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* Posts by P. Lee

2205 posts • joined 4 Dec 2007

Audio fans, prepare yourself for the Second Coming ... of Blu-ray

P. Lee
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Trollface

Re: Cuing the obligatory audiophile discussion regarding sample rates...

Also, below audible frequencies there is a spectrum where you can feel the sound.

At least, I can when a Subaru with gold wheels pulls up next to me.

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P. Lee
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Re: A good whine

The real reason for hi-res sources is so you can re-rip it when better tech comes along without compounding lossiness.

It's why I tend to rip my DVD's to iso format rather than straight to mp4.

However, I do agree that content is king and a bad film can't be saved by good media formats and a good film will probably still be good after cropping and compressing.

Thus saith TPB.

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Italy has a clumsy new pirate-choker law. But can anyone do better?

P. Lee
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Re: I'll just leave this here...

> http://theoatmeal.com/comics/game_of_thrones

Ha! A true classic. Although it somewhat misses the point. Shakespear's plays had some inherent meaning and point - you go to see a play for the play's content. The theatre understands this an allows a one-off purchase.

GoT is a advertising for HBO's cable. The whole point is to drive you to a cable subscription which you would not otherwise have. HBO knows you don't want a cable subscription so it tries to find something you do want and then makes you buy lots of extra stuff to get it.

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P. Lee
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Re: It's about time

>>even though it's illegal, then it should surely be legalised...

>Which would mean the end of speed limits and drink driving laws

Not quite. There's a bit of a difference between a commercial difference of opinion and engaging in life-threatening behaviour.

In the UK we have a reasonably good workaround for vehicular speed control. It is against the law but we make sure nobody looks too closely. I mean, we could just mandate that all phones carry an app which uses GPS to monitor speed and location to make offenders self-reporting.

The reason we don't do it is that there are other more important issues at stake than speeding, which isn't inherently wrong.

Likewise with copyright. If you build your business around an activity which is inherently unprofitable and "the people" are gracious enough to extend you some additional legal protection, you should be grateful for what you're given. I'm pretty sure no-one goes into performance art without realising infringement is a cost of business.

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So you invent a wireless network using LEDs, what do you do next? Add solar panels. Boom

P. Lee
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Re: Erm...

> Or you could, you know, use a LAN cable...

Yes, that would give you full duplex too. However, think about an enclosed space without precise electrical contacts - e.g. put a phone on a charging cradle and a little LED in the cradle talks to the phone - no breakable USB cable connection (or RJ45 clip / optical connector) required, no interference from the wireless charging device.

Or my favourite idea - magsafe-type network connectors. No need for precision laser fibre connections, just an LED and a receiver in a reasonable dark little box.

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It may be ILLEGAL to run Heartbleed health checks – IT lawyer

P. Lee
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Re: Thats the problem

> With laws

In England, the set up is that everything not forbidden is allowed, though I understand its often the other way around in foreign parts.

Actually the UK is getting much worse with overly broad laws apparently specifically designed to ensure that everyone breaks the law and then the powers that be can just pick and chose whom to prosecute.

I guess it goes back to "is it a feature or a bug?" It looks like a deliberate breach of privacy policy to me! ;)

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Dropbox defends fantastically badly timed Condoleezza Rice appointment

P. Lee
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Re: Damned if you do..

> Who knows, she may actually KNOW something about security!

Awww! How quaint!

Appointed for her security expertise and absolutely not because she has friends in high places and know who needs in government and industry needs to be given a free lunch.

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Microsoft: We've got HUNDREDS of patents on Android tech

P. Lee
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Linux

Of course its true!

"That's why we've disclosed all the relevant patents and have pursued the cash-rich inventor of Android and massive competitor, Google, rather than "attacking" our own channel partners and coming to agreements under NDA."

Oddly the other MS' competitors over which MS has no hold (Apple) also doesn't seem to infringe either.

Hmm, nice Windows licensing deal you've got there. It would be a shame if something happened to it...

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Mad Raspberry Pi boffins ripped out its BRAINS and SHRANK them for your pleasure

P. Lee
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Re: An old dog

> A HUGE number of projects & designs do not need even as powerful as the Pi,

Indeed, but I think that's the point of the original poster. It looks as though this design is to increase chip density. RPi's are useful for the places you can put them, not compute density. If you need compute density, this isn't the chip you are looking for.

OTOH, it might just be about repackaging to provide better IO or the start of a standard ARM CPU interface (I jest :) ). Here's Pi v2. When Pi v3 comes out, swap the DIMM or pop an octo-core +GPU on a DIMM and insert.

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In Australia, protesting against Brendan Eich will be a CRIME

P. Lee
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Background

Something missing in the piece is the current issues around extreme union corruption and secondary action currently going on in Oz. Somewhat akin to the "flying pickets" we saw in the UK in the 1980's.

I have to also disagree with the idea that the idea that , "It was about whether his actions were consistent with the Mozilla community's values – and whether the community had a right to tell Mozilla what it thought." It was OKCupid creating publicity for itself.

Personally I find seeking financial gain from destroying someone's employment to be an unpleasant business strategy. If Eich had tried to get Moz dev's into include, "Oppose Gay Marriage" in the Firefox title bar there might have been some grounds for the campaign, but that wasn't the case. There was no indication that his personal beliefs on gay marriage entered into the Mozilla project.

Putting OKCupid's financial incentives aside, the legal situation is "on the other foot" at the moment. Institutions are not allowed, by law, to exclude those who don't conform to their organisational values when making employment decisions, even when those values are the reason the organisation exists. Personal beliefs cannot be considered when determining employment suitability. Surely the point of such protest is to get Mozilla not to hire such people to start with. In which case we need to overturn the legal prohibition on personal beliefs being grounds for (employment) discrimination.

Do we want personal beliefs to become a valid basis for determining employment? "Are you an atheist? I'm sorry, I don't want your kind in my school."

Why would you allow a financially damaging protest if you aren't going to allow companies to do anything about it? Do you secretly want personal beliefs to be relevant to employment status but only when you think it will result in decisions you like? That isn't freedom. That's just being sneaky in using the law to enforce your morality. If you really believe that, just campaign for a law which makes a declaration that you support gay marriage a condition of employment. That is the logical conclusion and the ultimate goal isn't it?

I'm all for protest, but you also have to allow people with differing views to co-exist. If "winning" means all the people with opposing views keep them quiet for fear of losing their jobs, you haven't won, you've just censored. Harmony is mostly an illusion, people do have differing views and you may as well let them speak without fear of reprisal. In the West, we used to think that was of some value.

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Tamil Nadu's XP migration plan: Go Linux like a BOSS

P. Lee
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Re: Because they didn't believe in it

> f you have FOSS you can just continue to support it yourself, and you automatically pool your efforts with everybody else still using that software.

That rather assumes that your replacement software is FOSS too, not just proprietary on top of FOSS.

If you can't recompile, you'll run into the same issues as XP end of support.

I find it so inconvenient whenever I hit proprietary licenses - it pushes IT into all sorts of contortions to try to minimise costs. I've a project to run a couple of internet-facing sFTP Servers in an MS shop. Haha!, you want how much for a server OS and how much for patch management? Its really low throughput but we need dedicated HA through-out, so double the ftp servers, double the AD servers for authentication, network management servers. It's all for a function which could run a couple of atoms in terms of throughput. It's just madness!

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Intel's DIY MinnowBoard goes Max: More oomph for half the price

P. Lee
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Re: Cheap NAS controller?

No, NAS without drives aren't at all cheap - at least probably not cheap enough to make a big impact on the home market.

I might be more interested if there were 8 sata ports on there. Call me a luddite, but SATA 1 would be fine, still faster than any of my spinning disks. Dual Gig Ethernet too please.

Still no temptation to shut down the core2 in the garage.

I predict some more fail. Still not cheap enough for a throw-away device and not enough features for a server. I suspect the same problem as MS with RT vs FullFatWindows: they don't want to cannibalise their market.

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How Microsoft can keep Win XP alive – and WHY: A real-world example

P. Lee
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Re: Mr. Trevor Pott's analysis is correct

> they want world domination.

Too true. I doubt the issue is profitability of XP and associated support programmes. I suspect the real issue is ecosystem upgrade. You need W7 for Outlook 2013 which needs Windows Server X which means Lync needs an upgrade and sharepoint. If XP doesn't need upgrading, none of the rest happens either.

As far as W8 goes, it was an attempt to ram the windows mobile interface into the marketplace by leveraging the desktop. The XP drop dead date is there to force upgrades to the new interface in the hope they will pick up new mobile market-share as people get used to it.

Then there is the problem of mono-culture - from MS' point of view, the lack of it. XP and W8 aren't all compatible (despite "compatibility mode") MS doesn't want dev's to have to code for multiple Windows platforms nor do they want new features OS features to be ignored as dev's seek to provide a common experience across all platforms. Even worse would be devs deciding that something like QT provides a better way to do apps which cross Windows (and other OS) platforms than native apps. With OSX, IOS and Android eating away at consumer GUI mindshare, MS has problems in almost every direction.

Then there is the obvious - why just get paid for maintenance when you can slap a new GUI on and call it a new OS?

The W8 thing must really hurt. A failed mp3 player is one thing, but an OS that no-one wants is a shock to their core business.

None of this is to say that MS is dying, but they do have a lot to lose and as PC's continue to be replaced by more appropriate mobile form factors, MS knows it has to do something to break out of the traditional business desktop, and they need to do it quickly before ARM chips move up-market into PC-class devices.

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Sticky Tahr-fy pudding: Ubuntu 14.04 slickest Linux desktop ever

P. Lee
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Re: Head to head

Nice. But legal?

Any dlls brought across from a windows installation?

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No Notch niche: Minecraft man in rift with Oculus after Facebook gobble

P. Lee
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Re: EOF

I humbly propose anti-social, with "anti" in the earlier Greek meaning: in front of, in the place of, in opposition to, real-life social activity.

So if you use skype to reach those on the other side of the world, that's social. If you use skype to IM your spouse in the next room because you're too lazy to go and see them, that's anti-social.

I may have the wrong meaning there, but this is the internet - someone will correct me.

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As WinXP death looms, Microsoft releases its operating system SOURCE CODE for free

P. Lee
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Trollface

> Microsoft is not interested in having the community taking care of XP, and thereby competing with Win8.

More to the point, it is XP in different suit.

Ok, in a hipster beret, daggy shorts and a flat sheet for a shirt.

Ooh? What is this? NT 3.51?

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P. Lee
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Re: Are you insane?

> So the same as MS-DOS 1.1 then.

Yes. But without the joke.

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P. Lee
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re: WordPerfect? Or if you really better than Word (regardless of o/s), View?

How much would you give to be able to run an enterprise's productivity software on a single server?

Framework III anyone?

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Windows 8 BREAKS ITSELF after system restores

P. Lee
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Windows

Similar problem with W7?

My Win7 install managed to fail to install an update way back in the mists of time and to this day, every time it shuts down, it is haunted by its failure and tries to re-install the update.

Sadly, its too far in the past to revert to the patch just before the one that failed.

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They want me to install CCTV to see what YOU did in the TOILET

P. Lee
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Re: RE: Only temporarily.

Can we use those laser pointers that pilots go on about?

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P. Lee
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FAIL

Re: Better use for CCTV at work

Surely with the internet of everything, you just make the coffee machine a 4square check-in point which feeds off BT4 ultra-low power signals and/or NFC proximity signals to work out who put the pot back empty and then adds it to a twitter feed and updates its facebook status which is fed back into the abomination which is outlook-social media integration, to let the whole office know who didn't refill the water tank.

People wonder why the PC market is dying...

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TV sales PLUMMET. But no one's prepared to say what we all know

P. Lee
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Re: <stuff about inbuilt obsolescence>

I just bumble around in the dark.

Rather like my office job.

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Bruce Schneier sneers at IBM's NSA denials

P. Lee
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Re: I'm going to repeat my comment from elsewhere..

My understanding is that US law applies to all US people and companies where-ever they are located in the world.

Plus, the NSA can do what it likes overseas.

Of course, it turns out they all do what they like anyway.

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GSMA: EU net neutrality reforms are the enemy of business

P. Lee
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Mushroom

Not being able to make things worse hinders innovation and stifles business.

Then I think we all know what you can do with your business plans.

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AT&T and Netflix get into very public spat over net neutrality

P. Lee
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Re: Net Neutrality

> the arguments that stand on solid foundations need to be put forwards explicitly

He who pays the piper calls the tune. ISP's obtaining funding from places other than their current customers will slant policy towards those who pay lots. If Netflix pays... then the smaller video providers can't afford to compete.

Finally the network is funded and controlled by Big Players with QoS used to throttle all the competition. The users with their discounted fees and paltry contributions become irrelevant to the industry. Everything descends into a maelstrom of advertising and high-fees.

Remember that the costs passed onto Netflix by the ISP will just get fed back to the users in the form of higher Netflix fees. All that you have achieved is ceding control of the internet to the big players instead of charging users more directly.

Only the middle-men want this kind of deal. Netflix doesn't want to raise prices to cover the extra fees - possibly becoming uncompetitive. Users don't really want network performance manipulated by backroom deals - e.g. AT&T Mobile pumping in funds to de-prioritise skype so people give up on VoIP. Only AT&T like this model because they have nothing to lose from providing a rubbish service to users and don't care whether it is Netflix or Netflix's competition who pays them.

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'Arrogant' Snowden putting lives at risk, says NSA's deputy spyboss

P. Lee
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Re: NSA Deputy Director Richard Ledgett: Go To Jail. Go Directly To Jail…

Disband the USA.

Start again, legally and properly.

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New WebCL toolkit hooks browser apps into GPUs – and that's not good news for Apple

P. Lee
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Re: Silly headline

or a browser cache?

I suspect it's all moot anyway, the main benefit of the appstore is an easy way to pay without giving CC details to dubious devs.

It might push more business paypal's way if people opt out of stores taking 30% What I suspect you'll get is more free versions in the appstore with the premium version paid externally. Google might push this, as they have less of an interest in purchases and more interest in web-pages / high usage numbers.

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Intel reinvents the PC as giant 'Black Brook' fondleslab

P. Lee
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Re: All-in-ones are not for the desktop power user.

Also, AIO's are good for families where parents want to keep track of what the kids are doing on the computer.

The main advantage of AIO's is that they are essentially big-screen laptops and thus almost silent, which is nice.

Power isn't an issue in these scenarios, though I suspect it won't be long before we discover its ok to use an ARM chip for most of the time, rather than intel.

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P. Lee
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Trollface

Re: Water damage in 3,2,1

Well earlier, someone said it was potable...

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MPs urge UK.gov to use 1950s obscenity law to stifle online stiffies

P. Lee
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Re: The politicos said that grumble flick websites should require a credit card

Are you seriously suggesting that the smut industry may be less than reputable?

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P. Lee
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Re: In other news,

Are you suggesting that the wide-spread availability of the pill from the mid-1970's increased teen pregnancy and we're only now getting it back under control? ;)

I guess the social isolation induced by wearing headphones and using facebook is finally paying off!

In other news, only 185,122 abortions in 2012. That still seems like quite a lot to me.

https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/211790/2012_Abortion_Statistics.pdf

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French novel falls foul of Apple's breast inspectors

P. Lee
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Re: Why do people fuss about Muslims?

I wasn't suggesting that Apple was right to do what they did, merely pointing out that its a commercial decision - pretty much the same one Disney makes when it doesn't have topless women walking around with Mickey and Goofy.

While there certainly is a difference between nudity and porn, it is a relatively difficult one to police. There is a certain amount of subjectivity involved. It is far easier to say, "no nudity on display." It is a clear rule everyone understands and is easy (& therefore cheap) to enforce.

It isn't that a half naked woman is immoral. It is that a half naked woman on a cover (indeed on the internet) usually represents or is promoting immorality.

We don't live in a world of theory and idealism. What percentage of nudity on covers do you think is of the NatGeo type vs porn? It is a generalisation, a rule of thumb which holds true in the majority of cases (I suspect including this one) that nudity of covers is designed to trigger a sexual response. Apple know that a lot of their customers don't like that. That doesn't necessarily make the customers bigoted, it might just mean that they dislike advertisers (the cover advertises the book) trying to manipulate them into purchasing using sex. Some people like to keep sex as something special to share only with the person they love. Perhaps they think having advertisers trying to muscle in on their sex life is not something they want from their tablet, or that even just attempting to use sex to manipulate them into buying things is distasteful enough to warrant rejection of the device. Perhaps it is just a question of trust - if Apple don't demonstrate similar attitudes to decorum (ironically, all that is required is a veneer of restraint) as their clientele, they are less likely to be welcomed into their clientele's homes.

As far as childhood innocence goes, I agree that most very small children don't think of nudity as bad. On the other hand, just because children don't see anything wrong, doesn't mean its ok. I don't let my 11-year old walk the city streets naked. Nothing wrong with the human body? True, but that is deliberately misleading. Not everything is appropriate in every situation.

I found my aforementioned 11y.o. daughter (and her 9 year old sister) listening to Pitbull's "Timber" on youtube. She couldn't really make out the words (and hadn't really tried - she just liked the catchy tune). Damaged for life? Of course not. Utterly inappropriate? Most definitely. Even though she doesn't understand the meaning, I wanted it very clear that I disapprove and it isn't allowed. The reason it is banned is not that sex is bad, but because I don't want her to assimilate by repetitive listening, the rapper's attitude to sex. I want her to expect men to be respectful towards women and to be shocked and shun them if they aren't. That will be good for her. The catchy tune and thumping beat tends to switch off critical faculties and that is unacceptable, especially in a child with so much to learn.

Common-place nudity blurs the line between what is acceptable and what is not. In the NatGeo situation, what you aren't told is that often, while going topless is ok, something else (e.g. bare legs) is considered sexually provocative and is absolutely forbidden in those societies. That's not the particular culture I'm in though, so I don't worry about it.

There's nothing wrong with nudity per se, but neither is there anything wrong with defecating per se. Still, I don't want to see adults doing it on the pavement and neither do I want images of it pumped into my tablet where my kids are looking for Enid Blyton books.

I know in IT we strive for consistency, but I am still surprised that so many people fail to notice that life is extremely messy and edge-cases and exceptions abound. Attire for the beach is not right for a royal visit, but then again it might be if there is a volleyball involved and an Olympic committee-blessed judge.

There was a time when we mocked the Americans for their, "in order to liberate the village, we had to destroy it" attitude. Now it seems we have replaced liberal tolerance with militant permissiveness. The issue is not the content of our belief systems, but the viciousness with which we attempt to stamp out opposing viewpoints. We seem to be moving closer to Muslim regimes in trying to enforce everything we think is good and prohibit everything we think is bad. That might be logical with a religion (of the supernatural or political kind) where you are "saved" by how you behave, but not even Christians (should) think that, only with those concerned with controlling the behaviour of others.

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P. Lee
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Re: Why do people fuss about Muslims?

>the thought processes are the same and it's that we need to worry about.

Rubbish. There's no moral judgement here. We are talking about one of companies at the forefront of the push to redefine marriage to include homosexual relationships. Jobs was no Protestant and I can't see anything particularly Christian about Apple.

What we are seeing is a commercial decision by a company to not annoy a large number of its customers. This is about keeping the image of the ibookstore (and thus iphone/tablet) a child-safe place. We don't put pictures of naked women in children's bookstores and if little Johnny asks mommy why the naked lady has no legs, little Johnny isn't going to see the ipad again. That isn't what Apple wants.

As for raging against those whose decisions don't conform to your own morality as "bigots", I'll leave the reading of the irony-scale as an exercise for the reader.

Live and let live indeed. Stop trying to make me run my business to suit your moral philosophy.

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USB cuts the cord, again, with WiGig-derived wireless spec

P. Lee
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Coat

802.11ac anyone?

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WebEx gets shiny Chromebook look

P. Lee
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Chromebook-specific or linux in general?

It's slightly annoying to have to use skype to dial-in to webex. It isn't allowed through so many firewalls.

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WTF is … the multiverse?

P. Lee
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Trollface

Pesky second law of thermodynamics...

There it goes again, spoiling all our theories!

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Morrisons supermarket hit by MASSIVE staff payroll data robbery

P. Lee
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Re: Data Security??

> Most data stores are not improved by hashing or obfuscating them.

I know PCI-DSS is hard and expensive, but that doesn't mean you can't learn from how we deal with it. Tokenise the data and only get it out of the vault when you absolutely have to. In the meantime, encrypt in transit and encrypt at rest, so even the IT bods with a debugger and a copy of the data store can't see more than what is currently being processed.

A supermarket *can* afford that.

... and finally, surely this was infringement, not theft...

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Not sure if you're STILL running Windows XP? AmIRunningXP.com to the rescue!

P. Lee
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Happy

Re: Outdated?

Am I the only one to find the inclusion of a W8 laptop in the graphic of outdated items funny?

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Mozilla takes Windows 8-friendly Firefox out back ... two shots heard

P. Lee
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Windows

re :Mozilla takes Windows 8-friendly Firefox out back ... two shots heard

You are mistaken. Those weren't shots you heard, it was a hammer on nails. T.O.D. was much earlier.

Good idea to bring the garlic though.

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Behold, the TITCHY T-REX that prowled the warm Arctic of long ago

P. Lee
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Re: And this is filed under Security?

Depends if it suffers from the same, "if you fall over, you die" issue big brother had.

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Google's Drive SLASH, secret 'big upgrade': Coincidence? HARDLY

P. Lee
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I don't understand!

IPSEC is not hard. Why restrict yourself?

I had an IMAP server pointing at my home directory instead of just my email directory - everything over email, for free.

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Web inventor Berners-Lee: I so did NOT see this cat vid thing coming

P. Lee
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Re: aaron c

It was all going so well.

Then someone invented facebook and the gods of the internet took ill.

Then someone invented twitter and they realised that humanity could not be helped with technology.

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'Amazon has destroyed the unicorn factory' ... How clouds are making sysadmins extinct

P. Lee
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Re: Sysadmins - the new buggy whip manufacturers

I'm not sure the analogy holds. Clouds still use buggy-whips, its just someone-else wielding them.

The point of the article was that the skills required to build the infrastructure are being sucked up by big tech and no-one outside that area is bothering to learn.

It's kind of like introducing Windows into the DC. Sure, it might be a good point-solution, but people will end up assuming email requires some very complicated and expensive software with relational databases and proprietary protocols.

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Academic blames US for tech titans' tax dodge

P. Lee
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Re: Oz still doesn't get any money

The case could be made that Apple USA is also just an importer.

This is just international trade. Perhaps it is the *reason* for much international trade.

Typically, the scheme only postpones taxes until shareholders demand dividends, but it is unfair to smaller tech developers without expensive accountants, who can't re-invest in development abroad in a tax free manner.

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Microsoft chairman John Thompson: Redmond looks 'like IBM in 1990'

P. Lee
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Re: Competition

I pick floss for hassle-free licensing and managability. The os cost isn't that large an issue. The cost of their whole ecosystem is high, however.

Their mice however are now rubbish compared to their old versions.

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Apple 'hid AUD$9 BILLION' from Australia alone: Report

P. Lee
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A rate of 40% on inactive corporate funds...

No, it would do nothing.

Apple Australia don't make anything. If I import stuff and sell with a low markup, most of the profit on the item isn't made by me, its made by the person in the country I bought it from. If I start buying Samsung phones in Korea and ship them to Oz for sale, that ATO doesn't get a bite at the profits of Samsung Kr. All it gets is a slice of my AU-based organisation profit.

Selling Apple kit in Australia isn't that profitable. Making Apple kit is profitable, but that isn't done here.

How would Australia like it if the US wanted to tax Australian firms because it thought it wasn't getting enough ta out of things from Australia sold in the US?

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Windows XP market share GROWS AGAIN, outstrips Win 8.1 surge

P. Lee
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Re: That has got to be embarrassing for Microsoft

Is even W8 a new OS? A new product, certainly, but how much of the kernel is new code?

Is it just a new GUI slapped on top of the old product with a new price tag attached?

Did anyone actually ask for something new?

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Telstra 'snot boxes' challenge Turnbull's FTTN plan

P. Lee
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5Mb/s?

That's my normal speed in the Melbourne's Eastern suburbs and that's after Telstra rewired from my socket out to the road.

Rain knocks me offline completely, as do high-temperatures.

Rain, shine - there's always an excuse.

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Hey doc, what's the PC's prognosis? A. Long-term growth below zero

P. Lee
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You don't know what you've got 'til its gone

Where do you think all those torrented films are located?

All those music tracks - you aren't going to stream them all from the net to your phone - you need something to sync with.

Photo's go from phone to fb - true, but mostly the unimportant ones. A lot of them go from iphone to... iphoto. Certainly anyone with any sense isn't using fb as a hard disk for their wedding photos.

The PC will stay, but it may will hide as a server or an AIO which doesn't appear to be used that much.

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Google, eBay to Australian gov: 'protect us from our users'

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Re: The Irony

I think you'll find they are paying the legitimate amount of tax. Otherwise, the ATO be having more than a few words with them.

Though I do agree, a little government funding to push FLOSS personal clouds along wouldn't go amiss and there is a case to be made that if you put your name on goods and services (including auctions) then you should be liable to some extent.

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