* Posts by Ian Michael Gumby

2671 posts • joined 11 Apr 2006

Astroboffins mine data in pursuit of 11 lonely, homeless RUNAWAY GALAXIES

Ian Michael Gumby
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Alien

Niven was right!

The Pierson's Puppeteers are real!

(Ok so you really have to have read all of Larry Niven's stuff to get that joke.)

Maybe I should have gotten a masters in English (Science Fiction) ?

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Looking for laxatives, miss? Shoppers stalked via smartphone Wi-Fi

Ian Michael Gumby
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There is no opt-out.

You go to the website you're now tying the mac address to an IP address and to you.

Just think... what if a government did this?

You'd be screaming bloody murder.

Some tech should be left alone.

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SUPERVOLCANIC MAGMA reservoir BUBBLING under Yellowstone Park

Ian Michael Gumby
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Boffin

Geothermal energy?

I have to ask.. with such a large cap of potential thermal energy, why not try and tap it for electrical power generation?

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Coffee cup-sized MIT machine can SEE actual ELECTRONS, boast boffins

Ian Michael Gumby
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Alien

@Mongo, Re: tell me about it!

If you could see the neutrino, your tin foil hat wasn't on tight enough.

The neutrinos laugh at your petty government. They come and go as they please and like your puny wall, the government is powerless to stop them.

Its only when you have a drunk neutrino that crashes in to an atom that you have a problem.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Pint

So then did Douglas Adams have it wrong?

Is it Espresso not Tea that is at the center of the improbability drive?

A pint because you need to drink a few along with salty peanuts!

And don't forget the towel!

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London man arrested over $40 MILLION HFT flash crash allegations

Ian Michael Gumby
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Waste of time? Not..

Look,

Traders are trying to make money from buying and selling contracts over time. How long a time is now down to sub seconds as a way to make a small amount with little risk and then do it enough times that it adds up. That's not illegal.

Placing a trade and then making bids you have no intention of filling just to get the market to move in a certain direction? That is illegal.

The waste of time thinking you could stop the extradition.

He traded in the US and is bound by the US laws, specifically the Dodd-Frank law which outlaws his tactic.

Pretty dumb move on his part.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Boffin

@spleen

Clearly you haven't a clue.

If the allegations of his bids are true, he's in serious trouble.

What don't you believe, that the markets can record every bid that's being made?

That they can't record the open volume of contracts at any given moment?

That the guy is incapable of being foolish enough to try this stunt?

Or that the bulk of the HFT algos don't consider edge cases in their strategies?

(Hint: Trying to buy/sell a volume equal to the volume traded in a normal day is a stupid move.)

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Boffin

Re: Scapegoat?

Spoofing is hard to prove.

Putting bids out and then canceling them if the market moves away from you is legal. Putting bids out as a head fake and misdirection is illegal.

According to the articles on this individual, his program entered bids that represented 1/2 the volume of contracts being traded. This is also why its easy to charge him. He doesn't have enough cash to cover his trades. He's a small fish making outlandish bids. And once you find a guy trying to move the market, you can then go back and review any and all bids he may have made. Now you can establish the pattern of spoofing.

He's going to lose his extradition appeal.

Whether or not he's trader 0 is irrelevant. If he did put out and cancel the bids, that large a number of contracts... it could easily have been the tipping point. I seriously doubt these algos include a PID function.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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@Paul Re: meh

I think you need to learn more about trading.

What he's accused of doing is spoofing. That is he placed orders/bids with no intention of having them filled. It was a head fake.

HFT is not illegal nor the issue.

Putting orders out and not having them filled because the market is moving away happens all the time.

This is why its hard but not impossible to show that the trader was 'spoofing'.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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@Andy Re: Let me get this straight

Sorry won't work.

Kills liquidity in the market.

Its not the HFT, but that the algos being used suck at the edge cases and will add to the problem with a cascading failure.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Boffin

Re: meh

HFT isn't the issue.

Spoofing the market is. Then all those 'home grown' algos take the head fake and in the edge case, the other HFTs force the market to keep moving. (gaining its own momentum.)

So it heads down and keeps going in that direction.

Looks like they were able to find trader 0.

Of course spoofing is dumb. They will ultimately get caught. (And yes, there are ways to sort of cover your tracks. )

The other thing is that its possible to correct the market to charge for each bid. Then you get a credit (multiplied) to balance it out. If you do enough spoofing to move the market, you'll end up always paying the exchange. In theory it wipes it out the problem,

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So why exactly does almost ALL tech live in Silicon Valley?

Ian Michael Gumby
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Its SVS ... Re: On the other hand...

The term you are thinking about is 'Silicon Valley Syndrome' or SVS.

Its a term that got coined in the early 90's when techies from the midwest flocked to San Francisco / Silicon Valley and they felt suddenly superior to the guys back in the Midwest.

That is to say that you believe your code and ability gets better just by the proximity to Silicon Valley.

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Gwyneth Paltrow flubs $29 food stamp dare, swallows pride instead

Ian Michael Gumby
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Re: eat this

You are right about increasing the amount of rice.

If you think about it, if you can purchase items in bulk over time, you can make it work, not to mention if you can pool your money (stamps), you can get more bang for your buck.

The other thing to consider is that the food stamps are supposed to be a subsidy and not the sole source of income for food.

Could I do it?

Sure if you put a gun to my head, but not that I would want to do it.

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The Internet of things is great until it blows up your house

Ian Michael Gumby
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Re: Funny, but the solution is obvious...

Oh I can read.

Its a brain dead author writing a brain dead vision of what he thinks the costs would be ...

And its not the costs of the wifi link, but also the cost of the software, the cost of additional insurance, the cost of further testing the product to get UL certification... do you really want me to add in all of the costs associated with designing and then producing and testing a new model?

Not to mention the costs associated with marketing and then the uplift to make the product more desirable....

And then... the cost associated of going to the clothing industry to get them to use the new tag that you want which is redundant information in the existing tag.

Do you start to see why this idea is DOA?

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Re: I have a smart bed....

No, the bed isn't that smart.

Which is a good thing.

It captures enough information from my bed, along with the account information I set up.

Unless you know the email address for the account I used to set up my profile... you won't know who I am.

It's pretty primitive and interesting. If I'm away and one of my dogs get on the bed, it will record data and assign it to the person who sleeps on that side of the bed.

To be fair, its an interesting gimmick that kinda works, unlike the voice activated command module.

We bought the bed because its fscking comfortable and still affordable.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Boffin

I have a smart bed....

Select Comfort sells a bed where it measures your heart rate and breath rates along with your sleep patterns to see how their settings can help improve your sleep. (I kid you not)

You have to attach the bed to the wifi and if you have this feature, there's a smart phone app that lets you control your bed (to a point).

Now this deluxe bed not only has these features, but a voice activated remote, blue tooth remotes and a massage unit, and lighting control. (LED night lights under the bed, and plugs for reading lamps)

It actually does IoT right in that while you can set the amount of air in the mattress, adjust the bed's head or foot settings, that's about it. Much less annoying that having someone change your cable box's DVR settings, or changing the channels while you're watching.

As to why we bought this model?

Because it had the features we wanted and it included the extra gadgets for free. (We couldn't say no to them.)

The point is that if you can see value in the product, you will purchase. If you can't... you won't.

As to why I bought this bed over a competing product that wasn't IoT connected? It made my wife happy and its a damn good bed. ;-)

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Re: Nice pic

They must exist.

Or maybe my wife just can't cook a roast?

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Boffin

Funny, but the solution is obvious...

This is why the IoT is never going to leave the hype charts.

As a consumer are you going to spend $39.95 for an iron that has 6 temp settings which clearly list the fabric that matches the temp? (If not on the dial, on the surface or on a card attached to the surface.)

So I look at the Iron and I want to iron silk, there's a number. I set the iron to that number and I iron the fabric.

I want to use steam on my cotton dress shirt? I look at the fabric, find the right number and voila done.

Or do you want to spend $390.00 for an iron that has all these features in to read a barcode /q code tag that contains the same information that's on a human readable tag already on the shirt?

Oh and the $39.95 iron, will outlast the lifespan of the $390.00 iron. That's right. The simpler the device the longer it will last. I have a corded drill that my father purchased 50+ years ago. Compare that to the 4th Battery Powered Drill that I have purchased over the last 20 years...

The point is that you're trying to solve a problem that doesn't need to be solved.

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DTS announces DTS:X – sparks object-based audio war with Dolby

Ian Michael Gumby
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Huh?

"I mean, seriously, even installing a 5.1 system correctly, taking into account the room acoustics is a challenge. The rule of diminishing results certainly applies as you add more channels to a home cinema setup."

Isn't that the point of the DTS system?

You can place your channels anywhere in the room and it will model the room for you?

So if you don't have a proper listening room, you can surround yourself with X speakers and then model the room and then playback the sound?

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Amazon CTO destealths to throw light on AWS data centre design

Ian Michael Gumby
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Boffin

Re: Audio on a server

What's the difference between a server motherboard and a high end workstation?

Answer: The location of the box.

So you design one MB to serve both roles.

Cost savings for the hardware vendor. So what's a few watts of power?

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WHAT did GOOGLE do SO WRONG to get a slapping from the EU?

Ian Michael Gumby
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Boffin

@DougS Re: US officials haven't accepted anything

The US did in fact sue Microsoft and win.

That's one of the cases that made David Boise famous.

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Googley TENTACLES reach towards YOUR email

Ian Michael Gumby
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This would probably be illegal...

The question is Google's relationship with the retailers.

Are they 'partners' so that when a site says that they won't sell your information but will share it with their partners, what does that mean.

Suppose you give them an address to complete and track the transaction.

If they pass it on to Google, does that violate their privacy policy?

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Google’s plan for WORLD DOMINATION takes shape. And it begins with a patent

Ian Michael Gumby
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Prior Art.

Sorry but I believe there is prior art... not to mention looking at Akka for example ...

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Bloke hits armadillo AND mother-in-law with single 9mm round

Ian Michael Gumby
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@Nunyabiz ... Re: @Manolo ...Varmint?

I'll take rabbit over armadillo any day. :-)

And I'll take your word on how tasty they are.

I'll stick to gator meat too.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Re: @Chris G.... Doh!

Trust me, the round didn't bounce off the Armadillo.

I put many .22lrs in them. (They don't usually penetrate the other side.)

A 9mm will penetrate without any trouble.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Re: @Manolo ...Varmint?

You would have to be extremely hungry to eat Aradillo meat. And of course it depends on the species.

I wouldn't cook the ones you have in the US....

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Boffin

Re: It is the round, silly!

Sorry, but any proper farmer / rancher would tell you to use a .22lr or similar rimfire round.

As to their eyesight, yes they have poor eyesight. But they do have good hearing and smell.

As to being point blank, I doubt it. If he was, then the ricochet wouldn't have traveled 100 yrds. (Think about the angle.)

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Boffin

@Chris G.... Doh!

The round went through the Armadillo and then went on to hit the MiL.

The story has it wrong if the Armadillo didn't die. Their skin isn't going to stop a 9mm. Trust me, I know. I've killed 100's of them over a 4 year stretch. .22lrs work great, although I used a 16 gauge w #8 birdshot once.

Either the guy missed and the round richocheted off the ground or it went through the pest.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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@Manolo ...Re: Varmint?

You've never been around them on a farm, have you?

They are pests that have migrated north from South America.

They do spread leprosy, which makes them dangerous to humans and cattle.

They have large front claws. When cornered they'll cut you or your dog up. And when cornered they do charge at you.

They dig holes everywhere. Again a danger to humans and cattle.

They are varmints and breed as bad as rabbits. But with rabbits, at least you can eat them and use their fur...

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Boffin

@code junky ...Re: Ah

Actually, speaking from experience, the 9mm is the wrong tool for the job.

.22lr is the right tool. It does a good job on them. You usually use a rifle, but you could use a pistol. Typically you end up shooting them from a distance (20+ yrds).

They also have a habit of charging at you after they're shot.

Anyone who's spent time in the country know that they are nasty critter to have around.

Its not just an issue about leprosy, but they have amazing front claws from digging and can seriously hurt dogs and other curious pets. Not to mention they dig holes all over the place. A good way to break a leg, or to have a cow break a leg or get injured. (My wife didn't hate them until she got a bad sprain from stepping in to a hole dug by one.)

In terms of using a shotgun, that too will kill them, but with the .22lr, you end up with longer effective range.

The other fun tidbit is that when you do shoot them, they jump straight up so you know you hit them.

Oh and the 9mm? He must have used a FMJ usually used for practice on the range. Most self defense rounds would have expanded and lost too much energy.

I had to use a 9mm on a rabid racoon once. But then again, it was less than 10 feet away and I was shooting down in to the soft dirt so the round wouldn't have ricocheted.

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Need speed? Then PCIe it is – server power without the politics

Ian Michael Gumby
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Re: @Trevor PCIe won't work well outside the box...

So you don't mind Intel? having a hold on the market? ;-)

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Re: Just thanks for the fine article.

Hey!

While I don't agree with your opinion, I do appreciate the fact that you do respond in the comment section....

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Boffin

@Trevor Re: PCIe won't work well outside the box...

Actually Trevor, HP doesn't hold all of the cards.

There is a company called Crossbar which holds some patents and interesting technologies.

Their goal is to be 1+ TB on 1cm^2 (postage stamp) die.

And there's a group down in Austin TX.

Clearly you have a closed mind and haven't thought about this long enough. ;-)

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Boffin

PCIe won't work well outside the box...

I'm not saying that expanding PCIe as an interconnect isn't a good idea, but that trying to extend it outside the box may not yield the desired effect.

However, that doesn't mean you can't redesign the box. Imagine creating smaller cards that have CPU, Memory and RRAM storage. These cards could then be inserted in to a chassis with a larger bus. That contains an interconnect and power. Then you would need to create a daughter card for external communications including video and input to the daughter cards.

You could then take the same card and put it in a smaller frame so that it could operate as a single PC.

Note that if the RRAM proves to be relatively the same speed as regular RAM, you just need the CPU and the RRAM.

That would be the future.

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Rand Paul puts Hillary Clinton's hard drive on sale

Ian Michael Gumby
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Re: @AC the real issue... Anyone in IT and Corporate Governance knows she committed a crime.

No, I said Democrats because no Politician from the Democratic Party is standing up against Clinton. They are in fact putting their party's interest ahead of this country.

I agree that it should be any politician, but when you only have Republicans standing up and calling for a Congressional Hearing and investigation, while the Democratic party, the WH and DoJ turn a blind eye?

I think its fair to blame the Democrats on this one.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Boffin

@AC the real issue... Anyone in IT and Corporate Governance knows she committed a crime.

Sorry, but anyone with any time working for a large enough corporation knows that they own your email servers.

Hillary's use of her personal email account had at least tacit approval from the WH and as a lawyer, Clinton knew she had the legal responsibility to retain any and all emails sent or received by this account. (Including anything personal.)

The reason that they are claiming the requests for the emails and that she face a congressional hearing are 'political' is that the Democrats and the Democratic Party are placing their own self interests ahead of the oaths of office that they took when they were elected.

Lets be clear. Democrats are afraid to stand up for the law.

Hillary admitted to having deleted any and all emails that were 'personal' as well as deleting emails that she printed out and gave to the US Government in hard copy only.

This is obstruction and she should be wearing Orange Jumpsuits and taking lessons from Martha Stewart.

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HGST says its NVMe flash card will manage 750,000 IOPS

Ian Michael Gumby
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Thumb Up

@Lusty, ...Re: Very cool

There are use cases that can take advantage even if you don't have the network bandwidth.

Look at Spark, or SOLR/Lucene where you need to have a fast local disk for spill.

If you virtualize your server then more ops get eaten up.

So its a good thing.

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Microsoft Lumia 640, 640XL: They're NOT the same, mmmkay?

Ian Michael Gumby
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Boffin

@AMBxx Re: Come on Microsoft

The OS sucks.

They require you to set up a hotmail account or import everything from your hotmail account in as contacts, whether you like it or not.

As phone, physically the Nokia 1020 is solid.

As a camera, it rocks.

I have several shots that I took using it blown up to 17 x 14 without losing detail or looking grainy.

Good luck doing that with any other phone camera.

Of course the damn auto focus gets in the way sometimes....

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Ex-cop: Holborn fireball comms outage cover for £200m bling heist gang

Ian Michael Gumby
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Re: Sounds like a script for a "die hard" movie...

You got down voted because Bruce Willis has run his course.

Maybe a job for Ashton Kutcher ?

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Re: Possible

"Looks like it may have been started by someone smoking dope down there..."

Sure if they were smoking thermite.

Once you get it started, you can't put it out. Not too terribly complicated, although you need to get the mix right otherwise it goes boom or doesn't work. This would burn through almost everything.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Black Helicopters

@AC re GSM

You do realize that they can easily knock out mobile traffic too.

Not to mention that the nearby antennas for cell communication also use the same BT lines..

So if you knock out a large enough area in terms of power and cell towers, and then knock out the local cell traffic with a blocker... You've pretty much shut that avenue down...

Of course this is redundant because they took out the alarm system too.

This would only leave radio as an option, but that too can be jammed to a point.

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Trade body, universities row over US patent troll act proposals

Ian Michael Gumby
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Time to copy the UK...

The US needs a loser pays system.

This raises the risk of taking a lawsuit forward in court.

The other thing is that there has to be an easier way to challenge software patents and business process patents.

In fact, these shouldn't be patentable in the first place. By fixing this error, the number of patent related lawsuits will drop.

Then when you see something like Marvel's loss, you realize that CMU was correct in asserting their rights over a hardware patent.

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Steely wonder? It's blind to 4G and needs armour: Samsung Galaxy S6

Ian Michael Gumby
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Meh!

"Where the Galaxy S6 really stands out is ease of use for taking photos and videos demonstrating a versatile level of performance. "

Still not as nice as the Nokia Lumina, but then again try buying one new... Now that was the best camera that doubled as a phone. If only they weren't handicapped by a lousy OS...

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Non-American nerds jam immigration pleading for right to live in the US

Ian Michael Gumby
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Re: lie

If your wife is an American citizen, then she is required by law to report her income and joint income if she's named on the account, regardless if she has dual citizenship.

This had been covered in the press months ago and its not the ultra rich who are getting caught up in the net.

Your wife has to renounce her citizenship or risk facing terrible repercussions with the IRS.

And trust me. The IRS are all weasels.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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@AC ex-pats...

Most of those renouncing citizenships are ex-pats who have lived most of their lives outside of the US.

If you are caught renouncing your citizenship in an effort to skate on taxes... the US will not recognize it and you'll still be on the hook.

And of course countries like France have numbers that are worse.

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Marvell: We don't want to pay this $1.5bn patent bill because, cripes, it's way too much

Ian Michael Gumby
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Boffin

@Pele ...

The rule of thumb is to go after the easier targets first. Then you have a precedent of a win behind you. After that you go for bigger and bigger fish who will either settle or will have a harder time in court arguing facts that you have already used in a different court.

If you go after the bigger fish out of the gate... you fight a company with deep pockets who can tie this up in court longer than you can.

And by no means is Marvel a little fish.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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@ Marketing Hack... Re: the price

You have damages and you could ask the court to triple the damages based on the fact that the infringement was willful.

I agree that the courts did in fact properly award the damages and the penalty.

Marvel is SOL and would be better off paying it off now and getting out of court.

It wasn't a single patent, but several and they were necessary for Marvel's chip to work.

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Google, Microsoft and Apple explain their tax tricks in Australia

Ian Michael Gumby
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@ratfox... Not quite...

From the article:

"It's not hard to see why: Apple's managing director for Australia and New Zealand Tony King explained that the company generated AU$6bn in sales last year and paid $80m in tax on $250m of profits. That skinny margin comes, he said, from the fact that Apple Australia pays other members of the Apple group for the kit and content it sells here, but that the cost of developing those products is baked into the prices it pays even though product development is all done in the USA."

But here's the thing. That money is being siphoned off by the intermediary and is not coming back to the US. Higher tax? Yeah, but its a catch-22. They claim that they are paying more for the product that they buy from their internal division but that money isn't going back to the US.

In terms of a tax holiday... they can invest that money off shore tax free and then bring it in later.

In fact, they can borrow in the US against it and write off the interest rate, reducing their effective tax rate.

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Don't be stiffed by spies, stand up to Uncle Sam with your proud d**k pics – says Snowden

Ian Michael Gumby
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Boffin

Re: So, the conclusion is ..

For those who don't know US Law... there was a SCOTUS case Griswold vs State of Connecticut (1965)

That might explain why people want their privates private.

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CoreOS bags $12m, touts Tectonic – a DIY Google cloud for big biz

Ian Michael Gumby
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Trollface

@1980's ... Yeah but you have to like the name...

Hmmm what shall we call this "disruptive" company that is going to "shake up the IT world?"

Tectonic ... try and copyright it. :-P

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