* Posts by Vic

3830 posts • joined 7 Dec 2007

Thought YOU'd had rude service in France? Ce n'était RIEN, M'sieu Pantalons Malodorants

Vic
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Re: Bah!

the French are well-known to be stereotyping racists

"There's only two things I hate in this world: People who are intolerant of other people's cultures and the Dutch."

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Virgin Galactic SpaceShipTwo crackup verdict: PILOT ERROR

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Re: Motive ?

Nope, you're missing the point

No, I'm not.

if the pilot(s) believe that the handle moves the feather boom, and the safety catch prevents inadvertent activation of the handle, then unlocking the safety catch would have nothing to do with the transonic pressure

If the handle has a lock, it is to prevent inadvertent use of that handle. An experienced jet pilot would know that stange things happen as you go transonic, and simply wouldn't have fucked with it. Whilst we might all hope that the booms would have stayeed put without handle movement, anyone who has flown a glider knows that you don't leave stuff in the "closed" position, you use the lock.

in reality, the safety catch locks the booms in place

In reality, no it doesn't. That's why the booms deployed. A test pilot shouldn't really be determining that - it's simply too dangerous a situation, as we saw.

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Re: Motive ?

So it's very very reasonable to believe that a pilot could have believed that unlocking the boom early was benign, and the tail would remain where it was supposed to be until the handle was pulled

Perhaps - but en experienced jet pilot would undoubtedly have waited until he was going quite a bit faster before doing so - strange and wonderful things occur as you go transonic...

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FCC now regulates ISPs – but don't take your complaints to the watchdog just yet

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Looks simple to me.

Audio over IP?

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Puppet draws back the curtain on devops magic with funky gfx and UI

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Re: A picture paints a thousand words..

For once an article without an irrelevant and irritating overly large fondleslab/ADHD-yoofcroud-oriented stock picture of dubious taste? It was relaxing like a warm bath with complimentary saké.

Yes, but it would have been nice to see a picture of this new UI they're talking about...

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'Untraceable' VoIP caller ID-spoofing website accepts Bitcoin

Vic
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Re: No legal use...

You could route VOIP through your VPN/Firewall so that your calls from home are coming from work.

That adds latency; it tends to be unacceptable in voice calls.

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Hole in (Number) Two: MYSTERY golf-course pooper strikes again

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Re: Me Too

My personal temple is well trained by practice to evacuate twice a day

Way, way too much information...

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Boffins' audacious plan to blow up aircraft foiled by bomb-proof bag

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Re: And braces

Airplanes do not carry tanks of oxygen

Yes they do.

They have canisters containing a mixture of chemical explosives which generate oxygen

That's for the passengers. The pilots have one or more cylinders of compressed oxygen, depending on aircraft design.

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HP slaps dress code on R&D geeks: Bin that T-shirt, put on this tie

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Re: Tidy Desk

Except that someone has decided she doesn't like it there and put it in a cupboard full of other stuff she doesn't understand.

Think yourself lucky. Mine puts half of it in one cupboard, ...

I've taken to the policy that if I can't find what I need when I need it, I'll buy a new one.

Me too. I have about 5 multimeters these days. I even know where one of them is...

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Re: Scooby Doo, where are you?

when somebody has that Who Cares look, I know they will write whatever they want and to heck with compatibility, integration, or standards.

That's a prejudicial attitude - you are assuming something about someone without evidence to support your view. That's exactly what I was trying to root out - I wanted people to write code to the problem thaty was there, not the one they assumed would be.

Coders whos dress as they wish express individuality. Sometimes, that means they're the one person who can truly diagnose the situation correctly. Sometimes, it means they're total arseholes. Working out which end of that spectrum someone was on was a different part of the interview; my dress code was merely to see whether they would analyse the situation objectively, or succumb to prejudice.

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Re: Scooby Doo, where are you?

I had an interview with a gang of guys in various stages of dishevelment

I used to conduct interviews with 3 or 4 days of growth on my chin, and a "Freak Brothers" T-shirt on.

It was deliberate - I wanted to see how candidates would cope with the unexpected. Those that spent the interview looking down their noses at me didn't get the job...

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The Wilson Doctrine isn't legally binding, MPs CAN be spied on, says QC

Vic
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Good.

For far too long, the pols have been telling us that mass surveillance is good for us, but not for them,

If this QC is right, then they're going to get the same shitty stick they use on us. Aside form that being very well-deserved, it just might mean that they make an effort to clean it off a bit...

Or maybe they'll just fast-track through some more emergency legislation to get themselves out of the firing line once again.

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Jeep breach: Scared? You should be, it could be you next

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Re: Brakes

At least in the UK, and I would suspect (but can't confirm) in the States, there are two systems which *must* have a mechanical connection that works in all circumstances: the brakes and the steering.

That's not *strictly* true.

The steering requirement is that the steering continues to function within the (relaxed) maximum permissible input force after a complete failure of the electronic/electric system.

That doesn't actually *require* a direct physical connection, although I don't know of a way to meet the criterion above without one. But then I'm not a car designer.

I've no idea of the brake regulations - I've not looked them up, and I can't be arsed to do so today...

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Galactic BIRTH: ALMA peers THIRTEEN BEELLLION years into Dawn of Time Itself

Vic
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Re: There is a limit . .

the horizon is receding at greater than the speed of light.

Really?

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Get root on an OS X 10.10 Mac: The exploit is so trivial it fits in a tweet

Vic
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Re: chmod 0000 `which sudo`

FTFY

You didn't.

If you don't want to use sudo, use "/bin/rm /usr/bin/sudo". That means the binary is gone, not just disguised.

You could also do something like "rpm -e sudo".

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Re: The real culprit

visudo is not setuid.

Of course - I was looking for something that would most certainly have the appropriate context to write to /etc/sudoers. Bad example, I guess.

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Re: The real culprit

Maybe someone can comment about whether SELinux capabilities would be good safety net against such mishaps.

Assuming the SELinux contexts were set up properly[1], the exploit as posted would be entirely obviated; newgrp has no need to write to sudoers, and would not be permitted to do so, even if it were being run by root.

That said, something like visudo (if installed) would get around that ;-(

Vic.

[1] I've seen SELinux set up in pretty much an "allow everything" mode; it's *technicallly* running, but provides essentially no protection at all. This is, quite obviously, not how you're supposed to do things...

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Security tool bod's hell: People think I wrote code for Hacking Team!

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Did the code author really say that?

Hacking Team eventually used his tools and libraries in production, and are complying with the license, Mulliner said. The company acknowledges in its documentation that it is using his copyrighted software, includes his name and email address, and links to his website where the source code can be found.

This is not GPL compliance!

You can point at the upstream website for non-commercial distribution only. That's 3(c) in GPLv2. For commercial distribution, you're releasing under 3(a) or 3(b), and you need to supply your own copies.

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Re: It may sound stupid but...

CC BY-NC would work for what he's after, it allows the source to be used freely, but with attribution and not at all in a commercial product.

I don't think so. I didn't see any issues with it being in a commercial product - just a big deal about it being used in a snooping product.

This is the thing with software freedom - you're free to use it for whatever you want, so long as you abide by the licence conditions. As soon as you start trying to define usage scopes, you're narrowing that freedom, and with the amount of inter-linked code currently available, you'd end up with an exclusion on pretty much everything. So we have the situation in force today: you cannot define usage scopes and remain GPL-compliant. And that's a good thing, even if there are certain groups I'd like to see having no access to any of this code - but they probably feel the same way about me.

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Vic
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Re: if they used GPL code in their products...

Statically linking a library into your binary blob does mean that your whole blob must be under the GPL is any of the libraries is

Yes.

That's not the case where they are dynamically linked

Yes it is. From the GPL FAQ:

Does the GPL have different requirements for statically vs dynamically linked modules with a covered work?

No. Linking a GPL covered work statically or dynamically with other modules is making a combined work based on the GPL covered work. Thus, the terms and conditions of the GNU General Public License cover the whole combination.

LGPL, obviously, has an explicit allowance for such linking.

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Vic
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Re: if they used GPL code in their products...

If they made changes to the GPL parts, that they'd have to release.

Insufficient. If they made use of GPL software, they are obliged to release source on demand to all derived works - whether they modified it or not.

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Re: if they used GPL code in their products...

.. their products became GPL ones as well

Only derived works. "Mere aggregations" are not covered.

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Re: Easy...

IAAL :-)

Oh dear.

So, by all means say, "I grant this licence under GPL [whatever version], but I expressly prohibit its use for any purposes related to surveillance by state or corporate bodies"...

This is explicitly prohibited by the GPL; to do so would mean that the software is not GPL-compatible, meaning that it cannot be legally redistributed as part of a GPL-derived work. IOW, mentioning the GPL in such a work should be considered deliberately misleading.

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Re: not possible

There may be a "non-snooping source license" but it WILL NOT be "open".

More particularly, it will not be GPL-compatible. That precludes software so-licenced form being redistributed as part of a GPL-derived work.

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Microsoft to Windows 10 consumers: You'll get updates LIKE IT or NOT

Vic
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Re: RTFM?

Don't want to receive feature updates? - just check "defer upgrades".

Ahem.

Some Windows 10 editions let you defer upgrades to your PC.

[Emphasis mine]

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Are you a Tory-voting IT contractor? Congrats! Osborne is hiking your taxes

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That shouldn't be possible

"Shouldn't be" != "isn't" ...

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Vic
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Re: Yes, they will emigrate

Die Computer is the plural.

And, coincidentally, an imperative often shouted at said computer :-)

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Re: We are doomed

you should run, run away.

You are Del Shannon AICMFP.

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Vic
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Last 5yrs 2 year pay freeze 3 years of 1% (we have just had last years pay award, it should have been paid LAST July!)

That's better than many have had in the private sector.

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Joke

especially if you are selling vices to private individuals

There's a word for that sort of employment...

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Vic
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But it does fulfill its main purpose of stopping big companies renaming there employees contractors and thus oiling their way out of any responsibilities to their workforce.

It doesn't.

A few years ago, I was working for a company with an awful lot of contractors. Some of them had been there continuously for 10 years or more...

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Microsoft has RECORD quarter, in a BAD way - Sad Nad slashes phone biz

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Re: Sigh

They only made an overall loss from the write-down

So ... they made a loss. Which means they couldn't sell enough of what they needed to sell at the price they needed to sell it.

Which is what I said.

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Re: Sigh

An organisation manages to flog an absolute shit load of stuff - mostly electrons, and be lightly vilified for it.

It's easy to flog large amounts of anything if it's cheap enough.

Microsoft lost money on all that selling; that implies it's too cheap for them to survive on. That they didn't sell as much as they need implies it's too expensive for the market. And therein lies a bit of a problem...

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Microsoft open-sources Sora software-defined radio

Vic
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It makes use of multi-core processor features like SIMD (single instruction, multiple data) and caching

Errr - you do know that SIMD and caching have nothing to do with multi-core processing, right?

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Re: old school radios that lasted 20

If this is Open Source is it going to be ported to other OS?

It could be - it's BSD-licenced, so there's nothing stopping anyone who wants to do the job.

I wouldn't get too worked up just yet, though - there does seem to be quite a bit of FPGA work for something that sees itself as SDR; that's good for low-volume experimental stuff, but FPGAs generally cost too much for volume work.

Vic.

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Jeep drivers can be HACKED to DEATH: All you need is the car's IP address

Vic
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Re: A start, but...

I can't think of a good reason why you should be able to control the steering/brakes/accelerator from a position other than the driver's seat either.

It's very useful for automated testing \ but you do it with a physical cable, not over an IP link from the ICE...

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Re: A start, but...

Only if profits are seriously threatened

A $5,000 fine for each violation does seriously threaten profits.

$5000 for each violation. One on each of 200,000 cars - that $1B. That should make them think[1].

Vic.

[1] It won't - there seems to be a new breed of management at the moment who *genuinely* believes they'll never get caught, no matter how egregious their wrongdoing...

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Snowden to the IETF: Please make an internet for users, not the spies

Vic
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That's IPv6 dead then, as the MAC forms the last part of the address

No it doesn't. I grow weary of hearing this time and again.

Using the MAC address is one possible way of forming the link-local IPv6 address - which doesn't transit your router. And you don't have to use that method at all if you don't want to.

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Microsoft hurls out Visual Studio 2015, .Net 4.6 ahead of Windows 10

Vic
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"They'll tell you that they want to live in a fast 'build, measure, learn' loop."

I've met so many engineers that want exactly that. Except for the "measure" and "learn" bits...

Vic.

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Microsoft sets end date on Windows 10 support. Hey, wait, WHAT?

Vic
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Re: Updates

I would have thought that as your version of Windows 10 morphs into Windows 11 as it is continuously updated

That would seem to be a very efficient way to kill their own revenue stream...

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Oi, Europe: join in the sharing economy fun, yells Gov.uk

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Maybe there is hope, after all...

We need a measured approach: putting a hold on reactive bans which don’t recognise the reality of internet-enabled commerce

So is Gov.uk going to stand up to Cameron's proposed ban on encryption, then?

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Windows 10 Edge: Standards kinda suck yet better than Chrome?

Vic
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Re: Soon?

There are just far too many internal applications that just won't work on any other browser. This might be by design (job contimuation) or accident (even more job continuation).

I worked on a browser-based project a couple of years back. The intent of the spec was that only IE need be supported. The spec actually said that only IE would be usable...

Needless to say, we accidentally forgot to implement that bit.

Vic.

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GOOGLE GMAIL ATE MY LINUX: Gobbled email enrages Torvalds

Vic
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Is it possible that Torvalds gets a lot of email containing or with attached program code. Surely the mere presence of that should raise a red-flag for potential malware

Any code that Torvalds receives will be source. This looks very different to executable malware; a spam filter that mistakes the two is beyond useless.

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Your gadget batteries endanger planes, says Boeing

Vic
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You can't stop an electrical fire

These guys reckon they can. I've no idea if they're right.

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Re: Confused

So a smouldering bag in an overhead locker is somehow safer than a fire in the hold that's equipped with detectors and extinguishers?

Yep. The cabin detectors are far more numerous, and quite a bit more sensitive. And vocal.

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I'm not sure which is worse, a fire in the cargo hold or in the cabin

Cargo hold. It's far more likely to become established before detection.

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SourceForge staggers to feet after lengthy STORAGE FAIL outage

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You can believe everything they say.

SourceForge directory, download and project summary pages are back online

Mine aren't. It's time I hosted the project elsewhere. Which will mean finding that image again...

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You Musk be joking: Tesla's zero to 60MPH in 2.8 SECONDS is literally 'ludicrous'

Vic
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Re: it's nearly 3am and I can still use a calculator...

Bikes have lousy braking [etc. etc - snip]

Whilst there is grounds to dispute what you've posted, I will merely point out that it has nothing at all to do with the thread of the converstion, which was about whether or not 1g sustained acceleration is "ludicrous". It's not.

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Re: it's nearly 3am and I can still use a calculator...

0.98g is still pretty ludicrous.

It's quick, but it's not excessive. My bike accelerates to 60mph in the same time - and that's a 1985 design. There are many bikes quicker than mine...

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