Feeds

* Posts by P. Lee

2576 posts • joined 4 Dec 2007

Is your cloud server in the same bit barn as your DR site?

P. Lee
Silver badge
Coat

> Steve Martin, Redmond's GM for Azure...

Well that explains a lot!

0
0

Massachusetts shoots down car dealers' Tesla-busting sueball

P. Lee
Silver badge

The question is...

Why are manufacturers not allowed to sell direct?

0
0

Netscape plugins about to stop working in Chrome for Mac

P. Lee
Silver badge

OS cost isn't an issue, but there are plenty of white iMacs with core (1) CPUs out there - 32bit only - running snow leopard.

Mac users tend to be split between must-upgrade fan boys and if-it-works-keep-it people.

The downside of a hw vendor giving a free os is that they will use it to try to get you to upgrade your hw.

0
1

Microsoft's rumoured $2.5bn Minecraft gobble expected on Monday

P. Lee
Silver badge

"We're retiring the software on your computer"

How does that happen?

Anyone else find it amusing that only skype on windows has adverts and having adverts massively increases the latency when you switch to it? They don't even re-use the last advert and load the new one in the background.

Interstingly, skype on my hp touchpad still works well...

0
0

Drag queens: Oh, don't be so bitchy, Facebook! Let us use our stage names

P. Lee
Silver badge
Facepalm

Re: Yay, the Sisters!

Well, would you buy Cisco switches with dodgy serial numbers? Why should fb be any different?

Although I have to ask, if you want to be known as Sister Act, why wouldn't you change your name to that? If you want "Sister Act" to be an alias for you... set it as your alias.

Or don't use facebook, or lie. I think I set up an fb account years ago, with a false name, a photo I grabbed off the internet and I never posted once. Oddly, I did get friend requests...

2
12

Slough isn't fit for humans now, says Amazon. We're going to Shoreditch

P. Lee
Silver badge

Re: SLOUGH - if despond - easily the worst place in Buckinghamshire ... or anywhere?

>Having worked in both Bracknell and Slough, Slough is 100 times worse and I can't stand Bracknell

No stench of mars in Bracknell AND there is more than one way out.

0
0
P. Lee
Silver badge

Re: Slough

>I am somewhat older and think of the Slough of Despond

Almost 400 years older? :-O

1
0

HP: We will eradicate the colour grey from our market

P. Lee
Silver badge

Re: They want it both ways on globalization

Meh, conflation. Employees defrauding HP by doing an extra production run is HP's problem. Grey = importing when HP doesn't like it. It isn't illegal but it is due to attempted monopoly practises.

Any legal sueballs are HP's contract problems within the channel.

0
0

Oh noes, fanbois! iPhone 6 Plus shipments 'DELAYED' in the UK

P. Lee
Silver badge

Re: Nintendo Wii mania

>The problem is, no-one has any hard facts to prove or disprove this theory

True. Once or twice looks real. Every time looks like poor logistics planning, or a stunt.

1
2

Starship Troopers beat Aliens, Robots AND Chuck Norris to WIN in a FIGHT

P. Lee
Silver badge

Re: Daleks

>Leaving aside their utter inability to cope with stairs,

Solved, turns out advanced war machines can fly/hover.

>they're continually thwarted by some bloke with a screwdriver and a phone box. Nowhere near hard enough for #8.

True, but only by the one bloke+gal and only for one day. Most of the time, they get by obliterating everything in their path.

1
0

Not pro Bono: Apple's audio junk mail made spammers' lives easier

P. Lee
Silver badge

Re: They won't let me have it.

Is that dependent on having something later than snow leopard? As soon as I see a request for credit card details when I'm not in the middle of buying something, I hit cancel.

I'd look again, but then I'd have to care.

5
0

This flashlight app requires: Your contacts list, identity, access to your camera...

P. Lee
Silver badge
Alien

> Apps are becoming central to our lives

Not mine. I must be a sad grumpy bloke to shun the wonders of modern technology.

Email, maps, browser, music/podcast, ebook reader, LTE modem, bit of storage so I don't need a usb key.

Job done.

8
1

It's a pain in the ASCII, so what can be done to make patching easier?

P. Lee
Silver badge

Re: Patching Servers

Linux patches are a little more descriptive too. Windows ones always seem to say, "this fixes problems, please jump through four more hoops and then I'll tell you what it really does."

/pet peeve

2
0

Holy sentient blender, Batman: Telefónica to trial AT&T's Internet of Home Stuff in Europe

P. Lee
Silver badge

> International [licensing] we think is one of the largest revenue opportunities

I doubt it. There needs to be lots of devices in the IoT and licensing costs/tracking kills that goose. There's no cost-saving driver and it introduces complexity where there was none. It will be a difficult thing to promote.

4
0

Thought that last dinosaur was BIG? This one's bloody ENORMOUS

P. Lee
Silver badge
Coat

Behold, Rukwatitan Bisepultus

The Odo of the dinosaur world!

0
0

NHS grows a NoSQL backbone and rips out its Oracle Spine

P. Lee
Silver badge

Re: The numbers don't add up

I'm not that bright, but would it make sense to have a local (VM?) server at each GP office and replicate back to the centre?

It would ease the performance requirements and reduce reliance on network infrastructure.

0
1

Apple's SNEAKY plan: COPY ANDROID. Hello iPhone 6, Watch

P. Lee
Silver badge
Facepalm

Re: Eh?

More likely:

1. While walking road along looking down at phone keyboard for updating twitface, look a few inches up and see the time at the top of the screen.

See, its easier!

2
4

What the BLOCK? Microsoft to gobble Minecraft-maker 'for $2bn'

P. Lee
Silver badge
Facepalm

Cue increase in Office365 subscription costs

... and little messages in Outlook inviting you to play Minecraft with others who also play it.

2bn outlay for 114m profit? 5% ROI on a game which isn't that new? Gratz to the founders!

5
1

Snowden shouldn't be extradited to US if he testifies about NSA spying, says Swiss gov

P. Lee
Silver badge
Coat

Re: It's a long way

>>Canada would not win a rerun of the 1812-14 war."

>sharpens knives

>Try us, bub.

But Americans are so cute, just like baby sea... ah, yes, I see your point.

5
0

Everyone taking part in Patch Tuesday step forward. NOT SO FAST, Adobe!

P. Lee
Silver badge

Re: How is it possible for Adobe's software to be so bad?

>> They patch it several times a month.

>That's *why* it's so bad

Certainly, but let's not overlook the fact that anyone who needs to patch so frequently hasn't put any thinking into the coding.

Personally, I also suspect they do just patch to keep themselves in people's minds. If anyone has a patch regime, the first thing you think of is, "how often do we update adobe?" I just say thank-you to Chrome and FF and don't bother installing at all.

5
0

Fedora gets new partition manager

P. Lee
Silver badge

Re: Is there an option to have more than one partition?

What distro is that?

/tmp normally defaults to swap and at least on suse, it defaults to a separate home partition.

In my experience, /var/log is going to fill things up long before /opt/application does, unless someone thought a small system disk should include apps.

I generally find 50G for apps and logs is plenty. The sneaky one is mysql which doesn't default to storing data under /home/x

1
0
P. Lee
Silver badge

Re: opensuse...?

Suse is my favourite distro, but I seem to think I've run into problems with it not always playing nice with GPT in its partitioning gui - some bits are ok and others just tell you its GPT and give no further information. I don't have anything larger than 2TB though, so I can't confirm, plus my server-side is still running 12.x

0
0
P. Lee
Silver badge

Re: Yeah that's what Linux was missing!

fdisk doesn't do GPT with is the default for both OSX and Windows. It makes sense to have partitioning tools which play nice with other OS's.

It doesn't make sense and it isn't necessary to keep MBR-only tools for linux.

0
0

Rack-mount 24TB RAID 5 disk array for $5,000. Let's just check the label here. Uh, it's TiVo

P. Lee
Silver badge

Re: needs more tuners

Record everything all the time?

Might be nice if you a, er, "community based facility."

Let's calculate, $120/month foxtel x 5 users x 12 months and its more than paid for itself in one year. You'd need to add some fibre links and switches of course.

There are still cheaper ways of doing this though.

0
3

Microsoft's Office Delve wants work to be more like being on Facebook

P. Lee
Silver badge
Coat

I'm sorry I didn't get back to you with that vital information

but your request wasn't trending.

8
0

'Software-defined' IS just a passing fad: HP techie Fink Tank lays down law

P. Lee
Silver badge

> So, hardware company states that software defined things are a passing fad.

Yes actually.

There's always hardware, the question is whether its generic x86/AMD64 hardware or custom asics. HP has the custom ASICs for switching/routing and generic servers as well so it could easily go either way. With everyone wanting to hype the next big thing because they make money from change, it is surprising that HP comes out and says, "actually, its a bit rubbish" because most companies go with the hype regardless of the truth.

SDx is generally going to have pretty poor performance next to custom hardware but we usually see systems developed on generic hardware and then migrating to custom hardware for speed, once the protocols and methods have been locked down. Sadly, that in itself stifles innovation because once the system is hardware defined, it becomes almost impossible to add new things because none of the existing kit can cope. That's why VP8 fails - there are too many phones and tablets which can't do it, so no-one will use it.

0
0

It's official: Vendors are NOT shifting that networked storage

P. Lee
Silver badge

It's not surprising

You can rack up all the disks you want, but those 40G network links are neither cheap nor large enough - that's just 6 SATA3 ports. That's before you add the premium costs for the management features.

0
0

SHIP OF FAIL: How do we right capsized institutions we thought would NEVER go under?

P. Lee
Silver badge

Re: It's the money, stupid!

>Eventually risky practices will be fixed

Now there's a bit of groundless hopefulness!

It won't be fixed because reward is divorced from risk. The best way to get paid a lot as a manager is to hide the problem while sucking the company dry. The company fails and you walk away nicely insulated. Salesmen sell subprime mortgages because their commission doesn't depend on the profitiability of the mortgage. That's madness. People can invest in companies, pull out a dividend and profit while the company is ramping up its liabilities in secret. As long as you sell your shares in time, there is nothing to stop you benefiting from the unethical practises - in fact, there is a driver for you to encourage unethical practises as long as you can get out quickly.

Simply, the risk accrued by the institution does not reside with those controlling it, and hardly with its owners/shareholders either who can ditch and run at a moments notice. No-one is liable. This is why limited-liability companies used to be banned in England at a time when ethics were more important than profit.

As has been noted, debt is seen as a good thing... because it enables faster cash accumulation through investment. Sadly, its almost impossible to stop its abuse and it is a complete millstone. It drives house prices sky-high for example. The economy would be far more solid if everyone had to save and then buy. Slower to grow, certainly, but far slower to fail.

3
0

'Serious flaws in the Vertigan report' says broadband boffin

P. Lee
Silver badge

Re: BS alternatives

My understanding is that today's requirements are not just limited to speed requirements.

There is also a requirement to replace the existing aging copper in many places. So, if we are going to dig it all up, FTTP is a far better replacement. What we don't want is to put in more copper, which basically benefits Telstra by keeping multiple tiers of infrastructure as the norm and provides for market segmentation.

As with all large infrastructure projects, FTTP is likely to cost more initially, but there are "network effects" benefits from having fast internet which makes it worthwhile. I have at least two relatives in urban and suburban Melbourne who can't get wired internet at all because "the exchange is full." Wireless is rubbish, made worse by colourbond roofing. Someone needs a good kick up the rear end to put new infrastructure in. Telstra isn't doing it, that's for sure.

0
0

Huawei 'beats' Apple to bag sapphire smartie bragging rights

P. Lee
Silver badge

Is it just me?

I'd rather have a bendy surface which deforms a little like a... laptop.

0
0

PHABBA-DABBA-DOO! Samsung Galaxy Note 4, Edge, Gear VR – feast your eyes

P. Lee
Silver badge

Re: and on an unrelated note...

Most dual-sim phones have lower specs - the s5 dual-sim appears to be the same spec - at least as far as kogan.com notes things. I didn't know if anyone could confirm this.

0
0
P. Lee
Silver badge

and on an unrelated note...

has anyone seen the S5 dual-sim LTE? Unlike previous models they don't appear to have dropped the spec, but can anyone confirm? Work phone, personal phone together at last? Or more likely, cheap personal phone contract + sim from work 3g modem with loadsa data on plan...

0
0

Nvidia blasts sueballs at Qualcomm, Samsung – wants Galaxy kit banned

P. Lee
Silver badge

Re: Whither Apple?

> naming all three major competitors to Nvidia's own Tegra tech.

... and there we have it - they want to own the mobile graphics space.

From the patent titles it all looks a bit thin.

I did most of this stuff in a computer graphics and supercomputing classes in the early 1990's. Moving the software to hardware is neither novel nor non-obvious nor is "... on a single platform" an invention, that's expected consolidation.

I suspect the chaps at Hercules who built graphics cards to put pictures on IBM text-only displays (well before nVidia was founded) might be surprised to hear nVidia invented the GPU. I'd be surprised if most micros from the 80's didn't have graphics chips for "lighting up displays."

11
2

The BNP can rip off your works for ‘parodies’ – but only if it's not racist

P. Lee
Silver badge
Coat

Ah Zo!

Velcomman esteemed members of zee Reichst^H^H^H^HEuropean Parliament. Now zat vee haff brought to heel zee fun created by uncontrolled parody, vee shall move on to deal viz zee menace ov zee unregulated use ov irony.

1
6

Comcast merger-bait spinoff to be known as GreatLand Connections

P. Lee
Silver badge
Facepalm

Re: ClusterFsck LLC ?

but...but...but... how could that have happened when we had received assurances?

1
0

Look out: The Far Eastern white-box boys are coming for EVERYONE

P. Lee
Silver badge

>cheaper price point than normal branded server vendors can, by virtue of the lower cost resources

Someone will always be able to do it cheaper. The question is, can you add enough smarts that the extra margin is warranted? You have to keep innovating and innovation is expensive and disruptive for large companies. It gets in the way of a coherent message and extracting ROI for exsting products with sunk costs.

That leads to little tweaks to products: powershell, feature additions people don't really need, tick-box items, a new UI, but the kernel of the product stays the same - there is no drastic redevelopment or paradigm shift.

0
0

CNN 'tech analyst' on NAKED CELEBS: WHO IS this mystery '4chan' PERSON?

P. Lee
Silver badge

Re: Think of the children... or not.

>>"...abstinence is the only answer"

>Not really.

I think they meant "abstaining from taking the pictures."

But your anaylsis is correct - pictures are generally taken and sent by those who haven't yet realised the value of their reputation.

0
0
P. Lee
Silver badge
Trollface

Re: "We've all done these things"

I hear that if you paste them into an excel file, OneDrive will, er, encrypt them for you...

1
0

The IT kit revolution's OVER, say beancounters - but how do they know?

P. Lee
Silver badge

I'm with Autor

The paradigm shifts have happened. Standalone->networked->integrated systems. We have the networked systems and humans are out of the loop for pretty much everything where they could be out of the loop. The paradigm shifts provided order-of-magnitude efficiency gains, rather than just incremental improvements.

What is the hot tech now? Virtualisation. That's not a process-improvement thing, that's just admin reduction. VMware is sitting pretty, because the tech is still difficult, but the large costs will drive the freebie tech as Google and Amazon look to reduce their costs.

As I said, I'm with Autor - the massive investments of the past brought order-of-magnitude improvements. No-one is offering that now, not even the fabled cloud. Cloud engineering is so much overkill and failures result in such poor headlines. It relies on correct contention assessments Consolidation can only go so far before it runs into human fraility. If anything, consolidation increases complexity and frailty.

On the subject of MSOffice, I don't think it has improved my productivity for quite some time, yet the cost of buying new versions is recurring. I'm not sure that's very sustainable. Even Exchange/Lync which has added new features and integration doesn't really add much to my productivity. Here is where the beancounters are getting their information. What's my ROI on this expenditure? Why should I not just keep using the existing software? The answer increasingly is, "we have no technical need for new features or to upgrade, but we have to keep in support." or "the vendor has declared the product obsolete."

In this scenario, you pay as little as you can to keep the tech ticking over - maintenance mode.

2
0

SHARE 'N' SINK: OneDrive corrupting Office 2013 files

P. Lee
Silver badge
Coat

lol, "tight integration."

How bad is it when your operating system picks a particular application's data to scramble!

The question is, why is the OS messing with the data at all?

12
0

Carrier club's careful copyright conga

P. Lee
Silver badge

Re: ISPs biggest beneficiaries of piracy

> ISPs have benefited from piracy indirectly as it gives users a reason to purchase access plans with greater capacity.

Hardly. The d/l caps have been increased disproportionally more than prices. The d/l caps are mostly about inter-ISP competition. Capacity-wise its a problem for the ISPs. When I say "problem" I'm talking about the disconnect between marketing and engineering which leads to "traffic management" requirements.

I've just looked up cinema tickets in the overcrowed SE of England (Winnersh Triangle) and the standard adult peak tickets are $10.05 - one austrlian dollar cheaper than the "special-offer-thank-you-for-being-our-customer" cinema tickets with which Telstra graces its customers. The Hoyts-Eastland (in Ringwood, so much like a mini-Reading that I often mix the names up) is over 40% more for Lucy if you book online, with no concessions for anyone. "Into the Storm" is over 100% more expensive at $21.10, but you'll be pleased to know a child can get in for only $16.10.

Price-gouging tends to reduce my sympathy, whether you have the legal right to or not. To paraphrase someone, the internet sees scarcity as damage and routes around it. Sometimes it does - I can't even be bothered to pirate Hollywoods latest and greatest. I wonder if growing up in a world saturated with media will make the next generation as apathetic as I am?

0
0

Australia deflates Valve with Steam sueball

P. Lee
Silver badge

Re: Refunds are only sought for games that are not fit for purpose (i.e. don't run)

I suspect someone picked up a "still in development" game and doesn't like it.

However, an up front "no refunds under any circumstances" is quite aggressive.

6
2

Ofcom will not probe lesbian lizard snog in new Dr Who series

P. Lee
Silver badge

Re: "my suspension of disbelief finally broke"

Actually, homosexuality is "deviant" in that it deviates from the majority practise. That's a good thing too - if everyone was gay, there would be no more people and the human race would end. The beeb loves to promote it, but I found it to be an eww! scene. By explicitly sexualising the moment, it rather hit you in the face with "how would that work?" which just wasn't a thought that was required and completely dropped you out of the story.

The show has gone from being entertainment to social engineering. Surely it must be possible to have a show which is just entertaining. My kids are still kids, they aren't interested in sex and I'm reasonably sure Dr Who isn't the best way to teach them about it. If I did have kids who were interested in sex (say a 15 year old boy) I'm also sure putting images of sex between a woman and a lizard woman in his head is also not a really helpful thing to do.

I don't let the Beeb or any other mass media do my kids sex ed - that's a parent's role. I'd kindly thank the mass media to stop it - I'm not convinced they are either competant or have my child's best interest at heart. In the mean time, the button is off.

1
4

Britain's housing crisis: What are we going to do about it?

P. Lee
Silver badge

Supply always meets demand - its just the price point where they meet tthat changes.

The problem with SE England is that its extremely difficult to increase supply - there isn't a great deal of land left where its (politically) possible to build. Supply is reasonably fixed.

The problem isn't McMansions, the problem is the unwillingness to see low house prices as a good thing, leading to the ever upward pressure. The reason rent control is attractive is that it discourages investment-buying of second and third houses. With less rental income, you can't pay for high mortages, with lower mortgages more people can afford the houses which already exist and everyone is left (after a painful re-adjustment) with more money in their pocket.

Of course, this assumes that supply is fixed (which it is, in the short term) and that there isn't too much externally sourced demand which will flow in offsetting the drop in domestic demand.

In short, if you want people to be richer - help them get rid of their debt. Debt is bad for individuals and the economy and the UK is less solvent than places like Greece and Spain.

14
1

Ninja Pirate Zombie Vampires versus Chuck Norris and the Space Marines

P. Lee
Silver badge

Re: R2-D2 etc ARE combat robots by design.

If number 5 is alive - does that make him human?

0
0
P. Lee
Silver badge

> they'd stand a very good chance of winning if they just take off and nuke the site from orbit

While a technical possibility, the bosses are always far too stupid and greedy to take this option when its suggested by those who actually know what they are talking about.

Hmmm, that sounds like my workplace...

On a separate note, can we vote for the type of vampire we want to win, regardless of whether we think they actually would? :)

0
0

Intel unleashed octo-core speed demon for the power-crazed crowd

P. Lee
Silver badge

Re: Cheesburgers and "The Cloud" !

> Given all of that I think it's safe to say that this is a product for people that are both rich and a bit stupid.

Or maybe you could shove it into a database server? That's assuming you don't need the other Xeon features.

0
0
P. Lee
Silver badge

Re: @Joerg

> sick and tired of the Intel/AMD duopoly

It's hardly like unilever-proctor&gamble where they don't want to compete. Intel went for high performance low-core-count/high price; AMD went for more cores and lower prices. These are almost different markets. That makes it difficult for AMD to compete on marketing to end-users so they concentrate on the embedded market.

Gamers generally need a couple of fast cores but like to brag about their systems. Intel wants to sell to them regardless of their usage because they are less price-sensitive. Sensible IT type running VMs at home would go for the 8-core AMD chip and save a bundle if buying new.

I don't see memory as an issue - I've got 32G in my host which is half the maximum for my mobo. I got it for running VMs - most people can probably get by with 16G for years to come. I've got an "old" 3930k which has far more oomph than is needed. I got it for $300 which was enough to tempt me from my E7500 and as a desktop I expect it to last for at least six more years. My main "concern" is power consumption. Intel's done quite a bit to improve that but tiny incremental improvements dressed up as "generations" annoy me and don't warrant the expense of an upgrade. If anything, performance has mostly regressed since the 3930's were new.

Sure, I'd like to see some ARM or MIPS machines out there. I'd be happy with an ARM file-server, browsing and email host (built into a screen?). However, I've noticed that Word will consume as much of a single core as you can throw at it, which is a bit rubbish, but hardly Intel's fault. I'd like to see AMD challange Intel on the single-core speed front because I think the lack of competition is a problem but I suspect AMD's fabrication tech just can't match them.

Part of the problem is that general move to laptops. There's little chance of customisation and movement in the market with locked-down machines. At least in the past we had PCMCIA interfaces to add new functionality - now there's no chance of neatly adding functions to a laptop - you're reduced to ugly dongles and external devices.

3
0

Microsoft boots 1,500 dodgy apps from the Windows Store

P. Lee
Silver badge

Re: um

You are assuming reviewer accounts=reviewers

1
0
P. Lee
Silver badge
Facepalm

Re: Icons (@AC)

> At least that would make a change from the usual Zynga/EA/Disney/everyone approach of microtransaction-enabled Skinner Boxes masquerading as games?

I feel compelled to upvote you.

2
0