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* Posts by P. Lee

2537 posts • joined 4 Dec 2007

SHARE 'N' SINK: OneDrive corrupting Office 2013 files

P. Lee
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Coat

lol, "tight integration."

How bad is it when your operating system picks a particular application's data to scramble!

The question is, why is the OS messing with the data at all?

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Carrier club's careful copyright conga

P. Lee
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Re: ISPs biggest beneficiaries of piracy

> ISPs have benefited from piracy indirectly as it gives users a reason to purchase access plans with greater capacity.

Hardly. The d/l caps have been increased disproportionally more than prices. The d/l caps are mostly about inter-ISP competition. Capacity-wise its a problem for the ISPs. When I say "problem" I'm talking about the disconnect between marketing and engineering which leads to "traffic management" requirements.

I've just looked up cinema tickets in the overcrowed SE of England (Winnersh Triangle) and the standard adult peak tickets are $10.05 - one austrlian dollar cheaper than the "special-offer-thank-you-for-being-our-customer" cinema tickets with which Telstra graces its customers. The Hoyts-Eastland (in Ringwood, so much like a mini-Reading that I often mix the names up) is over 40% more for Lucy if you book online, with no concessions for anyone. "Into the Storm" is over 100% more expensive at $21.10, but you'll be pleased to know a child can get in for only $16.10.

Price-gouging tends to reduce my sympathy, whether you have the legal right to or not. To paraphrase someone, the internet sees scarcity as damage and routes around it. Sometimes it does - I can't even be bothered to pirate Hollywoods latest and greatest. I wonder if growing up in a world saturated with media will make the next generation as apathetic as I am?

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Australia deflates Valve with Steam sueball

P. Lee
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Re: Refunds are only sought for games that are not fit for purpose (i.e. don't run)

I suspect someone picked up a "still in development" game and doesn't like it.

However, an up front "no refunds under any circumstances" is quite aggressive.

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Ofcom will not probe lesbian lizard snog in new Dr Who series

P. Lee
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Re: "my suspension of disbelief finally broke"

Actually, homosexuality is "deviant" in that it deviates from the majority practise. That's a good thing too - if everyone was gay, there would be no more people and the human race would end. The beeb loves to promote it, but I found it to be an eww! scene. By explicitly sexualising the moment, it rather hit you in the face with "how would that work?" which just wasn't a thought that was required and completely dropped you out of the story.

The show has gone from being entertainment to social engineering. Surely it must be possible to have a show which is just entertaining. My kids are still kids, they aren't interested in sex and I'm reasonably sure Dr Who isn't the best way to teach them about it. If I did have kids who were interested in sex (say a 15 year old boy) I'm also sure putting images of sex between a woman and a lizard woman in his head is also not a really helpful thing to do.

I don't let the Beeb or any other mass media do my kids sex ed - that's a parent's role. I'd kindly thank the mass media to stop it - I'm not convinced they are either competant or have my child's best interest at heart. In the mean time, the button is off.

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Britain's housing crisis: What are we going to do about it?

P. Lee
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Supply always meets demand - its just the price point where they meet tthat changes.

The problem with SE England is that its extremely difficult to increase supply - there isn't a great deal of land left where its (politically) possible to build. Supply is reasonably fixed.

The problem isn't McMansions, the problem is the unwillingness to see low house prices as a good thing, leading to the ever upward pressure. The reason rent control is attractive is that it discourages investment-buying of second and third houses. With less rental income, you can't pay for high mortages, with lower mortgages more people can afford the houses which already exist and everyone is left (after a painful re-adjustment) with more money in their pocket.

Of course, this assumes that supply is fixed (which it is, in the short term) and that there isn't too much externally sourced demand which will flow in offsetting the drop in domestic demand.

In short, if you want people to be richer - help them get rid of their debt. Debt is bad for individuals and the economy and the UK is less solvent than places like Greece and Spain.

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Ninja Pirate Zombie Vampires versus Chuck Norris and the Space Marines

P. Lee
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Re: R2-D2 etc ARE combat robots by design.

If number 5 is alive - does that make him human?

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P. Lee
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> they'd stand a very good chance of winning if they just take off and nuke the site from orbit

While a technical possibility, the bosses are always far too stupid and greedy to take this option when its suggested by those who actually know what they are talking about.

Hmmm, that sounds like my workplace...

On a separate note, can we vote for the type of vampire we want to win, regardless of whether we think they actually would? :)

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Intel unleashed octo-core speed demon for the power-crazed crowd

P. Lee
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Re: Cheesburgers and "The Cloud" !

> Given all of that I think it's safe to say that this is a product for people that are both rich and a bit stupid.

Or maybe you could shove it into a database server? That's assuming you don't need the other Xeon features.

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P. Lee
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Re: @Joerg

> sick and tired of the Intel/AMD duopoly

It's hardly like unilever-proctor&gamble where they don't want to compete. Intel went for high performance low-core-count/high price; AMD went for more cores and lower prices. These are almost different markets. That makes it difficult for AMD to compete on marketing to end-users so they concentrate on the embedded market.

Gamers generally need a couple of fast cores but like to brag about their systems. Intel wants to sell to them regardless of their usage because they are less price-sensitive. Sensible IT type running VMs at home would go for the 8-core AMD chip and save a bundle if buying new.

I don't see memory as an issue - I've got 32G in my host which is half the maximum for my mobo. I got it for running VMs - most people can probably get by with 16G for years to come. I've got an "old" 3930k which has far more oomph than is needed. I got it for $300 which was enough to tempt me from my E7500 and as a desktop I expect it to last for at least six more years. My main "concern" is power consumption. Intel's done quite a bit to improve that but tiny incremental improvements dressed up as "generations" annoy me and don't warrant the expense of an upgrade. If anything, performance has mostly regressed since the 3930's were new.

Sure, I'd like to see some ARM or MIPS machines out there. I'd be happy with an ARM file-server, browsing and email host (built into a screen?). However, I've noticed that Word will consume as much of a single core as you can throw at it, which is a bit rubbish, but hardly Intel's fault. I'd like to see AMD challange Intel on the single-core speed front because I think the lack of competition is a problem but I suspect AMD's fabrication tech just can't match them.

Part of the problem is that general move to laptops. There's little chance of customisation and movement in the market with locked-down machines. At least in the past we had PCMCIA interfaces to add new functionality - now there's no chance of neatly adding functions to a laptop - you're reduced to ugly dongles and external devices.

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Microsoft boots 1,500 dodgy apps from the Windows Store

P. Lee
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Re: um

You are assuming reviewer accounts=reviewers

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P. Lee
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Facepalm

Re: Icons (@AC)

> At least that would make a change from the usual Zynga/EA/Disney/everyone approach of microtransaction-enabled Skinner Boxes masquerading as games?

I feel compelled to upvote you.

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Russia-based hackers prime suspects in JPMorgan mega-breach

P. Lee
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> Believe it or not, even people who work within a bank and have full access to their internal systems aren't able to do that!

Fear the nasty foreign tehwworwists scum! We are nothing like them!

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Top beak: UK privacy law may be reconsidered because of social media

P. Lee
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Re: "It undermines the rule of law if laws are unenforceable"

>Well, it's not odd for him to be saying it.

Indeed, it is true and he isn't the first to have observed this. Politicians just don't care because its all about the ratings which turn it into a gameshow.

As one (BBC IIRC) political analyst said, "Tony Blair passionately believed everything the focus groups told him."

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End of buttons? Apple looks to patent animating iPhone sidewalls

P. Lee
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Holmes

Re: No, nothing like Youm

What? Putting a screen on a different side of a phone! That's never been done before - a true invention!

Fanbois rejoice at the innovation crushing the heathen fandroid scum!

--

Every time I see something like this in the patent pile, another little part of me dies and I see the fall of Western civilisation coming closer.

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Tim Cook in Applerexia fears: New MacBook THINNER THAN EVER

P. Lee
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Paris Hilton

Re: This will not stop

> it does mean that the modulus of the chassis/case has to increase if you don't want unpleasant keyboard flex and, in the worst case, screen cracking.

Screen-cracking: that would be bad for whom, exactly?

Let LightOn=True

Actually I presume there's no problem going thinner as long as you go longer/wider and your heatsink works ok. MBA thickness appears to work ok. However, the no-go for me is all the dongles a mac will require. 802.11ac is fine if where-ever you are has it and the contention is low. Something inside me rebels at pushing video through USB3 - it just feels wrong!

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Pay to play: The hidden cost of software defined everything

P. Lee
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Is there something new?

Not in theory, but in practice the PC world is used to being allowed to run software on faster chips to get additional benefit. Now we see what used to be general pc software (e.g. Checkpoint firewall-1) being priced out of usefulness and a substitute "appliance" range which could run anything down to a celeron. The also hobble not just features, but the number of cores used. That is new to PC's.

Worse, this isn't just some washing machine built-in wearing-out date. Things go "obsolete" when the vendor says so, not when they are no longer fit for purpose. Same software, but you need to buy it new again and the hardware it runs on, or you'll drop out of support and we'll charge you more than ever. Add a complex infrastructure which has its own lock-in of complexity and it begins to look like extortion.

Not only that, software is notoriously unreliable. Just look at the number of phone app updates. Hardware has to be right when it goes out the door because its hard to change. I know which one I'd prefer to use.

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Oz metadata proposal: no to IP addresses, yes to MAC address logging

P. Lee
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MAC addresses?

Are they interested to know whether the nasty tewwowists use SNAP or Ethernet II from their routers to the ISP? I'll bet that's really useful and it does imply tapping the first hop on every internet connection. The meta-data in this scenario will gather lots of information about ethernet framing. If URLs are excluded, how about your imap or smtp traffic? What about VOIP? Are they redacting the IP headers?

This is the the strangest thing I've seen in a long time. It's so ludicrous that I refuse to believe they are that incompetant. This time, I'm going for "liars and deceivers."

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Banking apps: Handy, can grab all your money... and RIDDLED with coding flaws

P. Lee
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Re: (Understanding VFM)

I think people understand value-for-money, they just don't care about other people's money.

e.g. a manager extracts maximum value (i.e meeting his KPI) from his budget. The fact that he is dealing with an app which deals with other people's money is really irrelevant to him, especially if the work is outsourced and he can blame someone else if a vulnerability is discovered 1 year down the line.

It's why large companies tend to evil, aggregated systems devalue individual customers and encourage shaving marginal costs which simply wouldn't be worth doing for smaller companies.

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Boffins attempt to prove the UNIVERSE IS JUST A HOLOGRAM

P. Lee
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Re: Excellent (quantum theory of socks)

> Sounds like a certain cat...

I've discovered a small-dog-shaped wormhole which redistributes socks (and indeed underwear) around the house and the garden. I've yet to fathom the "neat cables go into the bag, tangled ones come out" mystery.

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HUGE iPAD? Maybe. HUGE ADVERTS? That's for SURE

P. Lee
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Lost the plot

If I wanted entertainment punctuated by ads, I'd watch TV. We use computers to escape such things.

Herein lies the problem of locked down tablets. With a general purpose pc we can ignore and block pop-ups and their ilk. With tablets the user relies on the vendor to do the right thing.

The local server+tablet always beats vendor-cloud+tablet. There's no WAN and its all under my control. It comes down to the usual: planning makes the experience better. Setting your PVR to record then play back on a tablet beats catch-up TV. You local linux distribution gives you a heap of free games without any adverts at all. I can never understand why people pay or will watch adverts, for solitaire.

What? You want me to pay for an X server on iOS? That's more than I paid for an entire linux distro on 5 computers. I think I'll stick with WebOS thanks.

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HP: We're still running the ARM race with Moonshot servers

P. Lee
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Re: Why binary compatibility?

It's about Windows in the SMB space. It's about Oracle (Linux/Solaris), Linux, AIX maybe HPUX in the Enterprise space. It's pretty much Linux (and perhaps BSD) only in the ISP/hosting/cloud world which is where Moonshot is aimed.

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Why has the web gone to hell? Market chaos and HUMAN NATURE

P. Lee
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Re: Human Nature

>Is said society then really free and tolerant, or is it just as repressive as the evil it claims to be saving us from?

The problem is that soundbite combative "never let it happen again" politics has conflated "toleration" with "acceptance." To be tolerant is to live along side those we *disagree* with without seeking their destruction. We might seek to convert them to our way, but we don't try to destroy them or to silence them.

I find modern society increasingly intolerant. Dissent is either made illegal or shouted down without coherent arguments being put forward. It is very difficult indeed to openly say, "I think you are wrong because..." Where there is wrong, people want to bring the law to bear, often where it can't or shouldn't. The law is trying to replace moral values and the law is a very blunt instrument which is becoming very intrusive. We are trying to safeguard freedom by building a barbed-wire fence and gun towers around it and every time we mark off one freedom as protected, we cut ourselves off from others.

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Cleversafe CEO: We would tell you about the 8TB drive, but...

P. Lee
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Tech details

Not too relevant?

We already don't use high capacity drives (2-3TB) in many arrays because you can't get the data off them fast enough. The contention for the data is too high. That's why enterprise arrays have smaller, faster disks.

So its an archive/media drive? Great for the home market where I just want to mirror to drives in a small space to keep all my photos and er, DVD backups, and I really don't care too much about access speed. It would be nice to consolidate the 8 disks in my home server down into a much smaller box. Perhaps all those over-priced dual-bay "NAS" systems are now an option.

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Loss of unencrypted back-up disk costs UK prisons ministry £180K

P. Lee
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Stop

Re: Fine should be much smaller

> I would propose a Gladiator-style battle

No way should Cowell be allowed to make money off the public for this!

Fining the Minister is fine - he sets the policy, he is supposed to be accountable. He should have a security officer who reports to him (not Operations) and without personal interest in the subject, he won't drive any change.

The reason is, its cheaper to pay the fine when caught than to audit and enforce policy. Paying the fine doesn't hurt anyone except the prisoners, since the MoJ has less money to spend on them.

"I'm sorry we lost your data, I'm going to have to fine you for it." is creepy - like paying for your own execution bullets.

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Super Cali signs a kill-switch, campaigners say it's atrocious

P. Lee
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Big Brother

>If they wanted to shut you down they'd go straight to the networks and pull the plug!

So why don't they do that when a mobile is reported stolen? I don't believe that most stolen phones are shipped out of the country. They could provide the added benefit of allowing 0118 999 881 999 119 725 3 calls anyway. I'm not sure that California is that concerned about privately created phone networks - those are location specific and can be jammed if required.

Is this just theatre, to preserve the illusion that they can't track phones if the sim card is changed?

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The agony and ecstasy of SteamOS: WHERE ARE MY GAMES?

P. Lee
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Re: It's unlikely to improve

There's a difference between Windows on a generic box and a Windows games system.

Do you think MS will want competition for xbox? How much does even an OEM license add to a system? Is it possible that Steam want an alternative to Windows because an aggressive Windows App Store could easily squeeze them out?

This isn't just a, "be nice to the linux desktop users" move, this is Valve making sure they aren't locked into an OS with a vendor well known for turning on its partners. It's also Valve providing a system which should be as easy as consoles to manage. The trick will be getting people to invest in the up-front costs of a steambox in return for the steam sales available later.

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P. Lee
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Re: I have 34 games

One further thing, PlayOnLinux seems to include an additional large number of my windows games.

However, I've struggled for some time to get FarCry2 running under it. When it finally got up and running the mouse felt a bit unresponsive and it crashed fairly soon afterwards. It would be great if Valve could put in some work on WINE to get a whole host of older less demanding games up and running - stuff that no-one is likely to port natively.

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P. Lee
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I have 34 games

Out of around 130 which run on Linux (openSuse in my case). To clarify, Steam on Linux isn't beta.

Apart from L4D2, hl2 etc from Valve, Civ5, StrikeSuitZero, Metro 2033, Serious Sam, Trine2, Witcher2, Amnesia et al, Dota2, Frozen Synapse, Swapper, Dungeon Defenders and a stack more.

I do miss Defense Grid, but DG2 is coming to linux soon. Whoohoo! SSZ was lots of fun as are some of the smaller indie games such as swapper, frozen synapse, limbo etc.

I wouldn't get a NUC for games though. I rarely get cutting edge stuff, but I have a 680GT running to power a 27" screen. You'll want something quick for FPS where streaming really doesn't cut it. Streaming works well for Monkey Island 2 though!

I suspect the devs are comming on-side with general portability for consoles and OSX meaning linux is an easy addition.

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Linux turns 23 and Linus Torvalds celebrates as only he can

P. Lee
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Re: 23 Years

>>And still waiting for it to hit the mainstream.

>No downvotes. no snarky remarks, just one simple serious question

>Why ?

Probably because its been asked a thousand times and is a boring troll.

That, and linux people mostly don't care - they have their own desktops and if someone else wants to use something else, that's ok. Linux is free - there's no commercial imperative to to push it. If you don't use it, we don't lose. If you do use it, we don't win. The fact that KDE or Gnome or LXDE aren't mainstream is not relevant to Linus and the article - he doesn't manage them. Linux is very much mainstream, from phones to tablets to STB's to GPS' to Intel86/AMD64 servers, supercomputers, Raspberry Pi's.

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Cracking copyright law: How a simian selfie stunt could make a monkey out of Wikipedia

P. Lee
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Re: Recent news on Page 2 @JeffyPoooh

> you're paying for but the knowledge behind it.

Except that the photographer has already admitted the selfie was an accident.

If I give my camera to someone who takes a picture of themselves with it, can I claim copyright? If I'm a photo pro and set up my friend's camera for his wedding, can I then license the photos taken with that camera?

Or are we just saying that copyright goes to the nearest human controller? In that case, what if a bystander yells, "yoohoo! over here!" Who is the controller then?

Its a difficult case, and hard cases make bad law.

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Oz metadata retention won't include URLs: report

P. Lee
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Holmes

Re: Source vs destination

Indeed, it seems unlikely that new legislation is required for get ISP DHCP server logs preserved, especially as that does nothing for corporate or even home connections with more than one user. In fact, it does nothing at all for security beyond being able to find an address/bank-account of someone who may or may not warrant further investigation. Without destination information, all you'll have is a list of Australian IP addresses.

On the other hand, if you wanted to bring in ISP account-holder liability for copyright infringement, regardless of the actual infringer, this sort of database might be quite handy...

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So, Apple won't sell cheap kit? Prepare the iOS garden wall WRECKING BALL

P. Lee
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Re: Oh no

I'm not sure the Aston analogy holds. iOS and Android are the fuel which powers the hardware. They are pretty similar. iphones may be slightly better built than S5, but S5 has better functionality. Slightly nicer curves vs more boot-space and room for the kids in the back.

Apple is obsessed with doing what they like. It could quite easily ruin them, as it almost did in the original Mackintosh vs PC days but I wish more coporates had the guts to do that. What I don't like is the more recent obsession with locking things down. Being the best is a worthy aim, lock-in is not. In the past, lock-in to the Mackintosh was a by-product of what they did, now it appears to be the aim - corporate efficiency at its worst.

As far as I'm concerned the Apple's download vs cloud model is good. Local execution is more reliable and much of the cloud apps don't need to be cloud apps. GPS/Maps is a prime example of the nuttiness of cloud where it isn't needed, as is music streaming over a WAN. Plus if there is a failure, its only for one person and you generally don't get bad headlines for it. That's simpler and better, and for the vendors' benefit, will drive CPU/new model requirements. Even better for Apple, driving tablet-based (or phone-WiDi) apps could give them a proprietary hardware edge where the bloat of MS Office fears to tread.

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GitHub.io killed the distro star: Why are people so bored with the top Linux makers?

P. Lee
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Maturity is bad for free publicity

Most distro's are now competant and there's little need to keep switching to get a feature.

The corporates have picked their distros and aren't going to want to add another or switch large amounts of infrastructure. Many large corporates' IT is outsourced making changes even more expensive and hazardous. Often the servers are basic infrastructure and the distro doesn't matter. You have a web server, who cares if its running Redhat or Suse since the code is the same. How often does your iSCSI or DHCP server software update?

Most people running linux desktops are also not that interested in switching - they've looked, found what they like and don't feel the need to change. As the size of the environment has grown, the pace of change inevitably has slowed.

My iphone is so old it doesn't doesn't really update but my wife's new one has zillions of updates. I have a feeling that the app devs just tweak things and call it a fix in order to remind you that their app is still there - its free publicity/advertising for them. If I had an app like that, I'd conclude the devs were incompentant and delete it. Corporates certainly won't stand for that kind of thing.

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Leak: Intel readies next round of NUC

P. Lee
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Re: the latest and greatest

> Seems like a good size/profile for SteamOS.

Without a dedicated GPU?

I guess "immersive" means, "on a big screen TV."

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Brit Sci-Fi author Alastair Reynolds says MS Word 'drives me to distraction'

P. Lee
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I've often found that Open/LibreOffice is much faster than Word and handles long documents far better. Formatting interchange issues are the only reason I keep a copy of "real" Word. Also up there on my list of peeves are things like document template macros - in one company I was at, the standard template ran off your personal profile on local drives, and thus failed every time a document moved from one computer to another since the username and thus template directory changed.

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Your move, sucker! Microsoft tests cloud gaming system that cuts through network lag

P. Lee
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> Yep. In modern America the game studios play you.

FTFY

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My big reveal as macro-economics analyst: It's a load of COBBLERS

P. Lee
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Re: There are a lot of studies about the US Great Depression - but how many about the German one?

Indeed, the Germans have an extremely vivid experience of what happens with QE. I thought the UK in the 1970's would be a timely reminder about Keynesian economics, but apparently people have forgotten that too.

The problem is that there are many who think that money and productivity are the same. There is also a problem in that Western economies are based on this fiction: value = the amount of money someone is willing to pay.

The problem with that idea is that willingness to pay is inherently unstable because we create markets based on speculation and the idea of ever-increasing productivity/wealth. I think it was Money magazine (I could be wrong there) which talked about an impending UK economic collapse because everyone has the idea that past growth rates must continue. The problem is that the past growth includes industrialisation and urbanisation, the introduction of power distribution, motorised transport, piped water/sewage systems. We've most recently seen globalisation made possible by the introduction of computer networks.

Now, who thinks that there is anything like these on the horizon to drive equivalent future growth? Is twitter or facebook going to deliver these real benefits? Is SDN going to equal the productivity leap forward of putting global networks in place to start with?

I'd suggest that we've done the great leap forward. There is little productivity to add when compared to the introduction of industrialisation, computerisation and networks. Everything from now on will be slow. What we considered normal growth in the past will be a bubble if it happens again. It could be a speculation bubble or it could be a fashion bubble, but we are already rather efficient at what we do. That is why IT is in such a bad way - it has little more to offer. Our large companies are so large that they can quickly saturate global demand, but then they struggle with over-capacity and expectations of growth which can't continue. We've seen it recently, with the IT companies hiding the drop in earnings by jacking up prices, "look demand is increasing, we've earnt more!" No, demand is falling and you'll earn less and less as we move from short-term ("we can't change anything so we'll have to pay") through long term ("some things can be changed") to very long term ("everything is changeable").

We've confused owning knowledge and rights with being productive. What happens when a city goes bankrupt and can no longer spend police time protecting IP rights? What happens when someone decides they'll just write a note on a bit of paper and post it, rather than spending $1000 on a computer, $400 on the OS, another $400 on some software to write a letter? In fact, the a flick of a pen any country can nullify all our "ownership." While intent on promoting profits from "innovation", we have grown fat on artificial scarcity of things people really don't need.to live. It was bad enough in the 1930's when the West produced things, now almost no-one has assets or skills to produce anything. It's all very well for MS to have an Office cash cow, but if things turn out like the 1930's no-one is going to be buying. All that "value" will go up in a puff of smoke, because it isn't really "value," its merely a price. Value is a far more ephemeral concept which varies from person to person and instance to instance, especially when it refers to intangibles.

I can't see how the future is going to be anything but messy and very unpleasant. All those poor third-world farmers shipping food to the West - they have very little to lose from keeping and eating their own crops. I suspect the escapades in Iraq will seem like a time of relative peace. In case you think it couldn't happen - it has happened before.

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AMD unveils 'single purpose' graphics card for PC gamers and NO ONE else

P. Lee
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Re: I wish there was a game I actually wanted to play.

> Each generation we are promised "photo-realism" and each time it's a lie.

I guess it depends how good your camera is! ;)

Photo-realism is over-rated. Rather like 4k video, we could do it, but its far more effort than is required to produce something fun.

VR goggles however, now there's something worthwhile, though I suspect that like 3D representations of data, you'll still lose out to those who don't have to move much physically.

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No, thank you. I will not code for the Caliphate

P. Lee
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Coat

> Isis please.

Does anyone else automatically think, "... Horus, Sirius" when hearing this?

Hmm, too much Stargate, methinks. I'll bet Daniel could fix the situation...

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Wall Street's internet darlings require an endless supply of idiots

P. Lee
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Re: Ho-hum - Brillian!

> It's the best argument in favor of slavery I've ever heard

Say what? I think you may have the wrong end of the stick.

Do I get paid for washing the dishes at home? No. I could employ people to do it for me, but I do it myself and no-one pays me.

Someone spends time and effort developing yet another torch app for mobile phones. Will they be compensated for their time and effort? Probably not. If we insist that they are, how would that work? How would we stop people expending effort on things nobody wants? Normally, by not compensating them.

Look at the tortuous lengths that are gone to make sure something that is not inherently scarce, such as a digitised song or film, is kept scarce. There is plenty of media (and indeed physical product) which only sells because it is shoved into people's faces. I'm thinking x-factor here. The "productivity" is not raw materials (singers & songs) it is the marketing plan to monetise them. If fact, it isn't much of a plan as far as I can see. Flood advertising to exclude competitors and a glitzy appeal to vanity and "anyone can be a millionaire" mentality.

Having said that, I do find kickstarter a bit use & abuse. I'd be happy to support for a share in the company, but I'm not doing it to get early access to the beta software and blue peter badge.

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Microsoft, Google link arms on browser vid chat

P. Lee
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Re: Pointless until WebRTC fixes it's privacy/security invasive issue.

IP addresses aren't secret and NAT is a kludge to fix address-space/routing failures, not a security device.

If you open end-to-end connections, your vulnerable. If you don't want that, use a proxy. It's the application level which is nearly always attacked. NAT is rarely going to save you because to communicate, you have to tunnel through it.

Roll on IPv6 maturity when we can replace a culture of obfuscation with proper security.

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Is it an iPad? Is it a MacBook Air? No, it's a Surface Pro 3

P. Lee
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Re: @Arnaut the less RE"......... but for the mass market it just costs far too much....."

> this device is deliberately aimed squarely at the enterprise sector

in which case it should have a non-glossy, probably 13" screen. You could get away with a couple of Dell 24"+ screens at work, but I think 13" is the minimum for any serious screen time with mouse and keyboard.

The use-case is a work laptop which gives you a freebie tablet when you're at home. Which would be fine except for the price - you want how much for an i3? Anyone with the clout to make that choice will already have a tablet from another vendor.

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Hello, police, El Reg here. Are we a bunch of terrorists now?

P. Lee
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Re: Collective Delusion.

> Atheism is a religion in the same way that off is a TV Channel, Bald is a hair colour and not collecting stamps is a hobby.

"Worship" ("Worthy-ship") had the orginal meaning of "to kiss towards" - to what or whom do you give your ultimate allegience. It isn't about chanting or happy-clappy marlarky. Think more a vassel giving their service/allegience to a feudal lord. Everything they do is then in the service of their master. What do you put first in your life?

The question posed by religion is, "who do you worship?" or "to what do you give your highest allegience." Atheists are usually humanists, so they normally "worship" humanity (themselves or the collective) in that they put humanity or a human (normally themselves) first. Some atheists are animal-rights activists put non-humans first. Some might think that the stars are the key to life and so give the most credence to an astrologer who can let them know what is going on and what they should do.

When picking something/one to give your allegience to, I'd ask, "what are the values shown, expected and resulting?" and "what is your documented track-record and plan for dealing with the big problems I face?"

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P. Lee
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Holmes

> What is the betting shouting "Allah won't like you doing that" at someone in the street "may constitute an offence under Terrorism legislation" in the UK?

Isn't that the point of the legislation? Make everything illegal and then you can just prosecute those who aren't your friends.

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Netflix swallows yet another bitter pill, inks peering deal with TWC

P. Lee
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Re: Genuine question (and maybe that's not the point of the article).

Isn't the point that there is wrong on both sides?

Netflix is pushing out Tbits to servers (rather than cacheing properly) on the ISP networks each day and the ISP's are upping the peering charges for netflix in order to prevent competition with their own offerings.

It's easy to fix, have a single published peering-connection rate card for all peers, rather than allowing individual negotiations. Go on FCC, make it so!

That would stop the protectionism and push netflix into some decent caching.

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Video of US journalist 'beheading' pulled from social media

P. Lee
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Re: Western morality

> enjoying the land and resources it stole from the original inhabitants 66 years ago

Here's a question: how far back do you go? 66 years? That certainly doesn't take you back to the "original inhabitants." 2000 years? 3500 years? Should we still be fighting the Germans because the Angles and the Saxons stole land from the true Britons? Do we hunt down a long lost relative of the Czar and put him back on the Russian throne? The people fighting are not the ones who either lost or won a fight 66 years ago.

At some point you have to admit what the status quo is. Then you have to decide whether your morality allows or demands that you kill people to change the status quo. As long as there are people happy to kill others for gain there will be no peace. That was the case with the Bablylonian seige of Jerusalem (597BC) and it was the case with the invasion of Iraq by the US.

Without wishing to be too judgemental, I'm not sure what the Palestinians are fighting for. Their best case scenario is that all the Jews leave. Whereupon they would take control of scorched earth and the US is certainly not going to continue to pour money in where there is no Jewish interest. All that wealth will just leave and they will be left with just more of what they already have in Gaza. I suspect the temple of the dome would be blown sky-high as a parting gift, maybe even nuked, to become lethal to anyone who wants to take possession. Quite frankly, winning is never going to happen for them. History shows the Palestinians fighting and losing. At some point, you really need to consider walking away. When my grandfather died, the government took 97% of the land he owned. I'm certainly not going to kill or risk being killed to get it back.

There comes a point when you can't put wrongs right because there is no-one left in the right. It does no good to harp on about past wrongs, because they will never be fixed. You can either forgive and move on or you can continue to kill and be killed. In moving on, the worst case is that Palestinians accept the Israeli ethnic cleansing as reality and move as refugees elsewhere. Of course that doesn't make Israel's actions right but it does give those who do it the chance to start fresh and perhaps they or their children will prosper. No-one prospers living in a war zone, so the question is how much longer their pride will prevent them from taking the kick in the teeth that they've been dealt, turning away from the fight and progressing elsewhere.

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Need a green traffic light all the way home? Easy with insecure street signals, say researchers

P. Lee
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Re: Given that this could cause crashes

There's no reason for this to cause crashes. Test it out at 3am and make sure the other signals turn to red.

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Gigantic toothless 'DRAGONS' dominated Earth's early skies

P. Lee
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Paris Hilton

Re: ROC

>There was a very large NZ bird (contemporary to humans) that may be the origin of the Arabian Roc myths.

The Kiwi? Now that's a bit of a stretch!

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Apple takes blade to 13-inch MacBook Pro with Retina display

P. Lee
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Re: £999

> Serious question - Can you install/run it without the GUI ?

I believe the OS is open source and can be freely downloaded without the GUI (which is not).

But my memory may be playing tricks on me.

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Call of Duty daddy considers launching own movie studio

P. Lee
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Re: GAME?

I quite enjoyed the early CoD games, which I got for a song on Steam - $9.99 for the first 4 games I think.

MW2 was disappointing, Black Ops was simply not fun (and I bought it not in a steam sale) and I'm never getting another game from that franchise.

I'm going through Far Cry (1) and that's so much more fun. You at least get the feeling that there isn't just one way to win. Val doesn't take over and do all the work for you (unlike the AI in BlOps - see MrBungle on youtube) and you can at least pick your own path through or around the battlefields. There's still quite a bit of insta-death but eventually you learn to pick a different strategy. That's strategy, not just route.

I can't imagine ever wanting to see a CoD film though. The games have mostly collapsed into multiplayer slugfests with humour and interest provided other opponants, not the game.

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