* Posts by Corin

22 posts • joined 19 Dec 2007

LG drops G3 quad HD Android mobe with FRIGGIN' LASER camera

Corin

Re: Why 3000mAh?

Why not 3A? Well the capacity is probably measured at a tremendously slow rate of discharge. Thanks to Peukert's Law (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Peukert%27s_law) the relationship between joules delivered and rate of discharge is not linear.

Therefore a 3000mAh battery might only be able to sustain a current draw of 1 Amp for half an hour* rather than the 3 hours a linear relationship might suggest.

*I made this up, did no maths at all to provide that number.

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No mobile signal? Blame hippies and their eco-friendly walls

Corin

Re: am I the only one

The trouble is that by attenuating the signal from the macro cell outside, your mobile phone will ramp up its TX power to overcome that same attenuation, therefore undoing your careful work.

For me it's also annoying - I live in a new build property near a city centre. Full five-bar signal outside, a flickering feeble bar indoors. A Three HomeSignal has fixed the issue there, but given the postcode they were certainly reluctant to give me one! What forced their hand was that the advisor asked to phone back on my landline midway through the call as the call was breaking up!

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Mobe networks bag UK 4G for a steal - £1bn shy of Osborne's £3.5bn

Corin

O2

Had another thought about O2's capacity.. perhaps with their coverage obligation they expect to have many more masts (perhaps to ensure no building is too far away from one). As it follows that each mast will cover fewer users, this allows them to go with less spectrum. They'll spend the same, just the spending scales are tipped in the direction of O2's infrastructure, away from the OFCOM auction.

Or they're just flat broke and hoping to cheap it out all the way.

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Corin

Interesting that Three haven't gone near any 2.6Ghz.. I wonder whether they're thinking building penetration is bad enough at 2.1Ghz and therefore want no more troubles with building penetration?

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Scottish Highlands get blanket 3G coverage

Corin

Three Homesignal user here

The arguments about paying double for the power and data don't really stack up in my eyes. The Three home signal in my house uses around 2-3 watts, roughly equivalent in electricity costs to one pint per year.

It uses around 2MB of data per day when idle, calls use around 0.75MB per minute (so around the same as a SIP call, give or take). SMS I can't really measure, but it'll be trivial.

I'll write off any usage due to data, but suffice it to say that any browsing I do on my phone while at home will backhaul via the ADSL, either directly via the wifi or via 3G to the homesignal and via the VPN back to Three.

So in terms of financial and bandwidth costs, it's trivial. In exchange, I get full 3G signal around the house, rather than a flickering 0-1 bar signal. The device was sent to me for no charge.. Colour me happy! Now if only my Three phone worked in other indoor areas...

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Europe's broadband bird goes up tonight

Corin

Mobile connections?

I'm surprised that the lottery terminals don't use GPRS / 3G. Surely they should only dust off a satellite dish when mobile fails?

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Apple voids warranties over cigarette smoke, users say

Corin

Well...

Well, the optical drive might well have nicotine all over the lens. However, I don't really blame the apple techs for this; you've seen the dusty computer pictures that were on this site not too long ago!

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BlackBerry users left bereft of service

Corin

Fine on O2

...I came along tonight and learned about the outage only now. O2 has been solid for me all day! Their last data "outage" didn't get me either, I seem to be lucky.

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BlackBerry Curve 8520

Corin
Go

Trackball - bye!

Trackball is something I wouldn't miss! Not a huge fan of how gunky they can get, and they're impossible to clean without voiding the warranty!

Looks a neat little phone. Pity about the lack of 3G, but for email only it's not really that essential.

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Microsoft offers EU choice on Windows browsers

Corin
Happy

Seems fair enough

Weighting it by current popularity should be fine. I suppose a comment on the software saying "You can use one of these browsers to merely search for and download any other browser you prefer" would maybe help too - after all, how many of you have "www.getfirefox.com" as the first and only link you visited using IE on a fresh windows install? Sure, Firefox will make it to the big 5 listed initially by the software, but, same concept.

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iPhone security cracked, smacked and broken

Corin

@ Richard Hodgson

Sure, you'll need access - but that was the point. Consider an iPhone being stolen, with sensitive data (presumed to be) protected by the encryption.

With a stolen phone, you can bypass its encryption and view the data anyway. The Blackberry won't give up its secrets so easily, if the encryption is enabled!

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Ice air con system aims for cool on the cheap

Corin

Capacity

...Surely this system would therefore require nearly double the capacity on the air conditioner?

I assume that it will operate twice as hard during the night, thus eliminating the need for daytime operation of the compressors. But, surely overnight the system will be chilling for tomorrow, AND will be coping with the continued operation of the data centre. Ok, sure, loading on the centre might fall, and also the efficiency of the cooling cycle (they're far more efficient across small temperature differences) will make calculating this difficult, but it's a consideration!

To those offering that the off peak power might become on peak; surely the trick is to use smart metering and control, allowing excess power to be used whenever it's there; so that even if the night time becomes the new peak, the load could spread out a bit.

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Bye bye BlackBerry mail

Corin

Dated idea?

Dated perhaps, but it still works.

If my phone polls every 15 minutes for new mails, then it will have to do so each and every 15 minutes. With a blackberry, the device can sit idle until informed that there's new mail, thus saving battery.

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Gadget-laden travellers given free Heathrow juice

Corin
Alert

£300,000 spent?!

How did they spend that much?

Power consumption? Er, yeah, take a big gaming laptop, and measure the power it uses while charging its battery AND playing crysis on medium. That's the most that each socket would reasonably use.

Design? Hmm, I could knock up something graceful looking in CAD that'd do just that job.

Cost to implement? Few days labour I'd imagine.

... I'd love to see them explain where that cash went! Just out of curiosity.

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BBC goes live... over Wi-Fi

Corin

Blackberry Bold

Works fine using the Blackberry Bold 9000. I'm connected to O2 LLU Broadband (4mbit sync speed) via wi-fi, and it's streaming nicely.

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Sky network downed in London

Corin

Crowded round mobile broadband?

For a sales team, it might be worth investing in a dual-WAN router (these can be had for just over £100), and then a second broadband connection from a totally different provider.

That way if one provider goes down, you'll only notice a reduction in speed, rather than the complete absence of an effective sales team.

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Heaviest Virgin Media downloaders face new daytime go-slow

Corin

@Jay

Why do you enclose the "important points" with the quote marks? That just reminded me of the Lasers being described by Dr. Evil in an Austin Powers movie.

netstat -b simply lists all the open connections your computer has. As I browse El Reg, my computer must connect to its servers in order to download the web pages. Similarly, if I sign into MSN, Skype, connect to a Ventrilo server, you name it, the connection is made and is listed by the netstat command.

I don't have VM Broadband, nor do I have VIrgin Media's PC guard installed, yet this is still the case. It's expected behaviour and is not fishy. If you're thinking about Phorm analysing the websites you go to, there's no software on your PC which you can uninstall to remove that; Virgin Media watch the traffic flowing off their network further up in their network, for that.

If it weren't for Phorm, i'd like the Virgin Media method. As has been said, it's a consumer grade product; they state "unlimited" as, still, you get charged no more, no matter how much you download. Sure, it slows down at the peak times, and they do clearly define their traffic shaping policy, but fundamentally they won't cut you off altogether at a defined amount of usage.

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PS3 to get movie downloads this summer?

Corin
Alert

UK ISP bandwidth...

I can see where this will go, most of the UK ISPs will start bricking it due to their lack of investment in bandwidth, just like with the iPlayer.

This is the time they've been dreading, the introduction of something legit, mass-market, legal and bandwidth intensive; just what they don't want their UNLIMITED!* subscribers to start using.

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Samsung laptop battery burns

Corin
Stop

Some laptops...

I'm the proud owner of an IBM T40 laptop, which sucks air in from.. the side, and pushes it out from.. the side! I've got some software which shows me its own temperature readings from all over the laptop (including two sensors in the battery pack itself), and when left on a bed or sofa, they're all in the low/mid 30s (unless the CPU is working hard, when that on its own increases a little). Moving it to a desk merits a temperature drop of all but a couple of degrees.

Fine? I think so, especially since the battery's warning label lists 100°c as the maximum temperature; OK having the battery warmer will shorten its lifespan, but i'm already well aware of that and happy to tolerate it.

It seems to me that bad design is the culprit here.

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O2 plans commercial femtocells for 2009

Corin

Just as well it's 3g...

O2's 3g coverage leaves a fair bit to be desired, so I guess they're hoping to pad it out by selling broadband connections and femtocells to people.

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MP3sparks.com downed by links to Russian cybercrime gang

Corin
Go

Got it here...

BT Broadband, loads fine (i haven't any plans to shop there mind..)

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Ofcom urged to clamp down on broadband speed deceit

Corin
Stop

There's a fair difference here...

I thought there were two things upon which the speed of your connection hinged.

Firstly is the speed of the link between yourself and the exchange. The best "real-world" indicator of this is the line attenuation (which is often shown in your ADSL router's status page, if you've already a connection) - lower means better.

Secondly, is further up the rung - as has already been stated, many ISPs oversell the bandwidth; they assume that not everyone will be on at the same time - this is the contention ratio, often around 50:1. So they might put, say, 50 customers who've all been advised "up to 8 meg" onto a single 8mbit connection to the internet. If the ISP can't afford enough bandwidth, then things will start to slow down horribly at peak times.

The first issue is troublesome - BT are the only people likely to care, and so long as you can get around 0.4mbit (i think...) out of your line, they won't do a thing. Only possible solutions here are to move closer to an exchange (yeah, right..) or install a new line in the hope that you get a newer bit of wire! The ISP isn't able to do a thing, besides connect your wire to the equipment in the exchange and hope - no amount of shouting will make them change a thing really, nor will "I pay £20 a month i should at least get 20meg" - for ADSL, that's just not going to happen.

The second, the bandwidth issue, is however where the ISP has a shout. They've got to find the ideal trade-off between speed and cost. To give every user the full (for example) truly unlimited, 8mbit connection would cost much much more than the £24.99 a month that the "unlimited*" plans give. A very good website to check, incidentally, is:

http://www.kitz.co.uk/adsl/caps.htm

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