* Posts by Ian Michael Gumby

3035 posts • joined 11 Apr 2006

Did the Russians really hack the DNC or is this another Sony Pictures moment? You decide

Ian Michael Gumby
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Boffin

@Veti Re: Tu use Hillary's own words...

I think you missed the OP's initial point.

Putin if the allegations are true... didn't craft the emails which indicate that the DNC party's nomination and election was a sham. In short, if you're a democrat who voted for your party's candidate, you were disenfranchised but their actions.

This has nothing to do with Putin but the DNC and its own corruption along with the corruption from the Clintons.

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The very latest on the DNC email conspiracy. Which conspiracy? All of them, of course!

Ian Michael Gumby
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@captain solo

The real villian?

It the modern 'Bonnie and Clyde' team.

The other irony is that while everyone talks about Trump being an anti-Semite, his daughter converted to Judaism because her husband is Jewish.

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Apple Watch craze over before it started: Wrist-puter drags market screaming off a cliff

Ian Michael Gumby
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Boffin

@Hyper Re: @Bob Dole ... Could Also Be...

"The Apple Watch keeps perfect time."

Perfect time?

Really?

Time is relative.

The clock chip in the watch is cheap and probably has a bit of skew.

It works well enough because it syncs to the iPhone. Who also has a bit of skew in their cheap clocks.

But it works ok, because it occasionally syncs with the cell towers which have much better clocks which are more accurate.

Good base station clocks have both GPS and Radio antennas to connect to the radio clock signal from a known site and along with knowing their GPS coordinates they are able to sync properly to the time signal and then keep track of the time and its internal skew.

And of course there are differences in terms of the types of clocks and their relative accuracy.

I guess what you meant to say was that your iWatch keeps time well enough that your girlfriend doesn't yell at you for being late. ;-)

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Devil

@Eddy Ito ... YMMV

I've seen a lot of people with them.

Where it comes in handy... at airports when you need to go through the TSA pre line or when you board the plane. (US issue) There's an app that has the flight detailed Q Code now visible on the watch face.

It does tell time (as accurate as the phone and the network)

It does work well as an alarm for meetings.

It does work well for those who want to screen their calls because their over sized cell phone is too hard to get out of their pocket / purse/ murse/ or backpack.

Its also a status symbol to some who don't understand why some men where mechanical watches...

Personally, I think the next watch I'll get is a CS clock that I can wear as a pocket watch and charge every night. Then I can become a walking ground station for GPS fixes. ;-)

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Pirate

@Bob Dole ... Re: Could Also Be...

There are some who don't like wearing watches. Ok, that's a personal preference. Some of us do like to wear watches and still use them to tell time instead of taking our phones out of our pockets.

But the smart watch is expensive, not really a good time keeper and is more of an aux device to your smart phone.

I suspect that the price will drop to expand the market.

Or you could be waiting for the sub-dermal model ... ;-)

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The Reg Coding competition – 10 times as hard as the last one!

Ian Michael Gumby
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Boffin

@JimmyPage Re: Language ...

SQL ... yes you can do it. However it would be pretty slow and you would need a SQL engine ... (Isn't that outside of the rules ? )

However, it would be trivial to do in Scala.

Which means its trivial in Java or C too.

Seriously... is this a contest to stretch your skills or for college kids?

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Bomb-disposal robot violently disposes of Dallas cop-killer gunman

Ian Michael Gumby
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@AC Re: @YetAnotherLocksmith ... It makes sense, but...

"Clearly the shooter was confined to an area with no alternative escape routes. Flooding it with a tear gas or a fast-acting anesthetic (perhaps using the same robot which was deployed for the execution) would have been a safe and effective way to take him down. Even if he did have a gas mask, these only protect you for a limited time, especially at high concentrations of the active agent."

I wonder if you know how stupid you sound...

Do you recall the movie theater where the Russians used gas to take out a bunch of Chechen terrorists who were holding dozens of civilians hostage?

Definitely an armchair QB.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Boffin

@Preston .. Re: @YetAnotherLocksmith ... It makes sense, but...

You have an active shooter who will not surrender and he has already killed several police officers.

I suggest you try to understand that the police have little or no options.

He positioned himself in to such an area that the police could not get a clear shot

So how do you end the threat?

You have to kill the shooter with the least amount of risk to yourself and your fellow officers.

Enter the robot.

BTW, some of these robots can be outfitted with guns too.

Of course you need to take a chill pill.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Re: talking of the war

Didn't the Brits also invent the Daleks?

EXTERMINATE?

Rise of the machines!

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Ian Michael Gumby
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@YetAnotherLocksmith ... Re: It makes sense, but...

Really?

C'mon, that's not even funny.

It makes sense because the shooter had already shot and killed several traffic officers and refused to surrender. He was a continued threat so that's the only way to get to him.

BTW, you can blame Holder and Obama for creating this mess... but you have to understand how Holder and company got involved starting with the Zimmerman/Martin shooting.

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Blighty will have a whopping 24 F-35B jets by 2023 – MoD minister

Ian Michael Gumby
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Boffin

Re: IMG @James 51

https://defenseissues.wordpress.com/2012/11/17/cleaning-up-red-flag-alaska-f-22-vs-typhoon-debate-2/

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Black Helicopters

Re ASDF Re: @James 51

Sorry, but I like having a man in the loop.

With drones, you don't always have that in that there is going to be a delay. Drone's flying recon or as a missile platform... ok. Drones trying to fly combat? The pilot has to be close and of course the drone has to be able to see the target.

Sure the drone can withstand more Gs... however... it too has some weakness...

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Ian Michael Gumby
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@James 51

Sorry, costs are relative.

I guess you're just jealous that you don't have any F-22s albeit they are not for ship use.

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You can’t sit there, my IoT desk tells me

Ian Michael Gumby
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@AN Re: I know that feeling well...

Anyone who has had back issues and sits at a desk for 8-10 hours a day knows that having a decent seat and desk is important.

The flame icon is for the author, not you.

I realize Alasdair is trying to tongue in cheek, however, for those of us IT professionals... its not a laughing matter. (Yes, I've spent time at clients where the working environment was a joke. )

I've always wanted a desk that could be adjusted from seated to standing. I just couldn't justify the price.

My wife had back surgery and I ended up spending $$$ for a desk in her office. She loves it and uses it both sitting and standing. I'm still looking for a new desk and a new chair. My Areon chair is pushing 20 years...

Sorry Dobbs, you're no thought leader and not really that funny. This really isn't a laughing matter.

As to the IOT kickstarter desk... not really a good idea. How does the desk know you're there. What happens if you disappear to head to a meeting? Coffee/Tea break? Lunch?

Imagine if your work buddies hacked your desk? Not cool!

While this seems more like a gimmick, the mechanical desk is not.

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Huawei: Our fake phone camera pic shame

Ian Michael Gumby
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Re: EXIF

I would have thought they would have scrubbed that or edited it out... ;-)

But still, it pales in comparison to the Lumina 1020. Sure the OS was for shit, but that camera was the best and still not rivaled by today's phones. I have shots taken with the 1020 that rival digital SLR cameras. The only difference is that with a camera phone its easy to get some skew because its harder to keep the phone perpendicular to the subject. I have on my wall a couple of 8x10s taken from the phone. (One of which is a cropped image that was a smaller portion of the original shot.)

At 12mp, there should be no excuse not to show off the phone's ability to take pictures.

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FBI won't jail future US president over private email server

Ian Michael Gumby
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Re: US' sad story continues

The only solution is to vote all of the Democrats out of office.

This may sound like partisan politics but I'm an independent. Both parties wreak, however the Democrats have shown themselves to be the most corrupt party. We have seen countless examples of where the politicians put their party ahead of this country.

We need new blood in office.

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fMRI bugs could upend years of research

Ian Michael Gumby
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Re: Good science

Here's the $64K (USD) question...

Is the underlying data bad, or just the interpretation done by the software?

If the underlying data is good and preserved, its possible to redo the analysis, however I get the impression that the data wasn't saved.

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Verisign keeps its dot-com cash cow until 2024

Ian Michael Gumby
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Boffin

Verisign is good. Greed is good.

Ok, before the freetard commentards stone me... let me explain...

As others have pointed out... low cost domain registration makes it easier for fraud and botnet command and control easier. (Note: Credit card fraud is involved...)

The domain name is an asset as you build your brand, whether its an .com, .io or whatever domain you choose. So the price of the domain name is the cost of doing business. Having been on the internet since the mid 90's when a switched 56KB line was $400 a month, then T1's were $400 a month, it kept most off the internet.

But I digress.

Because its a 'cash cow', Verisign has a vested interest in doing a professional job and be responsive when the SHTF. Attacking the root domain servers can cripple the internet and it takes deep skills to stop or mute the effects. I trust them more than I would trust the EU or some other bureaucratic group being in charge.

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While you filled your face at Noodles and Co, malware was slurping your bank cards

Ian Michael Gumby
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Boffin

@ma1010 ... Re: Probably management

Actually the conversation goes more like this...

IT Guy: "Its going to take $$$X to secure our systems from a possible attack"

Bean Counter: "Well why should we spend $$$X when we estimate we'll lose $$Y?"

Bottom line, the bean counters won.

Now post Target (department store that was hacked), the actual loss may be $$Y. But the loss in revenue/sales is $$$$Z as well as good will and now exposure from lawsuits.

To add to this... because they are still on mag stripes and have not moved over to CHIP & SIGN, they are liable for the losses.

This little fiasco will cost the company a lot. They will file for bankruptcy protection and may not survive.

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Bacon is not my vodka friend

Ian Michael Gumby
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@AC ... Re: @Measurer

I do have my fair share of lucid moments. ;-)

Unlike certain AC and other posters who tend to take a run at windmills.

When you get older you will find that you have more to lose and will become more conservative.

I have had my share of infused drinks, but only from bartenders and bars that I know and trust.

That does not mean I don't understand and agree with why they passed that law.

While I'm too old to partake in today's designer drugs... like Molly, you have to trust the person handing you the pill, and trust that they know where it came from and so on... otherwise you are putting your life at risk. I'm not judging, but the point is that when you don't know who made or mixed the drink, you are at risk.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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@Tom 7 Re: @Measurer

Yes, we can drink Piss, but you can eat Haggis. We can't. ;-)

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Boffin

@Measurer

What you describe is alcohol abuse.

What is against the law is for the bar to infuse their own vodka.

Were they to buy infused vodka from the company, then they would be ok.

I can understand this.. because its also a food safety issue.

The idea of the law is to protect the consumer from tainted drinks.

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Lauri Love at risk of suicide if extradited to US, Brit court hears

Ian Michael Gumby
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Boffin

@Ivan 4 Re: @Ratfox...

First, I seriously doubt that you will see a lot of news about extraditions from the US unless the person was famous.

I mean where's the news value of Joe Blow getting yanked to the UK over X and he's not fighting it?

The other issue... why would Hacker X in the US go after your spies when he has a ripe target here in the US?

Sorry, but when you're #1, you have a large target on your back.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Boffin

@Ratfox...

The crime was committed against the US and the computers were in the US. That is where the crime took place even though he was sitting halfway around the world.

Do you try the accused in a foreign country or in the country where the crime took place?

So you extradite them.

Guccifer was extradited to the US to plea bargain for his crimes and to cut a deal. He was then sent back to his home country where he faces jail time for other crimes.

Bottom line if you can't do the time, don't do the crime.

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Sharing your work cubicle with robots may not be such a bad thing

Ian Michael Gumby
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@Steve Davies ... Re: At least the robot won't...

No, they wouldn't. But depending on the robot, you may have to deal with one that believes that he should kill all humans, or make you kiss his shinny metal ass, or even worse...

Tell you about his weekend time spent robo-pimping as his second job.

Nope... on a positive note.. you wouldn't have to worry about him sleeping with your wife, unless she's in to that sort of thing...

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Airbnb drags SF into court

Ian Michael Gumby
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Boffin

Meh!

Commercial speech is not protected under the first amendment.

At the same time cities are able to regulate commerce and this is commerce. Its also a matter of public safety rules too.

And of course its a matter of the city collecting their fair share of the tax it is owed.

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Holy kittens! YouTube screens go blank

Ian Michael Gumby
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Coat

@Dave 126 Re: "Funny" error messages

Uhm... Windows? You're young.

I wonder how many people here remember Unix and that there's one error message that pokes fun of Cleveland OH...

Now I forget if that was ATT's SYS III or SYS V or both?

Mine's the jacket with the Geritol (Old Geezer vitamins) in the pocket.

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FBI expands code theft charges against Chinese national

Ian Michael Gumby
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Boffin

Re: "Stole"?

Ah, but you have.

The idea (IP) has value.

Since you now have it... your use of it deprives the owner of value that you would have to pay for the idea, or value lost because you could be offering a competing product. So any value you gain from the IP is value that he or she has lost.

Even if you give it away for free, where you don't gain any value from the IP you stole, you are depriving the IP owner from gaining revenue by those who now use said IP and do not have to pay the owner for the use of the IP.

Got it?

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Headmaster

Re: "Stole"?

Not to be a grammar nazi, but...

Steal / Stole is the correct term.

Taking a copy of the source code is theft. (noun. The act of stealing)

You can steal intellectual property.

How do you delete an idea?

But getting back on point...

The interesting comment was that he had a script that removed any reference to the originating company.

As if that's the only way to identify the true owner of the code.

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Hey cloud lawyer: Can I take my client list with me?

Ian Michael Gumby
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Boffin

@AC Re: Linkedin?

I think that its a bit ingenious on the part of the author.

In the article he stated:

-=-

These obligations also apply to the outgoing employee. In May 2016, the Information Commissioner’s Office successfully prosecuted Mark Lloyd (his real name), an ex-employee of Acorn Waste Management Ltd in Shropshire, for emailing the details of 957 clients to his personal email address along with purchase history and commercially sensitive information prior to taking a role with a rival. In that particular case, the individual in question pleaded guilty and was fined £300, ordered to pay £405.98 costs and a £30 victim surcharge.

-=-

[emphasis added]

Here's the sticky issue. You (Mark Lloyd) have formed a business relationship with the clients.

Taking the names of the clients and their contact information (e.g. phone/email) in itself isn't going to be an issue because the relationship could extend beyond work. This has more to do with what he does with the information.

If Mark attempts to sell the information... he's in hot water. If he passes it on to a new work colleague... he's in hot water. If he sends out a farewell email announcing he's leaving/left the company and provides his contact information... he would not be in any hot water.

What really hurt Mark is that he didn't just take the contact info, but the sales information which is company specific and not in any shape or form personal.

Connecting with clients on LinkedIn, aka your third party, in itself isn't an issue or anything for an employer to fret about, nor something that they could do anything legally about.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Alien

Re: Hi Frank

Ironic that you make such a reference.

In the movie, Brad uses a copy of the Cleveland Plain Dealer to cover him and Janet during the initial rain shower.

And last night, Cleveland won the NBA finals.

Coincidence?

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Apple to kill off Mac OS X?

Ian Michael Gumby
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@Sealand Re: Names, schmames

Meh!

I was a certified NeXTStep developer back in '92. I even have an old Next logo sticker on my mac book.

So yeah, I'm showing my age too.

I do agree with the fact that you get a reminder that you have an upgrade, but in order to see what that upgrade is... you have to pull up the app store and then check out the update page to see what's really up.

Of course Apple wants you to turn on the auto updates because they tend to think that all users are typical under educated users. (Granted I don't know half of the shortcuts or features because I actually use my mac for real work. ;-)

I gave up on Windows long ago and of course I still have to fix and maintain my wife's work computers too.

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Tinder bans under-18s: Moral panic averted

Ian Michael Gumby
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Boffin

@Anon ... Re: And the consequence is..?

You miss the point.

Yes, teens are going to hook up.

The issue is that here in the US you have the following:

1) A diverse culture with differing views on morality

2) Too many lawyers.

So Tinder has to question their culpability for promoting teenage sex as well as if a predator snuck in to the teen site by lying about his or her age.

Remove the group, remove the risk.

A teen sneaking on pretending to be an adult? If it happens and Tinder takes adequate precautions? It reduces the risk of lawsuits.

The other question... how does Tinder monetize that age group?

And ... what about the data collection laws concerning minors?

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Boffins send encrypted quantum messages to spaaaace – and back

Ian Michael Gumby
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Re: That's clever.

And that's why I asked my curious question.

If the theory is that you could have a very long distance between two entangled objects, you could have instantaneous point to point communications.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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@King Jack Re: Curious question...

Well if that's the case, then you've found a way to communicate faster than the speed of light.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Curious question...

I have to ask... when you have quantum entanglement... how far apart can the objects (photons?) be and still be entangled?

Then the next question... if you change the state of one... is the state of the other changed simultaneously too?

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US military tests massive GPS jamming weapon over California

Ian Michael Gumby
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@Voland ...Re: @Gray ... Military aggression

Remind me how much it would cost for TerCon?

Lidar senors aren't that cheap but they aren't that expensive. There's more to a ground following system than just the sensor...

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Ian Michael Gumby
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@Charles Re: @Gray ... Military aggression

So.... just curious.. what's the cost of an accurate inertial guidance system?

Now what's the cost of a COTS part that uses GPS?

I could have sworn someone has some kit that connects to a Raspberry Pi?

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Ian Michael Gumby
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WTF?

@Gray ... Re: Military aggression

You do realize that the GPS sat system was put in place by the US Government for military purposes. That the civilian clock signal is intentionally less accurate. Right? They have always had control.

At the same time... you don't want your own GPS system to be used against you.

Imagine a very cheap slow drone packed with explosives... Essentially a V 1 Buzz bomb that was really accurate... well accurate enough to hit major targets.

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Sparkling new Spark distribution spurs MapR to reduce MapReduce

Ian Michael Gumby
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Boffin

Re: back to the future

It's slow, doesn't work well enough and the local indexes are DOA from the start.

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Get outta here, officer, you don't need a warrant to track people by their phones – appeals court

Ian Michael Gumby
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@Kain Re: The judge got it right.

Obama?

He's dead wrong.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Boffin

The judge got it right.

Ok, I'm sure I'm going to be down voted to hell, but here goes the explanation...

The location data is metadata and its required for your cell phone to work. So there is no expectation of privacy since its shared with a third party. Also the data is really owned by the phone company.

This is actually grounded in a late 70's SCOTUS decision which dealt with warrant-less searches and pen taps. (capturing metadata of phone calls the hard way)

So there isn't any expectation of privacy since it really is the location of your phone and not you.

I know its weird, but its the law and you really need a couple of pints to wrap your head around it.

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Samsung: Don't install Windows 10. REALLY

Ian Michael Gumby
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Boffin

Re: Your files are still where you left them

You could do what I did... uninstall windows 10 and went back to Windows 7.

This was on my wife's work machine.

I use a Mac and Linux boxes... ;-)

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These big-name laptops are infested with security bugs – study

Ian Michael Gumby
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I agree.

For my wife, I first bought her an HP. Had the right components at a decent price.

Only problem was that it was full of adware carp.

Returned it, bought a store brand (Microcenter) which had OS only and then install the microsoft products.

No problems and it runs fine (Until my wife mucks it up...)

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ISS pump-up space podule fully engorged

Ian Michael Gumby
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Facepalm

Re: podule fully engorged

You realize that had this been built by the Swedes, none of this would have malfunctioned.

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Earth's core is younger than its crust surface

Ian Michael Gumby
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Coffee/keyboard

@ Jeffy Poooh ... Re: What is time

You didn't happen to take your cat along with you in to the box, now did you?

You didn't happen to catch his name? (Schrodinger was it? )

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Ian Michael Gumby
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A bit off?

Just out of curiosity, does any of the calculations take in to account the fluidity of the earth's core? So that something in the core could come up and away from the core and then recycle and flow back to the core?

Just going out on a limb but the further away from the core, the less of a factor the time dilation effect, so that it could be that Feynman is closer to the truth?

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Hillary Clinton broke law with private email server – top US govt watchdog

Ian Michael Gumby
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@Tom Dial... Re: So it begins...

The IG was told by the FBI not to pursue the legal aspect of the investigation because it could potentially interfere with their CRIMINAL investigation.

So at best, all the IG could do is to refute the excuses and spin Clinton created by showing that she broke the rules and leave it at that.

Note that the State Department didn't disagree with his findings. This has broader implications towards the FBI investigation which will at a minimum show that HRC and her senior staff (including Patrick Kennedy and other current State Dept. employees) should be charged with multiple counts of perjury, obstruction and violating the Espionage Act with gross negligence.

Keep in mind that HRC's server was set up and maintained by someone who was not qualified to do so. (Seriously check out the IT guy's CV). If you want to put a more interesting spin... This wasn't Clinton's first investigation that dealt with lost emails... Back when they were in the WH, there was a scandal and an investigation where somehow a lot of emails were 'lost'. Of course back then it was someone else and she too didn't have the proper credentials to manage a server or IT Staff.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Re: Hildabeast to Hildafelon

Trump will not pile more on... he'll start attacking E Warren and Sanders along w Biden ...

HRC is now in their cross hairs.

She will be interviewed by the FBI and she will be boxed in due to her public statements she made on the campaign trail.

We don't know what the Feds know, but you can bet it ties her time as SoS back to the Clinton Foundation

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