* Posts by Vic

3638 posts • joined 7 Dec 2007

Boeing 787 software bug can shut down planes' generators IN FLIGHT

Vic
Silver badge

Wonder if this has anything to do with Malaysia plane that disappeared into the Indian ocean?

No. That was a completely different aircraft type.

Vic.

0
0

SECRET PROTOTYPE iPAD 'stolen from RANDY Apple employee'

Vic
Silver badge

Re: 5 days ?!?!??!

Do you _really_ think that someone who's 'making a porn' deserves to be robbed and pepper-sprayed?

Some of them do. The production values can be *awful*...

Vic.

0
0

WHY can't Silicon Valley create breakable non-breakable encryption, cry US politicians

Vic
Silver badge

Re: But what about...

Look, it's basically how PGP-encrypted messages work.

But it isn't how Diffie-Helman-encrypted messages work. ITYF one of these is used more than the other, since PGP is a hybrid that incorporates DH...

Vic.

0
0
Vic
Silver badge

Re: Before the internet, no criminals could communicate in private

Because we demand no less from them.

You might. I don't. I'd much rather they caught some bad guys, rather than catching none because they insisted on going for every little thing they could.

Vic.

1
0
Vic
Silver badge

Re: But what about...

The same way he would now.

That could only possibly work for a small subsection of the encryption that goes on, then.

Currently, Alice will encrypt a messge with Bob's ublic key, and he will decrypt it with his private key. For Alice to send the decryption key with the message - she would need Bob's private key. That means it's not private any longer.

You encrypt the stream using a session key

So your system can only possibly work in a mechanism whereby a symmetric session key is negotiated between the endpoints. That cuts out the bulk of such messages. It also means that - were one to want to do something nefarious - it would be trivially easy just to send something other than that session key as the purported decryption key - which would only be discovered much later, when the transmission is decrypted by Law Enforcement. Thus it will be a hindrance to people going about their normal lives, but won't touch anyone who is prepared to fake the session key. And if someone's happy to blow up a building, I doubt there'll be much compunction over lying about a decryption key.

TL;DR: your mechanism is, like so many others, entirely useless when it comes to law enforcement, despite requiring significant intrusion into the private lives of innocent people.

Vic.

0
0
Vic
Silver badge

Re: But what about...

It would involve sending the decryption key along with the data, but encrypting it with the NSA's public key.

OK, so Alice sends Bob a message so encrypted.

How does Bob get the decryption key out again, unless he knows the NSA's private key?

Vic.

0
0
Vic
Silver badge

Re: Before the internet, no criminals could communicate in private

good old plod knew everything everyone (but only if they were a baddie) knew/thought/wrote/spoke

Actually, Plod *did* know quite a bit.

Information leaks over short distances. When we actually had a community, the Bad Guys often got caught because their friends and neighbours knew what was going on, and disapproved. It wasn't 100% effective, but better than we have now.

But current Law Enforcement personnel no longer try to be part of that community - they are aloof, and even to go near a copper can be hazardous to oneself (since none of us are quite as innocent as we might wish to be[1]). And so Plod's own attitude towards the community is the reason it no longer knows what is going on. The solution is relatively simple, but I suspect it would make Police recruitment rather harder :-(

Vic.

[1] For example, there's no way I'm going to come forward to make a statement about another driver's behavior if to do so would demonstrate that I was speeding. So the cops will have to do their own surveillance - and they'll get neither of us lawbreakers, because they won't settle for the more egregious case; they want both.

2
0

Apple Watch HATES tattoos: Inky pink sinks rinky-dink sensor

Vic
Silver badge
Joke

Re: What?

So the gizmo needs access to your blood stream and you need to enter a password to use it? This is clearly not a watch.

"Watch" is both noun and verb, y'know...

Vic.

4
0

Barclays, Halifax and Tesco still being gnawed by POODLE

Vic
Silver badge

Re: El Reg is not vulnerable....

I still see no excuse for ignoring good/best practice here on El Reg.

They're using cheapie shared hosting for the site; adding SSL would require a change in the arangement with the hosting provider (rackspace).

I often wonder whether it would be cheaper to do that than to carry on typing messages to try to defend the indefensiblecurrent situation...

Vic.

2
0

Samsung Electronics' sales go OVER A CLIFF

Vic
Silver badge

I'd never heard the word "embiggen" until I started reading El Reg.

It was a Simpsons joke originally...

Vic.

1
0

Apple to devs: Watch out, don't make the Watch into a, well, a watch

Vic
Silver badge

Re: A mite unfair...

If Apple (a company representing thousands of people) IS, why a cricket team (about 11 last I checked) ARE?

A cricket team IS, as well. It's a singular. Pretty simple, really.

The members of a cricket team are multiple, but the team itself is not.

Vic.

0
0

David Cameron 'guarantees' action on mobe not-spots. Honest

Vic
Silver badge

Re: The call of political parties everywhere...

I TELL YE THE TRUTH BEFORE IT HAPPENS

Man, you are clairvoyant. I am truly humbled...

Vic.

0
0

Welcome, stranger: Inside Microsoft's command line shell

Vic
Silver badge

As with *nix, enclosing the filename in speechmarks solves that issue.

Are you sure about that? ISTR the piping being performed entirely differently when LFN came in. I'm pretty sure the pipe mechanism was entirely re-written...

Vic.

0
0
Vic
Silver badge

Re: Not dead yet

I'm reasonably sure that the first versions of MS-DOS did offer command-line editing.

I don't remember a version that didn't - although I might simply have forgotten some...

The early stuff used F1-F3; F1 would repeat the next character in the history buffer. F2 and a character would repeat up until the next occurrence of that character (and ISTR you could prefix a number to repeat up until the nth occurrence), and F3 would repeat the whole line.

Vic.

2
0
Vic
Silver badge

Except that MSDOS was never claimed to be a multi-tasking operating system

But it *nearly* was.

The original design had all task-context data in a swappable chunk - the SDA. By changing the SDA pointer, you changed the context. There was some grief with changing that whilst certain non-thread-safe DOS operations wre ongoing - hence the InDOS flag - but it had clearly been built with multi-tasking in mind.

Sadly, this doesn't ever seem to have been completed (hence the single-tasking nature of what shipped), and each new version seemed to have more and more static data that wasn't in the SDA, leading to lots of work-arounds and side-effects :-(

Vic.

1
0
Vic
Silver badge

Except you could only pipe into certain commands and IIRC you could only pipe once - you couldn't daisy chain them

In days of yore, piping worked perfectly. You could pipe anything into anything, and use as many pipes as you wanted to. It worked.

Then they brought in long filename support, including spaces in filenames. This inherently broke the pipe system, leading to the situation you describe.

But prior to that, it was all good...

Vic.

3
0

The Apple Watch: THROBBING STRAP-ON with a knurled knob

Vic
Silver badge

Re: send a brief recording of your heartbeat

"I ain't dead

ITYM "I Aten't Dead" :-)

Vic.

3
0

Not so fast on FM switch-off: DAB not so hot say small broadcasters

Vic
Silver badge

Why don't mobile phones do DAB/DAB+?

Power consumption.

You know how quickly your battery runs down now? You'll get a small fraction of that time if you use DAB in any meaningful way...

Vic.

9
0

Microsoft to offer special Surface 3 for schools

Vic
Silver badge

Re: Back in my day...

A slide rule was the most advanced piece of equipment in my satchel.

I still use one.

I also have one of these, but TBH, my eyesight struggles to cope in all but the best of lighting conditions :-)

Vic.

0
0

Beowulf Gods — rip into cloud's coding entrails

Vic
Silver badge

The soon to be revolutionary new parallel architecture that just fizzled out?

Transputers have been very big in STB designs for a couple of decades now.

Just because you don't hear about something in the mainsteam press, that doesn't mean it doesn't exist...

Vic.

1
0

Fed-up Colorado man takes 9mm PISTOL to vexing Dell PC

Vic
Silver badge

Re: "Who said anything about faith? He was selling the stuff, not believing in it."

Mr. Justice Eady

How could anyone have guessed it would be him?

Vic.

0
0

Google versus the EU: Sigh. You can't exploit a contestable monopoly

Vic
Silver badge

Re: I used to trust them.

How do you feel about their driving a car past your house and grabbing your wifi data?

They didn't - because my wifi data is not broadcast to the ether unencrypted.

Google might not have been the purest of the pure in respect of that little debacle, but the "slurp" was only of plaintext broadcast data; they did nothing to break into networks, just listened...

Vic.

0
0

It's official: David Brents are the weakest link in phishing attacks

Vic
Silver badge

Re: Bad Grammar

emails containing Nasty Links and Infected Zip files that have been sent from an "internal" account

I get thousands of mails like that hitting my servers. My SPF record obviates the problem entirely...

Vic.

0
0

Australia mulls dumping the .com from .com.au – so you can bake URLs like chocolate.gate.au

Vic
Silver badge

they just allowed people to buy x.uk as well as x.co.uk

Does anyone know the formal rules for that?

I have a .org.uk. The .uk is still unregistered, and the .co.uk is registered to a domain squatter. And I want to find out when I can go for the .uk without flagging that up to a squatter with priority rights...

Vic.

0
0
Vic
Silver badge

Re: Dot Oz?

Soon be time to look up whether .en, .sc, .wa and .ni are still available for use...

There will be a bunfight for knights.who.say.ni ...

Vic.

0
0

Windows 10 MURDERED your Lumia? Microsoft says it may have a fix

Vic
Silver badge

Re: This is *NOT* how you do interfaces

I once rewrote 2,651 lines of C as a seven line shell script.

I was working at a place last year, where one of the "developers"[1] decided to replace one of my noddy shell scripts with a piece of Python code.

There was some 30 minutes' work in my script - it was exceptionally simple. He spent 2 months writing his tortuous snake before it was eventually discarded and the rest of the team reverted to my old bash script...

Vic.

[1] I use the term quite wrongly, of course...

0
0

iPhone vs. Galaxy fight hospitalises two after beer bottle stabbing

Vic
Silver badge

Re: article misses out the most important information...

You mean: "on their superior camera".

Singular?

Vic.

0
0

Lib Dems wheel out Digital Rights Bill pledge as election sweetener

Vic
Silver badge

Re: And don't bother trying https:// ...

As for the tories:

Did you post the correct link?

That's from Simon Hughes - who is a Lib Dem...

Vic.

0
0
Vic
Silver badge

Re: [the Lib Dems have] never broken an election promise before.

so maybe this libdem promise is worth a punt.

I admire your optimism, but from the first page of the paper :-

This paper sets out our ideas for a future Digital Bill of Rights. It is a preliminary proposal only

There doesn't yet appear to be any promise...

Vic.

1
0
Vic
Silver badge

Re: Oh look - the Lib Dems are making us a promise just before the election.

He has been a thorn in the side of Treasonous May for the duration of the last parliament

I'm really not convinced of that - he voted for a one-day process to push through a law on mass interception and retention of data, voted for that mass interception and retention, and voted against the DRIP Act having a sunset clause in 2014 - i.e. voted for it to be active until 2016.

Source

I'm not convinced that makes him a "thorn in the side" of May. He seems to be siding with her more than I'd like.

Vic.

6
0
Vic
Silver badge

And don't bother trying https:// ...

It's somewhat revealing that a party claiming to be doing something about digital rights is sending that survey data straight to the USA...

Vic.

5
0
Vic
Silver badge

Oh look - the Lib Dems are making us a promise just before the election.

And I believe them. They've never broken an election promise before.

Vic.

23
5

Cyber-crypto-criminal-cock-up. Little money and (probably) embarrassed

Vic
Silver badge

Re: real OS

I'd run a "decent OS" if there was a decent free OBD2 reader program for it

This is the first one Google found for me. You can run it on a variety of platforms.

Vic.

0
0

+5 ROOTKIT OF VENGEANCE defeats forces of gaming good

Vic
Silver badge

Re: "kernel driver providing a rootkit-like functionality to hide activity"

Who in their right mind will take a concept like 'push/pop', which have traditionally been used to work on a stack or a fifo or other buffer-like construct (maybe), and then applies it to an array?

In Perl, it means you can take an array type and use it like a stack. It's exactly the concept you expect - just that Perl doesn't worry too much about the base types used...

Vic.

0
0

Oh, hi there, SKYNET: US military wants self-enhancing software that will outlive its creators

Vic
Silver badge

Emacs, obviously.

It grows into anything you want it to be (and quite a lot you don't).

Where do I apply?

Vic.

0
0

Marvell: We don't want to pay this $1.5bn patent bill because, cripes, it's way too much

Vic
Silver badge

Re: Patents: Sought by the Wright brothers while Europe built planes

First to file means if I put a product on the market with a feature I think isn't worth patenting, you can then get a patent and turn around and sue me all apple-style.

No, that's not the case. If the product is on the market before the patent is filed, it is clearly prior art, and that is an absolute defence. Indeed, no sane patent owner would ever file suit against the product, since it would invalidate their patent.

Vic.

0
0

Popular crypto app uses single-byte XOR and nowt else, hacker says

Vic
Silver badge

Re: XOR != "Exclusive Operator" ?

I am not an expert in this field

We'd never have guessed...

Vic.

1
0

Dot-com intimidation forces Indiana to undo hated anti-gay law

Vic
Silver badge

1 John 3:17 - But whoso hath this world's good, and seeth his brother have need, and shutteth up his bowels of compassion from him, how dwelleth the love of God in him?

Bill 1:1 - Be excellent to each other.

Vic.

8
0

Mozilla piles on China's SSL cert overlord: We don't trust you either

Vic
Silver badge

Re: They still have IE

so you can actually manage **YOUR** policy

If people were to manage their own security, life would probably be pretty good.

But what we know from experience is that they won't - the vast bulk of them will just accept whatever defaults they're given...

Vic.

1
0

Crack security team finishes TrueCrypt audit – and the results are in

Vic
Silver badge

uti nsa im cu si

Ufuti si nsa cum yffalow tstire?

Vic.

0
0

Google takes ARC Welder to Android, grafts on Windows, OS X

Vic
Silver badge

Dalvik basically = Java.

Dalvik != Java.

Seriously, if ever you are tempted to post such things, read up on what Dalvik is. It isn't Java, and that is deliberate.

Source code is generally written in the Java language. but is is not compiled for the JVM - it is compiled for the Dalvik VM. These are very different in a number of ways. It's worth properly grokking this - Java bytecode won't run on a Dalvik VM, and the conversion to Dalvik bytecode is non-trivial.

Java language != Java VM != Dalvik VM. But many people would have you believe otherwise. It's worth considering what motivates them to take that position...

Vic.

0
0

Bristol’s ‘Smart City’ reserved for boffins. Sorry bumpkins

Vic
Silver badge

Re: Wow!

INMOS was taken over by ST - their office building is also 5 mins walk from me

When I got a job there, it was by far and away the best gig I'd ever had. I loved that job[1].

I was really quite shocked to hear the site had closed :-(

Vic.

[1] Owing to the quite fantabulous way the internal management worked, our (new technology, customer focussed) group was swapped for a different (legacy development) group in the same building. Neither group was happy about the exchange, and most of us left. So by the end, it was amongst the worst jobs I'd ever had :-(

0
0

Cybercrim told to cough up £1m or spend years in chokey

Vic
Silver badge

Re: There is a sensible argument

bring back "penal servitude" ie hard labour

Although it sounds somewhat mediaeval, there are a couple of arguments for it.

Prisoners working that hard every day are unlikely to have the energy to be able to cause much trouble at other times - thus making for an easier environemt in the prison.

Aditionally, physical exertion is good therapy for many forms of depression - so it would actually be good for the prisoners as well.

Counter-intuitive though it might seem, hard labour is probably a good punishment all round - although I really don't expect many of the General Public to see it that way...

Vic.

0
0

Google cracks down on browser ad injectors after shocking study

Vic
Silver badge

Re: Unwanted ad injectors aren't part of a healthy ads ecosystem

They got arseraped by OFCOM for their pains.

£50 fine?

Vic.

1
0

The coming of DAB+: Stereo eluded the radio star

Vic
Silver badge

Re: DAB...

Why don't they turn off the Freeview multiplex which carries all the shopping channels

Because that is the multiplex that makes the most money...

Vic.

2
0

It's the FALKLANDS SYNDROME! Fukushima MELTDOWN to cause '10,000 Chernobyls' in South Atlantic

Vic
Silver badge

Re: TYhe real tragedy is that ...

I am waiting for the BBC to pick this up based on their coverage of the 'disaster'.

That's only going to happen if someone posts the story on Twitter...

Vic.

3
0

UberPop granted temporary reprieve in France

Vic
Silver badge

Re: Funny isn't it?

Guys can we please stop propagating FUD that they are not insured

It isn't FUD. They are almost certainly not insured in most jurisdictions - and definitely not in Germany.

It is a COMMERCIAL policy, and does not act like the ones you have on your PERSONAL vehicle.

The policy on my vehicle is a COMMERCIAL policy. And, in common with every policy I'v ever held, it explicitly and specificly excludes travel "for hire or reward". So although I have a COMMERCIAL policy that permits use of my vehiicle in the pursuit of my business, I would be completely uninsured if I tried driving as an Uber driver.

this is a paradigm change and it benefits the consumer

As with all such illicit activities, it does until such time as something goes wrong - and then you find it really doesn't. If I were driving an Uber customer, and I crashed and paralysed that passenger, my insurance would not pay out. Not a bean. And I haven't got the money to pay for ongoing care. So although the fare would have been cheaper than a properly insured taxi, the end result is a massive loss for the traveller. This is not a Good Thing(tm).

so we can hear informed opinions

This is an informed opinion - carriage for hire or reward costs *significantly* more[1] in the UK than other forms of insurance. And in Germany, it's not available unless you're properly licensed. This might not be what you want to hear, but it is the truth.

Vic.

[1] Last time I got quoted for H&R, it was double the cost. I didn't take that option...

0
0

'If people can encrypt their cell phones, what's stopping them encrypting their PCs?'

Vic
Silver badge

Re: Congressman John Carter

and will hire specialists to explain things like encryption if it's not something they've had experience of.

... should hire specialists to explain things ...

The Dunning-Kruger effect is powerful...

Vic.

0
0

Hawk like an Egyptian: Google is HOPPING MAD over fake SSL certs

Vic
Silver badge

Re: Odd?

True, but I'm guessing this is aimed at small companies without the resources to do their own CA. To you and me it's not that hard to do, but I can think of several small business owners I know that wouldn't have the slightest idea.

Many small businesses don't have the resources to wash their own windows, or change the oil in their vehicles. So they pay someone else to do it for them.

IT in all its guises is no different - it's just that many businesses think that getting a favourite nephew in to do the job is a viable approach...

Vic.

0
0

Open-Xchange builds anti Oracle stack after server M&A splurge

Vic
Silver badge

Re: UM

The dual license open-xchange means you can't provide a paid for service using the free version

Says who?

Given that a chunk of what they're shipping is GPL, to try to put such a restriction on the code would remove their own right to distribute.

Vic.

0
0

Forums