* Posts by Cynical Observer

143 posts • joined 20 Dec 2007

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Bats and badgers hold up Apple’s Irish data centre plans

Cynical Observer
Facepalm

Don't underestimate the tenacity of these nut jobs!

As an example, Galway city was the fastest growing city in Ireland during the days of the Celtic Tiger. As the city grew and expanded however, the councils ignored the infrastructure until it was beyond breaking point and no longer fit for purpose.

A new, much needed bypass was required - and having almost secured the route and planning approval, in jumped the nut jobs wittering on about one field of flowers. They took it all the way to Europe and won - ultimately forcing the council into years of further consultation, planning and a route that demolishes two dozen houses in the process.

Apple would be well advised to say sod this - and walk away right now, It will only cost them years and millions otherwise.

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Row over GCHQ-built voice algo MIKEY SAKKE rumbles on

Cynical Observer
Coat

Re: When is a backdoor not a backdoor?

Patio Door

AKA French Windows. The French government doesn't like strong encryption and has been making noises about having lower grades. Windows is sometimes cited as being not as secure as other platforms.

Blimey - they're all at it now.

Coat - it's draughty around here with all these doors and windows that are not secure.

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Three: We won't hike prices if you say yes to £10.5bn O2 merger

Cynical Observer

Keeping a watching brief

SWMBO got the letter last week - the One Plan which was £15 after discounts was being withdrawn and their proposed suggestion was twice the price. After a call where she firmly but politely told them that this was not acceptable - a new plan was agreed at £14 pcm (Manager discretion is wonderful!). The data allowance is still generous - 4 GB pcm where she's had an actual max usage in the last six months of 2.7GB

The threat of taking all the family contracts to another provider seems to have worked.

I'm still waiting for my letter - not received and I'm not asking them for it. They cannot change the tariff without the thirty days notification -- at which point, I have the rest of the family contracts as leverage for a decent deal.

To their credit, one thing that Three do for free is their Home Signal box. We have zero signal indoors and Three do the box for free - the other providers either charge (circa £80 according to some reports) or suggest that you use an App to fudge getting over the lack of signal. In itself, that makes Three stand out over the others when everything else is comparable.

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Lights out for Space Vehicle Number 23: UK smacked when US sat threw GPS out of whack

Cynical Observer
Flame

Re: 'precision docking of oil tankers, as well as navigation'

"if you rely solely on /one/ system for anything important then you will get burned at some point."

.... And with an oil tanker, that burn has the potential to be serious.

Torn between Get My coat Icon and the one I eventually went for.

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Cynical Observer
Facepalm

He said: "A more effective backup for GPS is desperately needed."

Anyone else thinking that misses the issue - a more effective replacement for GPS is desperately needed.

Companies place their dependence on systems that can have their accuracy manipulated by a foreign entity. Yes I know that the commercial GPS services are supposed to come with higher accuracy & reliability service levels - but that didn't help in this instance.

Serious question as I've not had to do this for a long time - what ever happened to taking the atomic clock signals as the prime source?

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Microsoft buys SwiftKey, Britain's 'stealthiest software startup'

Cynical Observer
Facepalm

Counting the days

.. until they boll*x this one up and I have to uninstall it. Bought and paid for because it addressed an irritating issue that the stock keyboard had in my browser of choice (The stock keyboard would not auto-space in a web page's dialog box.)

Time to look at detaching it from the market and disabling future updates.

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BT blames 'faulty router' for mega outage. Did they try turning it off and on again?

Cynical Observer
Trollface

Re: Redundancy?

@ Lost all faith...

Taken from that link ....

with carrier-grade 99.999% uptime performance.

Well that's going to need some rewriting on the website or it had better be rock solid and stay up for the next 24 years (Estimating a two hour outage yesterday.)

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BT broadband is down: Former state monopoly goes TITSUP UK-wide

Cynical Observer
FAIL

And this is why

I cannot bring myself to put all comms eggs in one basket.

Currently connecting via a tolerable 2Meg wireless tethered on the mobile as Infinity takes an infinite amount of time to return from having vanished up its own jacksy.

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Outsourcer didn't press ON switch, so Reg reader flew 15 hours to do the job

Cynical Observer
Facepalm

Re: Let me guess

@jonathonb

... my guess they would have been stumped. As the machines were not on, turning them off would have been impossible and having failed to complete step one, they could not countenance proceeding to step two under any circumstances.

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Apple's design 'drives up support costs, makes gadgets harder to use'

Cynical Observer
Boffin

Re: So it's not just me then...

@TRT

Possibly an illegal format shift, depending on the content owner.

Right - let's start at the beginning. Format shifting is a matter of law not content owners preferences. For example, US copyright law embodies a concept of fair use which is believed by many lawyers to encompass format shifting. The matter is not fully settled - so this may change in the future.

In the Netherlands, citizens are allowed to make copies of their legally bought audio and video.

In Spain, provided that you retain the original media, you can make a copy for private use.

Similarly in Australia and New Zealand, copies can be made for personal use.

The UK government tried to introduce a provision for format shifting - but as per standard operating procedure, they screwed it up. Specifically, they did not provide any compensation mechanism for the content owners (e.g. such as a tax on MP3 players) and were adjudged to have unfairly deprived the content holders of their property rights without compensation.

That the format shifting card was played at all points to the overall weakness of the position being defended - we are talking technology not law.

So - for the purposes of this discussion, the DVDs are of home video, previously recorded on a Sony camera and transferred to DVD .

Back to the tech issue.

The player that I settled on does have a transfer mechanism built into it. So, the files are on the iPad and can be played. However, if in two months time a new wizzy player emerges and becomes the favoured player of choice then these two 'king huge files cannot be played by that new wizzy player. They are as useful as a dead parrot - you know

"'E's not pinin'! 'E's passed on! This parrot is no more! He has ceased to be! 'E's expired and gone to meet 'is maker!

'E's a stiff! Bereft of life, 'e rests in peace! If you hadn't nailed 'im to the perch 'e'd be pushing up the daisies!

'Is metabolic processes are now 'istory! 'E's off the twig!

'E's kicked the bucket, 'e's shuffled off 'is mortal coil, run down the curtain and joined the bleedin' choir invisible!!

As it stands, there would appear to be no way to make them accessible to the new wizzy player without loading them though the new player - that that is just plain daft.

It may be argued that it is "Safer" but my contention remains - usability studies are an essential part of design - and based on said studies, the design should evolve - evolve to accommodate new paradigms of working and evolve to fix decisions that might no longer stand the test of time.

Even if they were only to offer the option of "I think I know what I'm doing and I understand the risks - but let me pretend to be an adult and try something!" with 14 layers of "Are you Sure?" "Are you really really really sure?"

Anyway - at this stage it's now a philosophical argument - the experience has dissuaded me from ever spending my money on an iPad.

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Cynical Observer
Flame

Re: So it's not just me then...

@TRT, & Steve Todd

It is a design flaw - it's her device, her data, her choices on how data should be handled. We are not talking about one app messing up the running files of another. We are talking about the data - the consumer information. Their's to own and use/screw up as they see fit.

Oh Just use iTunes... Why? It's not my iPad - why should I have to use a bloated piece of software from Apple just to transfer files and make them usable, If I have successfully got the files on board - as I did with ftp then I should be able to use them as I see fit.

This all goes back to working with customers/consumers to see how they try to use the device - and making design choices accordingly.

SUSE did this with Linux years ago something in excess of 10000 hours of usability studies across different generations and abilities. And at that time there was a step improvement in the interface and the usability - but it's an iterative process - study how people use it, make changes, stick with some aspects for well documented and considered reasons. Rinse and repeat. Redhat have done similarly.

I just don't understand why it is that consumers have to accept the "We will tell you the only way to use it, You're holding it wrong!" approach from manufacturers.

Ah well - back to my mixed bag of MS/Linux/Android for the rest of the day...

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Cynical Observer
FAIL

@Dave 126

So ....

Under your logic, the car that will attempt the land speed record won't need a braking parachute.

The Bluebird of Malcolm Campbell didn't have one - and sod the years of evolution that might actually point to slightly changing priorities.

If a design ethos of 10 years ago is still be heralded as good enough for today then there is something very wrong. There are times when it does become necessary to embrace change and realise that perhaps some of the new fangled improvements need to be tried.

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Cynical Observer

Re: But

Because Apple treat their users as simpletons?

I don't know! But I wish someone would explain!

For example - why did they deliver a system without an obvious back button? This goes to the heart of the article/observations by the old designers. Why is it so difficult to reverse out of something.

Like so many others, I make mistakes, pick the wrong option, change my mind - but there's not a simple back out.

Or I want to share data between apps - a process that would seem intuitive to almost any user of computer type equipment for the last however many decades. But Apple decided that that model was too risky and sandboxed the data - breaking the basic principles of usability.

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Cynical Observer

Re: So it's not just me then...

Thought I'd do SWMBO a favour and rip a couple of DVDs to her iPad. Easy enough you would think - until you try to put them on without using iTunes!

Apple decided to sandbox the application data - so while I could FTP them on, I couldn't see them from the chosen player app.

The screams that accompanied the headache - for the most counter intuitive interface/system that it has been my misfortune to work with.

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MPs to assess tech feasibility of requirements under draft surveillance laws

Cynical Observer
Childcatcher

A=B=C=D

To the AC that posted first.

Interest in Alice allows them to record Bob - but separately, Bob communicates with Tom Dick and Harry. Harry communicates with Pugh Pugh and Barney Mcgrew who communicates with Fireman Sam.

Should they have the right to record Fireman Sam. How far should the powers be transitive.

Your argument works assuming that all persons involved in nefarious deeds are communicating with each other - as opposed to some cell type operation.

Don't get me wrong - I still think Bulk collection is wrong and that warrants should be obtained for surveillance. I just don't think your half way house will be deemed workable by anybody - pro or con the new proposals.

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Yesterday: Openreach boss quits. Today: BT network goes TITSUP

Cynical Observer
Black Helicopters

Re: Anyone else have DNS issues full stop with them?

Got rid of the BT HomeHub in favour of a Draytek and have tended to pick from this list of DNS servers for the last year

http://public-dns.tk/nameserver/gb.html.

Did have to change servers on one occasion as the DNS server was unreachable but otherwise, it tends to be fairly reliable.

If nothing else, my thoughts are that using the DNS servers of one ISP when the broadband is provided by a second should confuse mix things up nicely. :-)

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Cynical Observer

Admittedly - they don't make it easy to find the information...

24 hours a day, 365 days a year.

The best time to call is

between 12 noon and 4pm.

Please make sure you're at your computer when you call.

From a landline: 0800 111 4567

From a mobile: 0330 123 4567*

From abroad: +44 179 359 6931**

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French Playmobil heist: El Reg denies involvement

Cynical Observer
Coat

Search Warrant

Police are applying for warrants to search all duplo duplex houses

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Ex-competition watchdog and TalkTalk adviser calls for Openreach split from BT

Cynical Observer
FAIL

It's not my fault!

"Earlier this week, TalkTalk boss Dido Harding griped during a conference call about her company's first-half results that BT was slowing down the ISP's growth with Openreach's "lead time to connections" getting worse, she claimed."

Nothing to do with security breaches, poor service, etc.

Sounds like kids complaining that "It's not fair!"

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Microsoft's top lawyer: I have a cunning plan ... to rescue sunk safe harbor agreement

Cynical Observer

Re: Sounds like common sense....

@Danny 5

.... it was the blatant way in which US companies Government Agencies broke those rules again and again and again and again.

FTFY

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Weight, what? The perfect kilogram is nearly in Planck's grasp

Cynical Observer
Coat

I think you'll find that with spheres - there isn't one.

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Cynical Observer

Re: Heavy science

So physics teachers all over the world would be suffering mass hysteria at such comments?

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BOFH: I'm not doing this for the benefit of your health, you know

Cynical Observer
Coffee/keyboard

Note to self -

... put coffee down

" the infinite patience of the mentally deficient."

Bravo sir!

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Are you avoiding tax, big tech firm? Not any more you won't, growl MEPs

Cynical Observer

Re: Those companies aren't doing anything that....

@Ken

Not quite so clear cut. Ireland was already attractive to many multinationals due to the low corporation tax. Bit of history.

It used to be 10% for the multinationals. somewhat higher for the Irish companies - all with the aim of attracting investment from the tech companies. Europe said that that was unfair and must be rectified - expecting the Irish government to raise the tax level applicable to the multinationals.

That would also have made it much closer to French levels - the chief moaning entity if memory serves correctly.

Instead - they lowered the rate for the national companies so that everyone paid 10% - the French had an apoplectic fit but could do nothing as the rate of taxation is a national matter not a European one.

The Irish even defended this to the death during the bailout - it was the one thing that they wouldn't give way on.

That Apple managed to drive it even lower to 2% would suggest that they have behaved aggressively so I call both sides at fault with the balance to be determined by someone else.

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Cynical Observer
Pirate

Who profits?

€17bn - that's gotta go somewhere.

I know that one should always be careful about killing the goose that lays the golden eggs but if it has to go then I bet the Irish Finance minister is thinking that this is one hell of a way to go.

In the first instance, it would seem logical that it goes to the Irish Exchequer - but thereafter I suppose the EU will sharpen its talons and claim that Ireland's GDP has been understated for a number of years so there's a large settlement figure required.

And then you have every other country trying to claim a cut based on where turnover rather than profit is recorded.

Pull up some seats and make some popcorn - this one is going to run and run.

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BT commences trials of copper-to-the-home G.fast broadband tech

Cynical Observer

Re: Silly... @Cynical

@Peter

One example of one approach ..... from the Alcatel-Lucent web site.

"Part of a complete end-to-end portfolio of Alcatel-Lucent ultra-broadband solutions, the new G.fast residential gateway also provides a more efficient way to power the growing number of distribution point units essential for delivering on the G.fast standard. With an integrated reverse power feed capability that powers the remote G.fast distribution point unit, operators no longer need to connect the distribution points locally to the power grid."

Doubtless some will scream about powering a utility providers network - but it's a choice. Provide power for faster service or choose not to and settle for VDSL2 at best.

Ultimately as FTTH is just too expensive and unlikely to happen, anything that offers the chance to push the bandwidth levels higher is worth consideration.

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Cynical Observer

Re: Silly...

@JP19

Little bit of searching turned up....

G.fast distribution points are placed within 250 metres of premises For example, it could be in a manhole, on a pole, in a mini-cabinet at a relatively close distance (within about 250 metres) to the premises to be served. It could also be located at the entrance (inside or outside) of a building.

The obvious is on the pole for the final drop to the premises - OpenReach owns the pole (at a guess) and if the distribution point is not unduly large, I can't imagine there's any planning permission issue with what they put up there.

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At last we know for sure. Blighty's 'best mobile network' is ...

Cynical Observer

Sure SIgnal/Home Signal

While they have their failings, I'll give Three their due. It took all of about 30 minutes to agree that the signal indoors was non-existent - it didn't even have enough ummph to qualify as pants. Once that was agreed, it was a quick hop and a skip to securing their Home signal which backhauls over the broadband - and as the rest of the family are on Three as well, they can all be registered on the same device. Result - 4 bars indoors.

Changed SIM recently - and when that didn't sign on, a quick call to Three support and 5 minutes later it was sorted - the registration on the Home signal is via the SIM ID.

All in all - it makes them usable.

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Amazon threatens UK with James Blunt, muscles into music streaming

Cynical Observer

Long way from usable

Tried this morning - with some mainstream and some slightly more esoteric music choices. There was only a subset of the mainstream artists' material available via the Prime subscription.

Times like this my Luddite tendencies come to the fore and I think that streaming will be an option when you prise the album from my cold fingers...... There's still something nice about having the physical media

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Biometric behavioural profiling: Fighting that password you simply can't change

Cynical Observer
Thumb Down

As Mr Scott said....

....The more they overthink the plumbing, the easier it is to stop up the drain.

Anyone else think that this is a really bad idea - what about those who have just walked into the office in winter, hands cold. Anyone who sustained an injury playing sport over a week end.

Even an ouchy paper cut.

Anything that changes your standard typing practice - an interruption to your train of thought in the middle of typing. The fact that you have slowed your typing down to make sure you are hitting the right keys - which is self defeating as the algorithm is looking for you to do it at speed.

Hopefully this as an idea will die a fast and permanent death.

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Silicon-happy ARM engorges its profits by a third – so its shares dip

Cynical Observer
Flame

The ultimate F@£kwittery

A company delivers a profit that would make the eyes of Croesus water. To the layman - even those who are bemused by the cult of iThings, this is impressive.

To the analyst who has wet his finger and made a guess, it's a failure as it did not live up to the (un)educated guess.

Being a stock market analyst now seems to have levels of accuracy associated with forecasting the weather - the only time it is truly accurate is when describing what has already happened - the rest of it is glorified gambling/guesswork. And still, people listen to these guessmongers.

Time to go find a quiet dark corner......

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Shout, shout, Elliott loses out. Samsung will merge with itself after all

Cynical Observer
Childcatcher

"all options at its disposal

That will be lying on the floor drumming its heels like a two year old then.

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Ditch crappy landlines and start reading Twitter, 999 call centres told

Cynical Observer
Flame

Re: For the nay sayers... @Peter 26

Geodata!

My but we don't give a toss about our privacy do we..... One of the first things turned of when I launched the camera on my phone.

Besides - they can pull geo info from the cell towers if you're on a mobile - at least good enough to get within a meaningful radius

Why anyone would want to use a connectionless mode of data transfer (on a macro level at least) to transfer life and death information beggars belief

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Cambridge boffins: STOP the rush to 5G. We just don't need it

Cynical Observer

Re: Speeds versus Distance

All about penetration (Wash your minds out!)

With solid stone walls, 3G signals die within inches of being inside.

Most of the providers that do provide femtocells (Home Signal/Sure signal devices) seem to stipulate one per customer.

Thankfully, with all of the family on the same network, we can get more than one femtocell and place them strategically where needed to provide a useful signal coverage.

Just one reason why if we change network, we will all end up changing en-masse

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Cynical Observer
Mushroom

More ... Give us more,,,,,

You can see it won't stop yet - until one day someone can say of the mobile networks....

... "these go to eleven"

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UK safety app keeping lorries on the right side of cyclists

Cynical Observer
Thumb Down

Re: The main problem here..

Let's call pavement by it's other name - it's a footpath

The clue is in the name - you want your bicycle on the footpath then you can - provided that you dismount.

I'll happily cut kids some slack when I see them cycling on the footpath - but adults? nah! I become a belligerent pedestrian (clue in the origin of the work - pede meaning foot) and I don't give way.

Perhaps it's something to do with the complete cock who sent my kid flying one day - thankfully without serious injury but certainly with plenty of fear on their part.

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Your new car will dob you in to the cops if you crash, decrees EU

Cynical Observer

Re: Sound bites bite back

"Severity of injuries"

Fair enough - I'll accept it as a nuance of translation -

"The impact of any injuries would be mitigated...."

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Cynical Observer
FAIL

Sound bites bite back

“Quicker response from the emergency services to accidents on roads across Europe could save about 2,500 lives in the EU every year. The severity of injuries will also be considerably reduced in tens of thousands of cases.”

How will the system determine that emergency services are actually required? Or is it a case in the political heads that airbag deployment automatically equals serious enough to call the services.?

As for the "Severity of injuries" .... can someone with a command of logic please step up to the podium and explain that one.

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Breaking news: BBC FINALLY spots millions of mugshots on cop database

Cynical Observer
Mushroom

Screamed in Despair when this bit was broadcast

Evan Davis: For a year or so you have been introducing the unconvicted into the database as I understand it and using facial recognition software knowing that a court has asked you not to do that

Chief Constable Mike Barton: Well no! I am unashamed about keeping unconvicted photographs in this because we need them for different purposes than DNA and fingerprints and they are not covered by the same legislation.

Essentially that amounted to a Chief Constable saying "Judges? Pah! I don't care what they order!"

There should be alarm bells ringing on so many levels!

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Apple 'Genius': iPhone 6? We've had NO COMPLAINTS about our BENDY iThing

Cynical Observer
Trollface

What's the fuss

Surely this is just the latest iteration of "Round Corners"

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Munich considers dumping Linux for ... GULP ... Windows!

Cynical Observer

<Irony>Outlook IS an amazing piece of work. Anyone who dismisses it has never ventured into the more hidden features. </Irony>

TFTFY

8
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Multiple user accounts coming to Android phones 'n' slabs

Cynical Observer

Needs to go further

As there are Apps out there that can allow you to selectively dial back the rights that an App can exploit, this multiple user/profile needs to also factor this into any implementation.

More than happy for the kids to pick up the phone for a game, but it would be nice to dial back any rights on a per user basis such that when they are using it, it is a glorified games console. when I use it, its full potential is available.

Otherwise - this falls short of being truly useful.

Of course, this will mean that the people need to be as thoughtful about their phones/tablets as they are about the home PC.... Oh well, queue the arguments.

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Australia's metadata debate is an utter shambles

Cynical Observer

"it's becoming increasingly clear that our politicians have no idea what they're proposing."

Or... they are counting on the fact that they can blag their way through this, knowing full well exactly what it is that they are proposing. Using a fine balance of ignorance and apathy, they get acceptance from a percentage of the electorate. The remainder they will seek to discount in some way.

Sometimes feels that it's happening in a lot of other countries as well.

2
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Scottish independence debate: STV player flops under weight of viewers

Cynical Observer
Black Helicopters

Re: Std Dirty tricks by tory boys of the westminster clan

Conspiracy theory fails under mild scrutiny

The debate was broadcast on STV – a free to air service that is available to that part of the country where those of the electorate with a vote actually live.

It was not available (reliably in real time at least) outside of this area

So friggin what.

Those living in rUK don't have a vote – and while they may have an interest in the issue and may feel that they want to see wee Eck or bushy eyebrows, it doesn't change the fact that no one in rUK is materially disadvantaged by having missed the live debate.

It was a technology failure – they happen. Life goes on.

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Amazon's Spotify-for-books: THE TRUTH

Cynical Observer

Depends on the bundled options

When they recently hiked Prime to include film here in the UK, it provoked a "Let's Review at renewal" flag.

If Prime and Unlimited were bundled at a fraction over the Unlimited price then it becomes interesting again.

For example, there are books that I possess which would be nice to have on Kindle to reread for the commute - Unlimited would make that a simple process

1
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Cynical Observer
Thumb Up

Re: What about the authors?

Only heavy readers are likely to spend more than $10/month on books.

Teenagers bust this easily - certainly would here in the UK where a teenage fiction book might go for £5 or more and last less than a week. Even with daily deals and public domain which I have urged my teenager to consider, for some parents, knowing that they can get the years reading for a fixed fee is a blessing.

3
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Will the next US-EU trade pact prevent Brussels acting against US tech giants?

Cynical Observer
Trollface

At least the banks can make a case for their money back

Every bank that has every been fined for facilitating bank trades on behalf of citizens of Iran or Syria or Cuba or Libya or <insert country that the USA [did, does, will go on to] not like> can not argue that those silly banking rules constitute a hindrance to their profits.

So they can go and sue the US Government. :-)

Money Laundering - yeah! that hits profits if you stop that so can HSBC have their Mexican money back please.

etc.....

Or does this rule only works in one direction?

1
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Cynical Observer
Flame

Time to grow a pair

.... as the time honoured sentiment would put it.

It's a treaty, a negotiation, a consensus of minds. In what version of insanity to the Brussels Bureaucrats possibly believe that this ability to sue due to adverse regulations is benicicial to the European side of the cause?

EU: Aircraft manufacturers - we'd rather that you didn't fall out of the sky - so much so that we will put some of the rules into law.

US Air plane Corp: Mwaaaaaah! Uncle Sam! They being mean to me!

UK: we really don't think our citizenry should have assault rifles. We have banned them by law.

US Armaments Corp: Mwaaaaaah! Uncle Sam! They being mean to me!

Please - tell me there is some sanity left in this poxxed empire called Europe and that someone with the balls to do so with tell them to go take a flying fuck! - Subject to the appropriate health and safety rules of course.

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Facebook in new 'experiment' drama: Will users buy it?

Cynical Observer
Mushroom

First name Gazza by any chance?

1
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Say goodbye to the noughties: Yesterday’s hi-fi biz is BUSTED, bro

Cynical Observer
WTF?

The benefit of being slightly tone deaf?

A wallet/Credit card that suffers far less abuse.

Will admit - I just don't get the fascination with uber expensive audio kit!

Sometimes it is easier (cheaper) to just "make do" with something that still allows one to enjoy the music/artist and not get so wound up in determining if the sound has been clipped/distorted in one of the many rooms that it could be conceivably be piped into.

...... Unless it has a volume knob that goes to 11 - then I might just be tempted :-)

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