face the bail jumping charges. Then back on a play to Australia... after that.. who knows. Maybe he could then apply for asylum in Ecuador, get a Ecuadorian passport and leave Australia before someone else wants to extradite him.

Unlike Snowden, Assange has been documented to be a royal prick to deal with. We have a couple editors from real journalistic newspapers that can confirm this.

One thing for sure, when this is all said and done... Julian will never be allowed back in to the UK or Sweden....

9
0

Q: Just why are AT&T, banks snubbing kit from Cisco & co? A: Control

Ian Michael Gumby
Silver badge

A problem in the making...

Ok,

I'm not a Cisco fanboi or Cisco bigot.

But when we see these 'cut rate' programs get implemented to save money, they usually end up costing more in the long run.

I don't disagree that there are other kit manufacturers that are just as good and in some cases better than Cisco, however... the policy of just going to the lower cost provider opens the door to dodgy kit.

Its not Cisco, but the process.

While you may end up saving money on hardware. You may end up losing elsewhere. In terms of capabilities and training and support costs.

Just putting it out there... stop the madness of the bean counters. Focus on the QoS first.

7
1

Toshiba new HG6 range REVEALS slimmest SSD module you can buy

Ian Michael Gumby
Silver badge

Re: Ram size matters

I don't why you posted Anon...

But bang on... What's the point of thinner drives if the drive form factor is the same for all drives?

I agree the trend is to move towards RRAM and SSDs to get rid of the spinning rust.

We see this trend, but we don't see the cost dropping or density increasing as quickly as it could.

0
0

IBM gobbles CIA-backed NoSQL database upstart Cloudant

Ian Michael Gumby
Silver badge
Devil

Re: Even stranger...

Wow... smells of Mike Olson and selling his companies to Larry Ellison... ;-)

Yet another product in the Information Management pillar to help make the message even more 'cloudier' and not in a good way. ;-)

0
0
Ian Michael Gumby
Silver badge
Boffin

Funny... JSON fiddling...

The weird thing is that they (IBM) already has JSON stuff baked in to their IDS (Informix) Engine already. Not as a datablade, but as part of the query language itself. (Or so I am informed.)

Not sure why they bought Cloudant, but then again, IBM has been doing some peculiar things of late...

0
0

Harvard student thrown off 14,000-core super ... for mining Dogecoin

Ian Michael Gumby
Silver badge
Devil

@Don Jefe ... Re: Big fat juicy target

I responded to your earlier comment.

Its not alumni money, but grant money.

And that's the thing.

You lose grant money sources, there goes your R&D and then your researchers and then the school slowly goes down the drain. However this is 'Harvard' we're talking about where the students have more money than common sense.

2
0
Ian Michael Gumby
Silver badge
Boffin

Re: Even the smart ones

Book smarts vs Street smarts? ;-)

Yes, you can be book smart, yet lack common sense.

You could also be a sociopath.

Maybe he should have read "Crime and Punishment" ? Or is that no longer required reading your senior year in High School?

1
0
Ian Michael Gumby
Silver badge

@Don Jafe Re: A++?

Do you know what happens when you get funds for non-profit, or 'not for profit' research grants, than then get diverted to 'for profit' activities?

Depending on where the money came from... it goes away.

Then there's the damage to your reputation.

Then there's the issue of theft.

The student was guilty of theft of services.

At 'Hah vahrd' there is still a concept of an honor code. This act would have been a violation of said honor code.

The point is that the student either didn't give a rat's ass about the consequences or didn't stop to think about the consequences.

I think he should have read more William Gibson.

7
0

Winklevoss twins flash their Winkdex at Bitcoin price-trackers

Ian Michael Gumby
Silver badge

Sniff.

I smell an opportunity for arbitrage.

0
0