* Posts by Ian Michael Gumby

2620 posts • joined 11 Apr 2006

Google cracks down on browser ad injectors after shocking study

Ian Michael Gumby
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Devil

Re: Well of course...

But Google is doing it in an *ethical* manner...

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Silicon Valley gets its first 1Gbps home bro– oh, there's a big catch

Ian Michael Gumby
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Meh...

You talk about losing privacy with AT&T. But guess what.

Google doesn't give you the option to get your privacy back.

But then again, unlike AT&T, every major website runs Google's code that tracks you.

I wonder why El Reg and other journalists don't look at how Google uses Google analytics and how they force companies in to using them for their analytics.

Just saying!!!

PS. Yeah I know about no script.

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Apple's 13-incher will STILL cost you a bomb: MacBook Air 2015

Ian Michael Gumby
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Re: Mac vs Windows laptops?

Yeah, but on the Mac, you have Python.

Windows? meh

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Re: Mac vs Windows laptops?

Sorry, I meant real software.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Boffin

Mac vs Windows laptops?

Have you ever tried to develop software on a windows machine vs a Mac?

Sure, both can run eclipse and both can pull maven objects but because the Mac's OS is more Linux like, its easier. (Note: Mach is not Linux and at that level, you're splitting hairs, and no, it wasn't derived from Linux. Mach actually predates Linux, just ask Avi T. and some folks at CMU... ;-)

[No. Seriously... remember NeXTStep? ]

But I digress. The point is that for those of us who develop software, especially in the Big Data world, the Mac has the advantage.

I'm no fanboi, but I prefer to work with tools are easy to work with. Lets face it. Window 8.1? The UI sucks and I say this as I'm am building two new machines for my wife's office.

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Unlimited stolen Uber accounts flogged for $5

Ian Michael Gumby
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Re: no evidence of a breach

The evidence will be when the accounts are flagged as having fraud on the account and when you have enough accounts, you can figure out the source of the breach.

And by you, its the credit card companies since they will be able to do a simple k-means algo to find the culprit.

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Smart meters are a ‘costly mistake’ that'll add BILLIONS to bills

Ian Michael Gumby
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Re: I've always wondered...

The goal is to make the meter reading easier.

Wireless so that they don't need physical access to the meter. (Beware of dog), in buildings, etc...

You could lock down the meters so that once they are installed, the only communication would a HELO statement containing the data and then no further communication. You want to modify the meter? You need to use a physical connection and the PC has to have a special fob or smart card chip to ensure secure access beyond passwords.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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FAIL

Thanks Britian!

Because of your cock up, over here across the pond, left thinking politicians have pushed us to get smart meters.

Oh we must get them so we know how we're using or misusing power.

They have been shoved down our throat and to what end?

We're now more vulnerable to attack and cyber threats.

Security is always an after thought and too expensive to implement for the bean counters.

Time for a class action, but then again. companies don't learn and lawyers just get fatter and spend money on private jets which just increases our carbon footprint so we lose even more.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Boffin

Re: Smart, huh?

Beyond more nuke plants, there's the need to secure the IT infrastructure and maybe look at using TCP/IP over power cables as a backup for infrastructure in case you lose telco but have power.

I agree that Smart Meters are a joke. If you look back at how they were sold. They tried to show it as a benefit to the consumers. In fact the only advantage is that it makes reading meters easier and lest costly for the power companies.

And of course they add yet another access point for threats to the power infrastructure.

Yes Virginia, there really are bad people out to get you....

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Get off Facebook if you value your privacy, EU commish tells court

Ian Michael Gumby
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@Andy ... Re: Meh

You do realize that both Google and FB collect enough information from you that even using an alias online, that they can still join it to enough information about you to track the real you.

You don't even have to be on FB site to be tracked by FB. (Can you guess how many web sites embed FB javascripts? )

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No, really, the $17,000 Apple Watch IS all about getting your leg over

Ian Michael Gumby
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Besides that...

Some would say that its going to be a collectible. (Precious metals and all that)

But still. If this was about sex...

Do you realize how much hookers and blow you could get for 17K ?

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Assange™ lawyers demand Swedish prosecution files or no London interview

Ian Michael Gumby
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@Alan Brown Re: uh yeah

I'll defer to your local knowledge on jumping bail.

However...

Assange fled to the Ecuadorian Embassy. Its theoretically possible that Assange's fine wouldn't be that small giving the UK government a chance to recoup some of its expenses? (I don't know... just asking)

Also it could take some time for the courts to hear Assange's case. He's going to be put in to the clink until his case is heard... no chance of bail.

While the jumping bail is the least of his worries, it also leads to an excuse for the UK government to forcibly return him to Australia. Under the law, he's usually told to leave the UK and he can go where he wants, however, he can also, at the discretion of the UK government, be sent back to his home country.

Now which do you think is more likely to happen?

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Ian Michael Gumby
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@LucreLout

Reply Icon

I think Julian has the right to be scared. He's not going to be executed.

I'm not convinced about that. Sure, America won't put him out of our misery, but a sufficiently lengthy stay in general population may not see him leave incarceration HIV negative.

-=-

Well that's a different sort of lethal injection... and of course with some of the drugs not made in the US and other countries now refusing to sell the drugs used in lethal injections to the US... we're back to other methods.

Sorry, but the point is that Assange will not face the death penalty at trial, which is a major stumbling block to extraditions. He may very well die in prison, any prison because of other inmates in gen pop.

As to HIV... for all we know, he may already have it and its one of the complaints that the girls had and wanted him tested because he chose to have unwelcomed unprotected sex with them.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Re: Given his track record

I know, but when dealing with lawyers you have 3 options...

They take a retainer aka cash up front and then bill you.

They take the case on contingency (getting paid from the payout)

They do the work pro-bono for the good of the system if you can't afford proper representation.

Since this is not a contingency case its one of the other two options.

At one time, Assange could have gotten a lawyer pro-bono because of his idealism. However this isn't a potential ground breaking SCOTUS case, but one of a criminal act against an individual. (Rape)

And Assange isn't destitute.

Yes he caused his followers to part with cash because he's a scared little boy... or rather an adult with a Peter Pan complex, and that also leads in to the case itself.

Again... had he just manned up and didn't flee in the first place? He would have been back on his merry way. Now? Even when this is all over... he can be denied entrance in to Sweden. In addition, its possible that he could be denied entrance in to other EU countries as well or even other countries because of his criminal conviction. (Heck he could even be added to US's no fly list too.)

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Ian Michael Gumby
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@Tom13 Re: I suspect he *does* have something to hide

Unless you're one of the judges involved, it doesn't matter what you think.

As I said in an earlier post its what the prosecutor and the courts thing in SWEDEN.

Even though the courts in the UK said that 2 of the 4 counts, if true, would be considered rape in the UK. To your point, there are countries where none of this would be considered rape, or even if it was, it wouldn't warrant the extradition. THAT's WHY HE FLED JURISDICTION. He gambled and lost.

You claim that the women would perjure themselves if this went to court. Hardly. The real question is if their testimony is strong enough to get Assange convicted. His running will influence the courts as to which side is being truthful...

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Re: @Anakin He twists and he turns

Sparty,

Yes and no.

First, rape is one of the 32 crimes that doesn't require parody between the two countries, so really its what Sweden says.

While the high courts found that 2 of the 4 counts would still be considered rape in the UK, it meant that 2 counts wouldn't and of course there's the other issue.... getting a jury of his peers to find him guilty of the crime. That's where you will run in to difficulty. If you take everything at face value to be true, then you may have had a crime, yet during trial, if the defense can raise enough reasonable doubt... it makes going to trial moot.

I don't know why the high courts even suggested this because it wasn't necessary under the language of the extradition treaty.

But we're splitting hairs, we both agree that he needs to go back and face the music.

Oddly enough... had he not even fled jurisdiction (with the assistance of his attorney, which said attorney admitted to under oath...) , had he been charged and faced a trial, the worst case outcome would have been 4 years or so. The odds are he would have gotten far less time if any.

What this really points to is his character. And that says a lot.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Re: @Killing Time...

So you're right, Assange is no longer a threat because he's been outed as a prat.

But he's a threat because of Assange/Manning we have Snowden who isn't a whistleblower either.

And then if you don't punish Assange or Snowden... you'll have to worry about the next idiot who thinks its a good idea to steal and spill the beans even if no illegal activity has occurred.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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@Killing Time...

So... I have to ask...

I remember reading somewhere that they were crediting Manning/Assange for leaking material that set off Arab Spring. (Its actually on Manning's wikipedia page...)

So I have to ask... are we safer today post Arab Spring?

That was more rhetorical.... No we are not.

This is why bringing Assange to justice is important. Not just because he abuses women, but because he's a real threat.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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@ratfox Re: So basically Assange's lawyers are asking for favoritism?

You'd have to go back over the evidence in Manning's Article 32 hearing.

Again if all Assange did was publish the docs... he's have the 1971 Ellsberg decision where SCOTUS protects the press.

But the allegation is that he helped with the break in. That's a whole different kettle of fish and they seem to have some evidence to that effect. I don't know and I'm not going to say that if what was alleged in the Article32 hearing is true... Assange is in a world of hurt unless he can hide for the next 25 years.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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@Anakin Re: He twists and he turns

"I think Assange is a player and a pig when it comes to woman.

I don't think it was a rape but maby a bit humilating sex act and then it catched a political flu."

But in Sweden it was rape when you don't wear a raincoat and the woman says no sex without a raincoat.

There's more to it but where his actions wouldn't be rape in a lot of different countries... it is under the law in Sweden.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Re: So basically Assange's lawyers are asking for favoritism?

Here's the thing...

Were this only that Assange published the leaked documents... well, he'd have some protection under the constitution.

But its been alleged in Manning's Article 32 hearing that Assange assisted with the theft. If that's the case. He's looking at 10-15 in a serious prison and not some club fed.

Snowden? That's a whole nother kettle of fish. I'd suggest you choose better heroes.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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"At that point the Swedish police will just have to go to the end of the queue; the UK courts get first dibs on a small account of breah of bail conditions."

I'm not so sure on that.

It could be that he's extradited to Sweden. They charge him and hold a trial. At the end, (guilty or not, prison or not) He goes back to the UK for the jumping bail charge. Or he could be found guilty and then he's sent back to the UK to serve his time after Sweden. Then its off to Australia.

(You can bet that this has been already in the works. ) It would then clean the hands of Sweden, the hands of the UK where back in Australia, the US can present them with an extradition warrant and the Aussies will comply because they already know that he's a prat.

I think Julian has the right to be scared. He's not going to be executed. (That's already off the table because of Manning's sentence) He'll get jail time, and then there's a high possibility that he won't do too well in prison.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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@Sparty...

You wrote:

Sometimes I get the feeling that his paranoia is genuine, and that he may now believe that it's all a plot by the Swedish to send him to the US. But then he went from there to the UK, which is arguably an even worse place to avoid the long arm of the US. Given our extradition treaty with them is a fucking disgrace (thanks Tony!).

-=-

Actually didn't McKinnon ?sp? successfully fight extradition?

In terms of going from Sweden back to the UK, Assange didn't think that Sweden would file for an extradition over the 'he said/she said' issue of rape.

In terms of his paranoia... is it paranoia when you actually have something to hide? Manning's Article 32 hearing alleged something that wasn't used in the actual court martial but could bite Assange in the ass.

We won't know until Assage ends this Swedish nonsense.

In terms of the UK, they have options and poor Julian won't be walking scott free from the embassy.

He'll end up in Australia shortly.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Good points.

Suppose they let the police in... that doesn't mean that the police can leave with Assange.

But if Assange is his usual 'charming' self.... I wouldn't say that's out of the question.

The issue is that even if they come, Assange could refuse to answer and could refuse to meet with them. So while the investigators are there. Its pretty much a wasted trip.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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WTF?

Re: Given his track record

Huh?

This is a defense case. You're always going to pay up front and then get billed. No money... no legal representation. Unless its a pro-bono case.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Black Helicopters

Re: He twists and he turns

They have already said that the statute of limitations is almost near.

They haven't charged him yet and I believe according to Swedish law, they need to interview him before they can formally charge him.

The Swedes don't have to show him anything ahead of time. Suppose they do and then he decides that they don't have enough information to convince a jury. He could then go back and face trial. If they do have enough information to convict, then he can sit out in the embassy. A win/win for Assange and a lose / lose for Sweden.

But here's the irony.

Because Assange jumped bail in the UK... suppose that Julian waits out Sweden and is then free to go because the statute of limitation ran out? He still faces the jumping bail and when that's done normally he could just go free and the UK can say please leave the country. Or Not.

And that's the thing. The UK doesn't just have to let him go. They can opt to choose to force him back to Australia for being a prat and costing them $$$$$.

Assange doesn't get to go to Ecuador or anywhere else.

He could also lose his passport too. (ABC news talked about this moons ago when the whole extradition hearing started. ) And that's got to worry poor Assange because he shat on them too.

So Sweden is really a moot point if you're looking at the end game.

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YOUR DATA could be SOLD in RadioShack's bankruptcy auction

Ian Michael Gumby
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Re: Customer data, no problem.

Many PoS systems request email and phone # as a way to get more marketing data. You'd be surprised at how many people give it up without a fight.

I can understand this for online orders, however... at the PoS where you're buying the product in person?

In the States you can always give them <area code> 555-1212 (informtion) or any other 555 number which is never used as a real number.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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WTF?

El Reg Hacked? Re: El Reg sold my data...

Serious question...

First, any account could be hacked but if the OP created a clean email address for El Reg only, and is getting what appears to be malware... Leads one to think...

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Re: Give them the data

This is where the law gets murky.

First, the data on their customers is an asset. It has value and one could place a dollar amount on it. You can thank Silicon Valley VC types for this.

So while the privacy laws may restrict how they use the data, it doesn't mean that the bankrupt company couldn't sell the data.

In short, you're still screwed because they could always join this data to their existing data on you ...

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Dutch companies try warming homes with cloud servers

Ian Michael Gumby
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Meh.

Waste heat from server farms and machine rooms have been used to heat office building in the winter via a massive heat exchanger. You could also use them to heat the ground under side walks to melt snow and ice.

You could also push the heat in to an earth sink or large body of moving water.

BTW, if you're a corporation... would you trust having your server(s) sitting in someone's home unsecured? Didn't think so...

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GitHub ordered to hand over access logs to Uber

Ian Michael Gumby
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Uber using github?

So, riddle me this...

You're a for profit company and you store your secret sauce on a third party's system?

Granted there are two types of repositories, public and private. If you're using a free repository, then its public and anyone can view your code. If you're using a private repository, then you're paying for the privilege of only letting certain people to access your code.

Assuming that Uber isn't that stupid of a company and is paying for the use of a repo, then they have the rights to GitHub's logs on who accessed what when it comes to specific and relevant accounts.

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Apple takes ACID-compliant NoSQL upstart FoundationDB

Ian Michael Gumby
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Re: Not had much of a chance to play with NoSQL in a war zone

No and depending on the database NoSQL (Which is a misnomer) you can't make it ACID compliant.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Boffin

Re: FOSS that you can rely on

FOSS is a fake economy.

If you applied Game Theory and looked at the economy behind FOSS, you'll find that in certain micro examples, it works, yet at the macro example it doesn't.

Sorry, but do the math and run the numbers.

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Tachyon Nexus theorises on ultra fast storage

Ian Michael Gumby
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Re: Meh.

The issue is that you would want to use Tachyon and Spark in conjunction with a distributed file system.

MapRFS, IBM's... even Cleversafe's.

Things are getting interesting. And even Tachyon may become moot with RRAM although if its better writtent than Hadoop components... it could still be a winner.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Boffin

Meh.

While Tachyon is interesting. It can't stand alone.

You will need to persist data for one simple reason.

You can only fit so much data in to memory before you eventually have to deal with swap.

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Ex-Google & Facebook bods are on a Quest for the Enterprise

Ian Michael Gumby
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Devil

Color me silly.

You have Quest based on Dremel and then you have Apache Drill based on Dremel which is pretty much hitting the market as we speak and is championed by MapR.

So much money making it seem like I'm watching a Rocky and Bullwinkle cartoon...

Bullwinkle: "Hey Rocky, watch me create another tool that's better than sliced bread."

Rocky: "Bullwinkle, that trick never works!"

Bullwinkle: "This time for sure!"

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HUGE Aussie asteroid impact sent TREMORS towards the EARTH'S CORE

Ian Michael Gumby
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Velocity?

KE = 1/2 mv^2

So velocity matters, but what's the variance among the asteroids hitting the earth these days?

I'd imagine that there's not much difference...

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Re: Silly question .... how old is the moon?

Wow, I don't know why I was down voted, because I did say it was a silly question.

Oh well.

Here's another silly question.

We know that the continents (land masses) have shifted to their current position today from where they would have been millions of years ago. Would it matter where the asteroid hit? In lets say a center of a plate compared to an edge?

Again, I haven't a clue, just asking...

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Silly question .... how old is the moon?

If memory serves, wasn't there an impact that cause the earth to spew forth rock that eventually became the moon?

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Greedy web borg Facebook to SLURP news websites' golden nuggets

Ian Michael Gumby
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Big Brother

And so we have come full circle....

I remember the internet, when it was only a handful of tech companies and universities. And there was this thing called Usenet....

Back then, there were walled off dial up sites offered by Compuserve and AOL. You dialed up and you were in your private own little world with no concern of bothering us techies.

Then they got out and AOL died. Now we have FB which again is trying to rail everyone in to their little world because the longer you stay in FB, the more money they can make because they are gathering more data about you...

Weird isnt it?

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Premera healthcare: US govt security audit gave hacked biz thumbs up

Ian Michael Gumby
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Re: Bah!

There's more to HIPPA just like there's the PCI compliance that all financial institutions have to deal with.

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BIG DATA wizards: LEARN from CERN, not the F500

Ian Michael Gumby
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Boffin

Re: Huh?

Yeah... like I said the author really doesn't know Jack.

He's confused.

The latest generation of tools is using memory rather than disk in its processing.

Tools like SOLR (In memory Indexing) , Spark, and now Tachyon are using more memory rather than reading from disk. This should reduce the time it takes to work with the data.

However, at the same time the data has to persist to disk. Even in Spark the data resides in RDD which is local to the process. The distributed file system makes the data available to any and all nodes, yet most of the time with Hadoop's Map/Reduce, the data is residing on local disks to where the processing is occurring. So you're pushing the code to the data and not the other way around. Code is at least one or two magnitudes smaller in size so you will get better results than trying to push the data. *

*YMMV, it depends on what is being processed and the time it takes to process the data. If the time it takes to process a record of data is >> than the time it takes to push the data across the network, then you would be better off not using M/R because you will create hot nodes in the cluster.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Boffin

@StuCom Re: It would help if the author knew what he was talking about.

Naw, sorry any sort of 'points' are lost in the blubbering noise.

In the enterprise, there is always going to be the need to have transactional systems so you'll need the RDBMS. WRT Hadoop, Hive uses an RDBMS to manage schema data. So too does HCatalog. Then there's Amabari (Hortonworks) and Ranger for security, while Sentry (Cloudera) apparently does not.

But where relational modeling falls apart is that is an inflexible schema that is set at the beginning. Hadoop's tools have a 'late binding' schema at run time. (Sorry for lack of a better description, schemas are enforced when you run the job not when you load the data in to the files. )

There's more, but you should get the idea.

The author really doesn't know much about Hadoop and the other tools in the ecosystem so for him to make a suggestion to look towards CERN is a bit of a joke. No offense to CERN because they have done some really good work there and they do know what they are doing.

My point is that CERN and the F500 are two different beasts.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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FAIL

It would help if the author knew what he was talking about.

As someone who's been involved in using 'Big Data' tech in the F500 companies for over 5 years, and as someone who's helped set the strategy with a couple of the F500 companies, I can say that the author doesn't know jack.

You are talking apples to oranges when you try to talk about sensor data in the same way you talk about transactional data. Big difference. In terms of sensor data. Is it discrete or continuous data? If its continuous data then you may have long periods of no change in readings that get stored and this data could be tossed and then focus on the discrete data which occurs when there is a change in the sensor's input.

The reason vendors are saying to store everything is that many who are new to Big Data don't know what data is relevant and what data is not, or what data may become relevant when you combine it with other data sets.

Currently the F500 tend to store things in a relational model and when items don't fit, they get dropped. By going to a semi-structured or unstructured system, you can retain more attributes which may hold value. In terms of purging data or moving to cold storage... there are other factors like regulatory and business use cases that determine what to do.

In terms of the vendors, they are not going to tell a business what to do or how to do it. (Of course they'll spin reality to let them sell their version of Hadoop/Big Data and what tool is best.) They are going to say, when in doubt, save everything. Hardware is relatively cheap and getting cheaper in terms of cost per TB.

Sorry, but the author should look inwards and think more about the problem than trying to base a recommendation on something he read on the internet.

Not all problems are equal, so why should their solutions be the same?

I guess Mr. Nicholson should add more tools to his tool belt. His hammer vision makes everything look like nails and even with nails, you will want to think about different types of hammers. ;-P

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Mono Magic: Photography, Breaking Bad style

Ian Michael Gumby
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@Mark Re: Ken Rockwell laughing stock.

No, the camera doesn't get it right all the time.

As others have said that if you learn on film, you have the discipline to frame and take your time on the shot. So I take raw+jpeg all the time. I carry multiple cards and download to the computer ASAP to free up the cards.

There are times when you want to clean up the image and working with RAW is easier. Plus if you want to hand it over to someone who's doing a lot of digital work in touching up shots, the rawer the better.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Re: Well, it's a hobby

You know you have a serious hobby when you have an old drum dryer in your dark room. ;-)

(Yeah and rolling your own film too. ;-)

I've shot with a lot of different cameras and formats. And while I learned on film, going digital for me was easier. I started when I was 5, but got burned out by the time I was 18.

I started to get back in to photography when I got a D70 back in 2004 for a friend's wedding and safari.

I purchased a Nokia 1020. Sure the OS isn't that good, but it worked well as a phone, but was a killer camera that you could put in your pocket. And yes, the 24MP makes a difference over other phones.

I just ordered a Nikon 810. Sure its overkill, but then again, I'm getting back in to wanting to shoot again.

(They say its the last camera you'll need to buy) ;-)

In truth, it doesn't matter how good your camera is. Its up to the photographer to make the shot great. Post work in either the darkroom or photo-shop can only make an OK photo better.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Re: pinhole cameras are fun

You know you can go out and buy a decent camera for under $100 USD.

Fun cameras would be the old Roloflex twin lens reflexes that took 120mm film.

Or an old Nikon body. Saw a couple of old Nikon F (original , 1950's) bodies for sale.

In terms of film... I wonder if they sell technipan still.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Boffin

Re: Dust to (bloody) dust

Dust?

You can get issues with dust on DSLRs when you have to change lenses.

The only time you have dust and dirt issues is in the dark room that you don't have with digital.

The other issue is if you don't load the film properly in to canisters for developing or you don't mix your chemicals correctly or use out of date chemicals. (The issue of loading film on to spools has become less a factor when the spools became plastic and not single piece metal which required you to pinch the 35mm roll. ( Yeah, I'm old enough to have mastered both)

As someone who grew up doing B&W photography in the 70's and 80's, I prefer digital. Not because its better, but that its easier to work with and I don't have the $$$ for a good darkroom.

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US threatened Berlin with intel blackout over Snowden asylum: report

Ian Michael Gumby
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Re: Fair trial

When you're accused of stealing a bunch of secrets, which he did... you're not going to get a trial in public. Look on the bright side. If he did this to Putin... there would be no trial. No exile. He would have been killed long ago by some FSB/KGB person.

Snowden is the definition of irony.

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