* Posts by P. Lee

3317 posts • joined 4 Dec 2007

The Internet of things is great until it blows up your house

P. Lee
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Re: Um...

Or you could buy a duvet. Reduce your electricity bills, get rid of the chance of electrocution and stop "blanket-as-a-service-corp" from adding pressure sensors to get information about your sex life which they sell on to advertising corp, microphones ("for voice control") which can stream sound out to the "voice-recognition" servers - at pornhub, "gas-detection sensors" ("in case your oven gets hacked") which feed into your insurance company...

I don't need smart bedding. Even if I wanted an electric blanket, I'm reasonably sure I could accurately and consistently set a dial to 6.5. I'm sure thermostatic control doesn't require an IPv6 stack and a DC full of dodeca-core Xeons.

I don't remember ever damaging clothes with an iron. I may have done, but not often enough to worry about and I'm certainly not going to scan QR codes on every bit of shirt. Mostly the risk comes from my wife's clothes where she has cut the tags out because the tags were annoying her and I'm not sure what they're made of. In that case, I leave them for her to iron - they're mostly synthetic anyway and don't need it. Why would manufacturers want us to stop destroying clothes anyway? If they wanted clothes to last, they could use decent cloth and pre-shrink the fabric so it can all go in the dryer.

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Microsoft set to penetrate Cyanogen, promises app-y ending

P. Lee
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Re: Cyanogen better be careful

>Goodwill could easily go flying out the window if they are seen to be fragmenting the platform for the sake of a hatful of money.

MS are targeting google, not android. The aim is to get a decent android distro with MS apps, because MS has little hope of growing winphone. MS' problem is that if they don't have a foot on the client base, people will will care less about having Windows Servers. If MS doesn't have proprietary protocols in use which keep people happy, they will lose the market. MS want people on Android to be able to access their existing work environment, rather than allow some android dev (google) to drive a replacement of MS in the enterprise.

MS is putting their apps on the dominant platform, which is fine. Cynaogen is probably ok in the medium term as I doubt MS will make many in-roads into mobile. If however, MS apps on android keep people on vanilla MS software and that drives winmobile sales, they're all outta luck.

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Google has tested its speedy QUIC internet protocol on YOU – and the early results are in

P. Lee
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Re: Google - if you want to speed up page load times....

I thought they had done that... oh wait, that's just me & my browser extensions....

+1 regarding pushing things out over UDP. UDP over a WAN seems like a really bad when you need all the data. You're just shifting the reliability problem elsewhere.

Personally, I like simple protocols. All these optimisations may benefit companies like google, but there's little for the end-user which can't be solved in a better manner and it raises the barriers to entry to the market and makes troubleshooting really quite hard.

It's like complaining about map load times on gmaps. The better way is not to load them at the very last minute. You could, pre-download them into some sort of portable device...

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Gwyneth Paltrow flubs $29 food stamp dare, swallows pride instead

P. Lee
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Re: The problem

Observing my own behaviour, I tend to load up on carbs/fat if my protein intake isn't high enough to keep me feeling full.

i.e. if I skip protein, I end up eating loads of bread & pasta etc which normally come served with other badness.

Add peas, beans & lentils to the mix and you stay full on much less food but that food takes prep time and quite a lot of getting used to. Perhaps they should teach proper cooking in school? Nah, we're talking about the country which officially classes pizza as a vegetable.

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Sysadmins, patch now: HTTP 'pings of death' are spewing across web to kill Windows servers

P. Lee
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Re: I'm in my happy place... I'm in my happy place...

>Erm - so back and running again in a minute or so then? Not exactly that much of an issue.

No, not at all, as long as every Windows license allows you to install on two machines at once, the extra hardware to run it on and a decent free load-balancer, perhaps the licenses for all the other parts of your application which need to be replicated too.

Don't get me wrong, it probably isn't the end of the world, no matter how many servers bluescreen. It just makes MS look a bit like Linksys: a bit dinky and not what you'd want in your enterprise. Then I see that they charge money for it and I begin to wonder at the sanity of those who pay. I see the ecosystems created by anti-competitive MS licensing which drives a lot of these decisions and I begin to loath the company, not because there was a program design error, but because of the business practices which twist the environment in an effort to get customers to choose them rather than a competitor, which has nothing to do with suitability of their software for the job.

Seriously people, validate your input. These are well known, long-established RFCs. \d+ isn't validation. Pick a number as your bounds. Really, its ok to say, "Sorry, our webserver doesn't transfer billions of gigs from a single file, unless you set this tuning option".

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What's that THUD sound? It's your Lumia's best feature after unflashing Windows 10

P. Lee
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>Why are manufacturers making phones that can brick?

+10

All you need is something that listens for DHCP requests from a client saying, "I'm a dead WinPhone, HELP!" from a boot rom and which then kindly uploads a known good image. Dual flash banks and you're all good.

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While AMD, Apple et al thrash around, chippery fat-cat TSMC is grinning all the way to the bank

P. Lee
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Re: Racing to 10nm

>The rumors that showed Apple switching most of their production back to Samsung

But isn't that Apple's way? Play off the suppliers against each other and make sure you give enough revenue to each to keep them alive and competing with each other? If TSMC went under, there would be less competition and prices might rise. You have to keep them all hungry and dependent on your custom.

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FCC hit with SEVENTH net neutrality lawsuit

P. Lee
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Re: This just feels wrong...

It's PR by lawsuit. Throw enough mud and mud will be associated with the target, even if the mud doesn't stick.

"The FCC dragged into court again? They must have done something wrong."

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Googley TENTACLES reach towards YOUR email

P. Lee
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Re: Opt Out? Oh, but you can.

> (And if anyone has suggestions for email services other than Exchange that allow you to use different sender addresses and still use Outlook - yeah, I know - then those suggestions would be welcome.)

My ISP (Westnet) allows any email. I have my domain forward mail to google and pick it up via imap, which should work with Outlook too. KMail works fine, MacMail (Snow Leopard) too. If you've configured the sender address, both the latter options auto-select it for replies. As long as I authenticate the SMTP session (when out and about and not using my Westnet link), there's no problem and it doesn't do a google, "sent on behalf of..." either.

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Exchange Server 2016 will be mostly Cloud Exchange ported back on-premises

P. Lee
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Re: Did I get that right ?

Internet-based email?

'Tis a revolution I tell ya!

--

What is actually interesting is that with every app which shifts to a web client, the Windows desktop becomes a little less important. It will be interesting to see if a less important desktop makes the Windows server less critical. Perhaps Visio will never be cloud-based and MS is just making one less app require a desktop installation procedure to fend off Google defections. It will be a fine line to walk.

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Microsoft's top legal eagle: US cannot ignore foreign privacy laws

P. Lee
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>MS have one trump, that they sell a lot of the infrastructure behind cloud services - they could start selling Outlook.com and Office365 turnkey solutions to local providers,

They could, or they could go the licensing route, but both of those options mean the Microsoft name can't be on the product, which means it will be a much harder sell. It may be harder for all the tech companies, but now, most of them are competing against their customers - selling cloud vs customer-owned-on-site IT infrastructure.

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The Walton kids are ABSURDLY wealthy – and you're benefitting

P. Lee
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Externalities?

Lots of talk of external benefits, not much talk of external costs.

I'm not sure the "wealth is a motivator" argument holds true at all points on the curve. From what I've seen of CEO behaviour in general, the fun is in the winning, the dollars are just how you measure the winning. I suspect that's a quote but I don't remember from where.

I'm all for productive labour, but when 30% of your white goods are made by prisoners - is that slave labour? Does it drive law enforcement policy and/or implementation where it shouldn't go? What about tax incentives offered to the large companies to locate in a particular area, that's essentially moving money from people's pockets to the company via the tax system - is that being offset against the general "good" being calculated? Savings can only be offered by cutting costs - is Walmart doing things more efficiently in terms of process or are they just paying less? If they are only paying less, that's just shifting wealth from the workers to the customers and owners - there's no net gain.

Efficiency of process increases wealth. You get a new computer and one person processes twice as many orders in the same time period. That's good. You cut your staff's pay by 10% - that isn't increased efficiency unless you only think about ROI. You've reallocated wealth, but you haven't increased it.

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Twitter yanks firehose from DataSift, other resellers

P. Lee
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Re: Closed Systems are not eco-Systems

+1

That's why Apple, Oracle and even MS et al, want to own the whole stack. Not only does it ensure that they aren't the ones kicked out (ending up like Novell) but it also allows them to be the kick-er if they spot profit. It doesn't have to be an explicit kick, but controlling the platform gives you an edge.

Its also why so many have gone to Linux. It prevents anyone from pulling the platform-rug out from underneath you and allows you to control the platform as little or as much as you like.

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PC sales dip below 2009 levels, with Japanese sales off 44 per cent

P. Lee
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Re: Dell market share down ? Not a surprise !

They have taken a new interest in not serving you.

I notice prices have disappeared which may be considered a bit of a flaw.

The last time I looked, the successor to the $650 semi-pro monitor I bought was up at around $1250. I guess someone has to pay for that buyout.

If you got German on the website, lucky you! I got mostly Arabic when I clicked, "Contact dell." I clicked on Intel processors - Learn More i5 and ended up on a page "2-in-1s Usher in A New World of Productivity and Entertainment". Its a complete farce.

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Daddy Dyson keeps it in the family and hoovers up son’s energy biz

P. Lee
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>you ever tried cleaning the guts of a computer with a Dyson?

>Total PITA

Stop it! you'll have noobs zapping their CPUs with 10,000v of static.

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US govt bans Intel from selling chips to China's supercomputer boffins

P. Lee
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Re: They're still at it

>Bad as it looks now, the US is STILL a huge sight better than any other country on offer. Including China, or they would've ALREADY demonstrated self-sufficiency

Unless there was no need to, until now.

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Xiaomi's birthday present to itself: Flogging 2m phones in 12 hours

P. Lee
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Re: Profit not volumes

>Oddly enough, market share seems to be really valued by a lot of big businesses. Never really understood it, myself.

Margin may be important, but absolute wealth is also important. It's a balancing act between margin and volume and when marginal costs are low, you can ramp up the volume until marginal cost = marginal revenue.

Brands (amongst other things) distort the theory by attaching value to ideas and image. Xiaomi appears to be putting its marketing budget into lowering price rather than direct advertising and allowing its customers to do the marketing for them. You can do that when you don't need to keep telling people how magical you are for them to believe you.

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Australia finds $1 BEELLION to replace No-SQL DATABASE

P. Lee
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Re: Won't somebody think if the Greybeards

Those lazy greybeards aren't going to cost anything like $1bn.

I don't have a problem with new tech, I do have an inbuilt suspicion of recent licensing agreements.

For $1bn, I'd say, "I'll pay for the work, but I want it open-source."

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P. Lee
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Not this then?

https://books.google.com.au/books?id=u7WbsmbttwYC&pg=PT192&lpg=PT192&dq=instant+recall+database&source=bl&ots=vQZyhDZU2L&sig=tdtoNqQF7CA2q2Fq3jzKpW-vQyA&hl=en&sa=X&ei=udApVeG2MsXRmAWX5YDQDA&ved=0CCcQ6AEwCQ

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P. Lee
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>Crikey - with that much they might even be able to afford Oracle's licensing.

Cue license change where everyone with Centrelink data is now an oracle "user."

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All Mac owners should migrate to OS X Yosemite 10.10.3 ASAP

P. Lee
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Re: Not for older MACs

That's true and it wouldn't be too much of a problem if Apple didn't clamp down on upgrades, which is a relatively new thing they do and the full effect of it hasn't worked its way through the system.

I'd love an MBA, but with an 8G limit there's no way. Its one thing to not be upgradable, its quite another to hold down the spec so you can't buy what you think you might need in the future.

I see Apple are still defaulting to 4G RAM. I wonder how many people are disappointed with their new mac? Oooh! A shiny new MBA with a 3.2Ghz i7 and ... 4G RAM? Non-upgradable?

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P. Lee
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Re: It Just Means

>[It Just Means] That Mountain Lion and Mavericks aren't really supported.

or that one of the patches in the "Yosemite" bundle for OSX fixes the issue?

Says the man still running snow leopard... :)

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Videogame publishers to fans: Oi, freetard! STOP RESURRECTING our dead titles online

P. Lee
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Re: Expand this to all technology

>They won't be making any more money off of it, so why bother keeping it secret?

Probably because its rarely all their own work. What happens when the license a product/code which is still supported but the final software is not? Do the modifiers get an automatic license to use the included code? Can they redistribute it or does the product still die as the number of original copies dwindles? What happens if the product is obsolete but a portion of the tech in it is still valuable? E.g. what if XP needs killing because it is a flawed product, MS decides to give everyone a copy of Windows 10 but the NTFS code is the same in both? What if NTFS then needs a slight modification which breaks XP? Does the whole of the NTFS code have to be opened?

I'm not sure there is a good resolution to this. It is a can of worms which I suspect will stay firmly closed, mostly on the basis that customers will probably buy the stuff anyway.

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Microsoft goes cloud KERR-AZY, chops Windows Server to bits

P. Lee
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Paris Hilton

No local login?

Surely some mistake?

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P. Lee
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Thumb Up

Re: Hold the phone - stop the presses!

>And the Sidewinder flight stick; that was great.

don't forget the mouse they did a few years ago.

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Marvell: We don't want to pay this $1.5bn patent bill because, cripes, it's way too much

P. Lee
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Re: Blasphemy

>Besides, when has your God, had anything to do with science or tech?

When he made a universe that runs in an ordered way, (as we've noted in the "laws of physics"), electricity, the world's ecosystem, plant and animal life, the raw material from which semiconductors are made and the human brain and other things like that.

A "true" Christian shows concern for others' future. Pagans hope for the damnation of those who disagree with their point of view. I find it rather odd that professed non-believers, even those who have never been believers, revert to invoking deities when under pressure. Is it a natural human response?

Anyway, the original subtitle was ugly. Common speech often doesn't translate to slick writing.

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UK.gov: We want Britannia's mobe-enabled cars to rule the roads

P. Lee
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Encouraging British industry? Oh no Minister, we're just encouraging a conference for you to attend.

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Intel shows Google how to stick it real good

P. Lee
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Re: Hello darkness my old friend

I thought it was a double-line border, but I may be behind the times.

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Win Server 2003 addict? Tick, tock: Your options are running out

P. Lee
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Re: Linux NAS ?

The author seems to have been concentrating on old must-have apps which don't migrate well to newer Windows. Moving them to Linux is an unlikely option. Going Linux is generally an unlikely option if someone has a single server environment, because there is unlikely to be IT skills available. I'm not saying Windows is easier, but if you already have it, you probably already know it, which is probably the most important thing.

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Samsung's bend blame blast: We DEMAND a Galaxy S6 Edge do-over

P. Lee
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Re: Glass is not meant to be bendy

A suit pocket is fine at work, but what happens when you're wearing jeans and a tshirt at the weekend?

I was hanging out for an s6 but after playing with a couple of larger phones (and being used to an iPhone 3G) I'm thinking maybe an s4 mini. Btw an iPhone 3G is fine in the back pocket. I never have to worry about sitting on it- it's built like a tank and I've never had a problem with the weight. Is it time to revive the clamshell dual screen? Maybe even triple screen- small front screen for phone use, clamshell for browsing. Thin/light is good for a laptop where weight is significant but not required for a phone, within reason.

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To defend offshore finance bods looting developing countries of their tax cash

P. Lee
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>The money goes straight into the greasy hands of the politicians, and thence into Swiss bank accounts.

That may be mostly true but still, its politicians who are at least in-country and to some extent (if only via revolution) accountable to the populace. A foreign corporation has no accountability beyond the value of the in-country assets and it never will. Even the greasy politicians will want to live like kings and spend some of it in-country. Foreign corps will send the profit abroad, no question there.

I suspect the root of the problem is that capital is not mobile. When a company owns a mine, they have a local monopoly. How do "more capitalists flood in" to get a share of the super-normal profits if there is a legal monopoly there?

Ultimately, the best thing for the country is to develop its own processing skills. Large corporations know this and keep strict division of labour, not (I think) only for efficiency, but to prevent skills from leaking between areas. Someone did an analysis of the iphone production costs and worked out that making it all in the US would cost less than an extra $5 per unit. Why go to all that trouble to offshore? Perhaps for the extra profit, but I suspect its more about avoiding tax by splitting up the industry and ensuring that a manufacturing industry isn't built up in the US where business skills and capital are plentiful. That would make a new challenger more likely. Far better to make it difficult for new entrants by making sure you have to be a multinational to even enter the game. There is a good reason McDonalds dumbs down the running of its outlets. It makes everyone easily replaceable. Do you really think the resource extraction industry doesn't do the same?

There is also a national problem. If prices rise for the raw or nearly raw materials, the western companies lose profit. That means lower pensions, higher-priced goods. Is that what we want? Do you think our own governments would push for that? What happens when all those imported goods cost a great deal more. Wealth is not really about increasing the size of the pie, its about pie distribution. You are only wealthy compared to poor people. The number of zeros at the end of your bank balance is not relevant. Increased efficiency does lead to greater wealth, but that is process efficiency (actually doing things better) not capital efficiency (increased ROI, usually by cutting costs, most often labour costs). Economists tend to over-simplify and conflate the two.

I don't think its just developing countries which fall foul of all this. Australia does very little processing of its own raw materials. Most of it is shipped to China and the result re-imported. Why? I suspect not for labour-cost reasons alone, though Australian labour is grossly over-priced. Processing raw materials is a capital-intensive, bulk-reducing process. Cheap Chinese labour is unlikely to make much of an impact. However, it would be very hard to avoid Australian tax by processing locally and selling something valuable. It all becomes quite easy when the goods disappear offshore.

As to a solution, the best one I can think of is to encourage local processing. Nationalisation might be one way of controlling the goods, but rather than purely taxation, I'd consider licenses for extraction to be based on building up local processing and local training. Create a local industry which knows how to process sand into semi-conductors, obtain plastic or gas from coal and oil. If you don't do the work yourself, you don't get the profits. There is a place for division of labour, but it needs to be carefully monitored because it will keep the workers poor (and tax receipts down) and may need breaking.

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Microsoft drops Do Not Track default from Internet Explorer

P. Lee
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Re: DNT = AdBlock Plus

>Does anyone know why ads are so crap?

Ads aren't there to sell you stuff. Ads are there to stop other people selling you stuff.

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Streak life: Oz woman flashes boobs at Google Street View car

P. Lee
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Re: Political correctness

>Tits are for children (literally)

Disingenuous.

Children enjoy them for a couple of years maybe. I've found them a reasonably integral part of having sex for the last 20 years. I pity you for missing out!

I suspect the internet agrees with the idea that breasts are for sex, but that should be taken under advisement. It isn't true for everyone everywhere.

Yes, PC is rubbish and this is not important enough to get the PCs involved.

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Midlife crisis, suck ingenuity? Microsoft turns 40; does the dad dance

P. Lee
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Linux

Re: A multi-platform world?

>Well I interpreted it as an acceptance that other platforms already exist...

Well yes, Windows Phone, Windows xp, Vista, 7 and 8 are all different platforms. That's why they are introducing Windows 10 as the new, er, standard platform.

Tux to Bill, in modern parlance:

So don't be dumb

I got 99 problems

But you won't be one

Like what!

Yeah, I'm slightly bitter. Trying to install W7 + Office + Lync + all patches from scratch into a VM by DVD & download took several days of slow downloads, failed updates, reboots and blue screens. Not all MS' fault, vmplayer 7.1 would lock far too often, but even so - cache those updates! It shouldn't be that hard! I've used over 15G (excluding Office + lync) since 1st April nearly all on one installation. This wasn't anything clever, install W7 sp1, patch (patch, patch) install Office (patch patch) etc. Only VLC+Firefox were non-MS installs.

Bah!

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Digital pathology and the big Cs (that’s ‘cancer’ and ‘cloud’)

P. Lee
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Why is it cloud-based?

What advantages does that provide?

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Sony nabs cloud gamers OnLive, administers swift headshot

P. Lee
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I wonder what the legality of a killer firmware update would be?

I imagine it would be fine if you only licensed the OS and the license could be terminated at will.

But why bother doing that when you can bring out a new console and just terminate a required cloud service for the old one?

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Rupert Murdoch says Google is worse than the NSA

P. Lee
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Re: Google is not opt-in. ajax.googleapis.com is another threat

Private browser anyone?

Be someone new, every time.

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P. Lee
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Re: <cough>

>NSA does flog their wares too...

>to mossad!

>be afraid, be very afraid.

Mossad isn't bent on world domination. They can be very forceful when protecting their interests but they don't define their interests as "ruling the world."

I feel much safer with them than with the US.

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P. Lee
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Re: Anyone can play!

>Murdoch is Ebola.

Murdoch is the human fly; climber of walls; spoiler of picnics.

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Light the torches! NSA's BFF Senator Feinstein calls for e-book burning

P. Lee
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>When politicians call for the burning or banning of books, that's the time we have to start worrying.

While I generally agree with you. I'm far more worried about the general stifling of ideas and debate than about a how-to manual.

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P. Lee
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Re: so when is witches' turn?

Did you dress her up like this?

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Pumping billions into data centres won't guarantee you an empire

P. Lee
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Contestable Monopoly

The problem is that monopoly is not contestable by the little guy.

You could do things better and cheaper, but the incumbent sitting on a large cash pile will simply drop the price until you go away. They can even afford to pay customers to take their product, as intel was doing in the mobile market. Even if they don't engage in such practises, the threat of being able to do it is enough to stifle the competition. Intel missed out because (a) ARM was already operating where Intel wasn't and (b) the completely missed the mobile thing and the ecosystem built before it realised what was going on. If ARM's only business was phones & tablets, Intel would have squashed them. Do you think Google would be able to compete in most of its markets, such as internet provision vs Comcast, if it wasn't cross-funding from Search? There is no way to build from scratch just by being better, as Netscape found out.

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Is this what Windows XP's death throes look like?

P. Lee
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Re: Windows 365?

I think you'll find they will.

The reason for it is that its for home users only, who probably wouldn't upgrade their OS anyway for years if at all until a hardware refresh. Its worth it to MS get get back to a mono-culture to give devs an easier target to hit, rather than have them going for Vista, W7, W8 and W10. Plus, there are more options for cloudy revenue with 10.

Otherwise there will be a further slide to OSX, tablets, Googley-type stuff. Linux may not have many corporate apps, but what happens when Android/ARM becomes adequate for the modest desktop? What happens if QT/LLVM work nicely, now that the web also has 3d graphics? Package up your app for Apache/Docker/Chrome rather than Windows and you have nightmare in Seattle. You can hit Windows, OSX and Linux in one go. Lots of that desktop-management infrastructure become irrelevant and the Windows ecosystem shrinks. Lots of companies already are going to the cloud - what happens when they make their desktop versions just a local copy of what they do in the cloud? That isn't windows software.

MS aren't going away any time soon, but times are hard and in hard times, corporations don't spend money on upgrades they don't feel they need. W10 isn't really on the "need" list.

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Sony tells hacked gamer to pay for crooks' abuse of PlayStation account

P. Lee
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>His account was 'hacked' and all they did was spend £49.99?

Maybe they were hoping to stay beneath the radar.

Regardless it just underlines that you can pay all you want, but you never really own something while someone else has DRM control over it.

Coming to think of it, if the charges were run up on a credit card, wouldn't the card company cover him?

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Boring fixed 'net users still dominate Oz market

P. Lee
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Who cares about mobile grow vs fixed?

Far more important is mobile peek usage growth vs mobile peek usage capacity.

More fixed-line use is good for everyone.

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Project Spartan: We get our claws on Microsoft's browser for Windows 10

P. Lee
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Re: HTML 5 Test

>So, somewhat unsurprisingly, this is not the browser we're looking for.

Indeed, if you want another browser than IE, use another browser than IE, why do we want another MS browser?

I can see why MS might want another browser - they need to lock out Googley extensions which undermine their desktop monopoly, but I see no user benefit. Come on, MS, tell us why we'll want your browser. Don't give me "performance" because I don't buy that. I really don't remember the last time I thought, wow, this page isn't displaying fast enough! Don't give me "standards" - I already have Chrome and FF which get close enough. Security? That isn't a benefit, that's an assumed feature. Integration with the OS? No thanks, you already did that and it was horrible. Tell me why you expect me to switch! At the moment, Spartan looks like Windows Mobile. It might be a fine system when it finally gets here, but everyone has moved on and no longer cares.

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P. Lee
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Re: "Cortana integration looks good"

"We're getting rid of all the security problems created by activex."

Mostly cos we thought it wasn't fair that that non-MS organisations had the chance to totally compromise your privacy & security.

Anyone else dislike the ChromeOS model?

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Barry Obama declares national emergency over foreign hackers

P. Lee
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Re: Tim foil hat? - maybe

>With this new act, the USA could seize all the financial assets China owns within US borders.

Which kind-of works up until the US needs another loan from the Chinese. Its the nuclear option.

I'm sure Hollywood hasn't ignored the Sony hack though. Dotcom hosting unreleased films? Ah, all economic sanctions apply. Hosted in a foreign data-centre or with a foreign DNS provider? Shame they can no longer accept VISA or Mastercard payments.

Do the Swiss have a credit card system of their own? I think its time to start rolling that out.

What's the next step? Did you not accept that US patents apply world-wide? Well, sorry, but we won't allow you to buy or sell via any US infrastructure.

Hmmm no buying or selling... presents as harmless as a lamb, behaves in a beastly fashion... where have I heard that before?

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Chrome trumps all comers in reported vulnerabilities

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Re: @eek

>Chrome imports bookmarks from IE/FF and makes itself the default browser.

They all ask to make themselves default if they aren't already.

Chrome is the non-MS browser which is most likely to work with corporate sites designed for IE. It provides the easiest integration by using IE's configuration. I normally use it for internal corporate sites, with FF/noscript etc for teh interwebs.

The problems with flash are usually less with the download code and more with the Adobe's player. Regardless, don't go wandering down internet dark alleys and you'll reduce your attack surface greatly.

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The voters hate Google. Heeeeyyyy... how about a 'Google Tax'?

P. Lee
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Re: Suggestions...

>tax the imports.

That might catch "pure ip" plays like Google Search, but it won't catch anyone with physical goods for sale (such as Apple), since they simply jack up the buy-price paid by the in-country sales company. The only reason those companies don't run at a loss and pick up a rebate, is that it would attract too much hate to be worthwhile.

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