* Posts by Ian Michael Gumby

2905 posts • joined 11 Apr 2006

France joins India in telling Facebook to just Zuck off

Ian Michael Gumby
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Boffin

@Roq Re: France had hissy fit, nobody shocked?

Sorry this isn't just a hissy fit.

Even if you don't have a facebook account, many sites have embedded javascript that goes back to facebook. Just like Google's analytics. (Which is why Google will always have an edge over its rivals and why they are a monopoly).

Facebook is capturing data from websites and is tracking both members and non-members. Of course this is governed by the ToS of the website you're visiting.

Sending back the data to the US? That's a new one. What' will eventually happen is that each nation will force global companies to set up data silos by each country. This could make things interesting. Both from a DS perspective and how things play out.

I wonder what Gibson would have to say about this...

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Fleet of 4.77MHz LCD laptops with 8088 CPUs still alive after 30 years

Ian Michael Gumby
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Boffin

just fyi ...

"The T1000 was introduced in 1987, but that's long enough that we'll forgive Holrum the slight lapse, not least because the machine was one of the very first computers to use a clamshell form factor."

Try Grid which came out in 1983.

It was also one of the first PCs to go up in the space shuttle. Although that one was modified to include a small fan to help keep it cool.

An yes, I am showing my age since I remember selling them bubble memory.

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Submarine cable cut lops Terabits off Australia's data bridge

Ian Michael Gumby
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Joke

Jared Fogel strikes again!

Too soon?

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Official UN panel findings on embassy-squatter released. Assange: I'm 'vindicated'

Ian Michael Gumby
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@Sparty ... Re: The USA has won ...

Lets correct a few things...

1) Assange appealed the EAW three times, which is the maximum allowed under the law.

2) Under the EAW, there are 32 areas of law where there is no need to show duopoly. That is, you don't have to show that his actions broke the laws in both countries. Rape is one of those 32 laws. So while the appeals judges didn't have to consider the question of duopoly, they did. Even then they agreed that what he is accused of would be considered rape in the UK.

I agree that the Assange supporters continue to argue the issue and ignore the law.

In addition to the issue of the EAW, they also forget that Assange wasn't allowed to leave the country.

He was supposed to come in for questioning where he would have been charged, but his lawyer helped him escape. His lawyer admitted to his actions during the first EAW appeal in the UK.

Then they talk about Manning and Assange blowing the whistle on illegal US activities.

Yet nothing released was shown to be illegal.

You can point these verifiable details out to everyone, yet that won't change their minds. People will believe what they want to believe.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Mushroom

@Uffish Re: discredit ...

Manning violated his oath and broke the law.

The only good thing to come of this is that Manning got the US to pay for his sex change.

Manning was the epitome of a 'Sad Sack' who should never have been in the military in the first place.

His actions are no where near honorable.

Manning got what he/she deserves.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Boffin

@Alain Re: The USA has won ...

Look, I don't know what you call 'wrong doing'.

Manning was not a whistle blower by any definition. He was duped in to his actions by his infatuation with Assange. Every time this comes up, some maroon tries to claim Manning blew the whistle on some illegal activity. Only there isn't any illegal activity uncovered.

The only upside for Manning is that he got the government to pay for his sex change.

Assange?

Publishing the pilfered data? He's got some legal protection. That's now why he's afraid of the US. However, until the US acts, he's on his own, assuming that the US would act.

Sorry but the US hasn't won anything.

The only losers here are the girls in Sweden and the UK taxpayers caught up in Assange's delusions.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Facepalm

@Hans Re: Won't make a bit of difference.

Didn't you hear? The Swedish Chef died from a heart attack.

Too much cholesterol in his blood due to his cooking.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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@AC Re: Won't make a bit of difference.

Look, you had it right in your first sentence. He gets arrested by the 'Plod'.

What happens next. He's tossed in the clink until they have a flight booked for him and his escort back to Sweden.

He sits down with his new Swedish lawyer, and is interviewed and then formally charged with the sole count of rape remaining. They go to trial. Whatever happens, if he faces jail time, after all of that... he goes back to the UK to face the jumping bail charge. He will do time. (Why? Because he's a prat and cost the UK taxpayers $$$$$)

After all of that... the UK plod, escort him to the airport, and put him on a plane back to Australia. He may even be escorted back to Aussie land because he's been such a prat there and an international embarrassment.

After that. Who knows.

ABC once reported that the then Aussie government was thinking about taking away his passport.

Its then... if the US wants him, they would make a move.

Why? Because he's got a record. He's a convicted felon for hacking the US government's servers while a teen. It would make any extradition that much easier.

The only problem is that the US hasn't raised any issue or hint that they want him for anything.

Post Wikileaks, Snowden had done far more damage to the US and Western world. And Wikileaks has some legal protection due to a '71 SCOTUS decision.

Of course I will wager someone at the US State Department would say 'Boo!' just to toss Assange in to a tizzy and watch him leave for Ecuador never to be heard from again. ;-)

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Leak – UN says Assange detention 'unlawful'

Ian Michael Gumby
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Re: Cue Tom Jones....

Now why am I thinking about the movie "Mars Attacks!"

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Ian Michael Gumby
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@ Chris King Re: It all depends

If the US really wants him, they'll be patient.

Julian is like a cockroach. When he's in the dark most people wouldn't know or care if he's there.

So Julian shines a light on Julian as a way to protect himself from his delusions.

Julian will end up in Australia before he could go anywhere.

He'll go to Sweden, back to the UK and then on to Australia.

Note that in some cases, when someone gets bounced from the UK, they can go anywhere else. But Julian, for being such a prat, will be sent back to his home country. Where, according to ABC news, the government at one time was contemplating removing his passport.

Also remember that when Julian was a teen, he got busted for hacking a US Defense computer.

That just made the extradition request easier.

Julian doing a runner in Sweden and in the UK? That made it even easier. No bail while he fights a hypothetical US extradition.

And that's also important. In the US, he's old news. Hillary and Bill Clinton are now the target of a fed investigation. (Along with Hillary's senior staff) So again, nobody really wants Assange. Not even his current hosts.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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@Spartacus Re: It all depends

You do realize that two of the 'chairs' are alternates in case one of the first 3 chairs are not available to cast a vote.

But I have to wonder how do you get to be 'first chair'? Some sort of musical competition?

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Boffin

@Desidero Re: No legal force

So, essentially you're condoning rape?

First, had you investigated the EAW, there are 32 charges where you don't have to show a duopoly of the crime. That is to say that if Sweden says its a crime and submits an EAW, you don't have to check to see if it would be a crime in the UK. Rape is one of those 32 charges.

Second, during the EAW appeals, the UK government gave Assange the benefit of the doubt and reviewed the charges to see if they would be considered rape under UK laws. Guess what happened. They found that he would have been charged in the UK for rape. He lost all three of the appeals and then decided to do his runner to the Embassy.

Third, Sweden is pretty open when it comes to sex. The issue is that unlike the Middle East and most Muslim countries, women are first class citizens and have the same rights as males. Its when you force a woman to have non consensual sex, its called rape and you have to face the charges.

The boy is facing allegations he committed rape. Had he stayed and not used his lawyer to help him leave Sweden, this would all be a footnote on Manning's wikipedia entry.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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@AC Re: A completely meaningless ruling

Wow. Forget your meds?

Look, here it is in a nutshell.

Assange has a historical problem about keeping it in his pants. He has a child out of wedlock as well as admitting in an interview that he likes the ladies. There's more to it, and he would be too easy of a target for a honeypot.

But the US doesn't do Honeypots. And there would be nothing to gain. No blackmail leverage. So he wasn't set up. It would have been far easier to pick him up back in the UK or Australia before this whole Swedish thing blew up in his face.

Not to mention the reason why Assange was in Sweden in the first place. Sweden has a lot of protection of their journalists which would have given him more protection from an extradition request. Only he blew that chance.

The US doesn't want him. No extradition request, nothing. The entire thing is a fantasy he made up.

If the US did want him... they would have a much easier time nailing him in Australia. So in short, the Swedish thing is all on Assange.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Boffin

@Brangdon Re: A completely meaningless ruling

First, Julian isn't a Journalist, even by the loosest definition of the term.

To your point, the '71 SCOTUS decision which protected the press when they released the Ellsberg papers on how the US was lying about the Viet Nam War to the US public, Assange would have grounds to fight those charges. Hence no extradition from the US.

As to Manning and Assange, there is something there. Assange, while failing to honor a promise to help fund Manning's defense, he hired his own attorney to monitor the case. During the Article 32 hearing, some evidence came to light. During the actual trial, Manning plead guilty to the charges so that evidence never made it to court.

If said evidence is true, (An article 32 hearing is like a Grand Jury where the evidence is taken at face value to be true) then Assange has a right to be scared of being extradited to the US. However, that is separate from Sweden and the UK. The US has plenty of time to go after him, if the next POTUS so desires. Again that's another reason why Assange went to the Embassy. To wait out the clock.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Boffin

@ Nigel Re: We make our own prisons

You can't guarantee that he won't be extradited when no extradition request has been submitted.

And no, he will not be free to travel from Sweden to Ecuador while he's still wanted in the UK for jumping bail and he's traveling on an Aussie passport.

Now he'll go to Sweden, face the music. Whatever happens, happens. After that, back to the UK for jumping bail. Again, whatever happens, happens. After that...

Because he's traveling on an Aussie passport, he will be put on a plane and sent back to Australia.

Now... here's where the fun will begin.

The Aussie government could decide to revoke his passport. Which means he can't leave Australia unless he gets an Ecuadorian passport. And after his current stint as a 'house guest' who would never leave, they may or may not want to do it.

Second, if he's been found guilty of a crime in Sweden, countries could bar him from entering their countries. (e.g. certain celebrities are banned from countries due to their drug arrests...) So his future travel would be restricted.

Third, if the US wants him, they could extradite him from Australia and it would be a much easier thing to do than from any other country in the world. (Assange has only himself to thank for that quirk.)

To your post... The US hasn't said that they want him for anything. There hasn't been any formal charges or extradition requests made.

And when has anything Assange done make any sense? Raping women?

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Ian Michael Gumby
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@sisk Re: We make our own prisons

Kinda sorta... its a bit more than that.

Two women.

Going from memory because this happened ~7 years ago...

Assange engaged in consensual sex. In at least one of the cases, the woman agreed to have sex with him if he wore a condom. Later that night, while in bed, he engaged in sex without a condom. Which wasn't consensual there for rape.

There's more to this... there were actually 3 counts where two of the counts are off the table because Assange out lasted their statute of limitations. So he's down to one count.

The women reportedly wanted to make sure he got tested. And it got worse from there.

The biggest irony... had he not done a runner, this wouldn't have been a big issue and he would have been done with it YEARS ago. Now he's wanted for jumping bail and for the stuff in Sweden.

UN or not... he's not leaving the embassy any time soon.

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Privacy warriors plead with FCC to wield sword of net neutrality against snooping ISPs

Ian Michael Gumby
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Facepalm

@ GM Re: Well, yes we could...

Did you mean a company like Google? (err. Alphabet...)

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Gov must hire 'thousands' of techies to rescue failing projects

Ian Michael Gumby
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Boffin

Re: "he was useless, managed to delete the website a couple of times"

As a developer... and a consultant... I avoid production systems like the plague.

Too much liability because if something goes wrong. You get the blame. And if you accidentally did something... you have the risk of being sued.

Production systems? Just say no.

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Put your private parts on display if you want to keep earning a living

Ian Michael Gumby
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Serriously WTF?

So... I get that AD is miffed that some companies have started to place sensors to monitor how long they sit at their desks. I get that... they must be working as telemarketers or as drones.

In today's IT departments, many are in meeting and are collaborating with their peers. Also many don't have cubes or assigned cubes. They are sitting along a work bench with little to no privacy.

And really what's the beef? If they wanted to do this to me... then they'd have to also compare it to my calendar where I'm called in to multiple meetings throughout the day. Where I end up spending more time away from my desk drawing charts and stuff on the white board explaining tech to the pointy haired managers.

Of course if they did do this... you do realize that if it were a camera and not just a sensor... you'd have one heck of a great class action lawsuit against the company.

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DataCore scores fastest ever SPC-1 response times. Yep, a benchmark

Ian Michael Gumby
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Boffin

@Lusty

Actually its 3 copies.

If the values don't match (consistent) which one do you trust?

If you write at least 3 copies... the odds are greater that 2 of the 3 will match.

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It's replicant Roy Batty's birthday – but hey, where's my killer robot?

Ian Michael Gumby
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Re: Do androids wet dream of electric sheep?

Philip Dick's finest.

But when did he actually write it?

(My memory is gone due to killing off my last brain cell over NYE.)

Definitely one of the best films ever!

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T-Mobile US boss John Legere calls bulls*** on video throttling claims

Ian Michael Gumby
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When throttling isn't throttling...

So...

While I was in the UK, as a Yank, the only way I could get internet was via a hotspot. (No UK bank, no home service to my corporate apartment.) Since my apartment was close to the train station, after every major football match, the locals would come home and as they get off the train, they over loaded the local phone service. So EE throttled the service down to 2G because the number of phones in the area jumped and overwhelmed the service. (Hopefully they honored their stated plans and upgraded the service to LTE over 4G. )

The point is that for everyone the quality of service dropped to a point where you couldn't do more than text or voice calls.

Lets face it, you're being throttled automatically because the service couldn't keep up and dropped. Do you call this throttling as in Some Exec is looking to reduce the amount of data you can stream at any time or a system failing over to a lower grade service before crapping out?

Yes, you're being throttled in both cases, but in the second case, its not a corporate decision, but a system survival technique. Same term, different meanings.

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SpaceX makes rocket science look easy: Falcon 9 passes tests

Ian Michael Gumby
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Re: @Dave How many times?

Dave, no worries... I think we're in violent agreement. :-)

The only time I was stuck in the arse was with 500cc of Pen VK. (One in each cheek)

That my friend was not fun. (At least I had enough sense to call the nurse a sadist before the shots. )

One of the best ways to limit nausea is to have an empty stomach. As to who will succumb? No idea. The best test would be to be on a small fishing boat that spews a lot of diesel smoke out on rough seas.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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@Sweep Re: Needs a name

Bukkake?

Only if they explode.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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@Dave Re: How many times?

So, I get 6 down votes for saying the tech is neat and its a good start, but questioning how many times could it be reused ???

;-)

To your point, yes sitting on top of a rocket is still a risky endeavor. I get that and while I'd do it, my wife would kill me for even thinking about it.

However my point was that even if they could constantly land it... we have a strengths and materials problem where components will eventually fail after so many uses.

How could they test this? I mean, depending on the payload, even insured, there's going to be a cost for Space X and that has to be balanced out against the manufacturing costs and the savings from reuse.

That's not rocket science but strictly bean counting and risk assessment. One would have to have a bunch of these being reused, and even after examining them for stress fractures and failures... extrapolate their life and then divide by 2 for a safety factor. (e.g. if its safe to use up to 10 times, limit its reuse to 5 and then melt it for scrap...)

You bring up another issue.

While I don't know you... but you do realize that you could get the shot in the arm or anywhere. Most likely the flight attendant will be male so if you want to pull your shorts off and get a long needle in the buttox... who am I to judge? ;-)

Personally, I'd skip breakfast and travel on an empty stomach.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Alien

How many times?

Ok, so the rocket came back down in one piece.

But how many times could it be reused?

For materials... sure. But if you're going to be sitting on top of it... do you trust it?

I for one would love to know...

Don't get me wrong its a start and a step in the right direction.

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How long is your password? HTTPS Bicycle attack reveals that and more

Ian Michael Gumby
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Boffin

@Brewster's AG Re: Ok

No...

Not exactly.

The only way you would know the length of the password if you know the length of the buffer and the max length of the pad and the minimum number of characters required for the password.

So length of P = length(buffer) - pad_max iff length(P) > password_min_length.

e.g.

Length of buffer= 510

pad_max = 500

password_min_length = 8

So we know that the length of the password to be 10 bytes. (characters)

But if the length is less than 500 you wouldn't know its length.

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Linux Foundation assembles gang to build a better Blockchain

Ian Michael Gumby
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Re: The Problem With the B-b-b-l-l-l-o-o-o-c-c-c-k-k-k-c-c-c-h-h-h-a-a-a-i-i-i-n-n-n...

You got down voted in that you don't understand that the current implementation of block chains already handles this by taking a hash of earlier portions in the block chain so that you can keep it shorter than the entire history of the block chain.

So the block chain isn't unwieldy.

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Sneaky skimmer scam stings several Safeway supermarkets

Ian Michael Gumby
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Boffin

@Mike Re: Safeway is now on the hook.

The card companies (VISA, MC and AMEX) have all put chips in their cards and had mandated that by Oct 1, stores would have to have chip readers installed. The US companies balked at Chip and Pin and only agreed to Chip and Sign.

What I posted is a fact, yet down voted.

The card issuers (banks) delayed the inevitable and yes, while not complete, its the stores that have not yet turned on or implemented chip readers in their stores. That's the real issue.

Even in Europe today, the POS stations and hand held units all have both mag readers and chip readers.

After the Target breach... its a no brainer that we should have chip cards in the US.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Boffin

Safeway is now on the hook.

Since Oct, the stores were supposed to have the chip reader installed. Many / Most stores have yet to make the change, so that until they do, if there is any theft or fraud, the stores are liable.

Its amazing that they haven't taken the move seriously and customers should look towards switching grocers.

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How to build a real lightsabre

Ian Michael Gumby
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@Richard 12 ... Re: @Ian Michael Gumby

Well then its not much of a working Fusion reactor then is it? ;-)

That's like saying I built this grand electric car that runs on a single D Cell battery... only that you have to recharge it after traveling one foot. 6" if you have the air conditioning or heaters on... ;-)

I guess the next thing is to build a fuel injector then....

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Ian Michael Gumby
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@Torben Re: Plasma?

First show me a working fusion reactor that produces more energy than it consumes...

The current generation under construction do use magnetic force to help contain the plasma, but they also use the plasma field itself too.

You could think of the plasma as a jet of gas where its shaped and contained in the handle and the length of the blade is based on the amount of plasma being ejected.

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Physics uses warp theory to look beyond relativity

Ian Michael Gumby
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What no Dr. Who connection or Douglas Adams?

"Alcubierre’s idea was to consider how the expansion and collapse of space could be harnessed by a craft trying to travel to a distant star. His ‘warp bubble’ concept puts the craft in a region of normal spacetime that has, in front of it, some way of collapsing space. Behind it, a reverse process re-expands space behind the craft. The craft itself does not move across space at all - it is the space in which it sits that moves."

-=-

When I read that paragraph, why did I think to Dr. Who and how the Tardis moved through space and time, as well as how the improbability drive worked?

Is it just me? Am I a pint low? (Beer that is)

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Assange inquisition closer after Sweden, Ecuador sign pact

Ian Michael Gumby
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FAIL

Re: Charges?

Wow...

It seems that every time a story comes up, commentards who are pro Julian seem to forget that the procedure in Sweden is to bring someone in for questioning so that they could formally charge them. There isn't a concept of charging someone in abstensia ?sp?.

But you already knew that.

You also know that the Americans never made a request to Sweden so that the Swedes can't comment or agree to something that hasn't happened.

But again, you already knew that.

The thing that this article points out is that there's a new understanding between the Swedes and Ecuador which opens the path to allowing the Swedes to come in, question, then charge Assange per their legal requirements and then Ecuador will allow him to leave the Embassy.

Assange's days in the Embassy are numbered. One can expect the Swedes to pay him a visit early next year.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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WTF?

@Archie take off the tin foil hat.

Did you actually pay attention to the extradition hearings?

Did you even bother to read the transcript?

Under Oath, the lawyer for Assange in Sweden actually admitted to assisting in Assange's exit from the country.

That's right. The prosecutor has to go through Assange's lawyer once Assange lawyers up. So as Assange was doing his first runner, the lawyer played dumb and stalled the Police until it was too late.

Don't take my word, go Google the transcripts and read them.

It was a calculated risk. Assange was betting that the charges were so petty that Sweden wouldn't issue an EAW for him.

So that first blows your narrative away.

Second is that the women came forward and filed complaints against Assange. That's all it took and started the investigation. Whatever the women wanted after that point is irrelevant.

I don't know where to begin with your rant against the US. Clearly the NHS has failed you and you definitely need medical help.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Re: Once

So... Assange meets with the Swedes in the Embassy thanks to this new MoU / treaty.

Assange gets charged and the Swedes take him back to Sweden to face the music....

Many think that he's going to be free to walk around... he's not. He won't get bail and will be incarcerated for the duration of the trial and depending on the results, he will either be jailed or escorted on a plane, in custody back to the UK to face the music for his jumping bail. Note that while the bail is forfeit, he's still guilty of the charges and can face jail time.

Even then he will be kept in jail (custody) with no chance of bail.

So then when the UK is done with him... because of his actions... you can bet that the UK will then take him in custody to the airport and place him on a flight back to Australia. (Where he can see his dear ol' mum...) Whether or not he is in custody during his flight ... who knows. My guess is that he will be.

Post that... its a crap shoot. Does the US really want him? Probably not. Unless Hillary gets elected. But you never know. However, even then... Assange could now be denied entry in to many countries based on his current bad behavior.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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@AC re "Set up" Re: One Swedish Charge left

Ah yes, the "its all a CIA plot and a set up".

Really?

Sorry, but no. The CIA running a Honey Pot on Assange... remember Occam's Razor.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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@AC Re: @Yank One Swedish Charge left

"Jeez ... which extraditable crime has Julian committed in the USA that might magically be conjured up to legally allow this?"

Ah that's the rub isn't it.

If you believe Assange is paranoid that the US is out to get him, then either he did something, or its all in his head.

If its all in his head, then he has nothing to worry about because the US doesn't want to waste the time, effort and money of getting him extradited from Australia to the US.

If its not, then he did something.... which is why he hired a lawyer to shadow the Manning Article 32 hearing and the trial. Its also a reason why he didn't go to Sweden.

So what could Assange have done that would have made him so paranoid and scared of the US?

Could it be that he helped Manning during the theft of the documents and was more than just an innocent participant? This was raised during the Article 32 hearing but not during the trial.

So we'll just have to wait.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Boffin

@Scorchoi Re: One Swedish Charge left

"As to Uncle Sam, he was either too late or could not find a charge that would stick when the 17x convict Assange arrived in the UK"

That is a good question... what could the US have against Assange?

First, the publications of the leaked information could have a shield that it was to the public's benefit to know the material which would mean that he would have some potential protection under the SCOTUS' Ellsberg related decision.

Lets be clear... the US wouldn't go after Assange just for the publications, regardless of his delusional paranoid fantasies. Not worth the bad publicity, time and expense.

However, during Manning's Article 32 hearing, there was the allegation that Assange was in fact a party to the theft and helped Manning break in and steal the documents. Note that during the actual court martial this evidence was never used. Manning plead guilty to those counts. (Protecting Assange, or waiting for the US to give him a deal at a later time? Boise is a good lawyer, so we will have to wait to see what falls out from this...)

That would be the only reason why the US would want Assange. At the time of Sweden... the Manning court martial was just getting started.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Boffin

@AC Re: One Swedish Charge left

Julian is that you? ;-)

Look, here's the simple thing... Sweden has the most progressive and feminist laws on the books concerning rape. Even if the sex was consensual while wearing a condom, the minute he tried to have sex without a condom, it would be considered non-consensual if the girl said sex only w a condom and thus rape.

If you actually did your homework... you would learn two things...

1) There are 32 crimes where you don't have to show a duopoly. That is to say that its a crime in both jurisdictions. One of them is rape. So if the Swedes say its rape, its rape.

2) During the extradition hearings in the UK... and there were 3 appeals... one of the sets of judges ruled that some of the rape charges would still be considered rape in the UK. This means that regardless of the no need of duopoly, they gave him the doubt and even still he failed...

It pays to actually take the time and read the court documents and transcripts of the case. You might learn something.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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@Diogenes Re: One Swedish Charge left

Actually no.

With the outstanding EAW, the UK would have had to turn him over to the Swedes first unless the Swedes agreed and the US would have had to make their case... The US doesn't need to get him now and they have a lot more time since the charges he potentially faces in the US have a long statute of limitations.

So from the US perspective... they would love to have him back in AUSTRALIA, which is where he will go upon departing England. The UK Government has the power of how and where to toss him from their shores along with which countries will accept him on their soil. Since he's proven to be such a prat and jumped bail causing millions of pounds to be wasted on securing the embassy, he's not going to be given the benefit of the doubt and the UK government will put him on the plane to Australia since he's an Aussie traveling on an Aussie passport.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Boffin

@Yank Re: One Swedish Charge left

Sorry, but you need to take off the tin foiled hat.

Here's the thing.

Assanage pulled a runner in the UK as well as in Sweden.

So supposed Sweden dropped the remaining charge, what then.

He's not facing extradition, however he is going to face a jumping bail charge.

Regardless of what the UK does to him, the next thing he's going to be doing is being sent on a plane back to Australia. No stops, no detours. He's going to be booted from the country back to Australia.

Got it?

If the US wanted to, that's where they'd snatch him up via extradition.

Sweden wants him because he's allegedly raped (By Swedish standards/law) two women and rather than face the music, he did a runner. That's it.

Since Obama is our current POTUS, do you seriously believe he's going to go after Assange while he lets Hillary Clinton and others slide? IMHO he'd rather let things die than get to the bottom of it and expose the truth.

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US House okays making internet tax exemptions permanent

Ian Michael Gumby
Silver badge

@Tom No, this is bad, really bad.

First, the trend is to shop online, less at local retailers. So this means less tax revenue.

Second, companies are taxed in state if they have a business presence.

This gets confusing if a store has an Amazon site, but fulfills the orders directly themselves. Who's responsible for collecting the Tax? (Hint: Amazon could do this with very little effort.)

Amazon will still have Red and Green States... ones where they pay taxes because they have warehouses and ones where they don't and won't offer any local services so that they don't get caught in the tax issue.

In terms of paying state taxes... Its very easy, trivial actually, for the government to set up a web service that will tell you the percentage of tax owed by a ship to address. Of course buying online may still be cheaper than buying something down the street due to city taxes if they offer free shipping.

The US doesn't have any concept of VAT other than sales tax. So there's no pressure on over consumption.

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MapR floats Streams for integrated big-data stack

Ian Michael Gumby
Silver badge
Boffin

Just some corrections.

First, you don't need to run a separate cluster for spark. You have YARN.

And with MR2 (YARN) you could in theory run storm on the same cluster. Albeit you have to monitor the cluster and storm which will run outside of YARN to make sure that you're not overloading the cluster machines.

It will be interesting to see more on Streams. To date, MapR has built better mousetraps when compared to Apache's release(s).

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The gear I use in my test lab: A look at three Trident+ switches

Ian Michael Gumby
Silver badge
Alert

You should talk to a networking consultant.

"My experiences with my Dell PowerConnect 8132F have been phenomenal, so I looked at what they have in this range. The Dell N4064 is a 48 port 10GbE switch that can have up to four 40GbE ports and can be had for $12,500 if I work at it."

-=-

Uhm ... hate to break it to you... but you're looking at tech that's been around for ~3+ years and could be bought cheaper...

I believe Arista has this... along with some of the other vendors.

What you could do ... have a couple (2+) ToR switches. One for 10GbE the other for the 1Gbe and then uplink the 1GbE switch to the 10GbE and out to your main back plane switch.

Just a thought...

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Doctor Who: Oh, look! There's a restaurant at the end of the universe in Hell Bent

Ian Michael Gumby
Silver badge
Boffin

@msknight Uhmmm but she is dead.

You really have to follow the science fiction guide in time travel...

Her death did occur and its a fixed point in time. She is dead and will be dead. She has no heart beat and exists out of the temporal universe. She is both dead and immortal. Its this duality which is in itself a paradox. They should never had been able to pluck her out of her time stream. In doing so, they created this paradox and it will be corrected if she goes back to that moment in time.

The interesting thing is that there are now two Tardis' loose on the universe.

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Teradata: We're going to concentrate on data analytics. So we've binned our top man

Ian Michael Gumby
Silver badge
Boffin

@Gordon Re: Get out whilst the getting is good

You seem to have a bit of an incomplete vision...

IBM - After their third attempt to enter the Hadoop market, they are making a fourth attempt by pushing their 'expertise' in analytics and are jumping on the Spark bandwagon. So they are starting to play in the Hadoop/Big Data space.

Oracle - they still have exadata and are partnering w Cloudera.

Teradata has entered the space via acquisitions.

So while they will lose some sales to big data, each have their own specialties that will still exist.

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WDC's shingle-free stocking filler: A 10TB helium disk drive

Ian Michael Gumby
Silver badge

@Alien Re: Not to be picky, but how much do they cost?

Why?

Look, lets get real.

Do you have 10TB of data that you need to store?

Putting 4x of these in a RAID 10 NAS/SAN will give you 20TB of usable storage and reliability.

That's a lot of data.

If you're looking at a 4K movie jukebox... you've got a long way to go before you have enough available content to fill that up... and even then... you could probably afford it...

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Ian Michael Gumby
Silver badge
Boffin

@AC... Will we see 10TB desktop drives? Nope.

First you can always put a 10TB SATA server drive in a desktop box... no one is stopping you from doing that... however the real question is why?

Assume for a second that the hype around Crossbar's ReRAM (Resistive Ram) technology is real.

A 1cm^2 chip could potentially hold 1TB of storage. Now imagine a 2.5" SSD sized card that contains these chips along with the controller chips...

Granted that SATA ||| is too slow to really take advantage of these chips, designing the SSD-like ReRAM would be a no brainer and would give you something in the realm of 16TB using less power and generating less heat and noise than a 10TB drive.

Imagine a full sized PCIe card. Now you have more than 32TB+ of faster storage.

Or take the SansDisk approach like their UltraDIMMs that used DDR3 formats. Imagine using DDR5 (today's latest memory footprint.) Each DIMM could theoretically have 4TB of storage or more.

So depending on your form factor... you could have 16GB of RAM (2x8GB ) and 8TB of storage without any hard drives until you add a PCIe card. (Assuming 4 slots)

So ask yourself why do you want all of this noise, and heat from spinning rust? Much easier to fry a ReRAM chip than it is to destroy a hard drive of spinning rust. (for those paranoid)

With ReRAM around the corner, you're going to see a disruptive change in terms of computing power and form factor.

To your point... you can build a server that has 4 PCIe slots. Fill this with ReRAM cards... even raided, you have 32+TB in a small box. (Typical ATX cases are 4U).

32TB is a lot of storage.

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Sysadmin's former boss claims five years FREE support or off to court

Ian Michael Gumby
Silver badge

@AC ...Re: @Joe Drunk

Yeah, I escaped from the Borg... ;-)

They may have terminated the higher paid contractors... but they had to pay them for their notice period. Depending on the contract, that could be 0 or it could be a month.

So even on a 6 month contract and the notice period is 1 month... they let you go early... you can get paid out for the month. But here's the catch. They can refuse and tell you to sue them. If the payout period is less than what you will spend on a lawyer.. you tend to walk away and warn your friends about IBM.

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