* Posts by Ian Michael Gumby

2495 posts • joined 11 Apr 2006

IBM jobs axe: 'The cuts have STARTED and are spreading' sigh staff

Ian Michael Gumby
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Re: Doesn't work that way...

Depend on the package, role and division.

I was in S&D where if you quit, you could come back. If you took a package, you were gone and couldn't come back. But if you took a package, and went to work for a company IBM bought, you were allowed back in.

Learned a lot from my time within the Borg. Some good, some bad...

But life truly is better outside the Borg.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Doesn't work that way...

If you opt to take a package... you're no longer allowed back in.

Speaking of which... anyone who's escaped the borg... why would they want to go back unless they are mentally ill or challenged.

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FCC will vote to cut off 41 million broadband users this Thursday*

Ian Michael Gumby
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Thumb Up

This actually a good thing...

Weird as it sounds, the only way to get a monopoly to make changes is to force them to do so.

The have no competitive reason to do so unless they are forced to do it.

Govt PUC: hey Comcast, you need to improve you broadband offering beyond 4Mb/s down.

Comcast: why, we are already offering Broadband services...

Govt PUC: Not anymore...

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Google spent record cash lobbying Congress in 2014 – report

Ian Michael Gumby
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Facepalm

Re: Lobby?

Yes there is a difference.

Bribe == gift to congress critter in exchange for a favorable outcome on a vote.

Lobby === paying a high priced spokesman whom the congress critter trusts who will explain the issue to the congress critter in such a way that the congress critter will vote in his/her favor.

Bribe == filling a brief case with $10,000.00 cash and giving it to Congress Critter to vote X on issue Y.

Lobby == giving me $10,000.00 to sit down w Congress Critter over an expensive lunch explaining why he should vote X on issue Y. Of course I put the spin I want on the issue and gain Congress critter's trust.

Consider a Lobbyist as a trusted advisor that corporations buy and Congress Critters use for free. They help break down complex issues so that Congress Critters can understand them. ;-)

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IBM to open up on global re-org TONIGHT - sources

Ian Michael Gumby
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Re: Thomas J. Watson was about 50 years ahead of his time!!

There's actually a larger market if you can put mesos and spark on it. ;-)

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SCIENTIFIC CONSENSUS that 2014 was record HOTTEST year? NO

Ian Michael Gumby
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FFS lets get real!

The point of the article is that the rise in temp is less than the margin of error.

OK?

In short. Its bad science to suggest that it means anything in either direction.

Shouldn't we all agree that BAD SCIENCE doesn't help anyone?

Lets face it. I'd love to get rid of pollution and smog. But there isn't enough research in to fusion and nuclear energy has a slight problem Bad people will want to do bad things with the waste product.

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Snowden doc leak 'confirms' China stole F-35 data

Ian Michael Gumby
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Re: @Gordon 10

A couple of theories...

1) It was a test of sorts.

2) It was done to silence critics that it was a total waste of money, creating an air superiority fighter with no one left to fight.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Black Helicopters

@Gordon 10

"What you mean just like the US isn't building the F22 as well?"

Actually no, the US is not building new F22 aircraft. Too expensive.

That doesn't mean if / when the Russians or Chinese can catch up, we couldn't build more.

To the best of my knowledge, only one F22 combat mission has been flown, or rather publicly acknowledged. This was in Syria.

Want to guess why? ;-)

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Ian Michael Gumby
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@Kev99 Re: Let the Chinese have the data for our own good

I think you need to do a bit more homework.

The B2 is stealthy, even by today's standards.

You have to understand how the terrain impacted its stealth capabilities.

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Qubole rains down analytic insights from Hadoop cloud

Ian Michael Gumby
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Boffin

Errr not exactly...

The funny thing... there's this company Informix that was sold to IBM around the turn of the century... which had this database IDS.

It was originally a relational database, but when Phil bought Illustra in '95, they got some cool object relational technology.

To net it all out... Its the only relational database which could be used to store unstructured/semi-structured data.

Of course had the orginal Arrowhead project been allowed to be completed... it would have been extremely scalable.

Just a footnote in history... even though IBM still sells IDS.

The problem was that nobody understood its potential, or how to sell it outside of a few.

Oh and one more tie in... Mike Olsen used to work for Stonebraker's Illustra and then Informix. ;-)

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Apple wants your fingerprints in the cloud

Ian Michael Gumby
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FAIL

Its a Patent FaiL ... Re: Taking over the world one stupid patent at a time

Before you bash Apple,

How do you believe this to be patentable?

The patent should be denied on the grounds that its neither new, nor innovative.

We should flog those in the Patent office and in Congress. Bring back the reforms and vote! Harry Reid is no longer in charge and the Trial Lawyers haven't gotten enough money in to the pockets of the Republicans.

This is yet again more reason for Patent reform.

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Google v Oracle: US Supreme Court turns to Obama in Java copyright war

Ian Michael Gumby
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Re: Linux? PC BIOS?

That's an interesting example.

Lets talk about PC BIOS.

Its called developing the code in a clean room.

You have one group of engineers who are tasked with writing specifications as they reverse engineer the original product.

Then you have a second group of engineers who are tasked to build the new bios from the specifications with no communication at all with the first group.

That's what Google was supposed to do. But somehow they screwed it up.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Re: Oracle has a loaded gun, pointed right at their own foot.

Yes, Oracle wants money. They are a company. As a human, you exist to procreate and play video games. As a company Oracle exists to make money.

Google walks away from Java? That would mean writing a whole new OS and use a whole new language that doesn't use the JVM.

Google won't do that.

If Google loses, they will pay the royalty. They will indemnify the telcos that Google agreed to indemnify when the lawsuit came out.

Google will do the math, something you didn't do, and come to the conclusion that its cheaper to settle and then make money off the data they get from you, someone who uses an android phone. You are their product.

If you thought Uber's God View was scary... Google's potential is much worse.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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@JLV Re: @Bob Dole: Tough Cookies...

You've missed the issue.

Using the APIs, that's one thing and that's not at the heart of the argument.

APIs were created so that you, the developer can make use of their product in your app.

Google is creating a derivative product to compete with the product.

If Google wins then you're just made IP dead in terms of software.

It would mean that anyone who creates anything, publishes the API, has no way of protecting their IP from people reverse engineering their code.

If Oracle wins, its still BAU, Google wins... You have the world of cheap knock offs. Buyer beware.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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@ I Wretch...Re: @Bob Dole: Tough Cookies...

Its a good thing you're not a lawyer.

The API is not just like an 'index to a published work' .

Its more like the cliff notes. You don't get the meat of the argument, but a general idea of what's going on. ;-)

In terms of copyright... the argument is that Google created a derivative work.

They caused harm to Oracle (loss of revenue).

If Oracle's lawyer(s) have a good day, and Google's lawyers dont, Oracle stands a good chance of winning.

IMHO Google played fast and loose. The could have just licensed it. They have the cash.

They're making money because with 'droid, they have more ways to watch what you do and to influence your purchasing decisions.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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@JLV Re: Turkeys voting for Christmas

Sorry, you missed a few things.

When Sun created Java and Then the ME version, the capabilities of the phone were much more limited, so you had to reduce things, hence the ME. Sun didn't license Java for the desktop because they wanted people to adopt it. Then make some money off the ME version.

Oracle came much later when they bought Sun.

Turns out if Larry thought about it. By Buying SUN, they became the next IBM in terms of software,hardware and services.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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@Tom Re: Java was open sourced

Here's the rub...

Google claims it was a 'clean room' derivative.

The issue is that Oracle found evidence that it wasn't a clean 'clean room'.

If you take a look at the evidence, if true... then Google is in trouble.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Boffin

@Bob Dole: Tough Cookies...

There's a reason why SCOTUS wants to go to the WH for their opinion.

Unlike you, Obama, and his Democratic Minions in Congress, killed tort reform. Actually it was Harry Reid who is on the payroll of the Trial Lawyers Assoc which killed patent reform which would have made parts of this case moot.

However, the argument that the API is a published work and is therefore protected by copyright is a valid legal argument.

You may not like it, but it does deserve that protection. The API is public in that it allows you to write code to interface to their code. Not for you to write a competing product. You may not like it... but that's how Oracle's lawyers will frame the issue. IMHO the odds are, Oracle will win. You have to look at this through lawyers eyes and not a software developers eyes.

This isn't a simple issue and there is merit to both sides and the arguments that they could raise.

Google should tread carefully. Those that live in glass houses and all that sort of thing applies.

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Jammin', we know you hate jammin' too: Marriott U-turns on guest Wi-Fi ban

Ian Michael Gumby
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Re: conference rooms & lobbies

Not even that.

All they have to do is to use a specially coated film on the windows and you won't be able to get a signal for your hot spot or cell phone either.

If they did that... you can bet they'd lose almost all of their business customers.

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Apple v Ericsson: Yet ANOTHER patent war bubbles over

Ian Michael Gumby
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Meh. Nothing to see here.

Here's the gist of the lawsuit:

Erickson owns patents that every telco has to license. They are required to license this under FRAND.

What Erickson considers reasonable doesn't match what Apple considers reasonable so they are going to court to come up with some number in between that both companies can live with.

Its a non-event.

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It's 4K-ing big right now, but it's NOT going to save TV

Ian Michael Gumby
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@Ru'

How much are your electric bills?

And I imagine that you don't run the heater much during the winter either.

Plasmas suck up way too much energy and give off enormous amounts of heat.

Then there are issues if you're trying to use one at a high altitude too.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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@James

You must not work in IT.

You said two categories.

You of course forgot about the obligatory p0rn content that is mandatory for any bloke in IT to include in this conversation. After all... we all know that the internet was invented so we could all stream p0rn to the privacy of our homes ... ;-P

( I really have to wonder who are the types of guys who will up vote this and who are the types of guys who will down vote this.)

BTW, if I seem sexist, I didn't mention the ladies because many don't admit to the amount of p0rn that they watch too. (But we are all adults here, right? )

All said tongue in cheek. :-)

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Re: Meh. Build it and they will eventually come.

The one thing I don't want in a smurt tv is the camera that watches you while you watch the TV.

First, for auto shutoff, it doesn't work unless you move around a lot when you're watching.

Second. Color me paranoid, but I'm sure that:

1) The camera could be hacked so you now have god knows who watching you.

2) Its not far off to see sets invading your privacy to see what you're doing while you watch a show.

Its a feature I don't need and if I want to skype someone... I can already do it from my ipad, laptop, desktop, phone...

Granted if I ever get a TV wall, and its integrated in to my home... maybe then, but still within limits.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Re: Meh. Build it and they will eventually come.

5 Years?

You have to be kidding right?

I usually buy Sony TVs because I expect them to last 10 years or longer.

I did buy a first gen Sony Plasma, but it failed in year 5, but I shipped it back to Sony and they repaired it. So it lasted 10 years total. I have had sets last 15 years too. (One of the smaller 13" CRT tube...)

So when my plasma died and the wife said replace it now!!! I first looked at the Sony sets.

In truth, I was holding out for an OLED in 42" and ended up getting a Sony 46" LED.

In terms of TVs, I want the best possible picture, and of course need to get content worth viewing, besides College Football !! (American).

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Boffin

Meh. Build it and they will eventually come.

A TV is still a major appliance.

I mean, how do you justify the expense and swapping out a perfectly good TV set for the next new big thing?

I bought a nice new Sony 2 years ago. I got a 'smart tv' because it was the only thing on the market, and the only 'smart' feature I use is Netflix. (I would love to be able to remove the features I don't use...) Its 3D ready, but I don't have 3D glasses or a desire to ever use it.

I would love to have a nice 4K OLED TV, however, even though I could afford it, it seems to be a waste; knowing that a year later, there's going to be a net new refresh and that today, there's not enough 4K content available.

So I will wait.

That doesn't mean that I don't want 4K or 8K. It just means that I don't have enough of a justification to make the leap.

If you build the better sets, provide the content, I'm there. Eventually.

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Boybanders ONE DIRECTION launch DoS attack on open-source bods

Ian Michael Gumby
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Mushroom

How is this a DoS Attack?

Sorry, but I was looking forward to seeing an article of how a boy band was really a group of script kiddies who want to be l33t hackers. ;-)

Boy was I disappointed.

I wonder if hackers from Anonymous will counter attack the Boy Band's web site now...

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Google crashes supposedly secure Aviator browser

Ian Michael Gumby
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@AC,

Google is a bit more evil in that they are busy trying to convince people that they are not. ;-)

The truth is that you are Google's product and they are spying on you more than any Government could.

Do you think I care about which toothpaste ad they show me?

If I use Crest, do I want to see Crest ads or would I be more inclined to click on an ad for Colgate?

And yes, Google knows what toothpaste you use, what shampoo, and what newspapers you read. They can predict what you will do next because of all of the data they have captured.

Is this evil?

I know that if the CIA or NSA or CGHQ did this... everyone here would be screaming bloody murder.

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US kills EU watchdog's probe into EU cops sharing EU citizens' data

Ian Michael Gumby
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Re: No point in kicking a dead dog.

And here's the crux of the matter.

Go after the 'shitheads'. Not that I disagree with you, but those 'shitheads' have rights too.

So how do you collect enough information on those specific 'shitheads' to charge them? How do you know that the guy down the street is a 'shithead' ?

And that's the problem. J'accuse! And you're back to the lawlessness of the French Revolution, or in Iraq or Afghanistan where unscrupulous people claimed their adversaries were Al Qaeda

Here's the hypocrisy. You say you're against the massive surveillance that I am in favor of, yet at the same time you want a police investigation of the 'shitheads' which requires said surveillance.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Re: No point in kicking a dead dog.

Really? What US President made that remark.

(I'm calling BS on your statement. )

The irony is that many don't understand the amount and types of surveillance that occurs in all Western countries. CCTV cameras anyone?

Again, its not the capture of the information which represents a threat to one's freedom, but the use of it.

I had a friend who knew over 100 people who were killed on 9/11. Including one of her ex-boyfriends which she was still friends with. She was a lawyer.

If you had asked her about the use of mass surveillance which could have prevented 9/11 versus losing her friends, which do you think she would choose?

I'll give you another example. Suppose through a warrant-less wiretap, the government heard you admit to a friend that you were out the other night and did a line of coke. The loss of freedom only occurs if the police were to arrest you and use this as evidence in court. Or if the information was made public.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Re: No point in kicking a dead dog.

You bring up the IRA.

Do you realize what the Brits had done to try and combat the IRA?

There wasn't the level or ease of electronic surveillance back then as there is today.

Many of their actions won't be made public for another couple of decades still. (Or do you disagree with the Official Secrets Act too? )

Even 20 years ago, with the introduction of digital switches, the ease of which a warranted wire tap could be done that there was a change in the types and amount of surveillance that can occur.

My post was incredibly voted down by individuals who either don't understand the reality of the world we live in, or haven't thought through the consequences of the acts of Manning and Snowden.

When we talk about freedoms, the act of surveillance isn't the issue. Its how its used that becomes the issue.

I personally hate using google because of they spy on you. Same with FB. I choose not to be their product. Yet. just by using the 'net, I can't stop FB or Google from capturing data. IMHO they do more spying and data capture and retention that the government could and they are not restricted by law as to how they can use the data. So many protested the existence of PRISM, yet while the Government was bound by law and had to limit its use, the same protesters freely give more information to FB which had a greater potential to be misused. Talk about the 'God view' of Uber. Talk about a potential for being able to blackmail someone over midnight visits...

The point is that unless you've spend a bit of time thinking about the issue and the alternatives... you haven't a clue about why we need this surveillance.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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No point in kicking a dead dog.

If you've been under a rock, the latest incident in France will allow the spook agencies to continue to mine private data and share it with the other international agencies.

And considering the alternatives... its not a bad thing unless you're a terrorist.

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Saudi Arabia to flog man 1,000 times for insulting religion on Facebook

Ian Michael Gumby
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Let this be a lesson to all...

""It is horrifying to think that such a vicious and cruel punishment should be imposed on someone who is guilty of nothing more than daring to create a public forum for discussion and peacefully exercising the right to freedom of expression.""

Really?

Do you not think that other nations don't have the same laws protecting your freedom to express your opinion?

This is really nothing new... There was this guy named Luther? Remember him?

The really ironic thing is that if he were in Egypt, he would be free to make that statement.

After what happened in France, Egyptian leader Sisi is critical of Muslims staying silent on the issue of the violence.

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Boffins open 'space travel bureau': Come relax on exoplanet Kepler-16b, says NASA

Ian Michael Gumby
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Act Now!

If you act now and deposit $.10 (USD) by the time that we have developed safe travel where you could make a round trip within your lifetime, you could afford the ticket price. Or rather one of your heirs could.

Unless of course you double that deposit and wait until we develop a time machine which will then pick you up at your current time, let you do the trip yourself.

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Zuckerberg asks the public to tell him where to go in 2015

Ian Michael Gumby
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Detroit?

Sorry I was going to go with Hell Michigan, but you know... downtown detroit is bad enough.

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Fancy a .trust domain? How's $150,000 sound?

Ian Michael Gumby
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A rose by any other name...

Does any domain name inspire trust because that's what the domain name implies?

The first time one of these domain names gets hacked, and they will... You lose that trust forever.

This is where their business model fails.

In short ... They are doomed to fail from day one

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Senator: Backdoor for the Feds is a backdoor for hackers

Ian Michael Gumby
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Devil

Re: This sucks....

Sydney?

Guess what. Police can't be shadowing that nutter 24x7 because he's a nutter and might do something.

Lone wolfs are dangerous because they are lone wolfs.

But that doesn't mean that the agencies haven't stopped plots. You have some in the UK that were recently stopped and others in Australia.

The police and agencies need actionable intelligence. How do you think that they get it?

As to the hacking of Sony... I guess its one more reason to go see the movie "The Interview". ;-)

I guess a lot has changed in North Korea since the release of Team America!

Why hellwro Hans Brix...

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Re: hmm

>> ... a fatal accidence or some rare form of cancer.

>Sounds like polonium time!

This is America not the glorious USSR!

The CIA isn't skillful enough to do something like polonium.

The senator is a democrat so its either going to be a sex scandal (with a male page) or one of graft.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Black Helicopters

Re: Hooray for progress!!

Why try to hack the back door when the front door is usually open and if not, very easy to pick the lock.

Sorry, the Senator doesn't get it.

He just took some money from a lobbyist who works for a company that doesn't want to be forced to include a back door for the government...

The truth is that you could very easily design and implement a very secure 'back door' for the spooks that is more secure than the front end...

More noise than anything...

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'Turn to nuclear power to save planetary ecology from renewable BLIGHT'

Ian Michael Gumby
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Seriously WTF?

"Same for uranium, the supply won't support our energy consumption at is current pace."

Uhm... don't know about you but there's a lot of untapped sources in the US and other countries. The issue is mining and refining it to fuel grade. If you had the power plants then you can get the fuel.

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Brit GUN NUT builds WORKING SNIPER RIFLE at home out of scrap metal!

Ian Michael Gumby
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@ elmerf Re: Meh.

In the US we have the CMP.

They are pretty much out of their M1s for sale.

You can go to a couple gun warehouses that buy historical rifles in bulk.

There you could find guns like a 6.5x55mm Swede that's been converted in to a target rifle.

The nice thing about the US is that you can buy a receiver (requires a FFL holder) then purchase barrels, stocks, sights/scopes etc ... and have a very nice, accurate rifle.

Of course no one mentions that most IT guys who are 'firearm enthusiasts' have more money and time than girlfriends and do go out and buy expensive guns. ;-) Guns and IT seem to go together.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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@AC Re: @ Frosted Flake

> I think he is afraid of defending his own safety.

I think, to overgeneralise massively, and away from military uses, American gun nuts see guns as tools of defence and personal safety - to be used against large lumps of wildlife and ultimately people if necessary; British gun nuts see guns as tools of sport - to be used against paper targets, inanimate objects and perhaps small furry/flappy creatures.

-=-

Now that's just plain wrong.

There are many variations on what constitutes an 'Amerikan' gun nut.

In terms of choice of targets... there happens to be a wider variety of game in the US.

In terms of guns of choice, it depends on where you live. Each state has its own laws concerning what guns a person may own, and what guns can be used for hunting.

You could also classify a gun nut by the number and types of guns owned too.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Re: Meh.

@Gaz,

Don't get me wrong.

Most of the fun is in doing the build.

My point was that while you're at 3 MOA, its not a sniper rifle. AK-47s are considered good if they are 3 MOAs. Sniper rifles? That's sub .5 MOA or less.

The issue is that the title of the article is a bit off. (Not built from 'scrap' and not a sniper rifle.)

You could work on bedding, but with a barrel that has a lot of throat erosion, I don't think it would help much. (Unless you want to practice learning how to do the bedding.)

Sorry to hear that a new barrel is ~600 GBP. That's a lot for a ~$300 (USD) rifle.

BTW, you may want to invest in a 'cheap' scope. (Although mounting it would be a challenge. ;-)

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Meh.

Sorry, but while its an interesting article, its about as much work as upgrading a ruger 10/22 in to a tactical rig. You didn't really do any of the hard work.

But since you live in a country where its difficult to own a gun, my hat is off to you.

I hope you enjoy your rifle and think about upgrading the barrel and taking the receiver to a proper gun smith to see if they can further tune your rifle.

And yes, a 3 MOA gun is not a sniper rifle.

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What do you mean, I have to POST a PHYSICAL CHEQUE to get my gun licence?

Ian Michael Gumby
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Re: @Hud Dunlap - Why have a license at all?

Left Pondian?

LOL...

As a Yank, I can tell you what it's like going through owning a gun...

Gun laws vary state by state.

When you purchase your gun, you will go through a background check and you will have a waiting period.

Long Guns (rifles and shotguns) are different from handguns (pistols and revolvers).

In Illinois, since the late 60's you had to apply to the state to get a FOID card. You could not touch a gun, or purchase ammo without a card. It didn't mean that you owned a gun, only that you have gone through the background check to show that you can own a gun.

Then you go to your gun store, purchase the gun. The gun store takes your money, helps you fill out the paperwork, and you wait. They process the paperwork, do a background check and after the waiting period, you can pick up your gun.

So its not as simple as just saying I want a gun and I get to go in to the store and buy it.

Although for rifles in certain states, it can be that easy. (Again, it depends on the state.)

Suppressors, Short Barreled Rifles (SBR), Automatic Weapons all require special permits and this depends again on where you live.

Conceal Carry? All of the US now have some form of constitutional carry and conceal carry permits in place. Illinois was the last holdout.

In Chicago, there are several shootings a day. All clustered in to two regions and all tend to be gang related with some robbery attempts. (Even those tend to be gang related.) In all cases, the guns are unregistered and those caught by police end up having prior felony convictions and could not legally possess a gun in the first place.

But if you want to shoot. Plenty of options, including Perry OH.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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@Graham

Speaking as a gun owning American... ;-)

Home defense is relative.

Yes a 12 gauge pump with a pistol grip, 18" barrel with a night sight and ghost ring would be better than an AR for home defense, there are other options.

The issue with the AR is that you have to worry about over penetration.

Of course the AR is a platform and you could switch out the 5.56 (no .223 here) and go to a 9mm carbine.

There are other carbine options too.

(If you live in a state where you can own Class III and you have the $$$ you could get an MP-5 suppressed. ) Now that would be a great home defense gun. ;-)

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This week it rained in San Francisco and the power immediately blew out. Your tech utopia

Ian Michael Gumby
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Devil

Re: Still Going

"SF is always a pale shadow of what it was 20 years ago. In 20 years people will be saying the same thing."

Naw.

In 20 years time people will be trying to remember what San Francisco looked like after the big one.

Time to buy some beach front property in East Bay when San Francisco becomes the next Atlantis...

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Mushroom

Re: Hate sf

Then come to Chicago.

More affordable but then you have to deal with the Midwest's winters.

Oh wait, you're happy you don't have seasons.

Nevermind. You'd never survive a year in Chicago.

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Hungry, hungry CPUs: Storage vendors hustle to get flash closer to compute

Ian Michael Gumby
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Flame

Meh.

While this is a good article... its a bit old.

UltraDIMMs (DDR3) are old news these days.

Waiting to hear when the DDR4 are released... (Diablo lawsuit an issue?)

Beyond HP, there's Crossbar which has their own RRAM.

Don't get me wrong, I believe that this tech is definitely a disruptive technology which means we can build faster and have a higher density in clusters with lower power and heat.

But I have to flame Chris because its nothing new over the stuff 6 months ago, and I didn't see any mention of the lawsuit against Diablo.

I guess Chris rushed this out to hit a deadline and then off to the pub.

Sorry Chis, I expect better from you. ;-P

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Assange's WikiLeaks: Give generously this Xmas – for STATUE of our DEAR LEADER

Ian Michael Gumby
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Black Helicopters

Re: Standing on chairs??

Not pictured is the noose.

Sorry, but the moral of the story... if you want to be a rebel without a clue and claim to be a whistle blower, be prepared to put an end to having a normal life.

Assange - hanging out with his best buds in the Ecuadorian Embassy as he dodges his arrest in Sweden on Rape Charges.

Manning - sitting in prison because he trusted Assange and did a snarf of classified documents, with no real whistle blowing having occurred. (What crimes had he uncovered that the US Government has been charged with in International court? Hint: NONE. )

Snowden - Some say he was FSB, but in the end... his sitting in Russian still releasing blurbs.

I guess he must really enjoy vodka and not being able to leave the country in fear of the CIA rendition trips.

The only guy missing is the clown in Switzerland who gave Wikileaks Swiss banking records which is illegal under Swiss law. I think he's already completed his sentence by now...

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