* Posts by P. Lee

4277 posts • joined 4 Dec 2007

Crusty Cat 5e/6 cables just magically sped up to 2.5 Gbps and 5 Gbps

P. Lee
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Re: More speed!

>more than 1G on a Home/Home Office/Small Buisiness network is usually a complete overkill.

It would be nice to be able to put SSDs in my home server without wasting them.

But yes, that's pretty bursty traffic and not at all critical.

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Add 'fattism' and hacker stereotyping to the list of Donald Trump's list of non-PC positions

P. Lee
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Re: "Better to remain silent..."

Politics is no longer about doing the right thing, its about organising a team which can win the election game.

Right or wrong, smart or stupid doesn't matter - its about who can run the most efficient party machine. Forget what's right or even workable, can I get a "Hoo-rah!"?

We have generations raised on emotion-based theatrical entertainment and we've had years of government, increasingly not in the public interest - there is little correlation between who is voted for and people's livelihoods. After years of seeing public officials lie and play out stupid games and special interest groups pushing esoteric agendas to the forefront of policy, politics is just another absurd sitcom - Ally McBeal, 24, That 70's show and 2.5 Men all rolled together.

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Video service Binge On 'broke the internet' but 99pc of users love it

P. Lee
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Re: Mobile presentation != net neutrality

Ok, I'll bite.

I'll presume for a moment that T-Mobile is actually mobile-only and not "wireless broadband" so the smaller size pics are fine on a small screen. Is that true of tablets too, which might be on mobile internet? I don't know so I'll leave that aside.

For all the stupid name calling of van Schewick, she is absolutely correct. I've seen the same thing here in Oz. (yes, that's a pun on the picture). Optus advertise offer free unlimited music to mobile devices. Hooray! Except that they don't mean what they say in the headlines (shock!). What they actually offer is that streams from some specific companies don't count towards your download quota.

That means that if I buy music streaming from Spotify I can stream all day to my mobile. If I choose a less popular service, say, OzMadeupEthnicMusic.com or my own purchased music sitting on my own home server - that will be costed against my download quota. Van Schewick was right, (if badly phrased), the deal gives preferential treatment to particular commercial interests and that is a net neut issue.

Do I think Spotify paid to be in this joint venture with Optus? Yes. Does it push people away from smaller, less well established companies (or non-Australian companies) and towards Spotify and a couple of other well-entrenched players? Yes it does. Does discouraging traffic which doesn't go to a few possibly-cached corporate destinations benefit Optus and encourage them to keep their download quotas low? Yes. If Optus becomes dependent on Spotify's payments, how long will the other "most favoured" streaming services last? Maybe there will be a joint venture between Optus and Spotify (or Telstra/Foxtel/Presto...)

What we have here are large players paying ISPs for favoured access where the control isn't speed of delivery but overall bandwidth resourcing which would otherwise make the service impractical. What happens, for example, when your data quota is low but MS have given them a backhander to be included in your quota? Most people use skype and are happy, but how does a new p2p video service gain any traction? The ISP/telco's start picking up extra revenue from the application providers who then start charging customers who can't go anywhere else because other video conferencing providers have been effectively locked out. What we also don't want is technical specs used to discriminate. Is everyone using 480p and the ISP says if you are using 475p then you get a free pass, and, oh look, only one service does that!

This is a net neutrality issue where data quotas are quote low. I am, however open to being proven wrong. Give me a proxy through which I can request any video file or stream and it is transcoded on the fly, or the stream is limited to a particular transfer rate, or some standard way I can signal that my data stream is video and I can control the size so it is not counted against my quota.

Yeah, I didn't think so. Its a cute bird, but its still a cuckoo.

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Days are numbered for the Czech Republic

P. Lee
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>"I refuse to be President of a country called Czesko." -- Vaclav Havel.

Why?

I asda same question.

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Do AI chat bots need a personality bypass – or will we only trust gabber 'droids with character?

P. Lee
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Why?

Ok, I get that neural net simulations can be helpful in speech recognition and so on.

But take a hint. Nobody likes talking to machines, not even the trivial, "how may I direct your call" used by banks. I'd far rather use a web browser for banking than talk to a clever voice recognition system. That is a last-resort UI.

Intelligence implies guessing, guessing implies mistakes and for most of the time, we don't want and won't tolerate computers making mistakes, even if they are doing a better job than humans.

What we appear to have is an industry which has run out of ideas for actually making the world a better place, has seen far too many star trek episodes and is obsessed with becoming god! Manufacturing inventions make things better than humans can. IT now seems obsessed with making things a whole lot worse. Worse intelligence than a human, IoT worse than the manual solution, cloud worse than the on-site version, Internet streaming worse than a DVD/Bluray, support moved to increasingly unskilled and unintelligible humans. I've been working for an IT company where the senior engineers have no non-vendor expertise. Great analytical skills, great with the vendor tools, but all at sea when the tools fail. They have no skills in data processing.

Go ahead and and play with your AI, but please don't bring it out of the lab into inappropriate situations.

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London-based Yahoo! hacker gets 11 years for SQLi mischief

P. Lee
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>wonder if I can get parking tickets charged concurrently

Nope.

Tickets are revenue, prison is a cost.

Besides, we are keeping the outrageously long prison sentences for those who embarrass the government, not a has-been email provider.

Like those who leak MP's expense details.

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Cosmology is safe and the Universe is one giant version of the Barbican

P. Lee
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Angel

Re: temperatures were so high the laws of physics couldn't form

It was a time of magic.

If the laws of physics had not yet formed, things do not fall under natural laws - they are "supernatural."

Not only that, but if the laws of physics don't apply, you can't use the laws of physics to study it.

"Here be dragons" as the old maps say.

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New Gnome emerges blinking into the sunlight

P. Lee
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Joke

Re: Distro Wars

>Since when did a graphical desktop environment become a package manager? Sheesh.

Its all in systemd, innit ;)

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VMware's secret security plan revealed

P. Lee
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The real question is

Why are hypervisor vendors the only ones at the party?

Where is MS? Surely this is actually about application behaviour and should be managed by the OS?

All those billions for so many years... and all we get is Windows 10?!

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2,000 year old man found dead near 2,000 year old computer

P. Lee
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Re: Navigation error - core dump blues

Poor chap died of a heart attack after he got the invoice for the license for the device from the Oracle of Antikythera.

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Lack of Hurd mentality at Oracle OpenWorld: Co-CEO's cloud claims fall flat live on stage

P. Lee
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Re: Doh!

Except oracle isn't supposed to be run "for the people."

Nevertheless, I name thee, "Hurdy McHurdface,"

And he deserves it. Common sense seems to have lost against the koolaid.

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iPhone 7's Qualcomm, Intel soap opera dumps a carrier lock-out on us

P. Lee
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i5 and ARM are similar in performance?

Really?

If so, I'm impressed with ARM! How truly awful is an i3, or are they dead? Have intel been deliberately deprecating i5 to push people to "premium" i7's?

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Google: There are three certainties in life – death, taxes and IPv6

P. Lee
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Re: UDP Fear

Whatever Mr J's issues the point does remain valid and not just for mobile.

There's nothing to stop a UDP DOS attack chewing up my download quota. Currently if I get Gigs of inbound SYNs or DNS or NTP there's a good chance I can defend my position with my ISP.

Regardless, it seems everyone is obsessing over ipv6 without looking at this sentence from the article:

>QUIC's big advantage is in real-time apps, and it's faster and more reliable than TCP because it's not dependent on the operating system.

Say WHAT?! Surely that must be a mistatement! Software layering? We've heard of it.

But no, Chrome implements it. Oh great, a network stack implemented at the application level. What could possibly go wrong?

We need more OS involvement in networking not less. I know Google doesn't care about end-point security, but I think the rest of us might. I'd quite like the OS to kill network connections initiated by, for example, Word and Excel. Shouldn't the application be asking the OS for IP protocol 143 or something like that? Is the problem really TCP or poor OS IP stack design? In the end, packets need putting in their correct order, whether than happens in the OS or the application - why not have this as a library function the OS does, rather than putting it in every application?

If we need a TCPv2 stack that's fine, let's make a TCPv2 stack, but don't kick networking session/transport reliability functions up to the application layer.

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It's OK for the FBI's fake hacks to hack suspects' PCs, says DoJ watchdog

P. Lee
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Cleanup

What happens if they had got the wrong person or the wrong immature person who said they did it to the "journalist" but wouldn't do so to the police. I hope the have reasonable protocols for dealing with that.

Do they remotely remove the spyware?

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You should install smart meters even if they're dumb, says flack

P. Lee
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Re: Downvoted pv panels

>Its only southern UK south facing unshaded locations have any likelihood of generating a fair return now.

Possibly not even that. I understand that in Queensland, Oz, where solar seems makes sense, the power companies put up prices to compensate for the loss of revenue to solar.

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IBM lifts lid, unleashes Linux-based x86 killer on unsuspecting world

P. Lee
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Devil

Re: Awesome

>>"I want one (whether it plays crysis or not)"

>Heretic.

Heretic runs on Linux - you'll be fine.

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Pains us to run an Apple article without the words 'fined', 'guilty' or 'on fire' in it, but here we are

P. Lee
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Re: Stupid headphone adapter...

>And when you want to plug your snazzy (non-apple) headphones into another non-apple device, you are saying you can do that with the lightning adaptor still attached are you?

If they wanted to ditch the standard audio socket, they should have replaced it with a better standard socket, not proprietary lightning. Maybe USB-C/Thunderbolt3? USB would be fine for headsets - there's a good chance the industry might coalesce around it. Lightning will always be a dongle-thing.

Remember the 80's? Apple used to boast that "everything is built in." Now, everything is dongle-connected. I hate dongles.

This just looks like a headline-grabbing distraction to avoid talking about the lack of significant reasons to buy a new iphone - not that I'm faulting Apple for that. However, a new license-free standard for some things would be nice. A combined fibre/copper comms cable would be good. I'd be happy for Apple to push for a new standard to replace RJ-45 NICs for mobile devices. Can we do "visible light comms" with an optic fibre to keep the costs down? I don't need LR lasers, I'd just like a magsafe network+power cable.

If they wanted to do something really cool, how about using two cameras and processing the image so that when running video chat, you don't look as though you are looking away from the camera when you look at the screen? Surely that's more achievable than an autonomous car.

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Australia's Telstra and Optus outed as two of the world's six most expensive ISPs

P. Lee
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>Transit is an important source of revenue for isps.

It take it that Telstra and Optus own/rent the intercontinental links and want to force traffic across those (where they get paid) rather than pass data around within a single data centre.

I get that its more cash for them, but when they are the most expensive and engineered to be deliberately worse, there's probably some anti-competitive issue which keeps them on top.

This is exactly the kind of thing net neut tries to avoid - extracting money from data providers rather than consumers. It looks like too much vertical integration between retail, backhaul and Inter-continental businesses.

If your business relies on pushing all traffic over intercontinental links rather than a few feet of fibre in a DC, your business needs to die.

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It's time for humanity to embrace SEX ROBOTS. For, uh, science, of course

P. Lee
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>Its also the mental stress/discomfort from holding two contradictory views at the same time or performing an action that contradicts their views.

>Example: Kiddie fiddler with a conscience; Knows its wrong but still does it anyway.

The result is generally that one of the positions will win out. If you repeatedly acquire KP, eventually, the feeling of it being wrong will go away. If you repeatedly shun KP and destroy it at the first possible opportunity, you'll keep your belief that its wrong and stop acquiring it.

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P. Lee
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Re: actual evidence for anything being a "gateway"?

Is spending ten minutes on pornhub the gateway for spending five hours on pornhub? Is a "hot hatch" a gateway to higher-performance cars? Are low-alcohol drinks a gateway to more inebriating content? Is simulated sex on the dance-floor a gateway to the real thing? Is a cheap, hand-me-down smartphone a gateway to a far more expensive option, or life-eating social-media usage? Does going to the cinema on a Sunday morning tend to lead to a less productive Sunday afternoon? Could one hit of cocaine be the gateway to a damaging habit?

Whether its correlation or causation, does it really matter? Would you go out with a man who's murdered several of his wives? Do you think murdering the fourth one was easier for him than the first?

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P. Lee
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>Gotta worry about the validity of opinions of those who can't distinguish between ownership and rental.

Indeed, though I think the correct reading - the point the author was trying to make - is that men purchase sex (a sexual encounter/event) whereas women purchase toys.

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Meet Deliveroo's ‘bold and impactful’ new logo. No, really

P. Lee
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> What's that Skippy?

The marketing department is a fiver year-old with potato, a pen-knife and a pot of paint, who's fallen down a well?

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FCC goes over the top again to battle America's cable-box rip-off

P. Lee
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Re: Is TV a right?

>I am not looking for government mandated sharing of IP.

I think the issue is that the cablecos are using DRM not to manage content (which is inconvenient enough) but so they can rent you a box to undo the DRM at a cost far in excess of the cost of the box. It is dishonest.

If you could purchase the STB for something approaching its cost, I doubt there would be a problem.

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Sick of Southern Rail? There's a crowdfunding site for that

P. Lee
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Re: Political Slant

>The assumption is that the private sector will always be more efficient than any public agency

There is a confusion, which may be deliberate between efficiency of operation and efficiency of capital.

I can run a service into the ground, which may grant me capital efficiencies and senior management bonuses but that doesn't mean the operation of the service is efficient - I may just be able to sidestep the downsides of inefficiencies because customers have no alternatives in the short-term. I may be piling up the costs through massive inefficiencies, but deferring them. Or I may simply not both depreciating assets properly, leaving that problem for other people (perhaps the taxman) to fund after I'm gone.

Efficient service operation usually involves higher costs - regular maintenance, greater redundancy, replacement of functional stock which has manual doors, with new stock with automatic doors, enabling trains to leave on time, enabling better scheduling, reducing staff requirements, etc.

The upshot is, you can't really run any company by just looking at the numbers. You have to love the industry and the company and make balanced choices which may not be the most lucrative for yourself or make you look like the most efficient manager. This goes for public and private sectors.

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Sophos Windows users face black screens after false positive snafu

P. Lee
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Re: Solving the wrong problem

Have an upvote to couinter-act the presumably robo-downvote.

OS design is the problem. Windows is also not the only culprit. Until people are willing to swap performance/features for solid security, things won't change.

The OS needs to mediate all resource access, not just disk, ram allocation and CPU. We need finer-grained control over applications that simply, "which user is it running under." That control needs to include declared network/url access, disk access, it needs to be set at install time and vendors need to take the lead in providing secure, not just functional permissions. There is no good reason for flash running in a browser to have access to every file the user owns. Rights should be inherited. Running a PHP interpreter from a browser should mean it gets the browser's rights which may be different from running the same thing from a desktop shell. Along with virtual memory, how about providing each application with virtual disk and a virtual network proxy? The OS filesystem should be read-only. OS and application binaries and configuration should not be co-mingled. Binaries and config should not be co-mingled. Applications should not be running random executables to update themselves - the OS should be checking known repositories for updates.

All this AV stuff is a fudge and a massive performance drain. Has anyone tried measuring the performance hit of AV vs doing OS design right?

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HDMI hooks up with USB-C in cables that reverse, one way

P. Lee
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Re: Can we just use an Ethernet cable already ?

+1

But I think we need a new "thin-plug" ethernet standard for small devices. RJ45 is fine for the DC but always breaks.

I wonder if there is a USB-type plug which would suffice?

I know - one plug format which does multiple standards, so you never know if the devices you are linking can actually talk to each other!

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Telstra wins AU$39 million for data retention costs as grants revealed

P. Lee
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A$128m?

And they reckon that's 80% of the cost?

lol

If I were a telco, I think I'd opt for microfiche as the storage medium with rotating unicode character sets written out in morse-code.

And I'd send a readable copy to my subscribers every month, saying, "this data is what the government is forcing us to store about you this month. It will be kept for x years in case you are a criminal. Here is a list of VPN providers and instructions on how to configure your PC to use them."

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Brexit must not break the cloud, Japan tells UK and EU

P. Lee
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>Japan - We want cheap labour and if we don't get cheap labour we will move our factories where we can get cheap labour.

They're whinging about this to a country where labour costs dropped 10% overnight? Ok, I know it rebounded a bit, but I don't think that's it.

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P. Lee
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Meh

Re: Dear Japan

>Either UK tows the line or the Honda, Nissan and Sony factories move to Eastern Europe leaving their entire workforces (which by the way are from 70%+ vote "leave" regions) unemployed. Followed by Japanese banks.

What has this do with factories? What has the personal information of various citizens of Europe go to do with where cars are built? Europe imports and exports cars, the UK imports and exports cars. Cars aren't the issue. Indeed, the article (if you read it) says this is about "Cloud."

At first I thought it was just "the sky is falling!" Remainers (see - both sides can indulge in snide name-calling), but as I thought about it, I realised they may have a point.

If cars are collecting excessive amounts of personal data on their owners and feeding it back to the corporate data centres in the UK, that might be something they could get away with while the UK is in Europe but not when we leave. The snoopers will have to put their data somewhere else as the data leaving the EU is "too personal" to be allowed to leave the EU's excellent data-protection jurisdiction. Then there is the problem of what do you do if the car you are snooping on crosses from the UK to the France? Can you still snoop on it with French devices? Which jurisdiction does the data fall under?

Because that kind of data collection is something we want to continue, right? This is the kind of Europe we want to build, where data on people across the whole continent is free to move and be mined, free of the racist Brexiters' data centre policies (We'll not mention that its probably EU legislation which will prevent the free movement of information to and from the UK...)

Brexiters, pah! Killers of unicorns and stompers of rainbows! You are killing our dream of not having to buy another server! A pox on your sovereignty! We of the mighty Nissan Corp have not built our infrastructure around national lines (and, more importantly, neither has MS and Amazon), therefore neither should you! Be like us, one big happy Corporation! With a song!

This is all speculation of course, only vaguely informed by what data processing is required to "monetise" (ugh!) the Next Big Thing - autonomous vehicles. Anyone with a better explanation is welcome to chip in.

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Microsoft thought of the children and decided to ban some browsers

P. Lee
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>They are acting more and more like the Gestapo but without the nice leather coats and hats.

Are you trying to get el reg onto the fetish-site list?

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P. Lee
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Re: Move on, Move on. Nothing to see here

Yeah, get office365.com on the block list.

And don't run with scissors.

All sensible precautions.

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Appliance-maker Liebherr chillin' with Microsoft, prototyping another Internet fridge

P. Lee
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Use case

There's only one I can think of.

I've just used the last bit of something in a packet, I want some more, so I scan the barcode to add it to a shopping list, sync'ed to my phone. Or you could snap a picture of it or add a voice memo and have that added to the list.

Nothing you couldn't do with a phone, as far as I can tell, though a large button you can press with your elbow and a wireless mic/camera for "hands-free" operation might be nice.

Cloud not required.

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When Irish eyes are filing: Ireland to appeal Europe's $15bn Apple tax claw-back

P. Lee
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Re: EU power grab?

The rules are consistent with creating a level competition playing field so its within its purview. However, the logical conclusion of the EU is a single centralised government, so it is consistent with that too.

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P. Lee
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Re: Exported untaxed profits under the guise of importing IP rights

>Solution: All that the nations of the Earth need to do is slap an Import Duty on imported IP Rights.

Or you can just see what profits the shell company has made, divide it by number (or estimated number) of units sold locally, and tax the local company based on that value. No duties or WTO required.

For good measure, you can declare that you won't be offering a tax concession ever, so any shareholders holding out for that are out of luck. Maybe even have a stepped increase in the tax rate for repatriated funds based on how long the company has held onto the cash.

If companies aren't playing nice, there's no reason the government should.

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The survivors: Intel's Apollo Lake netbook CPUs stagger from Goldmont bloodbath

P. Lee
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Re: Apple to finally enter a (useable) netbook market?

Isn't apple already their with their "one-usb-socket-for-everything" macbook?

Oh, wait, you said "usable" netbook...

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Census fail to get Oz Senate probe; NDIS fix promised this year

P. Lee
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Testing at scale

Being a test client is one thing the public cloud might be good for.

That's after you've done you're internal load testing.

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Cooky crumbles: Apple mulls yanking profits out of Europe and into US

P. Lee
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Re: I'm pretty sure

>Taxing a company for having more money in the bank just seems bizarre.

Corporations aren't taxed on "money in the bank" any more than people are. They are taxed on net income.

With zero corporation tax, you can store money above your needs in a corporation, go traveling for a year (becoming non-resident) and then bring your money back into the country as "wealth" rather than income, or simply retire and never go back to the US. Think of it as adding 35-40% to your pension every year.

The US may think its jurisdiction is "the world" but other countries do not.

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Tim Cook: EU lied about Apple taxes. Watch out Ireland, this is a coup!

P. Lee
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Re: Well, bears in the woods etc.

>so all that extra profit must lie in the IP (design, ecosystem, brand etc.). And that is based in the US, and taxed under US rules. So Ireland hasn't provided state aid

I thought the opposite was true. Apple-Ireland holds the IP but the Irish government doesn't make Apple pay tax on sales outside Ireland.

The question is whether Apple's arrangement was fair and comparable to any other corporate in the same position.

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Australian geoboffin discovers 3.7 billion year old fossils after ice melts

P. Lee
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Trollface

>Thank (diety) for (man-made/natural/magic/alien) climate change. Extending our knowledge of the earth's past with every extra fraction of a degree.

And how much fossil-fuel were the stromatolites burning to heat the earth to the point where the Greenland glaciers had melted and the rocks were exposed?

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Intel's makeshift Kaby Lake Cores hope to lure punters from tired PCs

P. Lee
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>decode 4Kp60 HEVC at up to 120Mbps ... for watching high-quality films and TV on the internet

I guess your internet connection is better than mine.

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P. Lee
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Re: Thunderbolt & USB

>I fail to see how that could be desirable.

For server clusters which need to sync data?

Not all external devices are untrusted.

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Uber lost $7m a DAY in the first half of this year

P. Lee
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>Stupid investors put money into company with a repeatable, unprotectable business plan and fail to ensure it makes any kind of profit whatsoever.

And the fact that investors put money into this kind of long-shot is a grave indictment of the rest of the economy.

Perhaps higher interest rates on savings might see off this kind of madness.

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P. Lee
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Re: Not my idea of a 'sharing economy'

>>"trouser profits monstrously disproportionate to what they put in"

>Or in this case, lose $7m a day.

Trouser personal profits - its only the company which is losing money.

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P. Lee
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Happy

>"Deutschland, Deutschland über alles!"

What a marvellous song that is, "German, German Overalls!"

-Flanders & Swan

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Li-Fi with my little eye … a vulnerability

P. Lee
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Re: Reliability & infrastructure

>There's a problem waiting to be solved out there, but I've not figured it out yet.

Light is easier to contain than parts of the radio spectrum which pass through walls. Easier to contain = more bandwidth (if you have walls). For home use, probably more secure than traditional wireless and more bandwidth as the signal doesn't leak to the neighbours or get disrupted by 2.4Ghz devices, microwaves etc. You have more wires (to each room), but you have a lot more bandwidth.

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EU verdict: Apple received €13bn in illegal tax benefits from Ireland

P. Lee
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Re: What I don't get...

>This is State Aids

And indeed, would a European firm have done better if they had the same tax arrangements as Apple? Or would another country have got the chance to be Apple's host if Ireland hadn't created this arrangement?

Level playing fields etc.

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$329 for a MacBook? Well, really a 'HacBook' built on an old HP

P. Lee
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Re: 1600 x 900

1600x900 isn't that bad and ... probably a matt screen!

That might be worth the price.

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Robot babies fail in role as teenage sex deterrents

P. Lee
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Re: Bah!

>Because teenagers are genetically wired to want to bonk no matter what their parents say or teach.

>And bonk-minded teens aren't thinking of the consequences when the urge hits hard.

>I offer into evidence ... well, the world. Look around. Also, try and remember your own teen years.

Genetically wired, yes, but that doesn't tell the whole story. All the media is telling them that commitment-free sex is not only possible but desirable. Unlike real-life, media-entertainment thrives on conflict and drama. In real-life, that sort of thing destroys relationships. I've seen the macarena done at toddlers' parties. Look at the moves, hands out in invitation, a hug, pelvic thrusting, move on to the next partner. Listen to its words, "my boyfriend was out of town, so I cheated on him." Does it have an adverse influence on toddlers? No, but it does demonstrate a complete lack of thought on the adults' part with regard to the culture with which they surround their children. Look at the sitcoms - Happy Endings, Friends, Home & Away, whatever, everyone takes turns in sleeping with everyone else. There is the assumption that "boyfriend" or "girlfriend" or "going out" means "having sex" in pretty much any film where the subjects are 17 or older. Dancing has gone from telling a story like swan lake, or the rigid frame synchronisation and grace of the waltz or even the social mixing of a "country dance" to jiggling breasts and pelvis and spreading legs in a rather unsubtle simulation of sex, or at best, a "look at my primary/secondary genitals" display in a high-volume scenario which makes anything but visual communication impossible. And Society as portrayed in the media appears to be ok with this. Classical music is the domain of psychopaths, serial killers and the socially stunted.

Then we allow children to grow up with passive visual entertainment. For hours on end their prefrontal cortex which activates during critical thought and the exercise of love for another person goes dark and their emotional response centres are lit up, leading to the brain's pruning of unused areas affecting their critical-thinking capacity, while decision-making shifts to their over-developed emotional centres. Are we surprised when they make poor decisions about sex and fail to consider the long-term implications of their behaviour in general?

Don't have sex because of babies is a stupid KPI - of course it doesn't compute. Hormones and under-developed teenage critical thinking see to that. What is criminal is neglect of the moral principle of human worth. You don't refrain from sex because of babies - that's just a government policy problem - you do so because having sex exposes those involved to deep physical and emotional vulnerability to another person. For oxytocin -laden girls, the bonding is even stronger making the breaking of that bond later all the worse. What does your sex-partner think of you? Are they going to swap you out when their hormone level subsides or if they find you a bit irritating? If they aren't, get them to say so, in public. That's what marriage is. If they don't commit for life, they are holding out an option to ditch you. You deserve better. Don't let people treat you as if you're nothing but mammals. That's generally just short-hand for "I think you're here just to serve my pleasure."

As for my teenage years, I made it through without having sex. This isn't evidence of superiority, but it is evidence that teenage sex isn't inevitable. You can control it - but it helps if you don't let situations develop which promote sex. I'm not convinced even the Puritan practise of "bundling" is a good idea. You (and by that I mean the children) need to make a decisions about your social life and plan activities and situations. That means you (the parent) have teach children about their worth and where that comes from. Of course, if you think people really are "nothing but mammals" then a coherent and useful idea of human worth is a difficult one to develop and instil in your children.

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Tech fails miserably in Forbes' most innovative companies

P. Lee
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Re: What is "tech"?

Worse - tech success used to mean solving customer problems. Now it means restricting the use of powerful hardware and using your network-effect lock-in in combination with "support & maintenance."

IBM must be feeling so nostalgic.

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Notting Hill Carnival spycams: Met Police rolls out real-time live face-spotting tech

P. Lee
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Re: V

>Plus of course that blacks have more trouble getting good education and a good job.

Neither a lack of education nor poverty are an excuse for crime. If the crime is begging or stealing bread, I"ll be happy to revisit the issue.

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