* Posts by Ian Michael Gumby

2975 posts • joined 11 Apr 2006

IBM's quantum 'puter news proves Big Blue still doesn't get 'cloud'

Ian Michael Gumby
Silver badge
Flame

This is a piss poor article.... Re: Marketroids

Ok,

First, yes, IBM's marketeers aka marketdroids aka shit for brains, just don't get it.

IBM's current decade slide is a testament to that.

But beyond this... here's the thing. You have a scarce resource. A quantum computer to play with if you have the right credentials.

So put yourself in IBM's shoes. How do they market this play toy and yet limit access to those who would actually do something of value with it?

IBM put themselves in to a no win situation.

Were I IBM, I would have done things slightly differently. I would have marketed this by saying that they were putting a quantum computer up on their cloud and are granted a select few access if they can show that they deserve access. Just being honest and up front about it... Sign up, make a case and if we (IBM) think you have merit, we'll grant you access.... I get it and I think most sane normal rational people would get it.

But then again, we're talking about IBM Marketing which haven't a clue about how to have a mature conversation where they aren't trying to sell you something.

THIS IS WHY IBM IS STILL STRUGGLING TO TURN THEIR SHIP AROUND AND ARE FLAILING IN THE BIG DATA ANALYTICS AREANA.

But hey! What do I know... I'm just a commentard who's flaming both IBM's stupid as usual marketeers and of course the lazy El Reg reporting...

1
0

Server-jacking exploits for ImageMagick are so trivial, you'll scream

Ian Michael Gumby
Silver badge

@AC ...Re: That's the unix way of doing things..

Before you bash Linux/Unix...

Looking at the exploit, unless you run ImageMagick as root, you're limiting the potential damage.

Yeah, this is brain dead, but, it could be worse.

1
0

Ex-HP boss Carly Fiorina sacked one week into new job

Ian Michael Gumby
Silver badge
Mushroom

Re: On behalf of the human race

First, its a bit ingenuous to say she was sacked 1 week in to a new job. She didn't have a job until Cruz won the nod and he didn't. So it was a tentative offer at best.

Second, Kasich is still in the race. He's the anybody but Trump. Take Cruz, Rubio and Kasich's delegates, and he's a lot closer to Trump than you think.

Both Kasich and Sanders will have had the election stolen from them.

Sanders because HRC will be indicted and the DNC will parachute in a Biden / Warren ticket at the last minute.

Kasich because he's been completely ignored by the Press from day one. He won Ohio and if its a contested election between him and Trump, he has a very good chance. But the media finds a "GOP pundits eat crow" story more appealing than talking about candidates.

That's the sick thing about the US and probably other Governments. We don't know how much our opinions are influenced by the press.... er... actually we do, thanks to Facebook who experimented on their pleebs....

Go figure. I wonder if NZ or AU are far enough away to survive this potential melt down....

1
4

F-35s failed 'scramble test' because of buggy software

Ian Michael Gumby
Silver badge
Boffin

@ASDF ...Re: This is how the US is preserving its air superiority

The Army Air Corp is the USAF. Don't you know your US and World History from the 20th Century?

Post WW II the army air corps became the USAF and the Army was left with rotary aircraft.

0
0
Ian Michael Gumby
Silver badge

Re: @Mr Xavia...This is how the US is preserving its air superiority

"What makes you think it will be the US AF that gets it right? Some countries defense contractors and employees are actually required to be competent (some countries might actually for example hold a billion dollar failed virtual fence against Boeing). If the F35 has proven anything its that even nearly infinite resources can't polish a turd."

I wonder if you realize who are the defense contractors working on the F-35.

And if we look at what the EU has put together over the years... it makes the F-35 look like a wonder plane.

The issue is that the current school of Agile development doesn't work well when it comes to building

0
1
Ian Michael Gumby
Silver badge
Boffin

@Mr Xavia...Re: This is how the US is preserving its air superiority

You do realize that there is more software involved in a drone than in a fighter jet right?

If the US can't get the software right for a jet, what makes you think that they can fix a drone?

Also food for thought.

Remember the F-4 Phantom?

Maybe it was before your time.

The Air Force decided that air to air combat would use missiles and would occur at ranges before guns would be effective. So the F-4 had no guns, just missile rails and rocket pods....

Then Viet Nam hit. the long story short... a gun pod was created ASAP.

Got the point?

3
3
Ian Michael Gumby
Silver badge
Black Helicopters

@yank ...Re: This is how the US is preserving its air superiority

Strategic bombing is a joke because the WH doesn't want collateral damage.

Guess what? In war, shit happens. That means collateral damage happens.

The Russians using dumb bombs were more effective than the Americans in their Syrian campaign. Costs a lot less considering that a dumb bomb is cheaper than a smart bomb.

Were the Americans to bring in the BUFFs and carpet bomb the enemy strongholds... you will see hell on earth looks like. And the US could do this if they didn't care about the human shields used by ISIS/ISIL.

This is a major difference between Russian and US policy planning.

2
1
Ian Michael Gumby
Silver badge
Boffin

@Crazy ops guy ... Re: This is how the US is preserving its air superiority

Please don't give up your day job.

Army / Marines both need close air support as well as rapid deployment capabilities and rapid extraction capabilities.

So you have helicopters, Ospreys, and the Marines have jump jets and Naval jets.

Navy requires air support to protect the ships. Maybe you didn't learn your lessons from a certain WW I pilot who bombed some old ships to prove a point and pushed for the creation of the aircraft carrier?

No?

Please learn your military history before making such daft statements.

3
0
Ian Michael Gumby
Silver badge
Boffin

@asdf ... Re: This is how the US is preserving its air superiority

The Air Force and Pentagon is being run by a bunch of bean counters who look at the logistics and costs of running a fleet of aircraft.

Specialty role fighters cost more to maintain because your maintenance crew has to be trained specifically for each weapon system as well as the parts are not interchangeable. So the idea is to find an aircraft that can do multiple missions.

The other issue is that when you put a specialty role aircraft in theater, you also need another specialty aircraft to maintain control of the airspace. (e.g. the A-10 needs someone to watch the skies above it.)

Seems that they didn't learn their lessons from world war II. P-47 Thunderbolt vs P-51 Mustang in a ground support role. P-51 was an overall air superiority fighter yet the P-47 could take more abuse and provide better air support of ground troops.

The F-22 is the best plane on paper because its a generation ahead of the competition. The Russians aren't going to put their aircraft up against it any time soon and they won't sell their latest tech to a third world nation any time soon.

The F-22 was used for air strikes in Syria. I don't know what they learned from that experience....

3
0
Ian Michael Gumby
Silver badge
FAIL

@asdf .... Re: This is how the US is preserving its air superiority

One would think that drones would be superior.

However, there is this thing called c.

Its a silly little constant that represents the speed of light and its a nasty little constant that means that when you take the man out of the loop and make him a remote pilot... sitting halfway around the world, you have a delay that while flying a surveillance drone, may not be much of an issue, it would mean life or death in an air to air fight.

Then there's putting a pilot in theater but not in the aircraft. You have other issues like radio jammers...

The point is that it will take a while for the AI to replace a pilot. Not to mention that your drone will end up costing more than putting a man in the machine.

3
0

Ultra-cool dwarf throws planetary party

Ian Michael Gumby
Silver badge
Paris Hilton

Why am I thinking of this 60's song?

Its now the 'Age of Aquarius' ?

Of course its interesting that the discovery is 47 years after the song was released, and the distance is 40 light years away...

Just a coincidence? ;-)

Paris, because this is a bit of an airhead post...

0
0

Score one for the patent trolls: US appeals court says it's OK to shop for patent-friendly judges

Ian Michael Gumby
Silver badge
Boffin

Re: Texas. The nanny go[a]to state for trolls!

You do realize that beyond the patent lawsuits finding the appropriate venue is part of the legal process. So you can't say 'aha! this is a patent suit and you cannot pick your venue....'

The larger issue is changing the patent laws in general. Software patents should never have been allowed in the first place. But any meaningful attempts were shut down by Reid because he being backed by the trial attorney's association. That goes too for tort reform.

That's what needs to change.

Not picking your venue.

3
3

Pop goes the weasel! Large Hadron Collider blown up by critter chomping 66kV cable

Ian Michael Gumby
Silver badge

Re: Half a pound of tupenny rice...

No, it was one of those pan-dimensional people, only this one was a member of a rebel group trying to stop us from finding the question to the answer 42...

9
0

Comcast Com-templates Com-trashing Com-crap Com-pact Com-caps

Ian Michael Gumby
Silver badge

Well there goes 4K!

I wonder what would happen if you wanted to upgrade to 4K videos.

Oh wait, Comcast doesn't offer 4K content and therefore believes that with a 1TB limit, you wouldn't want 4K either.

Or maybe their content doesn't count so that you get penalized for watching Netflix on top of their cable shows?

3
0

Neo4j bolts on binary protocol to up its graph database game

Ian Michael Gumby
Silver badge

This is kinda neat...

This makes the graph database more viable and probably a bit more scale-able.

I've played a little with graph databases, but small ones. Neo4J was more than enough to manage.

0
0

If Android’s wings are clipped, other Google platforms may gain

Ian Michael Gumby
Silver badge
Boffin

Re: Least likely

You want to clip Google... just stop using Google Analytics on your web sites and then go after them when it's lack of use drops your page rankings.

As its pointed out, Google will morph to another platform. It will take years and cost millions in lawyers to get this settled and in the end, Google will wear down the EU until it gets something it can stomach and the EU gets a token win. Google has very deep pockets, more so than what the EU can afford to spend.

But if you want to stop Google, remove its roots. Google's analytics was their way in to get all of the stats and information on your page hits. They don't need cookies anymore because they retain the cookies on their infrastructure and know who you are.

I wonder why El Reg doesn't report on how Google uses the data they capture from their 'free' analytics and what happens if you suddenly remove them from your site.

4
0

Clinton's $1m troll fight

Ian Michael Gumby
Silver badge

Re: Why is Billary not in jail yet?

Funny you should mention Bill Clinton's budget surplus...

Kasich was in Congress at the time and fought and won on the budget when dealing with Clinton.

I know Kasich. He's boring, but he's a hard worker. Just what we need to fix Obama's mistakes.

2
6
Ian Michael Gumby
Silver badge
Boffin

@AC Re: Reality Check

Clearly that would be you.

Look, here's the reality. This new fund to fight trolls is for HRC to pay bloggers and reporters to put a spin on the news in her favor as well as to harass commentards online and to make threads of discussions meaningless.

If you haven't been paying attention, those in the press who support HRC are ignoring facts and are intentionally misinterpreting the law. The level of corruption is insane. Regardless if you're for the right or left, she and her hubby are so criminally insane, all they want to do is put $$$ in their pocket at everyone's expense.

Their 'charity' has done nothing of value except to host fundraisers that put more money in to the foundation. In fact, the one thing that they did... camp stoves for those off the grid in impoverished areas did more harm than good. And within 2 years... most of the stoves were trashed. So... only the manufacturer made $$$ from this... and the foundation of course.

The classified documents are only a tip of the iceberg.

3
7

Google's 'fair use' mass slurping of books can continue – US Supremes snub writers' pleas

Ian Michael Gumby
Silver badge

@Adam Re: I simply do not understand copyright anymore.

I think you need to take a step back and remember the history of this...

That book you saw at Amazon. Was it a new copy or a Used Copy and out of print?

And even if the author is alive and well, that doesn't mean that Google was able to find him and to ask him for his permission. Or if the author is dead, the estate who owns the copyright. Or the publisher could have gone out of business and they couldn't provide the records. ...

Lots of reasons why Google, the world's largest search engine who knows everyone on the web couldn't reasonably find the author... (note the sarcasm)

The point is that Google is stealing the works and then setting the payments they would pay the author if he didn't opt-out.

0
1
Ian Michael Gumby
Silver badge

@Andrew O.

So you're saying its ok for Google to steal their works and then when the authors are found, they have 48 hours to decide if they want to OPT-OUT or take whatever deal Google has cocked up?

That's like saying I picked your pocket and stole your wallet. Now you want it back, I'll give it back to you if you agree 1) not to press charges for my theft and 2) Give me the cash so that you get your credit cards back...

In other words, they steal the book, demand rights over their stolen work, and then dictate what they think the value is that they should pay you the author.

0
0

US anti-encryption law is so 'braindead' it will outlaw file compression

Ian Michael Gumby
Silver badge
Boffin

Re: Just a point of clarification...

Now you know why the US is so messed up and fed up to the point of trying to elect an idiot with a comb over.

Seriously... you want to force a company to comply with a court order to help police decrypt an encrypted file where they don't know the key?

Congress doesn't need an intelligence test but a sanity check. Or rather a senility test. We need term limits.

40
0

You keep using that word – NVMe. Does it mean what I think it means?

Ian Michael Gumby
Silver badge

@Jack Re: These characteristics could suit ...

First... is your alias a nod to the Sci Fi author Zelazny ? ;-)

To your point... The NVMe drives are already in the home lab.

The fabric and networking cards would be next, but you're starting to look at some serious $$$ for kit.

Where this comes in to play is in proving out some of the advances in Big Data tech.

But a 48port or smaller ToR switch and the cards (Mellonox, Solarflare), cables aren't cheap.

And they have very little value unless you're working for a startup and are doing this as a small 5-10 node cluster...

0
0
Ian Michael Gumby
Silver badge

Just to add...

"An NVMeF deployment involves an all-flash array, adapters and cabling to link it to a bunch of servers, each with their own adapters and NVMeF drivers. The applications running in these servers require 20-30 microsecond access to data and there is vastly more data than can fit affordably in these servers' collective DRAM.

These characteristics could suit large scale OLTP, low-latency database access for web commerce, real-time data warehousing and analytics and any other application where multiple servers are in an IO-bound state waiting for data from stores that are too big (and costly) to put in memory but which could be put in flash if the value to the enterprise is high enough."

-=-

Most OLTP databases are very small in relative terms.

You could do this to build out a reservation system and have a very small cluster of small boxes serving a lot of clients. But it will take a lot of custom code and a team of people who actually know what they are doing.

You could then build distributed clusters to serve the customers as well as provide redundancy with cluster to cluster xfers taking normal time/latency.

In terms of costs... more than spinning rust, but not that much more than a rack of high end machines w tonnes of memory.

0
0
Ian Michael Gumby
Silver badge
Thumb Up

This could be a good thing..

" Chelsio tells us that a RoCE network must have PAUSE enabled in all switches and end-stations, which effectively limits the deployment scale of RoCE to single hop. RoCE does not operate beyond a subnet and its operations are limited to a few hundred metres, not a constraint in the environment (servers linked to external storage inside a data centre) for which it is being considered."

First I would worry about security, however... if limited to a single hop, then you could essentially make a shared nothing cluster (Hadoop/Spark) in to an MPP HCP super computer.

Its interesting because Spark is now poised to take advantage of this and we can see faster throughput in the big data space.

0
0

Cutting edge security: Expensive kit won't save you

Ian Michael Gumby
Silver badge

Two factor authentication is a start.

Companies have switched to a two factor authentication. I love it.

I have a token generator that uses a password that I created to generate a token/pin.

I then log in using my LDAP/AD password and the token to establish my link.

The same could be said for using a token generator on your phone too.

If only my banks did this...

Will it stop data theft? No. But it would make it harder.

2
0

Mobe and Wi-Fi firms flog your location data to commercial firms, claim reports

Ian Michael Gumby
Silver badge
Boffin

Re: Bastards

Last time I checked... these operators are here to make money.

Monetizing subscriber data defrays the cost of providing service and should allow them to make money while staying competitive.

That said, they need to be careful what data they sell off.

Telcos have a legitimate need to track your phone and its movements. However.. that doesn't mean that they should be allowed to sell the data off to third party services. And you can't opt out or move to a different service provider unless the laws change. Everyone is doing it and only doing the minimum.

If you started to fine them like the US fined HSBC... they might start to take data privacy and protection more seriously.

1
1

Microsoft grabs ex-Google and Facebook brains for unstructured SQL engine

Ian Michael Gumby
Silver badge

@Alister...

You should have used the 3 stooge pedantic grammar nazi icon. :-P

But to your point... Apache Drill is the OS spin off from Dremel. So why spend $$$$ on buying yet another NoSQL database doesn't make sense... But then again, this is Microsoft we're talking about so what do I know? (They did buy Nokia, right? ;-P )

0
0

Big Blue bloodbath: More IBM staff slashed in Europe, US

Ian Michael Gumby
Silver badge
Boffin

Re: Who in their right mind would want to move to IBM

First, if IBM buys your company, you can get a back loaded bonus if you're deemed to be a key person.

Second... Cash is still king.

1
0

Three-bit quantum gate a step closer to universal quantum computer

Ian Michael Gumby
Silver badge
Coat

@PaulAb Re: Byte me!

There are more things than hair that can become entangled.

I was thinking more along the lines of a therapist. Relationships, even at the photon level, can be messy affairs.

0
0

Net neut naught: Netflix throttles its own video

Ian Michael Gumby
Silver badge
Coat

Re: Important Question

You can adjust your setting to ignore this... however... YMMV when it comes to video quality because of your carrier.

While in Scotland, I had to rely on a wi-fi hotspot as my main internet connection, paying 30GBPs a week for data. (Yes, I used that much data on streaming for work and watching videos. ) At times, the local cell antenna got overwhelmed and dipped to 2G. (No streaming or data services.) Hotel wi-fi's ? fuggit about it.

For those who don't live out of a suit case months at a time, Netflix and Hola can make travel a lot easier.

0
0

IBM wants to harden your 'data centre on wheels'. Yes, your car

Ian Michael Gumby
Silver badge

Re: Google,Fartbook,TLAs is that you

There is nothing new here in terms of monetizing the data.

Traffic.com did this voluntarily.

Google's Android... automatically, no opt in or opt out. Your phone already spies on you.

So now you have to buy a data plan for your car.

0
0
Ian Michael Gumby
Silver badge
Boffin

@Adnim, Re: Do

"Do vehicles really *need* to communicate with the manufacturer? "

Yes and no.

For commercial vehicles, the answer is yes. They need to be able to communicate with the fleet management company as well as feedback information to the manufacture / dealer. Of course the feedback is two different types. One needs to know the location to make sure the driver is where he is supposed to be and is doing his job. The other needs to monitor the engine and other elements of the car in order to determine alerts and service calls.

The manufacturer can take the information over a series of vehicles and determine how a specific engine is handling. (This is a good example of IoT and Big Data.)

The downside is that they can also capture data like the routes, times and distances driven. Also along with your driving patterns. That would be a bit invasive. (Just like those who use Uber all the time... never use them for a booty call, or an extra marital affair...)

The third issue is safety and security. OnStar alerts if the airbag is deployed or some other emergency occurs.

Fourth, software updates done automatically. So you don't have to go in to the repair shop to get a software update to your engine.

But the larger problem... Tying the wifi and hotspot features in to the controls of the car. (e.g. remote stop or remote control of the car by a law enforcement agency.) That's a bit scary because of hacking concerns.

There are other advantages ... e.g using your car to monitor traffic. This could be a good idea because the car's navigation could automatically alert you to traffic jams ahead and suggest alternate routes.

Do you need this? No, you need air, water, food and shelter. Is it a nice to have? Sure, if they can stop hackers from taking over the car.

Do you trust Microsoft or IBM? Not so much... I would hate to have to have my car stall out and reboot in the middle of the 101 during rush hour.

0
0

Bell done: Nokia delivers super-speedy 100Gbps links fresh from the Labs

Ian Michael Gumby
Silver badge

Cool, I think...

How would you take advantage of this? Running Dark Fiber between your DCs? 200km (120 miles)

That's a long distance, but it beats the traditional 10-20km separation.

NYC/NJ to Boston ? or NYC/Philly?

0
0

Good-on-paper FlashBlade: We've seen the hardware, we've touched the blades

Ian Michael Gumby
Silver badge
Boffin

Not sure if there's a market ...

The price of the blade is suggested to be at the $1.00 per GB. That's $1000 per TB.

So 8TB would be $8,000 for a node which would have 8 cores.

That's awfully high. Granted this is specialized hardware. And we don't know the cost of the chassis.

In the Big Data world, it could make sense when you look at certain spark jobs.

Also the upside is that if you were to look at ReRam, they (flashblade) would have a leg up on the competition.

Would have to see the discounts off list.

0
0

Why should you care about Google's AI winning a board game?

Ian Michael Gumby
Silver badge

Re: @Dave Bollocks

Dave,

I'm not sure that it would be.

There's this thing called parallel processing cluster.

So can humans think 80 moves in advance?

I don't think so. If then, they could easily count cards on an 6 or 8 card shoe in blackjack.

0
16
Ian Michael Gumby
Silver badge

@Dave Re: Bollocks

While I am not a Go player... you have to consider a couple of basic rules on which move to make.

Take the top 100 potential moves. Then for each of those moves. Consider the top 100 counter moves. Then for each of those.. consider the top 100. (Do this for 10 levels of recursion deep.) I'm not sure of how fast this would be.. but if its too slow... reduce the 100 to N and if its fast enough... increase 10 to 20... but that should be more than enough to beat a human.

At the end, you'll have the move that makes the most sense at that point in time. Clearly there's more to this but the idea is that you need to out play your opponent and not make any mistakes.

If you want to train your machine... build a second machine and have it play one another as a way to improve its skills.

0
23

IBM pimps Watson out to Hilton robot for concierge duty

Ian Michael Gumby
Silver badge
Boffin

Meh...

So what you're really saying is that Watson is a solution still looking for a problem and so far it hasn't found many areas of interest.

The whole idea of a concierge could be done via an iPhone app.

Hotel apps already have keyless entry to your hotel room that supports RFID cards and not mag stripe cards. They also have maps of the hotel property.

Then they have links to uber and local eateries.

In short, there isn't much of a need for an AI when it comes to being a concierge.

Is this article a comment on how desperate is IBM is... or how limited Watson really is?

1
0
Ian Michael Gumby
Silver badge
Paris Hilton

Re: The Robot

If you are going to go after the Paris angle, why not use the Paris icon?

2
0

So you wanna build whopping pools of PCIe flash? Say no more, whisper Intel, Facebook

Ian Michael Gumby
Silver badge
Thumb Up

Finally! Some good news!

The announcement has two interesting pieces.

First, the FPGA on the die. This allows one to add a customized solution that will give killer performance. Think about building a cluster of servers for a given task where having the FPGA programmed for a specific task. (Trading systems, encryption, etc ...)

The bigger thing is the SoC Xenon D. Now you can build white box servers that could be put in to fanless cases. Now you can have a small cluster of desk side machines for R&D that doesn't require noise cancelling head phones, and generate a lot of heat. As long as they don't turn off your office's A/C after hours... you're ok.

0
0

Canadian live route map highlights vulnerabilities to NSA spying efforts

Ian Michael Gumby
Silver badge

@AC Re: Meh...

No junior birdman, you would not be breaking the law in the US.

First, the encryption laws are for US companies exporting the encryption technology as a munition. Using strong encryption that was produced outside of the US isn't violating the law, nor is sending encrypted traffic regardless of what path the data takes.

Please take off your tin foil hat and take your meds.

0
0
Ian Michael Gumby
Silver badge
Black Helicopters

@Nuno , Meh is right... Re: Meh...

The author of the article is being a tad paranoid.

Look, apply Occam's Razor to this and you may start to see things in a better light.

In the internet, not all routes are created equal. Some have greater bandwidth (capacity) than others and even if they are longer, they are preferred routes. It just so happens that most of those routes flow through the US and not Canada. (If you were a telco, do you want to piggyback on existing long haul routes, or do you want to spend BILLIONS to run fiber across rugged terrain?

Lets also not forget the whole thing of peering agreements and contracts which also drive the traffic flow...

So regardless of the NSA/CIA/Alphabet/etc ... your internet traffic in Canada will most likely flow thru the US.

Having said that... if you were the NSA, where do you think you would be able to capture most of the traffic? Doing something clandestine in Canada, or something clandestine in the US. (Its against the law for the NSA to knowingly spy on US Citizens... a subtle fact that gets abused by a lot of people...)

If I were the NSA, I'd monitor the choke points on the major internet highways first.

When you put this in perspective, you lose the tinfoil hat and the idea that the telcos are in cahoots with the NSA. (Which they are not.)

That doesn't mean that the NSA isn't slurping data, or Google if you're on their network... it just means its not an evil conspiracy. (Unless you're talking about Google.)

And if its not the US, then its the Chinese, Russians, pretty much every spy agency in the world is doing this at some level.

0
0

Blah Blah blah ... I don't care! To hell with your tech marketing bull

Ian Michael Gumby
Silver badge

@AC, Re: @Ian Michael Gumby - @Trevor Potts, MAN UP!

What lies?

I have seen shops that don't practice DevOps and ones that do.

The ones that don't have a difficult time meeting or managing SLAs or even upgrading software.

The ones that do can meet SLAs, keep up on the latest upgrades.

You don't lose staff, but you reassign to other projects as your toolset grows.

Trevor's 'lies' are that companies are switching to DevOps so they can reduce head count.

I don't see that.

1
1
Ian Michael Gumby
Silver badge
Boffin

@Trevor Potts, MAN UP!

Dude,

I feel for your loss, I really do. Its tough having to say goodbye to a friend, but you counter it with the years of unconditional love, even after they stalk you and treat your ankle as prey. Or when you tell the rat bastid to go to his kennel for being bad, you turn your back and he bites you in the ass. You still love them.

But seriously man up. Get over it and focus on your work.

You made a comment about DevOps.

DevOps isn't about letting admins go, its about being more efficient. Compare a DevOps shop to one that doesn't practice it. BOFH rules the day in the shop that doesn't practice DevOps. Nothing gets done on time, and its a constant goat f.

Think about it and get back to work.

4
26

Hacker 'Guccifer' extradited to US

Ian Michael Gumby
Silver badge
Black Helicopters

@David Roberts ... RIF Re: Prison time?

David,

Reading is Fundamental. ;-)

He got caught in 2011 for hacking... suspended sentence.

He got caught in 2014 for hacking... 4 years prison time. (Not sure where you come up w 7 years served.)

Now wanted in the US for his hacking and ID theft here.

Now... funny thing... he can make a nice plea deal with the FBI in exchange for testimony over Hillary's server.

No?

0
5
Ian Michael Gumby
Silver badge
Boffin

Huh? Seriously WTF...

If you were going to be doing jail time... where would you want to go?

Romania or some Eastern Europe / Slavic country, or a medium security or club fed prison in the US?

And you have to realize that he has a huge bargaining chip in his back pocket.

If it wasn't for him, we would never had known about Hillary's private server... or found proof of her and Billy Boy's corruption.

He could cop a plea and testify against Hillary. Do you not think that he didn't go after Clinton's server once he found out it existed?

He had better act fast. Google Vince Foster if you don't understand.

1
2

Hillary Clinton private email server probe winding up – reports

Ian Michael Gumby
Silver badge

@ E Coli Re: The other shoe

Yup.

Only none of this has been proven in the released information.

We know some from official documents and the allegations in 'Clinton Cash' as well as some of the Foundation's required filings.

There's the 30K or so emails that the FBI may have recovered from the server.

That could be used to show the corruption and the smart money is that the Feds found something.

Clinton is putting on the brave face and is lying to herself and others because she thinks the Fix is in

1
0
Ian Michael Gumby
Silver badge

Re: Let it go

That's like condoning bank robberies because the banks are insured so depositors are ok.

1
0
Ian Michael Gumby
Silver badge

@Tom ...Re: @Hans

Actually, its Patrick Kennedy who is also in the hot seat. He's the man in charge.

0
0
Ian Michael Gumby
Silver badge
Black Helicopters

@Doug S Re: @Ian Michael Gumby "Bush didn't make the mess"

You clearly don't understand what happened and why it happened.

You want to blame Bush, but remember Congress voted on it too.

Again We won the war but lost the peace.

1
2
Ian Michael Gumby
Silver badge

Re: Immunity

If you are not truthful in your testimony, you lose immunity and your statements can and will be used against you.

He's toast and he knew it. He also knew he wasn't in her inner circle and was going to be roadkill.

4
1

Forums