* Posts by P. Lee

4127 posts • joined 4 Dec 2007

Body of evidence: Biometrics and YOU

P. Lee
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>It’s a spin-off from its Welcome home security product that also relies on deep learning.

... and there goes all credibility, off out the window to join the pigs.

To be fair, I know nothing of the products, but electronic home security products don't have a great record.

The real knife in the heart is "deep learning" but I suspect the victim was already dead.

The absolute most you want from biometrics is "Hello Mr X, please enter your passcode now."

Or you could just put the key in the lock and turn the key without any of that junk.

Quite frankly, paywave doesn't require any authentication up to $100 and a pin after that, so why bother? Anything more is going to be a hassle the customer doesn't want (along with "please swipe your reward card now or press.,,")

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What Brexit means for you as a motorist

P. Lee
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Re: On the plus side...

So many contradictory statements, no arguments, no evidence... no meaning.

>Duty Free for anyone travelling between the UK and the EU...

or they might just do the sensible things and say, "carry on as before," pretty much as is the response in every single area.

Hello Bong? I've got your nephew Ryan here. He says he works for you.

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Those Xbox Fitness vids you 'bought'? Look up the meaning of the word 'rent'

P. Lee
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Its all fun and games...

until people realise what's going on.

No MS might well consider that the content they have provided far exceeds what customers would have received had they bought a static video.

Customers on the other hand, are likely to see this as a betrayal.

Appliances are bad long-term business. They benefit the customer in the very short term, the vendor in the medium term but in the long term, the vendor is tied to stuff they don't want and the customer hates the vendor's (required but poor) support.

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My plan to heal this BROKEN, BREXITED BRITAIN

P. Lee
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Re: From the 27

>Germans strongly back EU membership, oppose referendum - poll

So you're saying the Germans are so strongly in favour of EU membership that they oppose being asked if they are in favour of the EU membership?

Perhaps their leaders have more sense than Cameron had, then to *actually* ask people what they wanted.

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P. Lee
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Re: I'm a leaver

>you'll see that it's a perfectly democratic organisation.

The democratic structures are not in doubt, but there are two problems:

1. the real power doesn't reside with the parliament, it resides with the council of ministers who can make decisions and then claim it was someone-else's fault.

2. Democracy isn't an end in itself. Its a means to the end of self-determination. When you scale a democracy up, you start squashing the individuality of those below as they all conform to one law. You reduce the power of any given vote and any given voting block, which leads to those at the top being insulated the effects of a small revolt, giving them time to quash it before it grows. You can have perfectly democratic structures but make the voting base so large that no-one can influence the executive. What's the point in a democracy if it doesn't reflect the wishes of the people?

In this case, the people have said they wish to leave. Its downright frightening that Bong can write such a cynical piece and we all recognise his ideas as those playing out.

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P. Lee
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Re: "Such diverse cultures?

Not to mention that Europeans have been fighting each other for a very long time.

The Greeks went rampaging around the world. The Italians brought them down and occupied much of Europe up to the edge of Scotland. The Germans attacked them and brought down their empire... and we haven't even got to 500 AD yet.

Europe isn't a country. The people who live there don't see it as a country. If cancelling an international trade treaty causes this much pain, we probably shouldn't have signed it.

Personally, I suspect there are major problems in the financial system. If GBP can drop 10% overnight then its grossly disconnected with economic reality. In that case, the pain was destined to arrive at some point and its probably better to get it now than let the problems pile up for later.

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Microsoft releases cross-platform .NET Core 1.0 at Linux event

P. Lee
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>>"New .NET Core workloads can now be easily moved from a Windows Server environment to Red Hat Enterprise Linux"

>God knows why anyone would want to though.

Licensing.

MS knows that its licenses costs scare off cloud-provider-services who have no desire to track licenses on deployments or cramp their instance spin-ups.

MS also knows that if all the cloud devs ditch them, they'll be left with very little at the server end.

But the sentiment is correct. You really wouldn't do this. If you're MS-based product isn't going to make you money on an MS-hosted platform, you need to re-think your plans.

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P. Lee
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Devil

Re: What I just read

"Just wait until .net on linux becomes a second and third class citizen - after only three years I will bend their will with slight incompatibilities and their cloud apps will be MINE! Mwahahaha!"

Yeah, no thanks. It isn't just about the FLOSS license for .Net, its whether anyone else is doing any development and if any of the dependencies will support thing in the long term. If you want to develop for Android for example, you can see where that is going and you know Google's business model and how they are likely to act based on their history. Ditto MS.

When "real" FLOSS is no longer supported, it at least hangs around for as long as you want it. Proprietary vendors bearing clouds tend to remove the facilities to force you to buy new stuff or just because they are busy chasing another unicorn.

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Quick note: Brexit consequences for IT

P. Lee
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Re: CHange

>War, war war.

Unlike the rest of the world, of course.

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Special delivery: Activists drop 100,000 net neutrality complaints on FCC

P. Lee
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Re: Be careful...

+1

It isn't about traffic prioritisation, its about service provider prioritisation.

Net Neut is an anti-corruption, pro-competition play.

Just to show how this works out with zero-rating, my wife signed up to Presto (free trial for one month) unaware that its a foxtel service, zero rated on Telstra (her phone) but not via our ADSL link (Westnet).

I've had to cancel it as she used 3/5 of our monthly allowance in a week.

The service ran more smoothly over tethered phone link than it did over the ADSL. So if I'm a new VoD startup, how do I compete with Foxtel's cosy arrangement with Telstra?

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Brexit government pledge sought to keep EU-backed UK science alive

P. Lee
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Re: brexit government?

>"The most obvious outcome of this referendum is some dithering followed by another referendum."

Indeed, the powers that be did not get the answer they wanted so they'll keep asking until they get the result they want.

See "Ireland."

It isn't a resounding mandate from the whole country to leave. But it is a larger mandate than the one to stay. Suggesting that "people didn't really mean it so we can ignore it" shows utter contempt for democracy. This is a far clearer expression of views on this precise subject than any general election platform. Far clearer a mandate than, for example, the use of fox-hunting as a pretense to make the Lords more compliant with the Executive.

Who exactly in the EU is funding our science? Would that be the Greeks or the Spanish, the Danish or Dutch? The Germans or the Poles perhaps? Where is this money coming from? Maybe the French are funding our science.

Another question is "Why is the EU funding our science?" If we aren't a net beneficiary or the EU has a no impact on our income, why are they holding the purse strings for science? Does it improve trade? Is it required for the organisation of a single market, the free movement of goods, services and people? Or is it just a power grab so the EU institution gets some PR for "giving funding to science?"

While the downturn in economics always leads to unpleasant racist politics, I suspect most people who voted "leave" don't dislike Europe or Europeans, what they dislike is the institution of the European Union which is about as "white middle-aged male" as you can get, and its the usual supporters of "white middle-aged-male" institutions who have had enough. Having said that, you can be sure that if Westminster does ignore or seek to revise the referendum results, you're going to see a major swing away from the middle of politics and its going to get ugly.

Cameron has turned out to be a coward. You don't ask people what they want, and when they don't choose what you want, refuse to follow through. "Would you like Coke or Pepsi? Ah, you didn't choose Coke (I like Coke), maybe the next waiter can help you. No, no-one else can serve you until I go off shift, but I'm going to stay here for a bit." Even if the waiter is going off-shift and the drink won't arrive for a while and is delivered by someone else, we do expect the order to be placed. Cameron forgets he was elected to serve us, not get huffy when he doesn't get his way.

As far as the economy is concerned, its already shot. There is recession coming all over the world due to the debt the neo-Keynesians have racked up. All that "government debt" that's piling up despite several governments mouthing of the word "austerity" actually belongs to the people. We are the ones who will have to pay it off. Our standard of living will plummet as inflation climbs. I suspect that as in the 80's the UK will take the hit first, but we'll also come out of it first. If we manage to pay off our debt in ten years, I'd be pleased with that result.

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Thinking of using multiple clouds? Don't do it, stick with us says AWS CEO

P. Lee
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>Unfortunately there is a degree of lock-in with AWS, because many of its APIs are in fact unique to its platform

That would be because cloud computing isn't a commodity product. You can't have a commodity when every vendor has unique, proprietary APIs.

Coffee is a commodity. Coffee beans from anywhere can be interchanged with coffee beans from elsewhere. Wrap it up in a Nespresso capsule and its no longer a commodity.

Your x86 hardware is (pretty much) a commodity. A service from a vendor where you don't own the hardware... that's not a commodity unless lots of vendors offer exactly the same service and you can swap suppliers without impacting your business.

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Fat-thumbed a BGP entry? Relax, now your pain has a name

P. Lee
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Thumb Up

Re: re. "...the Druids of the Internet, ..."

>Do they report to the Elders of the Internet?

Yes, Jen.

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Cloudian clobbers car drivers with targeted ads

P. Lee
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Unhappy

Two Things

1. This is what "deep learning" is all about. You can forget your Cherry 2000.

2. Any company which puts "cloud" or references to the cloud in its name probably deserves to die.

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Snoopers' Charter 'goes too far' says retired Met assistant commish

P. Lee
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Actually, the Lords (despite apparent disconnectedness from the real world) have historically done a pretty good job of holding the executive to account.

Sadly, too good a job. The government screamed "constitutional crisis" over the best way to kill farm pests and Labour used that like WMD in Iraq - it was a lie that allowed them to push their agenda over the line to the point where it couldn't be undone. The Lords was "reformed" to make its members more beholden to the executive so now it reflects the executive's agenda and is thus even more pointless (though so much more "representative") than before. Whatever you think about fox-hunting, (and no, I don't support it) it was a naked power grab by the executive to shut down those who had consistently caused trouble for it by undoing government legislative spin.

Do you think the current Met Commissioner would make a statement like this? Of course not - its more than his job's worth. It seems that in today's society, no-one can stand to have anyone disagree with them. There is no arguing of a case, no hint of "you're right, we got that bit wrong so we'll update our policy," there isn't even, "the downside to what we're doing is a,b,c, but the benefits are x,y,z which I believe are worth it," only the incessant sound-bites and slogans attempting to drown out all voices of opposition. Failing that, we'll undermine them, regardless of whether they have anything useful to add to the conversation.

Winning and being seen to be winning, rather than doing the right thing seems to be the objective.

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Chinese numerologists are betting Dell/EMC deal will make them rich

P. Lee
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Re: Numerology?

>I live in the real world.

and in the real world we never do funny things in a business context... such as identifying java files with the bytes CAFEBABE or name our new pager "less" because "less is more"? Did WWI really end at the eleventh hour on the eleventh day of the eleventh month by accident or was there some symmetry to the time that was appealing?

These companies didn't get where they are by relying on superstition. Why shouldn't they have a little fun and a sense of humour?

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Apple faces Beijing blackout for iPhone 6

P. Lee
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Re: "Don't do business in China" - Carl Icahn

> the general trend is to shut down foreign presence in China. Get the message???

... as if the West doesn't do the same. We are more subtle with it and we done it for so long there is little need for additional legal protections.

We call them, "industries of particular national importance" and we don't outright ban imports (that would be "in restraint of trade") we use tax money to subsidise our local industry so it can undercut them furriners.

That's how we end up with corn mountains in the US, wine and milk lakes in the EU. It leads to the ungodly sight of food either being destroyed while much of the world is starving or the food being dumped on the world market - tax money from the rich nations destroying the markets and livelihoods of the poor around the world who might otherwise make a living growing crops.

The US corn over-production is what drives the HFCS market leading to really cheap sugar which makes its way into so much food, resulting in ill-health.

Does anyone (apart from Apple) really have a problem with what the Chinese are doing? Isn't "making decisions that the market wouldn't make" the role of government? Having seen Apple's attacks on Samsung, they might come to the conclusion that Apple manipulate the legal and patent system to increase their super-normal profits and it is therefore quite legitimate to rebalance the playing field to help with local industry develop.

Or it might just be corruption. Which is bad, and our governments would never take money from lobbyists which may influence their decisions, would they?

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Dad of student slain in Paris terror massacre sues Google, Twitter, Facebook for their 'material support' of ISIS

P. Lee
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Re: That linked article is nonsense

>For what it's worth I agree that Islamacists would be much less of a problem without the illegal meddling of powerful states (including the Saudis) in the affairs of third world countries.

For what its worth, they aren't really a problem anyway.

Spectacular though it is, the damage they cause is so minuscule that it isn't worth worrying about. I wish my own government would stop trying to do things to keep me safe - they are the ones causing the damage. Compare terrorist deaths with car accidents, "normal" murders and suicides - each of them are far more significant... but less politically useful to those in power in the West.

The correct response is to look after those affected and work to turn your enemies into friends.

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P. Lee
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Re: "MTB"

Numerical Value "2" but crucial for taking out subs - protect them!

/Dover Patrol board game - 1930's-1950's version

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Stopped buying Oracle's kit? You've literally decimated its profit

P. Lee
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"If you didn't buy Oracle kit..."

Is Larry having a Ratner moment? When cloud is so great, you have to question a company's commitment to on-prem.

When you look at what companies have done with "appliance" pricing vs pure software, you realise they are quite capable of manipulating their markets to make BYO [hardware] untenable.

When companies keep raising prices, which hides the fact that unit sales are dropping, you eventually reach a point when people stop buying and income falls off a cliff.

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It's [insert month] of 2016, and your Windows PC can still be owned by [insert document type]

P. Lee
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Re: The obligatory question

Where is my OS redesign?

How many of the binaries on my system does Word need access to? Why does the installer (rather than Word) not designate a data scratch area for each application instance and why doesn't the OS check with me if the application wants to read/write outside of this area?

Applications should not have free-run of user-space data. Any programs not installed officially should get severely sandboxed. Data can be copied in but not out. This is the OS responsibility, not Norton's nor VMware's. Or how about having properly installed applications register their mime types? The OS then checks the mime types of files being accessed outside of the application-allocated area and kills access to non-relevant files outside of the app's designated data area. Pwnd word can't crypto locker excel files. Flash in a browser gets flv files in its cache area- big whoop.

I get that this is different from using things like sort, grep and wc, but those are kicked off from shell. Who gives shell access to a browser or spreadsheet? If software installation has a security manifest, you should be able to add either containers with different rights, or add a filtered, virtualised FS to the application installation.

How about an auto versioning FS (hello vms) with purging only by elevated privilege. It helps crypto locker be less profitable.

OS vendors need to get their act together, especially those with high exposure.

Kill the value in pwning applications and the attacks go away.

I might even pay for that kind of thing.

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Nokia to Oz: 5G will need fibre, and lots of it

P. Lee
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Re: So 93% FTTP is the right build mix

That depends on the application.

If everyone in your family wants to connect / stream 4k home movies over 5G, then FTTP sounds like a great plan.

How about if I want to (shock horror) set up my own website for my home business or even just run a home-based remote desktop at a reasonable speed?

Think what opportunities open up for ISPs to provide cloud services before all that traffic hits their transit links.

These infrastructure projects are about getting things right for the next 10-20 years. Look at the last 10-20 and see what kind of increases you need to plan for. It isn't even just about the speed. Whatever speed you want to run at, fibre is going to do it, and you will have to roll it out at some point anyway.

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Safari 10 dumps Flash, Java, Silverlight, QuickTime in the trash

P. Lee
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Re: That is all well and good but...

And it does appear to be a whitelist per site, not per plugin-type.

So, do you trust flash from the BBC but would like to avoid drive-bys from tpb.ru? Not a problem.

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Patent trolls, innovation and Brexit: What the FT won't tell you

P. Lee
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Re: Hmmm. What to do.

Surely the point is that the larger the democracy, the less responsive it is to the people and the more prone to corruption it is, with a single leverage point and vast influence.

Dealing with lots of smaller nations makes it much harder to pull off a fait accompli, more likely that someone will throw a patent out and that may lead to the patent being over-turned, even where it has already been granted.

That's before we go anywhere near the point that the EU is not a sovereign country and there is no particular reason to have one law. If we mess up our patent system, at least we don't have to try to convince the whole of Europe that we need to fix it - we can do it ourselves, and we can do so more easily on our own than if we have to drag the the rest of the EU with us.

You may like the patent laws, but what happens when you've given sovereignty away and you have to deal with French-style labour laws? "Ever closer union," remember? Unfortunately, democracy scales badly. We don't have it for its own sake, we have it to allow self-determination, but law is mostly about quashing differences. The more differences you have with the fewer differences in laws, the more quashing is taking place.

When people feel persistently thwarted they do things like electing Donald Trump, or Le Pen, or support Robespierre.

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Apple WWDC: OS X is dead, long live macOS

P. Lee
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Re: So it's boring and mainstream?

>Can we go back to actual problems now?

Such as, "Where can I find an OS which doesn't require vendors' cloud services?"

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Don’t let the Barmy Brexiteers wreck #digital #europe

P. Lee
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Paris Hilton

Re: Aaargh

>On that basis you're better to be associated with Gove, Putin, Trump and the North Korean lad.

And those oppressors of humanity, the Norwegians... and don't forget the Swiss, they don't want to be in the EU either. Obviously, if we stayed, we'd have to got to war with the Swiss.

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Sophos U-turns on lack of .bat file blocking after El Reg intervenes

P. Lee
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Re: ren virus.csv virus.exe

Real hardcore hackers get their victim to use their own magnet, needle and steady hand... to remove their own building's hardcore.

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AWS Sydney's outage shows the value of a walk in the cloud

P. Lee
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Re: Yes, you don't

Banks using a cloud without geographical redundancy?

Hmmm

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Why everyone* hates Salesforce's Marc Benioff

P. Lee
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Re: More Baron Frankensteins-

>Fewer robber barons!

I suspect that is the point.

It isn't the increased efficiency that is objected to, it is the massive centralisation and consolidation which is being accompanied by new and innovative ways to bleed the customer, including taking features away to increase lock-in (MS VM translator) or to add them back later as an "upgrade" (Galaxy S7), finding ways of totally removing the financial benefits of improvements in hardware by hiking the software license costs (per core); vendors deliberately killing their own software industry to allow them to hawk their products "as a service" or to tie them to hardware which mysteriously has a totally fictitious end-of-life not driven by support costs, but by the need to make the customer purchase the whole thing again - rental by another name.

I like FLOSS - its the only "vendor" not deliberately making things worse for the customer.

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Why does an Android keyboard need to see your camera and log files – and why does it phone home to China?

P. Lee
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Re: That's yet another point caused by needless complexity

>So you want Google to wall up their garden with higher walls than Apple?

I think what might be desirable to el reg's audience are FLOSS repos for android.

You can keep your trivia apps, I just want vlc or mplayer, amarok firefox, kmail etc on a phone.

I trust those guys more than I trust google.

Alternatively a system of shims between apps and resources: a GPS fuzzer/usage verifier, a camera/mic use verifier, a contact data filter.

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Freeze, lastholes: USB-C and Thunderbolt are the ultimate physical ports

P. Lee
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Phew!

I'm glad it will be fine for the PCIe x16 Gen4 external graphics cards coming out next year...

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Don't go chasing waterfalls, please stick... Hang on. They're back

P. Lee
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Re: What is this article trying to say?

"Break fast, fix quickly" is not something the business sponsors involved with systems running cobol want to hear.

Agile might be fine for new things which don't have to work, but when your software supports a product which has moved from the innovation to exploitation phase of business usage, its time to protect the investment.

Too much innovation, not enough exploitation -> never turn a profit from your work

Too much exploitation, not enough innovation -> be overtaken by innovators

The trick is to keep the balance.

/credit -> TED

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Microsoft waltzes users through Azure by killing VM conversion tool

P. Lee
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Well we never saw that coming did we?

No siree! Removing features once market share is high enough to drive lock-in?

I wonder what it will be like when everything is in the cloud and there are no downloads ever?

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Ransomware dodges EMET

P. Lee
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Re: A crisis in winTel land

Possibly, but the question is, why is flash so privileged that exploiting it is worthwhile?

Sandbox that whole browser process and its children. No network socket access, chrooted disk, read-only disk except for a stub directory/Object storage, http/s access only via a hardened local OS proxy which logs and can filter.

Read-only OS partition? Read-only installed software partitions?

Browsers don't need privileges. Use repo's or execute by default in a sandbox.

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Intel reveals Xeon E7 v4: Is that 24TB in your pocket or are... oh, it is

P. Lee
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"Fewer cores means fewer bucks on enterprise software licenses."

Yeah, that's what we were told about CPU sockets, too.

Its all fun and games until you mess with someone's income model. Next up, software licensed on bogomips.

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Universe's shock rapidly expanding waistline may squash Einstein flat

P. Lee
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Re: Too early to tell.

>The 'Dark' is an explicit statement of ignorance.

And it's a good thing to admit that we don't know what's going on. I think the objection is that the terms "dark matter" and "dark energy" appear to be designed to give the impression that we know more than we do.

If we substitute P (pixie dust) for dark matter and M (magic) for dark energy we haven't actually got to change the equations.

This doesn't change the investigative science but it might redress the balance in the weight we give to scientific pronouncements based these things in the layman's mind.

"Dark matter is stuff we know is there but can't detect with today's instruments" and "sometimes the results don't tally with expectations" sounds like homeopathy with better jargon.

Undefined stuff with undefined effects is not strong science. That doesn't invalidate the idea, but for laymen, a caveat of "Here be dragons" might be more enlightening, even if it does strip the scientists of some of their priestly robes.

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North Korea clones Facebook, forgot to change default creds

P. Lee
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Re: Why is everything on the sign-in page in English?

So, do we still believe western media?

Because it tells us what we want to hear.

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Helium... No. Do you think this is some kind of game? Toshiba intros 8TB desktop drive

P. Lee
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Re: Cue the pain in 2.0001 years

Maybe the 8tb is the backup for the network.

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P. Lee
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Why 8 tb for gamers?

Maybe gamers are often tech heads who also run pvr's.

Maybe they rip all their CDs and DVDs to their home network too.

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You don't need no STEEENKING GPU, says Intel

P. Lee
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Re: Bloody 'Ell

>why would one want a Xeon for 4K streaming, pray tell ?

The only reason I can think is to split the a noisy workstation from an ultra-quiet frontend. Two 4k streams speaks to a dual-monitor setup and a fairly good LAN connection.

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Not two, not four, but 10 cores in Intel's new PC powerhouse

P. Lee
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Re: Coincidence??

>10 times the telemetry?

I doubt it links to Windows. More likely they've disabled 6 cores so they can sell an easily manufactured upgrade later.

Mouth, meet nasty taste.

Interestingly, if arbitrarily multi core systems take off, it leaves scope for popping lots of cheap arm chips in a box.

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Surface Book nightmare: Microsoft won't fix 'Sleep of Death' bug

P. Lee
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Re: Latest Drivers do help, somewhat...

Hibernate is fine if you have a low spec machine.

Load it up with ram and it becomes less usable.

As lots of other people have said, several generations of Macs do it just fine and the whole point of a vendor-appliance is that they have supposedly sorted out issues like this.

It's another war story to add to the list of, "we're stuck with MS because of the cost of moving, but we do quite loath them." and with top-end machines like these, it will infect the minds of important people who will assume MS is rubbish in general. That can cost MS in the long-run and its why it is better to hold off releasing a product until it is ready.

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P. Lee
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Re: Still copying Apple

>If your Mac is in sleep mode, hitting a key on a Bluetooth keyboard or moving a Bluetooth mouse will wake it up

Which is *really* annoying. They keyboard is fine, but a mouse shouldn't wake it up - they are far too sensitive for that.

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The Windows Phone story: From hope to dusty abandonware

P. Lee
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Re: Too little too late

>>>Every one I know hates Microsoft software

Perhaps "hates" is over-egging it.

It does, however, remind most people of the 9-to-5 grind. Who wants to take that with them at the weekend?

Another fail of Universal UX.

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P. Lee
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Re: "Universal" anything is always a disaster...

>Lying behind that is probably a mistaken belief that 'we'll get it right even if everyone else has failed'.

I don't think that was it. Their problem was that there few windows phone apps so they were hoping to leverage their desktop application dev army. Hence, the abomination which is W8.

They should have gone for security and privacy as their USP, but they shot that idea down with W10 and then viciously stomped all over it with their backports to W7.

So yes, I'll take the free "upgrade" to W10, but it will sit on a very lonely and under-utilised partition with a couple of games. Another freebie W10 system runs in a VM for customers who insist on that sort of thing. All *my* stuff gets done on Linux. Even my gaming purchases only go forward with that magic little "steamplay" icon.

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P. Lee
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Re: I wonder when Microsoft is finally going to pull the plug.

>Intel's problem is not the architecture ... its the management.

Or perhaps the profit margins.

ARM gets by on very little. If Intel start producing low power, low cost x86, will it eat into the Windows laptop market, but at very low margins? Would it be hard to justify other products?

The danger is in whether ARM will be able to move up and eat that market anyway. Or will everything go Cloud/VDI, so that ARM doesn't need to move that far up market for Intel to lose that segment?

My guess is that Intel want to hold off that day for as many years as possible.

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$10bn Oracle v Google copyright jury verdict: Google wins, Java APIs in Android are Fair Use

P. Lee
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Trollface

Re: Google must have paid big bucks...

Obvious Troll is Obvious

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Dropbox gets all up in your kernel with Project Infinite. Cue uproar

P. Lee
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Holmes

"Clunky at best in a web browser"

Wassat Sherlock? A web browser is not an OS? Heresy!

I have some sympathy for the idea of a kernel-based system, in that we'd expect other remote storage protocols such as iscsi to live in the kernel, and we'd also expect proprietary device drivers to be in the kernel, but (and its a big but!) I think the main issue is that we just don't trust web2.0 companies to behave properly. Would I trust Javascript devs with my kernel?

No.

But then again, cloud storage is not for me either.

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A UK digital driving licence: What could possibly go wrong?

P. Lee
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Re: OK, I'll bite

If I want a digital license, I'll use my mobile phone to take a picture of it.

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China caught astroturfing social networks

P. Lee
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Re: Will they carry out a similar study ...

>I mean, the Chinese didn't invent this

Yeah, Western governments are much worse

Ooh! 50c!

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