* Posts by P. Lee

3688 posts • joined 4 Dec 2007

Ed Snowden crocked cloud, says VMware CEO Pat Gelsinger

P. Lee
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Re: How is it possible

>that you can get to be CEO of an operation like VMware and think that there won't be difficulties with the varying data retention laws in different jurisidctions if you use just one 'data cloud' globally?

I'm sure he does know. He's trolling because otherwise his event would really not be newsworthy.

'Tis but click-bait which aids him and the press.

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Microsoft backports data slurp to Windows 7 and 8 via patches

P. Lee
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Re: MicroNSAoft.

Nice if you have the option of Linux, but if you don't, ms has just removed one obstacle to upgrading - what you already have is better.

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The future of IT is – to deliver automation. Discuss

P. Lee
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And the upshot is...

the end of Windows?

I jest of course, but for automation to work you need to be able to access the data and GUIs are generally quite bad at that. You end up going from a little script to automate a small process to a huge project which fails. Automation is often about transforming data and that's where *nix excels. That perl script is going to chomp through the process much faster than your excel spreadsheet. Batch extract, process and batch import. 120,000 records? Easy and no running out of memory either.

I remember processing firewall changes. They would arrive in Word documents with random table elements. Even a manual cut&paste into vim, save as text and then running them through a script saved heaps of time.

Of course MS does very well is a massive army of VB/Word macro and template programmers. My own experience of that is that it is a living hell of fragility. Drive mappings going here there and everywhere. Everyone on a slightly different version, or at least different data cached who-knows-where.

Herein lies the key as I see it: use computers to process data and keep the UI minimal. It's often the UI which is difficult, not the data processing. Chain processes together to keep each step simple. Often a cron job every few minutes is easier to do than a true on-demand system. Make sure you check for sane results before committing data.

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T-Mobile US CEO calls his subscribers thieves, gripes about 'unlimited' limited tethering

P. Lee
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Re: Unlimited doesn't mean unlimited then...

The problem is that it's marketing. They call it unlimited knowing you'll self limit on a phone. Why not just say 9gig and that's your lot? For most people a phone is not for calls but for comms. Saying unlimited in large text and redefining it in small print is not acceptable. Just say what you mean!

Relying on client side reporting was always going to fail. This isn't a new problem and he knew about it before the plans were sold. That sounds like a dumb move on his part. Maybe they need a CEO who has an clue about how people use mobile data.

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What sounds like a silly yoga-fitness-dance craze, and lost $325m in value in 8 years? Zimbra

P. Lee
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Who says trickle down economics doesn't work?

In other news, value created from nothing returns to nothing shocker!

I find kmail nice. Not as nice colours but rather capable.

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New low for humanity: ONE BEELLION lost souls log on to Facebook in one day

P. Lee
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Re: meanwhile

> feel the urge to comment on this.

>No, seriously.

You comment is incomplete without a picture of either a cat, a dog, a sign or some food. Is there something else on your mind... mass murder probably?

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In redneck heaven, internet outages are the American Way

P. Lee
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Re: It's a sport....

>"Welcome to Australia, where the wildlife want to kill you

Not just the fauna either, the flora have a tendency to spontaneously combust and try to burn you alive.

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P. Lee
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>An Internet Outage is when you and your neighbor sleep the night in the other's hammock

... and you've forgotten to turn your webcam off.

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Win10 Insider build 10532: Avoid if you run Chrome 64-bit

P. Lee
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Re: Trust

+1 Just because the powers that be might not be abusing things now, why would you tempt them with the capability?

Let me rephrase that. Just because the powers that be aren't abusing you now, why would you give them the option or support a company/product which gives them the option?

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OS X remote malware strikes Thunderbolt, hops hard drive swaps

P. Lee
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Re: Doh!

>And what happens when an actual ROM has an exploit in it? Good luck trying to fix it...

That's why you keep it small and using well-tested tech with very limited functionality. (You could put it on a SD card in a slot which can't be written to by the general OS.)

If you need to update things, you write the software to an external device, move a slider switch (or hold a pin in a "reset" hole) to "config mode" and reboot. The rom then looks at the external device loads all local device drivers and updates the flash (now enabled by the slider switch).

It wouldn't be fool-proof, but it would prevent firmware malware from being downloaded an installed on the sly.

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Associated Press sues FBI for impersonating its site to install spyware

P. Lee
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Wider Issues

As I understand it, the issue really wasn't this case. This case was just when they realised what was going on.

The issue is that the FBI are impersonating the press and AP wants to know to what extent this is happening as it may actually put their people in danger in other situations. My reading of it is that they probably want some oversight of the process. I suspect the "harm to the brand" is a ploy to get the issue addressed in court. The press want and are expected to be seen as non-combatants in dangerous situations in which they may have to operate and will want to distance themselves from being known as part of the police force.

That seems reasonable to me.

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Travel back to the 19-Z80s this weekend

P. Lee
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Coat

Will entrance Bee Moderatrixed?

There's an ABBA song in there somewhere...

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Win10 PCs still stuck on slow boat from China, warehouses empty

P. Lee
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Re: Microsoft refused to comment

And we certainly won't fill in the time by making comparisons between the desirability of MS' new OS and the Ashley Madison website, no sir we won't!

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Nano – meet her: AMD's Radeon R9 4K graphics card for non-totally bonkers gamers, people

P. Lee
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Re: $$

Smaller might mean more expensive if you need more expensive materials to move the heat faster, but I agree - this looks like trying to sell a bin-sorted chips as premium. That's a business which apparently doesn't want to be seen as trying to do its best for its customers. It's accountancy-driven. It's a shame. I want AMD to do well but they just keep messing up.

Am I the only one who wants a pseudo-all-in-one? If I've got a large screen, hide the cpu/graphics behind it in a couple of boxes with large, slow fans, maybe with water cooling if the angles are hard. I like all-in-one tidiness but if I wanted a laptop-spec, I'd get a big screen and a laptop. ITX has missed the boat a bit. We need a new hidden-behind-the-screen form-factor standard.

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Windows 10 blamed (partly) for stalled PC sales recovery

P. Lee
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Re: Who Cares..

>..After all Windows isnt a necessity anymore

Nice try, I wish that were true. Sadly its not true for most businesses.

What is true is that the OS just provides a platform on which to run applications. Businesses don't run on an OS for its features, they run Applications to facilitate business requirements.

The Applications don't need a Store or Cortana, they need a way to use a CPU and memory, read and write data to storage, interface with a user and communicate across networks. Some applications are used to distribute others.

XP did this ok. W7 added a bit more security and enough memory to last a long time. W8 added tablet access (which very few people in business need or wanted to rewrite their apps for) and W10 adds, erm, what exactly?

W10 might be a bit of a boon to business if a Corporate Store is easier/cheaper to use than the current software distribution software, but most companies already have a sunk investment in software management. It might be a requirement for those who need a "supported OS" but not for a few years yet.

W10 might never be enough is if Cloud means even Windows apps get containerised. I'm not talking (necessarily) AWS, I'm talking the logic extracted from a Windows-specific app and maybe the UI moved to a browser. The whole lot could still be installed locally. I mean, if you have to rewrite the UI to be a universal app, wouldn't you just use HTML instead allowing "clientless" network execution and possibly Cloud-provided software rental at the same time?

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Vote now: Who can solve a problem like Ashley Madison?

P. Lee
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Re: Even more obvious a candidate.

>Tony Blair.

I think you've missed how the site operates. Unless you're gay or one of the presumably very busy one percenters, AM gets paid, you get... nothing.

Forget the privacy problem, until that news came out, AM still had a chance, because fools and their money are always easily parted.

Now though, AM, through its adverts, have climbed the Tower of Wrongness to the height of the top floor of Irony and are about to leap off into depths of the Custard Pie of Laughing Stock. If you want to play doctors and nurses and resuscitate them, you will need the services of one Dr Frankenstein. This one, however, I suspect is going to be reported as "missing presumed dead - last seen drifting off in icy waters, alone, wearing nothing but custard, with a lawsuit sticking out of its chest."

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Windows 10 now on 75 million devices, says Microsoft

P. Lee
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Trollface

75m devices have W10

Well, that's our Surface inventory sorted.

Now, take it to the landfill please!

(with apologies to Yes Minister)

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The most tragic thing about the Ashley Madison hack? It was really 1% actual women

P. Lee
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So the crackers were correct - it was a scam

They were selling a product they could never deliver.

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Motorola monsters Apple's swipe-to-unlock patent in German court

P. Lee
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Re: Break that self perpetuating game..

>Quite a lot of these patents are defensive in nature: if you don't patent it, someone else will do it and screw you over.

Cheaper to file than to fight in court. That sounds reasonable, but in that case, they should have contributed it to a patent pool and not held onto it.

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Spanking Spam King: Sanford Wallace faces jail for Facebook flood

P. Lee
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Coat

Someone posts junk on facebook.

Investigators are shocked that anyone realised it.

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'Hans free' mobe gag crowned Fringe's funniest

P. Lee
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Big Brother

Following the Russian banning of Western-manufactured cleaning products

"Police finds two grams of Persil detergent on a man in Ivanovo," the comedians of @Lie_News tweeted. "In court, the defendant tried unsuccessfully to prove that the washing powder was merely cocaine."

(reported on bbc.com)

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The container-cloud myth: We're not in Legoland anymore

P. Lee
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Is someone really admitting this?

Cloud is a bit like having all your GOSUBs running across a network?

You have to rewrite all your apps to take advantage of it?

Don't get me wrong, it works really well for people like Netflix - geo-distribution of data where data security is not important and scaling is. However, I don't see many non-web2.0 companies where random scaling is important - certainly not important enough to rewrite your apps. By the time you've rewritten your apps for ultimate flexibility and reuse, you could have done something a lot cheaper and less brittle.

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C For Hell: Data centre meltdown for irate customers as C4L GOES TITSUP

P. Lee
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Re: Another day...

Not sure why you got all the downvotes there.

Cloud uptime is generally quite good. Having said that, a seventeen hour outage is long, even for a small business with no support.

The only thing I would say is that if you run your own stuff, is that your own stuff is generally simpler and therefore less likely to go wrong. You are more likely to be able to hack together a work-around than a cloud-provider can. Popping an extra 1G NIC into a device is easier than working out how to deal with an extra 40G going somewhere unexpected.

Multiple cloud providers are an option, but then you need to be careful about who controls DNS and how wide-area load-balancing is carried out.

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High-heeled hacker builds pen-test kit into her skyscraper shoes

P. Lee
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Mushroom

Re: http://imgur.com/a/hj07m

>VERY DANGEROUS! DO NOT APPROACH!

May explode at high altitude!

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Blueprints revealed: Oracle crams Sparc M7 and InfiniBand into cheaper 'Sonoma' chips

P. Lee
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>Maybe the manufacturing cost is like $1 or $2 but they are sticking $1000 price tags on the things.

Do they still even sell chips or even sparc hosts?

It's been ages since I used a sparc but they were never about high-volume throughput, they were about being rock solid. That attribute has been devalued as systems scaled up and everyone has much wider redundancy and failover solutions, than "it hasn't gone down in living memory - if it does, we'll restart it, but its rather unlikely."

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Carders fleece $4.2 million from Victoria's MyKi transport agency

P. Lee
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The Law of Unintended Consequences

Myki's purpose is to take money from users before it is needed to pay for a ticket and to hold on to it. It is a finance scam that has very little to do with paying for tickets to travel.

Live by credit, die by credit.

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AshMad search outfit Trustify to El Reg: 'Trust us, we're the good guys'

P. Lee
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Joke

Oi Richard!

I've just checked - you're not exposed.

Oh wait....

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Twenty years since Windows 95, and we still love our Start buttons

P. Lee
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Re: NT - Long filenames

but NT did things properly, such as requiring graphics to be arbitrated by the kernel... and we understood that that was much harder and slower to do. The NT model we knew was the stable, sensible thing to do but we just couldn't afford it yet and there were many times when speed was a more useful attribute than stability.

Yes, 95 was a kludge, but only if coming from NT, not if you were coming from 3.11 and still had to operate in a DOS world. You could say NT 3.51 failed because it was too far ahead of its time (not as far as LISA/Apple ///). W95 gave NT the breathing space needed to let the hardware catch up and when it did NT4/XP was waiting to step in. The software (even OS software) was driving the hardware requirements market and that was ok because it was better (in some way) than what went before.

MS' current problem is that their software is not "better." W8 was written for tablets not PC's. It wasn't better for a PC so no-one wanted it there. It was fine on x86 tablets. W10 with Cortana is actually worse. Apart from Cortana sounding like "[Ford] Cortina", it is basically the PC equivalent of the Samsung fridge which leaks login details. You don't really need the USPs - Windows store and Cortana; the security turns out to leave something to be desired and still with the tablet interface? Is Cortana useful? Probably, like Siri, when you're in your car and want to dictate a text message or for voice calling. On a PC - desktop, laptop or tablet? Not really.

I'm sure how much to blame MS. Yes they've got things really wrong, but if we really have reached the point where we don't need new features then they're in trouble regardless. However, I suspect that like many incumbents they can't think outside the solution they already have. As I've said before, I think they should have spent the time working on a new security model, with the OS arbitrating security access to raw sockets and the like. That would have been a feature to at least make the IT people happy. They could have crowed about it, demonstrated how it keeps your data safely on your computer, rather than snaffling your data themselves. They could have shown how it blocks zero-days and forces malware/trojans to reveal their network traffic via OS-provided HTTP and TLS services. That DVD backup software you downloaded, would you like to allow it to connect to a w.x.y.z? (Located in Outer Mongolia) (Yes/No/Always/Log Transfer/Log Data): Sent A bytes / Received B bytes....

It would be really cool to have IPSEC tied to a user, not a host, providing network connection authentication not a tunnel.

They could have offered a subscription service to their cloud providing IP-address geo-blocking because I rarely need to talk to servers in eastern Europe or China or Russia or the Middle East or Japan or south-east Asia.

How about restricting applications' disk access unless done via an OS-provided and logged GUI element/api call? No, that flash streaming player can't have access to My Documents, even if it running under user "me," but it can store cookies in this nice little ramdisk filesystem I have located here...

All these features would have slowed things down. But would they be worth it? I think so. I think you'd have business such as Sony and the OPM crying out for such features. A new browser MS? Is that what the world needs most?

And yes, the tablet GUI would have been a great option, but I don't need it without a touch-screen so it must be an option. It's one I simply don't need.

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P. Lee
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Re: while enabling ... the Windows Store

>how many of those that have said that they are shifting to Linux have actually done it?

I moved to linux quite a while ago.

I still have W7 in a VM on my work laptop because I need "work" apps which are windows only.

I actually two instances of W8 as well. One is for Steam with a Steam icon on the taskbar which is all I need to click. Every few months I load it up and run updates but I don't really use it, as I have Steam under Linux too. The other instance is for one piece of software which is Windows only and needs more 3D acceleration than VMware can provide. Both instances are on the same hardware so I get away with a single license. Not sure if I'm supposed to do that or not...

It was the non-pirate-able W7 and lack of Windows functionality which pushed me over the edge. I have a server in the garage, a big-screen/stereo connected desktop in the lounge, a work laptop, a laptop running video on the back porch for exercising, an imac desktop and now two mac laptops (wife's work and kids school).

How much is that going to cost me to license for windows? One laptop has an OEM XP license, one has an OEM W7 home license. Given that I'm likely to want a domain rather than a workgroup? The macs were using iscsi for time machine. Everyone thinks iscsi is a business protocol and charges correspondingly for target software. No problem with linux. Apple doesn't even bother with a client so AFP is my clean way of getting off snow-leopard which has a free 32bit iscsi driver from SNS. Again, no problem with Linux.

It turns out that MythTV is the linux/osx killer app for me and it needs access to the hardware to run fast enough on my laptop, so no VM under Windows. XP is unsupported but guess what? The hardware still does what I need it to do - video display. Ok, that's disingenuous, support has never really been an issue, but I do like the fact that I never have to deal with licensing. Drag down an ISO every year or so, pop it under my TFTP boot server thing and off I go. I don't usually need to do even that, but I do it in case things go badly wrong with the online updates.

I'm not MS-free. The imac has vnc which I use to edit CVs in Word. Matching presentation for a CV with who's going to read it is important, but I don't use it when it isn't critical - normally I use libreoffice and output to PDF, but contract agencies like Word because their search software seems to deal with it better.

So congrats MS - I no longer infringe on your "intellectual property." You have made an honest man of me. I'm not sure if the result was what you intended. I'll still use your stuff when I have to, but I've gone with "that could be quite useful" for W7 to "I don't really need that (but I guess I might eventually have to go there)" for W8 to "I'm never gonna touch that with a bargepole - and I can't see anyone else touching it either." for W10. MS seem to have taken their Vista experience and asked the question... "double or nothing?"

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P. Lee
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Re: Ah, memories...

>I didn't think of it as bloat back then, since games such as Ultima 7 and Wing Commander 2 (with the speech pack) needed even more floppies...

I seem to think NT3.51 came on 1.44M floppies. 31 of them, IIRC. I did install it a couple of times and yes, I got nearly to the end before finding a corrupt disk... grrrrr!

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That thing we do in the UK? Should be ILLEGAL in the US, moans ex-State monopoly BT

P. Lee
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Evidently you don't remember what an execrable mess the railways were under state ownership.

True.

All I remember is that the trip into London didn't cost almost 1GBP/mile, took 35 minutes rather than 75 minutes and was available outside peak times with relative frequency.

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Směrť Špionam! BAN Windows 10, it SPIES too much, exclaim Russians

P. Lee
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Re: Simple solution

>The data from Win10 should also go to the Russians. Problem solved.

You're right, I think that problem has been solved.

--

However, the backlash against W10 is just further proof that this linux thing is a pinko commie conspiracy to hobble our security services and should be banned as aiding and abetting terrorists and dictatorships around the world. We didn't spend all that effort winning WW2, Vietnam, iRaq and Afghanistan to be thwarted by some ungrateful Europeans who want to run their own rubbish email servers and refuse to pay for things that have no business being free. They should be grateful for our shield of protective nukes and corporate hegemony which have kept a few of us richer them them, which is their punishment from God for being foreign.

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Ashley Madison spam starts, as leak linked to first suicide

P. Lee
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Re: Spam started...

>here are decent sites if you look but sadly you may be better off just downloading the 10 gig dump and checking yourself

Why would you bother? If you signed up, you should assume that you're in there. What are you going to do about it?

As for "imposing a personal view of morality," well, I guess if you don't subscribe to that view, you won't be bothered by practical implications of it - the data going public. That would be a bit like calling yourself a Christian but being embarrassed to tell people you go to church.

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Spotify now officially even worse than the NSA

P. Lee
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Re: II thought El Reg was exagerrating

It's the "you won't be able to use our service but we're still going to bill you" that cracks me up. There's no technical problem, but we just feel like doing it.

I suspect spotify is going to learn how fickle Internet users of free services are. Perhaps not straight away, but it will happen. Someone will accidentally allow spotify to tweet or advertise on fb that they are listening to Celine Dion, the newspapers will pick it up and the userbase will disappear.

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Want security? Next-gen startups show how old practices don't cut it

P. Lee
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Re: People "trained in IT security" are a lot of the problem

>Within 30/60/90 days an infiltrator will have managed to syphon everything out, even over a bumpkin broadband link.

You'd be surprised how many people put in firewalls and then allow a fair amount of outbound traffic from their DMZ hosts. SMTP from their webhosts to their hardened, but non-monitoring mail servers and DNS straight out to the internet, for example - that's quite handy for ex-filtration of data.

Another problem is encryption everywhere. It's quite hard to get your NIDS to be fast enough to do decryption and security checking fast enough to be usable. Actually, it isn't so much that its really hard technically, the problem is that all the security vendor appliances are pitched at high-end customers with prices to match and are performance-limited to ensure upgrades every few years when they go "end of life."

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Now Ashley Madison hackers reveal 'CEO's emails and source code'

P. Lee
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Re: Or the opposite could happen....

>Cheating is an action that is expected to cause harm, by definition.

Actually, no. Cheating just means you aren't following "the rules". "Survival of the fittest" implies it is prudent to break the rules if you can gain competitive advantage. Anyway, "the rules" are just a thing society made up and not an objective standard. Morality is just a social construct to increase our likelihood of survival, right? There are no moral absolutes, right?

Besides, definitions can be changed, by law if required, allowing the police to be used to enforce the change.

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Yet another Android app security bug: This time 'everything is affected'

P. Lee
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Unhappy

Re: But where's the attack vector?

>the exploit would be via apps that haven't been properly vetted

The whole thing is designed to provide a way to download random software from people you don't know, have no relationship with and certainly and aren't (intentionally) paying any money to. What could possibly go wrong?

We measure trust by relationship cues, but IT replaces personal and real relationships with a mediated, crippled proxy for real ones. The trust measures therefore will always be garbled. If I go into a bank branch, I have a building (which I may recognise) and staff (again, whom I may recognise - or if I don't, I have confidence that someone does and would stop interlopers) which implies some investment and permanency. On a computer (of any sort) I have little picture of a logo. If I install stuff on a Windows computer, I'm fairly sure Mr Gates or Mr Cook haven't approved the action and I get little warnings ("admin privileges required"). On a phone, the phone vendor appears to have curated and certified apps which he is now encouraging me to use. There are no warnings about "admin privileges required" or "this may harm your computer." "GET" and "Download Now" is all over the place and the full-screen nature of applications further gives the impression that if you can't see an app, it isn't running.

I get that security is a hard problem, but knowing that, there should have been extra care taken in OS design, not dumping it all on the J/Dalvik/whatever VM which was originally designed to run trusted enterprise applications on protected servers. It feels as though we're back with IE6.

Most depressingly of all, the outsider in the mobile game, who is likely to need to be the most innovative and could use security as a USP to gain a foothold, is MS, and they have decided just to ape the others. They could have re-written Windows for mobile as Apple re-wrote IOS from OSX. MS could have rewritten Windows to build on all the things we have learnt about security, but they haven't. They just want to reuse existing code. Its the very worst of accountancy-driven product development and ignores the users requirements, stated or not. At least Apple try to anticipate users' needs. They may be locked into a mobile model with no incentive to change, but MS is not. As for Google, they've got profits, they should at least be hiring extra bodies for code review.

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P. Lee
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Re: But...but..but...

>Linux running Java, it's a lovely sturdy wooden desk that someone's put their horrible woodworm colony on.

... and then placed outside in the park under a tree with low-hanging branches, right next to the street.

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People bored of mobes, say magic quadrant wizards

P. Lee
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Re: Too Dear! Too Flawed!

Have an upvote!

I too look covetously, although my iphone 3G does need an upgrade, but I think... that, or a macbook air?

As for the magic quadrant... top *left* anyone? Ahem. Sooo transparent el reg ;)

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P. Lee
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Holmes

>From now on, I'll just replace either with "cheese".

My point exactly, Jennifer.

-

On a possibly related note, I heard of some research recently where it was suggested that theatrical entertainment (mostly TV/film) lights up the emotion-processing centres of the brain with its constant diet of fear, excitement, joy, etc. At the same time, the pre-frontal cortex (critical-thinking) goes dark. Its hard to enjoy such entertainment when you apply logic to what you are seeing and hearing. It gets worse with music videos, which are designed to change scenes faster than you can process the images. The point being, that the brain "prunes" itself for functions we don't use and expands the capabilities for things we do use. Thus a diet of emotional claptrap actually reduces your ability to reason and increases emotional response to stimuli.

I wonder if this has anything to do with the increasing lack of precision and variety in language? Compare (children's) literature pre-1940 with today. Are thought processes and hence language today simply a reflection of unfocussed, fuzzy ("like"), emotional thinking? Is there a link between TV and violence, not so much "monkey see, monkey do" but the fact that we are more likely to make a knee-jerk emotional response to threats when we have suppressed the development of our critical thinking faculties and spent our time immersed in emotional stupidity?

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Biz that OK'd Edward Snowden for security clearance is fined $30m for obvious reasons

P. Lee
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Re: "Obvious reasons" ?

>Did Snowden have a history of whistleblowing then?

No, the "obvious reasons" refer to why USIS was fined:

1) "the government" is never to blame

2) someone must be blamed

3) We need to keep focus on other people's failings, not the government's failings.

4) We need to further legitimise the pursuit of Snowden by having already convicted someone of something.

Perhaps we should have a whip-round to help USIS out.

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Microsoft turns on Windows 10 file backup to Azure

P. Lee
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the chance to store data for 99 years.

and that chance is... zero?

Seriously, go back 99 years and see how many tech companies from then are still going now.

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The Ashley Madison files – are people really this stupid?

P. Lee
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Holmes

>>After spending the day reading through this database I wonder how many lives are going to be ruined by this hack.

Er, no. The hack ruined no-one's life. Signing up to the site is what causes damage.

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EE Harrier Mini grounded by errant Wi-Fi calling upgrade

P. Lee
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Re: Cognitive dissonance here ...

Do we want "tight integration" of everything?

No.

Do we want a little button which says "reset to factory defaults"

Yes.

Do we want to be able to open the phone and press a little button which allows a TFTP/USB/Serial Line boot?

Yes. Hey, if you used a light/LED interface, you could just fill a whole room with phones and flash the whole lot in one go.

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Mumsnet founder 'swatted by misogynist griefers'

P. Lee
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Re: Set theory

>Given that the number of women committing adultery is exactly equal to the number of men, this seems unlikely.

That's not very, er, "Modern" of you.

There's also the possibility that there are lots of men trying (and mostly failing) to have an affair, with just a few very promiscuous women.

I have a sneaky suspicion that linking "misogynist" with "griefers" is a mistake. That implies that they have some philosophical basis for their actions - probably not griefers in that case. Either Mumsnet has misunderstood griefers or they rae falling into the trap of saying "if you aren't for us, you're against us" which irritates people.

Haters gonna hate. I think it was a mistake to turn this into "thing."

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Pirate MEP: Microsoft's walled garden is no consumer pleasure park

P. Lee
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>Corporate isn't going anywhere, they can get a garden inside the garden.

Or more likely, they get control of their own garden.

They are used to deploying things and being able to remove things at will, so no change there. There's no way MS would mess with them intentionally, though I can see a very well paved road to Hell...

Small end-users are another matter. However I wouldn't be surprised if this was a slightly overzealous legal department rather than a strategy. If they pulled even one of their own pirated games off a PC, they would get slaughtered for it. What *might* be going on is that XBox might become available as a virtualised environment in Windows and in that scenario, they might be a little more aggressive.

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Windows Server 2016 Preview 3 brings containers at last

P. Lee
Silver badge

>So, it remains to be seen how many people will bother to make, test, and debug container packages for Windows Server as well as for Linux.

It's probably more for commercial providers - "Runs on AWS, also on Azure and your private cloud."

It might also be the way MS deploys services in the future.

It will be interesting to see how the licensing pans out.

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Ashley Madison keeps calm, carries on after hackers expose lives of millions of its users

P. Lee
Silver badge
Facepalm

Re: Fake users

>Tinder is free and even more discreet, not sure why anyone would pay for a site like this.

Were you expecting an answer more sophisticated than "because the chic in the advert is hot"?

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Hackers exploiting wide-open Portmap to amp up DDoS attacks

P. Lee
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Coat

Re: why?)

>"I once left Hercules support off the install disk I made for my Gran, and caught hell"

Your gran is still running monochrome graphics on an IBM text-only screen?

That is dedication to retro-computing!

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Raspberry Pi gains new FreeBSD distribution

P. Lee
Silver badge

That would be, "over-entitled militant lunatic, Sir!

Jokes aside, I'm a big linux fan, but I always have the feeling it's BSD which does things in the proper manner whereas linux just throws things together. I really would love BSD to be huge, more popular, better supported than linux and yet I know it just isn't and won't be.

It makes me a little sad. In many scenarios, we need more secure operating systems more than we need more speed, yet faster is all we hear about.

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