* Posts by Ian Michael Gumby

3080 posts • joined 11 Apr 2006

Narcissist Heidi Powell wants her dot-com and she wants it now, now, NOW!

Ian Michael Gumby
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Re: Popcorn Please

The sad thing is that this is real.

I've had my domain for 22 years and I have to wonder when some numbnutz tries to sue to take my domain name away because I don't run a public facing web site.

This should have been dismissed on the face of it.

Its really a no-brainer, but in the US, the court system is designed to keep the lawyers employed.

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Viacom, Mattel and pals busted for stalking kids with creepy web ads

Ian Michael Gumby
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Big Brother

Re: Can this precident be applies to say... Google?

Google is a monopoly even though they haven't been declared a monopoly.

They can track you now without using cookies.

But the scariest thing was a friend was surfing the web on his phone and when he walked in to his bathroom to use the throne, he got served an ad for toilet paper. I kid you not.

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FBI overpaid $999,900 to crack San Bernardino iPhone 5c password

Ian Michael Gumby
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Re: Now there is no need to reinvent the wheel.

Sorry, but when you have a single phone, and if you burn out the chip the data is lost then you are screwed.

In your example, you removed the old NAND, but is it still functioning 100% of the time? Can you then put it back in too? 100% of the time?

If not 100% of the time, then you have risk and if you have only one shot... you would want to seek other options.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Boffin

@Phil Koenig

"

They probably overpaid, and overpaid by a lot, and trumped-up the figure to make headlines. But they could not have done it in a proper way for $100, either.

"

What exactly did the FBI pay for when they hired this company to crack the phone?

I mean how many PhDs helped design the tool set used. (This was an in house developed system)

How much for the guy who's using it and doing the work?

Compute time on hardware that is custom designed? (Even with COTS hardware there is always some tweaking)

All of this is part of the cost.

And again, there is a time value to the solution. Could the FBI and NSA build a comparable solution?

Sure, but it would take N months of X man years of resources, plus the hardware...

And that's why you see the $$$$ being charged. Because they can do the following:

1) Show value

2) Cheaper than the alternative

3) Have a solution in place

4) If they failed, there was always a riskier plan B of pulling the chip.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Boffin

@Nepenthe Re: @Voland ...You are missing the point

Sorry, no.

The in house 'expertise' is limited.

Unlike TV in house expertise tend to be more 'Jack of all trades, and master of some'. When you need deeper technical expertise in a specific area, you hire outside staff.

Going for unpaid advice is one thing. Going for advice where you have a high risk and a short time period is another. That's why they went to that company.

While at client sites, I routinely am asked to look over the shoulders of their in house expertise (software architects). I either bless their design, or I tweak it. Sometimes I tell them to start from scratch and give them a high level view of a solution that fits. I am that paid voice who gives them the expert opinion.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Boffin

@Voland ...Re: You are missing the point

No. Sorry. Not true... Use Occam's Razor...

1) You remember the joke/story about the old engineer who charged 10K to fix an assembly line?

2) If you don't know the solution and you can assess the value of the solution... if the price to solve the problem is less than the value, you pay it.

Occam's Razor, this is the simplest solution. The FBI didn't have a clue on what to do, and the options... were too risky... they paid the $$$ because the potential value found on the phone was worth more.

The other issue... there is a lot of risk in desoldering the chip, especially since you only have one chip to work with. You have to balance that risk against alternatives... like software hacking.

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Swedish appeals court upholds arrest warrant for Julian Assange

Ian Michael Gumby
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Boffin

@AC ... Re: @John... Very few commenters seem to know the facts of this case...

"

Assange has a simple choice: if he wants fame, he'll have to call the US embassy and ask them to send a car round, at that point he can play the hero and get the martyr fame he wants (which he'd like to have without having to go through the actual suffering in jail part, but that's not how that works). If he wants continued infamy, it doesn't matter where he is: stuck in the Embassy desperately trying to ride along on other people's efforts (who DO take risks) or standing in front of a Swedish court getting confirmed that he's so sad a fucker that he has to sleep with a girl whilst she is still asleep. Either way, he's irrelevant.

"

Actually, not quite. He can go to the US Embassy where he will be detained and handed over to the Brits who will then process him and hand him over to the Swedes. Forget bail. (That's pretty obvious).

Remember that the US doesn't want him. (Officially) There are no charges against him or any extradition warrants. His offer is fluff and he's getting scared. Manning is getting his gender reassignment surgery.

So all this does is let the actual course of law play out.

He faces the courts in Sweden. He may or may not spend any time in Sweden but he will most likely be barred from the country. He goes back to the UK. He faces time for his bail jumping. Probably what... a year? Then the UK tosses him from their country. If he were your garden variety pratt, he would get to choose his destination. But Saint Julian being the most ambitious sort of pratt, will get tossed back to Australia and they will have some choice words for him. They also have the option of baring him from leaving the country and recinding his passport.

Now if the US wants to... again it may depend on who wins the White House... they have the option of picking him up and charging him... and maybe Manning will testify against him. I have no idea... its possible, but unfortunately my crystal ball only works on probably events I cannot predict the future.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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@ John ... #2 Re: @John... Very few commenters seem to know the facts of this case...

You wrote:

"3. The version of events are absolutely nothing like what you say."

Normally I wouldn't say this but you seem to be pretty thick.

Its not what I say, but what the court documents say.

Go back and read the testimony from the Swedish Prosecutor when asked about "questioning Assange".

Here again, she reiterated that its not just questioning (interview) but part of the formal process to charge Assange with the crime. To be clear and blunt, she was asked by the Judge if she intended to charge Assange and her response was yes, he was to be charged.

While not a lawyer, I've seen some slime ball attorneys do some questionable things. Stuff where they get sanctioned and disbarred. Assange and his lawyer played the percentages that he could flee and not face an EAW and the case would be dropped. Had it been a normal bloke and not some pratt (Assange) that might have been the case. Just not worth the effort. But when you go around tweaking the nose of some very powerful people and play politics, you end up pissing the wrong people off.

Oh and this is really all about the issue of his alleged rape of those girls. Again if the US wants him. They can grab him in Australia.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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@John ... Re: @John... Very few commenters seem to know the facts of this case...

Wow. Your logic leaves me speechless. (Julian is that you?)

"2. It is not illegal to abscond."

Oh but it is illegal to flee jurisdiction while under investigation. Assange's lawyer was in communication with the prosecution when they were asking for him to bring his client in for the formal interview which meant he would be charged.

The lawyer gave Assange the heads up. Assange flees jurisdiction while the lawyer dodges phone calls from the prosecution. Only he couldn't dodge the text messages left by the prosecution nor claim he didn't receive them. (He did and the phone company can prove it.)

Again, Assange's Swedish lawyer admitted to this under oath in the UK to the Swedish Prosecutor.

You can't argue point by point because the evidence is against you.

Here, lets save some time... Assange had not one, but three appeal hearings. <u>HE LOST ALL THREE. </u>

The courts even went a step further in establishing the validity of the warrant by looking the the reciprocity of the charges. Meaning would he still be guilty of breaking the law in the UK assuming the facts in evidence were true. NOTE THE FOLLOWING: The EAW treaty specifies something like 32 criminal act/charges that do not require reciprocity. The charge of Rape is one of those that does not require reciprocity. (I think its #22 on the list, so if under Swedish law he is to be charged with rape, then what the say is rape goes. )

Yet to give Assange the benefit of the doubt, they looked at the evidence presented (again assume it to be true since this isn't a trial) and under UK law, he too would be charged with rape.

Bottom line, you can make any claims you want, but the actually law (courts in the UK) upheld the warrant and Assange then compounded the issue by jumping bail.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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@Ohil Koenig. .. Re: Ah, yes, the famous "afraid of the US" bogeyman.

Look, you really need to learn something about the case and Swedish law.

Assange goes to Sweden to be questioned and charged. Its a formal process. This would have occurred except that Assange's original lawyer in Sweden ran interference while Assange left the country. He admitted to this under oath in the UK during the first extradition appeal.

Sorry, but for someone claiming to know something... the only thing stinking in this is Assange. You can easily google and read the transcripts which I believe are still online where the case against him was spelled out.

Assange had not one but three extradition appeal hearings and each one said he was to go back.

The law works. Assange had his day in court. Now the women he allegedly raped should have theirs to get some closure.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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@Hans1 ... Re: Ah, yes, the famous "afraid of the US" bogeyman.

"6. The UK has absolutely NO SAY whatsoever in what Sweden does once Assange is in Sweden."

Uhm this is wrong. Flat out wrong.

Because of the EAW and extradition proceedings, if any country made an extradition request to Sweden, the UK would have some input on the request. Depending on the situation, they could object.

This had been pointed out during the first extradition hearing where Assange put forth the insane idea that this was a plot by the CIA to get him.

Again the truth... when this all blows over, if the US wanted him in connection to Manning's theft, they will have plenty of time to get him in Australia, assuming he doesn't flee.

Remember his prior bad acts as a teen will be brought up and used against him in Australia which would pretty much seal the deal. Maybe he wouldn't have ended up such a pratt if that judge had sentenced him to jail instead of probation.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Facepalm

At PNGuinn ... Re: Except that Assange didn't leak anything

Ah but wrong.

He wasn't fully dressed in a 'rain coat' so he did leak which is why its rape and not consensual sex. Had he worn a 'rain coat', then there wouldn't be an issue because they had consented to protected sex.

Of course had he instead kept to Rosie and her 5 sisters, none of this would have happened and he would already be in US custody if they wanted him.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Boffin

@Mark 85 ...Re: Ah, yes, the famous "afraid of the US" bogeyman.

"This is beginning to sound like a "we don't want him, you take him and he'll be your problem" type of thing."

While Assange is a pratt, there is the issue of law and the fact that while Assange could theoretically face the death penalty, they will not agree to any extradition to the US unless its off the table. Since there is no extradition on the table, the worst case for Assange is if he's being indicted as a co-conspirator to Manning. If so, he wouldn't face the death penalty but something less than Manning.

But even still, Assange would have the ability to fight extradition to the US in both Sweden and the UK since he would be in Swedish Custody and due back to the UK for bail jumping. The UK could waive its right and then if Sweden lets him go... that's it. However that would be a riskier move than just waiting until he's sent back to Australia.

You have to remember as a teen he was convicted of hacking US government and defense systems. This will play against him if the US wanted Assange. Here they could use his past against him. Australia could also remove his right to travel and take away his passport for his antics in Sweden and the UK. (This would be the Australian Government's right. )

So while the UK and Sweden really don't want him... (who does?) ... they still have to follow their laws and give him the opportunity to fight the extradition. Now having said all of this... if you want to consider how the US would act... look at how they handled Guccifer. He was in, testified / cut a deal, got sentenced and then back to fulfill his current sentence. Afterwards he could come back to the US, face his sentence and then get sent packing back home. (I think that there are other options ...)

The bottom line, his fear of the US extraditing him from Europe is in my opinion overblown. Its far easier and more likely that if the US wants him, he'll be taken when he gets back to Australia. A lot depends of course on the winds of politics and world current events.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Boffin

@John... Re: Very few commenters seem to know the facts of this case...

Clearly you don't know the facts you think you do.

1) Assange jumped bail and is hiding out at the Ecuadorian Embassy. He can leave at any time and face the Swedish Government, along with the UK Government for Jumping Bail.

2) Assange did flee. (Absconded) This was accomplished with the help of his then Swedish lawyer who admitted to this during the first extradition hearing.

3) As identified by the Swedish prosecution, their legal system requires that Assange comes in for a formal interview where after the interview they will charge him. In the first extradition hearing, they made it very clear that this wasn't an "interview" per se, but that Assange would be charged.

4) Assange fled jurisdiction where he needs to be so that they can official charge him, hence the extradition request. He has had not one but three appeal hearings where the extradition request was granted. He then FLED again, jumping bail.

Look, I can go on, point by point, but you're trotting out the old arguments, all of which have been soundly been rebuked.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Re: If he is ever dissapeared

People would care and many would be happy.

Seriously... if the US wanted him. He will be extradited in Australia and it would be very public.

You also have to ask yourself why the US is paying for Chelsea Manning's Sex change operation... ;-)

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Boffin

@People's Poet ... Re: Ah, yes, the famous "afraid of the US" bogeyman.

Learn the law.

Publishing... the leaks... he has some legal protection and it wouldn't be worth the effort.

Assisting Manning... that's a different story.

BTW, I think you need to understand what said batteries are used for as to why it was illegal.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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@Jason B.... Re: Ah, yes, the famous "afraid of the US" bogeyman.

Assange was asking for blanket immunity because there are no extradition requests in play.

No Government would do that. Period.

Again the US wouldn't extradite from Sweden because now the UK would be involved.

If anything the only thing Assange could be in trouble with is the involvement w Manning in the theft of the material. There the statute of limitations is long. Much longer than Sweden's sex crimes and most likely longer than the patience of Ecuador.

The issue is this.

He surrenders from the Embassy... he goes to Sweden.

Best case for Assange, too much time has elapsed and he gets a plea deal w no jail time... or found not guilty if it goes to trial. Worst case... he is found guilty and because of his stunt they throw the book at him and he gets what? 4 years max?

The from Sweden, he goes back to the UK.

I don't know what he would get for jumping bail, lets say 2 yrs max?

From there, he's booted back to Australia. He doesn't get the option to choose where he goes when he leaves England.

That's where he will be extradited from if the US does in fact extradite him. (A Clinton Presidency would. Trump may not.)

The US wouldn't attempt to extradite from the EU. They have a better case in Australia due to his prior bad acts as a teen.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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@AC ... Re: Ah, yes, the famous "afraid of the US" bogeyman.

You're getting down voted because you're focusing on the wrong thing.

Assange may have tweaked the eagle's beak, but publishing the leaks is the least of his worries and he actually does have strong protection here and could very well fight that thanks to Ellsberg.

The truth is that if Assange isn't paranoid, then there is some merit to the claim he assisted Manning, which is an illegal act.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Boffin

@Jimmy Page... Re: Ah, yes, the famous "afraid of the US" bogeyman.

I think to answer your question you have this:

"

If Obama grants Manning clemency, Assange will agree to US prison in exchange -- despite its clear unlawfulness https://t.co/MZU30S3Eia

"

Why is Assange making this statement?

The answer is that while there are no charges pending or extradition request, Assange is fearful of the US.

Its not for publishing the Wikileaks documents. He actually has some legal protections under the claims that he is a journalistic organization. the "Ellsberg" SCOTUS decision back in '71 allows Wikileaks and Assange to claim that they published for the greater good. Any decent lawyer would be able to win that case.

But the larger issue... Assange may have also participated in the break in and subsequent theft which would carry a heavy prison sentence. We know of this because of evidence revealed in Manning's Article 32 hearing, and if true then Assange is an accomplice. Yet this was never produced during his court martial because Manning had admitted to the facts of the theft. Nor did Manning make any public statements concerning Assange. Assange's fear of the US tends to lend credibility to the claim that he helped Manning break in....

The whole mess in Sweden is Assange's own doing. Boys will be boys and that's what he gets for taking women for granted. (When in Sweden, play by their rules...) So the whole issue there is that these women should get their day in court, something Assange has deprived them from having...

The point is that the fear of extradition from the UK or Sweden is over rated. If he did go to Sweden, and he did get found guilty, and he did get prison time... He could be extradited to face a trial in the US, however that scenario would be unlikely. The issue would have to go through both the UK and Sweden. Then there's the issue of bail jumping. Jail time for that. Again the US could extradite him, but he could again fight it and who knows.

After all of this... he goes back to Australia.

And here... he yet again could be extradited to the US. Here, however, unlike in the EU/UK, Assange was convicted as a teen for breaking in to US Systems. This could come in to play and would make the extradition much easier.

So if Assange did assist in the theft. He does have reason to fear the US, except that he will not be rendered in the EU or UK, but in Australia. (I know Brexit won't happen for a while but just getting used to the idea...)

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Apple's tax bill: Big in Japan. Like, $120m big

Ian Michael Gumby
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Boffin

@Chris Miller ... Re: Apple pay all tax that is due

If only it were that simple.

Revenue recognition is a bit tougher in the digital world and what constitutes revenues earned outside of the US. Even there games can be played.

Take a certain global coffee shop....

They ship their products to the EU country with the least amount of taxes, they do this as Company A. The coffee shop in the EU (Company B) buys the supplies from Company A at a markup that sucks up most if not all of the profits. Even though Company B could have bought the coffee, etc ... directly from the same source as Company A so that the revenue rec would be properly recorded in the country where the product was sold.

Note while this isn't illegal, its a way to do business that will reduce their tax exposure.

The thing with Apple, Google, Facebook, is that they undervalued assets that they moved offshore and then recognized the revenue in Ireland rather than were the transaction occurred. Don't be a hater of the tax man. At least not here.

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Songsmiths sue US antitrust over Google-friendly rules ruling

Ian Michael Gumby
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@AC ... Re: Treasonous

Did you miss his sarcasm.

The one decision Obama still gets to make and needs to make is to keep ICAAN under US control.

As counter intuitive as that sounds... handing it over to some unknown group will be worse. It would be a fracturing of the net.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Boffin

Re: "To understand [..] requires understanding how song licensing works in the United States"

Here's the shorter version.

Lynch's minion should have recused herself due to her past work for the companies involved.

That said, this case should move forward and will most likely end up in the Supreme Court.

Yet another overreach by Obama's Administration. If Clinton wins... expect more of this and things to get worse. Trump? Now that's a wild card but I suspect he'd walk things back to more normal and rational thoughts.

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Ad flog Plus: Adblock Plus now an advertising network, takes cash to broker web banners

Ian Michael Gumby
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Mushroom

Big mistake....

First, this opens a door to another company to create an ad blocker to replace ABP.

(Its a free market)

Second, now ABP can be accused of shaking down sites by saying... Look, we're going to continue to block ads as people look at your site unless you cough up the cash... IMHO that could get them in trouble with the law.

Not a smart thing to do.

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Sex is bad for older men, and even worse when it's good

Ian Michael Gumby
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Joke

@AC ...Re: @Is Just a Bloke ... Correlation does not imply causation

Yes, condoms do have expiration dates, no duh.

But since being married, haven't had need to use the little rain coats ...

The sad thing is that you missed the obvious question... why did I still have condoms in the pocket and never taken them out... ';-)

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Coat

@Is Just a Bloke ... Re: Correlation does not imply causation

Uhm... let me guess.

You're a 40 year old virgin still living at home with mum and dad?

You share the computer with them so you don't watch porn because they monitor your internet use?

Really?

Maybe we should open up a kickstarted account to help you buy a book called the Kama Sutra ?

That may help... assuming your local library doesn't have a copy or anything on sex ed.

Mine's the coat with the old unused condoms since before I was married.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Devil

Re: I think, on balance,

This is why you need to work out and take a statin. ;-)

Now if my wife were truly evil, she'd encourage me to shag women who are barely (1/2 my age + 7) and die from the heart attack so she gets everything!

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Google plots cop detection for auto autos

Ian Michael Gumby
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Re: Oh good grief

You're right, its not patentable.

This should not be granted a patent because they aren't really doing anything new or novel.

Vision software has been around for years.

Recognizing traffic signs and speed limits has been around for years.

As to 'flashing light patterns'... its a slight change and really isn't new or novel.

(To your point) BTW anyone with a flashing red/ blue or mix would cause the vehicle to pull over.

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Lindsay Lohan's Grand Theft Auto V cartoon case kicked out of court

Ian Michael Gumby
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@J R Hartley Re: BAN THIS SICK FILTH

Were you talking about the game, or the lawsuit?

Personally I wish the US would adopt more of the loser pays mentality because that would put a freeze on a lot of these dumb suits. But then again... we'd have more lawyers on the dole.

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Samsung's million-IOPS, 6.4TB, 51Gb/s SSD is ... well, quite something

Ian Michael Gumby
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Re: If you have to ask...

Speed vs reliability?

First the flash SSD is reliable. I think you meant to say resiliency.

Lots of applications and keep in mind, you can always house the data in two locations on different types of media to get the redundancy that will give you the resiliency

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Re: If you have to ask...

I'd love to see pricing and price difference between the low profile and the regular sized.

So if you can use 2U instead of 4U boxes... ok, the issue though would be power and heat constraints.

First, forget about VMware since you wouldn't be virtualizing these boxes.

The idea in my post was to look at tiering the storage so that you had fast storage and slower storage that would be high density and cheaper.

So I thought of spinning rust because SSDs don't match their density and lower cost. Again here, there's a trade off due to heat and power requirements. Assuming raid 10, you would need 2X spinning rust to match the storage in the fast memory.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Boffin

@ACs ... Seriously?

You do not want to RAID these devices.

Seriously, are you that thick?

Consider that you have possibly 4 PCIe slots in each machine. You now have the ability to tier your storage devices. 1 copy of data on the PCIe SATA disks, and then 1 copy on raided or GFS type set up. (GFS = global file system) which protects better than raid because you have it distributed across your cluster...) This means that you will want to have both SATA and spinning rust to prevent data loss.

Now for the fun part. Data loss / Data corruption is only part of data security. If you're working with PII or other sensitive data, you will need to also encrypt your data. Then also you would need to control who has access and then have role based authorization ...

A bit more than just a raid discussion...

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Thumb Up

If you have to ask...

Then you don't have a real need for the tech...

The real important question is how much heat does it generate and how dense can you pack em?

;-)

You'll have a 4U rack and 4 to a box so that's ~25 TB of raw storage per box.

With 10 per rack (Depending on power/weight/cooling) , that's going to be 250TB per rack.

4 racks per PB.

Its not that great a density relative to spinning rust, but the response time withing a cluster (think spark/big data) would be incredible. Or if you're going old school, Oracle or Vertica relational db which could also be really cool.

Lots of other cool options too.

These times are changing, provided they can deliver on quantity and pricing is something enterprises can afford.

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The Internet of Cows is moo-ving fast … no bull!

Ian Michael Gumby
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Re: Huh,

An invisible fence isn't the same thing.

Really? You have to think about it.

And yes, RFID chips are used in data tracking.

That's not doing anything but marking the animal.

And you have to have a reader. That's usually found on the head gate. (You do know what the head gate is, right?

RFID tags, ear tags, are roughly $2.50 or less in quantity. Calves and Cows don't go to market that high. At least not in the states although YMMV.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Re: Social

There are usually 1 bull to 20 or 40 cows ...

Not much of a social life.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Mushroom

Cleaning up BS?

If you could automate that... then there would be a lot of reporters and most of the press out of work.

This year's political races around the world (including the US) are full of it.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Boffin

@ Refugee from Windblowz ... Re: Not exactly a developing market

Not only is it not a new idea or concept, its not even a viable one.

IT in Ag makes sense in a couple of applications.

1) Farm equipment automation.

2) Soil testing / sampling

3) data tracking... from birth to store.

Just to name a few.

The farm equipment can be automated due to the use of GPS w ground station. This will help reduce labor costs and will help with labor shortages. (Certain farm work is back breaking and not many people are willing to do it. )

Add to this the ability to test soil around the farm and you can better tune your fertilizer use as well as join this data with farm yields. Could even help improve some of the organic methods on the farms.

In terms of data tracking, some numb nutz wanted to create collars and then beam the data up to a data center to track the animals so that they could monitor the health of the animals. The issue is that you need to wire your farm. So how much do you think it will cost to wire up a 300+ acre farm with wi-fi? and then transmitters back to your central access point? Not cheap or easy. Not to mention the potential for theft. Then there's a question about what value do you get? If the animal is sick you could provide meds earlier, but again at what cost? Especially when you consider that you have cows that sometimes ignore their calfs (especially first time cows), delivery isn't always easy and cows and calf can die. Calf gets ill from mother's milk... on average you can lose up to 4 calfs and a couple of cows a year. (Depending on varmints) The cost of the tech far exceeds the benefits.

But tracking data is a bit different.

You can buy cheap RFID tags. You can monitor the cows, what you feed them, weight, and what meds you give them when you work the herd twice a year. This would help to establish and certify good farming practices.

Sorry, but there are limits and the smaller farmers can't afford to waste money because the benefits just aren't there. (Outside of the examples I gave)

This comes from practical experience where I am in IT and while father-in-law was alive, he lived on a farm and I 'volunteered' to work the herd as well as invest in a couple of his bulls to help grow the herd.

There is too much hype and when you crunch the numbers... it doesn't work.

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MySQL daddy Widenius: Open-source religion won't feed MariaDB

Ian Michael Gumby
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Re: the efforts of hobby coders

You missed the point.

The bulk of the work in FOSS is off the backs of people who have minimal economic incentive.

Anyone can take an apache project code and embed it in to their licensed app with minimal requirements. (Why do you think companies like IBM like Apache licensing?) So you can take mySQL/MariaDB/etc and build/enhance a product that is no longer open source.

Fully open open source code is not going to make you rich. The exception to that rule is RedHat and its in an interesting situation.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Boffin

Re: the efforts of hobby coders

There are several types of people who contribute.

Those who work for big companies and as part of their job they are allowed to contribute.

Those who work for big companies where the companies are backing the Open Source projects and are assigned to work on them.

Then there are developers who work on these projects outside of school and work on the code as a way to make a name for themselves and to establish some credibility.

These people don't make money off of Open Source ...

The only way to make money is to own the code so to speak and provide paid support.

Even then, you can't make a lot of money doing this.

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Intel teases geeks with 2017 AI hyper-chip: Xeon Phi Knights Mill

Ian Michael Gumby
Silver badge

Re: Eh?

VT-100? LOL...

Everything old is new.

When you have networks that are now fast enough to have distributed memory and cpus that are powerful enough as well as have enough memory to retain state?

Yeah, old ideas are now being tested.

Its a good thing... for those of us who've been in this game for a long time (30+ years) but are still too young to retire... dust off all of those old texts and ACM/IEEE Symposium notes... :-)

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Penetration tech: BAE Systems' new ammo for Our Boys and Girls

Ian Michael Gumby
Silver badge

@Richad 81

"There's something rather odd about discussing the toxicity of a bullet"

I guess that comes from not being allowed to own guns and shoot.

Lets talk about shotguns. Lead Shot vs Steel Shot.

Which shot would you rather have in your game bird?

Shooting clays?

In Chicago, there once was a trap range where they flung the targets over the lake.

They phased out lead shot because of its polluting the environment.

Or that deer?

Shooting .22lr?

There were a lot of rumors swirling around about the shortage of .22lr ammo.

Seems that they increased the weight (amount of lead) due to EPA regulations. Ironically they increased the amount of lead (weight) in the rounds.

The point is that beyond military applications, you have sport shooters and range time where you will expend more ammo than during a military conflict. That's where you want to keep your environment healthy.

But back to the article...

Steel core bullets aren't new. Most ranges will not let you shoot with steel in them because they cause more damage to the indoor retaining walls and materials. Some outdoor ranges won't allow it because steel core / tipped rounds may cause sparks and fires.

A larger issue with non military rounds is controlled expansion. When you hunt, you want to kill the animal as quickly as possible.

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'Clock Bomb Kid' family sues

Ian Michael Gumby
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Its the long con...

The 'clock' was a commercial clock opened up and put in to the case to make it look like a bomb.

He's a fraud.

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Seagate soups up M.2 Nytro flash card

Ian Michael Gumby
Silver badge
Boffin

@Stuart H. M.2 isn't replacing RAM...

Here's the skinny.

DRAM is the fastest although its volatile. Lose power, you lose what's in memory. Then there's the density. 1 TB of memory takes up a lot of DIMM slots. Its also the closest to the CPU.

But what happens when you want to persist your data?

SATA spinning rust? very slow.

SATA SSD? Faster but limited by the SATA interface.

PCIe (Closer to the CPU) faster.

NVME (M.2) faster still.

So now with the faster bus, you're able to get better performance from the flash drive.

This is why the M.2 is a good thing. You now have a persistence layer that is fast so that you can still get better performance without maximizing your memory.

At the same time... these m.2 flash cards/SSDs use less energy and throw less heat than older alternatives.

Outside of this... the UltraDIMM technology (Diable) where you have DIMM slots with a persistence layer, albeit smaller than what you can get on an M.2 card.

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F-35 targeting system laser will be 'almost impossible' to use in UK

Ian Michael Gumby
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@AC Re: Ditch the American Crap Planes...

Did the UK build a new aircraft carrier capable of launching an F/A-18?

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Ian Michael Gumby
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@boltar ... Re: None-story

Then have your pilots come train in the US.

Note that they will be bringing an extra large extra suitcase to take back a bunch of electronic goodies when they make their pilgrimage to a local Best Buy... ;-)

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Diablo backers toss $18m in pot to forge software keys to XPoint DIMM kingdom

Ian Michael Gumby
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Thumb Up

Interesting but misses a key use case...

All memory writes by the application are first written to DRAM and then asynchronously moved to the Memory1 DIMMs. While an application is continuously writing to the same region of memory, that data will remain in DRAM. The data will only be moved to the Memory1 DIMMs when the writing of data to that specific memory region stops and the pages become 'old' or 'dirty.'

Therefore, if pages are modified frequently and indefinitely, those pages may never be written to the Memory1 DIMMs, ensuring both optimal performance and endurance. Alternatively, any data continuously written randomly by the application to all pages in the memory map will flow through the DRAM to the Memory1 DIMMs to make room for new, incoming writes.

-=-

This describes using this as a way to off load memory into a more denser albeit slower memory that can be persisted. Yet the most frequently used pages aren't cached so that in the event of a power failure, that data is lost.

Don't get me wrong, this model works well if you want to store a lot of data and spill to this DIMM rather than spill to disk, (even PCIe cards.) It would require some changes to spark, albeit all under the covers and would require a setting like "MEMORY_AND_DISK" to be "MEMORY_AND_DIMM".

Still waiting to see what Crossbar comes up with where you have 1TB level density... Not sure if it would fit in a DIMM slot, but maybe one of the X.2 type slots ...

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Did the Russians really hack the DNC or is this another Sony Pictures moment? You decide

Ian Michael Gumby
Silver badge
Boffin

@Veti Re: Tu use Hillary's own words...

I think you missed the OP's initial point.

Putin if the allegations are true... didn't craft the emails which indicate that the DNC party's nomination and election was a sham. In short, if you're a democrat who voted for your party's candidate, you were disenfranchised but their actions.

This has nothing to do with Putin but the DNC and its own corruption along with the corruption from the Clintons.

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The very latest on the DNC email conspiracy. Which conspiracy? All of them, of course!

Ian Michael Gumby
Silver badge
Boffin

@captain solo

The real villian?

It the modern 'Bonnie and Clyde' team.

The other irony is that while everyone talks about Trump being an anti-Semite, his daughter converted to Judaism because her husband is Jewish.

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Apple Watch craze over before it started: Wrist-puter drags market screaming off a cliff

Ian Michael Gumby
Silver badge
Boffin

@Hyper Re: @Bob Dole ... Could Also Be...

"The Apple Watch keeps perfect time."

Perfect time?

Really?

Time is relative.

The clock chip in the watch is cheap and probably has a bit of skew.

It works well enough because it syncs to the iPhone. Who also has a bit of skew in their cheap clocks.

But it works ok, because it occasionally syncs with the cell towers which have much better clocks which are more accurate.

Good base station clocks have both GPS and Radio antennas to connect to the radio clock signal from a known site and along with knowing their GPS coordinates they are able to sync properly to the time signal and then keep track of the time and its internal skew.

And of course there are differences in terms of the types of clocks and their relative accuracy.

I guess what you meant to say was that your iWatch keeps time well enough that your girlfriend doesn't yell at you for being late. ;-)

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Ian Michael Gumby
Silver badge
Devil

@Eddy Ito ... YMMV

I've seen a lot of people with them.

Where it comes in handy... at airports when you need to go through the TSA pre line or when you board the plane. (US issue) There's an app that has the flight detailed Q Code now visible on the watch face.

It does tell time (as accurate as the phone and the network)

It does work well as an alarm for meetings.

It does work well for those who want to screen their calls because their over sized cell phone is too hard to get out of their pocket / purse/ murse/ or backpack.

Its also a status symbol to some who don't understand why some men where mechanical watches...

Personally, I think the next watch I'll get is a CS clock that I can wear as a pocket watch and charge every night. Then I can become a walking ground station for GPS fixes. ;-)

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Pirate

@Bob Dole ... Re: Could Also Be...

There are some who don't like wearing watches. Ok, that's a personal preference. Some of us do like to wear watches and still use them to tell time instead of taking our phones out of our pockets.

But the smart watch is expensive, not really a good time keeper and is more of an aux device to your smart phone.

I suspect that the price will drop to expand the market.

Or you could be waiting for the sub-dermal model ... ;-)

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