* Posts by Lennart Sorensen

170 posts • joined 1 Jan 2008

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Vinyl LPs to top 3 million sales in Blighty this year

Lennart Sorensen

Re: The irony is

So you are saying if you listen with a crappy system it sounds worse than if you listen with a good system? A good system with digital will be even better than the analog.

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USB-C adds authentication protocol

Lennart Sorensen

Re: Security?

That would be wrong. USB type C will allow a single cable to carry both power and data. It does NOT make a single wire within that cable do both. The author of the article is wrong. Of course all USB did that but power was expected to only go out a USB host port, not in, while type-C allows both directions (as the new Macintosh devices take advantage/abuse of).

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Lennart Sorensen

Re: I can't wait

Oh good, so it was standards compliant. USB 1 and 2 explicitly allow up to 500mA and no more. USB 3 allows 900mA. Of course you can support more, but that's all the spec requires a port to support.

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IEEE delivers Ethernet-for-cars standard

Lennart Sorensen

Re: Ethernet for real time?

Ethernet hasn't had collisions since we started using switches, so that is not much of an issue any more. Temporary block in the switch though because some other packet is currently being sent out a given port is still an issue though. And there are Ethernet extension standards to deal with bandwidth reservation and such for those cases where that matters.

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Linux lads lambast sorry state of Skype service

Lennart Sorensen

Except NetMeeting actually used SIP, as in the standard that existed long before skype barged in with their own stupid peer to peer protocol.

SIP does have the issue of not being a fan of NAT on firewalls which has become rather common for just about everyone. It is an old protocol after all. Some firewalls do manage it OK though it seems.

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Lennart Sorensen

Re: Just hack your own version per the open source spirit

Ekiga is one of many SIP clients. It is a quite nice one. Of course SIP predates skype by many years and being a standard, it is supported by lots of software and hardware. But it is slightly harder to use than skype, but on the other hand it isn't evil and proprietary.

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WD CEO: We ain't getting Unisplendour's $3.8bn. But we'll buy SanDisk anyway

Lennart Sorensen
Happy

I love that they got the year of their special shareholder meeting wrong consistently everywhere in the press release, while getting the year right for everything else.

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Debian 6.0 about to take flying leap off long term support cliff

Lennart Sorensen

Re: LTS is a joke

Debian follows the FHS (File Hierarchy Standard) and any upstream that doesn't will be fixed before being packaged. Upstreams that think they know better than everyone else and go their own way are best avoided. Just too much of a hassle to deal with things that want to do it their own way.

So no, the upstream wordpress is not better. It's wrong and actually hostile to proper packaging and installation.

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Lennart Sorensen

Re: LTS is a joke

Trying to maintain security while using PHP is a joke. The Debian LTS tries to do security updates pretty quick with limited resources. This means things like firefox (well iceweasel) are out (It is just hopeless to try and keep up with the security problems in that), and I can imagine PHP being neglected too given how fundamentally insecure it always is.

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Khronos releases Vulkan 1.0 open graphics specification

Lennart Sorensen

Re: OS X and Windows?

It doesn't matter what Microsoft thinks. If intel, AMD and Nvidia all support it in their drivers, then it doesn't matter if Microsoft officially wants to support it. They already did it back when OpenGL wasn't what Microsoft wanted, and they are doing it now with Vulcan.

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'Unikernels will send us back to the DOS era' – DTrace guru Bryan Cantrill speaks out

Lennart Sorensen

Re: 80386 vs 80286

Then Pentium Pro was perfectly capable of running 16 bit code the same as any other x86 and is fully compatible. The issue people had was that it wasn't very fast at 16 bit code compared to 32 bit code (which is what it was optimized for with the new microcode pipeline). So 16 bit code didn't run any faster than on a Pentium, while 32 bit code was much faster, so if you ran DOS or Windows 3.1, then you might as well save your money and get a Pentium instead. The PII and later improved on the 16 bit performance again and were hence much better upgrades.

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Lennart Sorensen

Re: Windows/NT must be 20 years old at least.

Well I think they called it NT 3.1 since it shared the look and feel of Windows 3.1 and could run Windows 3.1 applications.

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Lennart Sorensen

Re: "Operating systems these days..." @Herbert

Actually the 68020 was the first version to support an MMU, and the MMU was an external chip. The 68000 and 68010 did not have any support for an MMU. The 68030 was the first to be available with the MMU built in (and many variants did not include it).

But at least they were 32bit chips with a flat memory model (OK, only 24bit supported until the 68020, but the register were 32 bit even before that), unlike the horror of the x86 family.

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Lennart Sorensen

Linux is for everyone that wants an OS that works on pretty much all hardware and is scalable. FreeBSD is way behind in both those areas. And then there is the horror of the BSD user space which is just intolerable.

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AMD's 64-bit ARM server chip Seattle finally flies the coop ... but where will it call home?

Lennart Sorensen

Re: The future can't be prevented. Only delayed.

No gigabyte has been showing vapour-ware for a long time too. You can't actually buy any of the nice arm servers gigabyte has shown, while you could actually get a hold of a development system from AMD. That is still the big problem for all the arm servers: You can't actually buy the damn things.

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Got a pricey gaming desktop from PC World for Xmas? Check the graphics specs

Lennart Sorensen

Re: Not a Ti

Well HP list the 860-008na as having a 980 Ti, so I don't see why the 860-078na could not have one as an option.

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Apple pays two seconds of quarterly profit for wiping pensioner's pics

Lennart Sorensen

Re: It's official now.

If you wait until the device is broken, it may not be possible to do a backup anymore.

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BlackBerry to bug out of Pakistan by end of year

Lennart Sorensen

Blackberry only holds the keys to the servers they operate, not the ones enterprises run themselves. It seems when India was demanding access, blackberry put a server in India for consumer users there so that India could make requests for access to that data for users in India. This of course didn't do anything for access to messages for corporate users since they tend to have their own blackberry server with their own keys. Seems India thought that was good enough for them. Sounds like Pakistan wants a lot more than that which no one has ever gotten. If you want to access the messages going to a corporate blackberry server, bring a warrant to the company, not blackberry. I seem to recall blackberry said they would leave India too when they were demanding everything until they got a clue and accepted what blackberry said they could provide.

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Mobe-maker OnePlus 'fesses up to flouting USB-C spec

Lennart Sorensen

Re: Maybe true

Well they are clearly not doing the right thing. It doesn't matter if the cable works with the phone. In 6 or 12 months you will grab that cable when you need one for some other device and potentially cause a fire or damage to something else because of it.

So they have only half done the right thing and half done the wrong thing.

After all I doubt the cable has a giant 'For use with OnePlus 2 only' sign on it. And their next phone might very well NOT work properly with this cable, assuming they stay in business long enough to make another phone.

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BitLocker popper uses Windows authentication to attack itself

Lennart Sorensen

If you use it with the boot password (which I honestly thought everyone did), then it probably is a good replacement for truecrypt. If you use it in stupid mode because it would be so awful if you inconvenienced the users, then it isn't.

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Lennart Sorensen

Re: Passwordless Bitlocker?

The fact it allows windows to boot from an "encrypted" drive without asking for the decryption password certainly indicates that such a problem exists.

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American robocallers to be shamed in public lists

Lennart Sorensen

Given most robocalls I get (in Canada) are from fake numbers, what use is a list of numbers?

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Smartmobe brain maker Qualcomm teases 64-bit ARM server chip secrets

Lennart Sorensen

But will you ever be able to buy one? Gigabyte has shown of both x-gene1 and thunderx machines, at least one of which has prices and preorder options at various dealers (and has had for 3 months) but can you actually buy one? No, of course not. If we could, we would buy one today (or maybe two).

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Twenty years since Windows 95, and we still love our Start buttons

Lennart Sorensen

Re: I remember Windows 95, too

Weezer - Buddy Holly and Edie Brickell - Good Times videos were on the windows 95 CD. No idea what the plus pack CD had on it.

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Lennart Sorensen

Re: The public accepted Windows 95

Well one big thing Microsoft also did right in windows 95 with the new UI was to also include program manager for those who were not ready for the new UI. You could run windows 95 with the same program manager UI from windows 3.1 if you wanted to. I never saw anyone do it, but you had the choice. Same when they later did the new colourful stuff in XP, there was the option to stay with the older look if you wanted to. Windows 8 was the first time you were force fed a new UI with no option of saying "No thanks" and sticking with the previous UI until you got used to it (and no one will ever get used to the dreadful UI of Windows 8, which was a shame given the improvements in every other part of windows 8). With windows 8 Microsoft managed to simultaneously make a new UI that was awful and not give people the choice to not use it, rather than as in the past, make a UI that was usually considered better and give the option to stick with the old one.

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So what are you doing about your legacy MS 16-bit applications?

Lennart Sorensen

Re: @1980s_coder - Start asking the developers pointed questions

Well actually the Alpha never did 32bit mode either, it was 64bit from the start, just like the Itanic that killed it (well that, along with totally incompetent management and infighting at Digital).

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Samsung S6: You might get a Sony camera in it - or you might not

Lennart Sorensen

Looking at the pictures in that test, the sony sensor does appear to have a tendency to make things quite purple in some cases that the samsung does not, but is perhaps a tiny bit more detailed in some of the shots.

The summary of the difference does appear quite accurate.

Now of course it is a cell phone. What are you doing taking pictures you care about with a cell phone anyhow? Get a proper camera.

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IBM details PowerPC microserver aimed at square kilometre array

Lennart Sorensen

Re: 12 actual and 12 virtual cores

It is a 12 core CPU with the ability to run 2 threads at once on each core. No different than what intel does with hyperthreading on many of their CPUs.

So 12 physical cores, 24 virtual cores. Your OS would see 24 CPUs.

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For Windows guest - KVM or XEN and which distro for host?

Lennart Sorensen

I have no experience with xen, but at least the kvm information says that while device passthrough is supported, video card passthrough is NOT. A few people have managed to get it to work with some patching work done.

I do see some documentation on it having been done successfully with xen however.

I agree with other people on BTRFS. The developers say it isn't ready for production use. Of course if your machine is just to run games and do some hobby work, then that might be good enough.

I too would avoid AMD graphics cards. I also personally am a Debian fan, and have no interest or appreciation for the commercial linux distributions.

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Top Microsoft bod: ARM servers right now smell like Intel's (doomed) Itanic

Lennart Sorensen

Re: Dinosaur MS

In the server area, most people really don't care about Windows. Serious server users run linux and ARM will run that just fine already.

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Lennart Sorensen

Re: @ThomH

The P4 was a bad design. It was obviously designed to aim for the biggest clock speed number because that's what intel marketing wanted. The fact it was lousy at running existing x86 code that had been optimized following intel's own recommendations didn't matter to intel. As long as consumers were buying the machine with the biggest GHz number, intel was happy with the P4. Only when they ran into leakage issues and overheating problems and discovered they wouldn't be able to scale to 10GHz like they had planned did they throw the design away and start over using the Pentium-M/Pentium3 design and create the Core 2 by improving on the older design. Only the new instructions from the P4 were carried over, netburst was dead and well deserved. The Opteron/Athlon64 destroyed the P4 in performance on typical code at a lot lower clock speed and power consumption. intel has made a number of stupid blunders over the years, but they do eventually admit when things don't work and recover quite well by changing course and they have the resources to pull it off. x86 will be around from intel long after the itanium is gone.

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Lennart Sorensen

Also MIPS never tried and SGI bought into the Itanium idea and killed development. It still does well in embedded markets where almost all wireless routers are MIPS based although a few are ARM. Alpha (owned by compaq owned by HP then sold to intel) was killed off, and had failed because digital had priced it out of the market to protect the VAX market that eventually was killed of by competition from everyone else instead. PowerPC hasn't failed, it does great it the markets that use it (lots of engine computers in cars are powerpc, as is lots of other embedded systems, and IBM has rather nice servers). Itanium failed because it was slow and stupid.

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Lennart Sorensen

Apple changed to x86 because no one was making powerpc chips that fit their needs. IBM was making high end server chips which used too much power for a desktop, and freescale was making embedded chips which were too slow for what the desktop needed. Nothing wrong with PowerPC itself, just the server and embedded market was vastly more interesting (and a vastly larger market) than tiny little Apple's measly desktop market. It is the same reason Apple moved from m68k to PowerPC in the first place. m68k wasn't getting faster any more.

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Lennart Sorensen

ARM64 (well aarch64) is very much a 64bit extention to the existing ARM 32bit design a lot like AMD extended x86 to 64bit. All 64bit ARM chips are perfectly able to run existing 32bit ARM code and a 64bit ARM linux system will also run 32bit arm applications with no changes or recompile needed. This is not a new thing. Sparc went from 32 to 64bit, PowerPC did it, Mips did it, x86 did it, PA-Risc did it, and now ARM is doing it. Nothing complicated about extending an architecture from 32 to 64bit while maintaining backwards compatibility. Only a few architectures were 64bit from the start (Itanium and Alpha that I can think of).

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Lennart Sorensen

The Sun Niagara is a Sparc, not ARM. Sparc itself is fine, the Niagara design, not so much.

All the ARM chips so far have been perfectly sane. Itanium was not a sane design for a general purpose CPU. it was assuming compilers would become able to do compile time scheduling of parallel instructions, and that didn't happen. I vaguely recall seeing a paper a few years ago that actually proved it can't be done, so what intel hope for is actually impossible if I recall correctly. And if I recall incorrectly, it is still a very hard problem that has not been solved. So as it stands, the itanium is a terrible CPU design and rightly deserved to die. It is an enourmous shame that it caused MIPS to give up designing high end chips, made the Alpha go away, and certainly hurt sparc (powerpc seems to be doing OK). I don't personally miss PA-RISC.

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Microsoft bans XXXXBOX gamers for CURSING in online combat

Lennart Sorensen

So no swearing, but killing is OK.

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KILL SWITCH 'BLOCKED by cell operators' to pad PROFITS, thunders D.A.

Lennart Sorensen

Re: In light of this

Well if Samsung sells half the worlds smartphones, then actually Samsung alone doing this would make a difference.

And yes the cell phone companies are vastly more evil than your average company. Especially in North America.

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Hate Skype now it's part of Microsoft? How about a Chinese clone, then?

Lennart Sorensen

Re: My utter disdain for

No kidding. The awful protocol, peer to peer disaster, ruining company networks, is just terrible. And there were plenty of standards compliant systems out there before skype showed up and they never do provide a gateway to those even though they have often promised to make one whenever the media remembers to ask why they are a closed environment.

Skype has always been about vendor lock-in and for the first while using the end users resources to run the system. What an evil company. I suppose Microsoft is a sensible owner of skype in the end.

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Sony's new PlayStation 4 and open source FreeBSD: The TRUTH

Lennart Sorensen

Re: And this is news? @Kebabbert

Actually SunOS 4 was BSD based. Solaris (SunOS 5) was actually more system V ("real" Unix), although with some bits of the BSD code merged in.

OSF/1 became Digital Unix, NOT HP-UX.

Now going with Linux and GPL2) has the strategic advantage that you know anyone using Linux and making changes is required to release those changes, so it forces everyone to share. If IBM invests 1billion in helping develop features in Linux, it doesn't make sense to do so if some other company could just take the result and go make money without sharing any of their contributions. The BSD license assumes people are nice and that they will help out, but doesn't force them to or demand that they do. As an individual developer or a small team, perhaps that is OK and you are happy to see people making good use of your code. On the other hand if you are putting thousands of people on something, you might want to make sure you aren't funding someone else's business for free.

I personally would use the BSD license if I came up with some small useful piece of code, because I like the being totally free thing, but I certainly see the benefit of making sure everyone plays fair.

Of course these days Linux just makes sense since it supports more platforms than even netbsd now, and it is what everyone supports. The BSDs are just starting to look obsolete in comparison in terms of support for large systems, odd ball systems, etc. Last I saw, freebsd just added support for 64 CPUs, at a time linux supported 4096. There just aren't that many people contributing to freebsd as there is to Linux anymore. of course the BSD userspace being such awful obsolete stuff that drives you insane compared to any linux system in the last decade probably isn't helping, although I suppose one could always use debian/kfreebsd and get the freebsd kernel without the BSD userspace hell, instead using a nice Debian userspace.

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Cisco: We'll open-source our H.264 video code AND foot licensing bill

Lennart Sorensen

Quite misleading.

If it is only free to use the binary version, then it isn't a free open source H.264 is it?

Rather misleading really.

I for one don't want any binary blobs on my nice open source system, and this doesn't change a thing. just Cisco trying to get some good PR while throwing around "open source" and "free license", except not at the same time.

So linux distributions can't include it, because Cisco pays the license for the binary downloads, which of course means they need to know how many downloads there are, and it only applies to the binaries they offer, not any others built from their source.

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Hackers crack femtocells to pwn then clone phones

Lennart Sorensen

The issue here is that a femtocell is part of the cell network, but physical security of it is with some random person. This is a concern for cell phone users in the area should their phone happen to choose to connect to that femtocell.

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WD: Enjoying our $630m, Seagate? Let's ruin your day with our results

Lennart Sorensen

Re: Poor quality

I think by definition, only one brand can be giving you the most problems. That's pretty much what 'most' means.

On the other hand, it certainly doesn't match my experience, unless you don't actually deal with Seagate in the first place.

And of course if no month ever involves sending drives back, life must be great.

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UK gov's smart meter dream unplugged: A 'colossal waste of cash'

Lennart Sorensen

Our cheap time is from 19:00 to 07:00. I can easily handle running the dryer and dishwasher in the evening before going to bed. That is not a problem.

I have never noticed a manual for either a dryer or dishwasher telling me not to run it without someone around, nor have I ever heard any such suggestion from the fire department or anyone else, until I read your comment. You are the first I hear of that.

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Lennart Sorensen

Where I live (Ontario), we have smart meters for electricity (but not gas), and time of day pricing. At least for me, it has resulted in a lower bill than before the smart meter came in, given I do run the dryer off peak when it is cheapest, as well as the dishwasher and such. So works for me.

I don't have a display telling me my current usage in the house. I would have to walk outside to look at the meter's screen to see that.

Of course given heating the house and water is done with gas, it is only the air conditioning that uses a lot of power during the day time when prices are high. Having a high efficiency model and good insulation in the house helps with that though.

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Microsoft: Someone gave us shot in the ARM by swallowing Surface tabs

Lennart Sorensen
Linux

So you want something like what http://eltechs.com/ is doing (except they are doing it for ARM servers and almost certainly are dealing with Linux, not Windows). i am sure there are others, that was just one of the first Google turned up.

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AMD reveals potent parallel processing breakthrough

Lennart Sorensen
Thumb Up

I believe most of the SGI machines had all of the video card mapped in the CPU memory space so everything could access everything else.

Of course it used to be video cards had their memory mapped into the memory space of the PC, although there wasn't as much acceleration then, so allowing the CPU a fast way to write updates to the video card made sense. Once we got 3D chips with hundreds of MB of ram, the 32bit memory space started getting a bit tight and they stopped doing that for all the memory. No reason a 64bit machine couldn't allow everything to be mapped into one memory space though, unless you want to support running 32bit software still.

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GE puts new Nvidia tech through its paces, ponders HPC future

Lennart Sorensen

Wine won't help. After all the fact it is NOT emulation means it won't do anything to help run x86 instructions on an arm. So unless crysis is recompiled for arm, you won't have any hope of running that.

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Software glitch WIPES OUT listings of 10,000 eBay sellers

Lennart Sorensen
FAIL

So what ebay should have done (and obviously did not), is to simply hide the dormant accounts, then wait and see if anything broke, and if it did, unhide them again and fix the bug that made it select the wrong accounts. Simply deleting data is not a good idea.

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Linus Torvalds in NSFW Red Hat rant

Lennart Sorensen

Re: Quite frankly.....

Actually secureboot is all about virus protection (and probably a bit about Microsoft making it harder for other OSs than Windows 8 to run on a machine).

it is not at all about pirating and does nothing to prevent it.

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Apple, Google tumble off top 20 trusted companies list

Lennart Sorensen
WTF?

Totally invalid averages

How can you say that a company that scores 17 one yeah, but doesn't make the top 20 the other six years has an average of 17? It is clearly much higher than that given in six of the seven years it ranked worse than 20th.

By their averaging methods a company that got a 1 in one year and NR in the other 6 years would have an average of 1, while a company that got a 2 in all seven years has an average of 2. Clearly that's wrong.

I am not good at statistics, but I am not as bad as they are.

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