* Posts by P. Lee

3089 posts • joined 4 Dec 2007

Ugly, incomplete, buggy: Windows 10 faces a sprint to the finish

P. Lee
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Re: "Hey, Camilla. What can I do for You?"

>Now, what do you suggest for people who use Windows-only accountancy packages, CAD suites, and play the occasional game?

There are quite a few games under linux. Steam is your friend.

Accountancy shouldn't be a problem - get VMware Player so you can move your software between hardware instances.

There are CAD programs from linux. GIYF. If this is a business the odd OS license cost is probably negligible next to the CAD software cost if you've gone Autocad. Apparently Chief Architect X can be moved to Linux if you have a windows machine you can borrow to do the initial install. Your VM might work there. YMMV since it isn't even that stable on Windows.

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P. Lee
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Re: RTM

re: Supported lifetime of the device

Badly put. It could mean, "for as long as we decide to support the device."

The problem is MS' Byzantine licensing scheme. You haven't bought a W10 license for the lifetime of W10, you've got a W10 license for the lifetime of a particular device instance.

Even if people are mis-understanding things, MS have generated a bit of a PR failure from what was supposed to be a PR triumph. Working out what MS really means is evidently too hard. Regardless of whether you think people are spreading FUD or are stupid, the end result is poor for MS. If they had said, "all non-enterprise, non-Pro Vista, W7 and W8 licenses can have an free upgrade to W10" it would have been somewhat clearer. Don't add licensing weasel-words to your PR, it makes you look dodgy.

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P. Lee
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>The default Start Menu style is the merged Metro/Win 7 style.

But WHY?

There is a tablet mode - use the metro style with that. There is a desktop mode, use the W7 mode with that.

Don't splat tiles around in menus when I'm using a mouse - that just makes me have to move the mouse more.

IS this design based on someone's ego and rank?

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Does Big Tech hire white boys ahead of more skilled black people and/or women?

P. Lee
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Paris Hilton

Re: better call the NAACP

Is that you, Undercover Brother?

White She-Devel ---------------------->

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Facebook kills pic of Mohammed weeks after Zuck's Je suis Charlie!

P. Lee
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Re: "If a country's laws are crap, it is up to that country's citizens to get them changed"

>I'm sure the Saudis would love to hear your suggestions on how to change their laws when political parties are outlawed and you can be imprisoned and flogged for criticising the royal family who hold all positions of power.

But you don't know whether the majority of people love the king there. We have "sovereign nations" specifically to prevent international meddling, which leads to war. Otherwise the Saudis could claim that most Frenchies agree (they don't? how do you know for sure?) that Mohammed shouldn't be depicted so punishing Hebbdo with the death penalty was the right thing to do. Angry words get spoken, stones thrown, perhaps the odd missile and Shell.

The Americans in particular seem to have no concept of geography and restrictions on their jurisdiction. Just because you are right and someone else is wrong, does not mean that you should beat the living daylights out of them. We hold this to be self-evident, because we've seen doing otherwise starts a lot of wars and being at war is a lot worse than not being allowed to draw funny pictures of Mohammed.

So, we pass laws that allow us to speak more or less freely, but we don't go around the world saying, "What, your citizens can't vote? We'll bomb them then." At least we shouldn't. At least, we didn't used to.

As far as FB is concerned, it complies with French law and Turkish law, which is probably right.

Because you support free speech and condemn lunatics, it doesn't mean you go around breaking local laws in their jurisdiction.

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What do China, FBI and UK have in common? All three want backdoors in Western technology

P. Lee
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Re: Communication equipment

>There is a requirement for all communication equipment commercialized in the EU that says the communications going trough it should be interceptable.

That's true I think on the network side - you can't set up a phone company where the kit doesn't provide interception capabilities. However, encryption is now happening at the application level in the client, since no-one trusts the telcos any more. So the requirement has gone from compromising the network, in one place which was relatively out-of-sight, requires physical access etc, to compromising every application everywhere, remotely.

As Schneier says, we can make secure systems, or we can make insecure systems but we can't make a secure system which can only be snooped by the "good guys."

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Microsoft 'showers gold' on anti-Google Cyanogen and its Android alternative

P. Lee
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Re: That'll please Google

Two ways to go here:

1) Brand proliferation. A non-Google Android will keep privacy advocates away from MS which might offer a more business-friendly, non-snooping option.

2) If I were MS, I might well consider giving up the phone market to concentrate on tablets where Office strengths lie. Do proper Outlook on Android (done), make sure there is a non-google android on the market which can host Outlook and pick up the license payments from Android phones. Its an ego hit, but MS already seem to have abandoned Windows Phone as a Tier 1 platform. This would be a proper "third place" strategy rather than continuing the emperor’s new clothes charade. They can always degrade the Android experience if their own mobile strategy takes off. No-one expects great things of office on a phone anyway, so not having Windows underneath is no great loss.

The downside to (2) is if phones take off as pocket computers with attachments to larger screens. MS can counter this by license bundling - if you have a Windows desktop, you get cheap android outlook. If you don't, you have to pay for a Windows desktop license on top of your Outlook license.

One thing is for certain, in the long term, you will not be able to save money by putting Linux or OSX under an MS application. That would be unacceptable to MS.

Remember Linux with multiple user GUI logins? That wasn't too hard was it? With those 8-core phones coming online can't we virtualise things? In-coming phone functions hold meta-contact lists (without slurp-send capabilities) and can check CLI data etc against both logins' phonebooks and the one with the matching contact data wins screen access. If both match or neither match, one login is designated "preferred" or "high security" and that one wins. Google needs to do this if it wants to get the business market. Each user doesn't need different security features, its just so users can allow one login to be managed by the company without giving up control and privacy (haha) on their phone.

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Google Translate MEAT GRINDER turns gay into 'faggot', 'poof', 'queen'

P. Lee
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Re: Fact Hunt!

>In the mean time, single interest, narrow-focus pressure groups are attempting not to increase the functionality, but to remove the use, in any context, of words they don't like.

That's a tall order. Words become offensive when they reflect the offensive intent of the users. It is the intent, not the letters or sound which is offensive. Until you can erase hateful people, you won't ever erase words full of hate. It works both ways though... "I hate your hateful words, therefore I hate you and seek to marginalise/erase you." appears to be the common moral-high-ground-surrendering response.

There do appear to be activists who seek out all opposition to their cause and try to destroy it by any and all means. They tend to be quite obnoxious, sad people. They remind me of present-day Nazi-hunters. Yes, the Nazis were bad people, but there is little to be gained from prosecuting 90-year-olds. If doing so would undo the evil they did, prevent future abominations or really even demonstrate justice in action I'd be all for it. At this point however, it just makes the hunters look like people who nurture spite and hate with an inability to forgive.

As has been said, tag the terms appropriately as colloquial, slang and.or vulgar. Job done.

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LEAKED: Samsung's iPHONE 6 KILLER... the Samsung Galaxy S6

P. Lee
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Re: 64 bit?

The the CPU is 64 bits, you can do simultaneous operations on twice as much data.

e.g. comparing 8bit ASCII strings: 32 bits->4 characters, 64bits->8 characters per CPU op.

It isn't all about the RAM, especially on low-power CPUs.

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P. Lee
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Re: And the price will be?

>If it's £200-£250 I might be interested. Pointless spending more than that on a phone.

It's going to depend on Samsung's strategy. This is a flagship so I would expect it to be overspec'ed and expensive - that's what flagships are - aspirational. Apple won't be that worried because as the first poster noted, ipunters don't buy android. The key point about flagships is to make everyone think - "Aww, I wish I had that," even if they aren't in the market sector who would buy it. With the performance of the S5, Samsung need to go for features, not lock-in / network revenue.

If I were Samsung, I'd do things slightly differently - more like Apple for this. Find a unique, iconic design and take the name off the front, or at least make it very subtle. If it is the Snapdragon 820 the features are impressive. Unlike Apple, I'd turn this thing into a pocket computer. Make it do everything Apple would never do. Put all the connectivity features on it, even if you need to have the thing plugged into power when using it for driving an external screen or using all those cores. Bundle it with a docking station dongle for charging, HDMI/DVI/DP video & USB mouse, maybe Wii controllers too. Put an SD card slot in it. It may have 802.11ac in it, but not everyone has an ac network and even an N network can be too slow for HD video if you have a few walls in the way. Don't use storage capacity to push people to a more expensive phone, that's annoying and makes the brand-feature link hazy, 64G is fine.

Software is usually an issue with phones. Make sure it streams to a wide range of "smart" TVs and to VLC. If you can stream/store *from* elsewhere with VLC, that would be good too ;) They could do some cool stuff with "hand-off." Service announcement with mDNS and bluetooth, ssh to update bookmarks and flick-to-send file functionality, so you don't need a cloud. You also want to have simultaneous wifi hotspot and "infrastructure" mode for easy data transfers.

Sadly, I have a feeling they aren't going to do this.

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Listen up, AT&T, this could be YOU NEXT: $40m sting for throttling 'unlimited' mobile data

P. Lee
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Re: Truth in advertising?

>What a novel concept!

I think "oxymoron" was the word you were looking for.

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Man trousers $15,000 domain name for $10.99 amid registry cockup

P. Lee
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Re: registry trust

Indeed, why would the company have the right to rescind?

It isn't as though a domain registration has intrinsic value or cost where it would be obvious that a mistake had been made. He wasn't buying a car or coffee machine. I also assume that the transaction was completed.

The CEO would have had better PR if he had said, "Our mistake, he did well." rather than "well we could stuff him up, but we choose not to... this time."

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Bill Gates – I WISH I was like Zuck and spoke Chinese. Yep, I drink poo

P. Lee
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Bill: The one thing I want but I can't have...

Galaxy S5? iPhone? A recent version of Windows that works with a mouse?

So many options, so little time to mock!

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Australian spookhaus ASIO could retain private data FOREVER

P. Lee
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Don't worry It will be deleted, right before a new government comes in.

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US looks at plan to hand over world's DNS – and screams blue murder

P. Lee
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Re: The simplest and best solution

>The world isn't ready for a fair or accountable organisation to handle the DNS since the majority of the world is not a democratic republic.

I've fixed the icon for you.

What makes a republic a particularly good idea? What makes you think there is an effective democracy in place at the moment?

Thanks for the giggles! :D

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Wall St wolves tear chunk off Microsoft: There goes $30bn!

P. Lee
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Re: OK, it's a personal issue, but...

I wonder how does your experience plot against MS needing others, such as Novell for networking.

I'm afraid most companies tend to behave like this in similar circumstances. Given Bill came from a legal family, I can imagine that winning was everything in his background ethos.

I just find Windows too hard and there is little advantage beyond Office file format compatibility. Unless I'm collaborating on a document, I don't worry about that anyway. I have a Windows VM on an SSD NFS share so as long as the laptop is on the network, I can execute the VM locally on any host or RDP to it, but I haven't fired it up in months.

I rarely reboot into Windows to bother playing games any more. I have a a reasonable number on Linux which keep me happy, despite a much larger library on Windows.

For all the ease of use MS has been trumpeting, yast seems easier. I don't actually feel the need to have a single look & feel across all devices. Its a different form-factor and I can handle that as long as there is an easy-to-find settings icon. I don't hold out much hope that the "unified app" thing is going to help them. It may even backfire as it encourages devs not to consider differences between form-factors.

Realistically, though, I like linux because it helps me do what I want to do. Free is a cash bonus and I believe open source helps keep application functionality honest. People involved in open source are trying to solve problems and provide features to do this. Companies behind closed source software try to prevent me from doing things, unless I'm paying them and even then, they tend to limit the functionality of their own products to segment the market and extract as much cash as possible. In the "olden days" I'd have no problem with that - you put your product out there and compete. These days, its all about killing the competition and manipulating customers' environments, not being the best and letting customers decide. That offends me.

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P. Lee
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Re: Stock pricds tend to be foward looking

>No, all they need to do is produce a product that people would actually want to pay for.

No, all they need to do is produce a product that people would actually want to pay for again.

FTFY

That's pretty hard to do in a maturing market where the product doesn't wear out.

For all the fun it is to rag on MS, making something better would be a major re-write, leading to instability, insecurity and incompatibility. Personally, I'd like to see it done, but it would probably need to be a skunkworks project, which I don't think is the MS way.

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The firm that swallowed the Sun: Is Oracle happy as Larry with hardware and systems?

P. Lee
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Re: Oracle a lock-in? How?

>Specially ZFS still has no working equivalent on Linux

These technologies are really good (on larger systems), but a major reason Solaris/SPARC is declining anyway is that some of the really cool stuff doesn't matter to business or it runs into natural barriers.

There was a time when the more expensive and reliable electronics in SPARC systems were critical. These days everyone who would spend extra to get that reliability puts in redundant systems & sites anyway... and then much of the need for enhanced reliability on one site/system goes away.

Don't get me wrong, I started my unix life on Solaris/SPARC and I like it, but the days of needing it to host the corporate services for reliability reasons, are over, not because the PC is more reliable, but because the architectures are more reliable. The reliability requirement has moved from the compute engine to the load-balancer. Oracle just use SPARC to push their services which is fine and is very lucrative for Oracle, but probably not needed elsewhere. Mirror your transaction journal and replay it if you need to. Yes DTRACE is very cool. Do you have the techies needed to use it properly though? Not many companies do. Not many companies want to.

Obviously there are instances where you really do want reliability in the compute engine. SPARCs and PowerPC etc are still there for the midrange and mainframes for the top end of that requirement. I think it makes sense for service providers (such as Oracle) because the enhanced reliability makes problems go away and you would have decent techies anyway. Problems are always more "catastrophic" when third-parties are involved than if your own IT dept messed up..

Perhaps its just me, but if I were planning and I had the choice of going SPARC or putting in F5's, I wouldn't be going with the SPARCs.

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P. Lee
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Re: ENOUGH WITH THE CHARTS ALREADY!!!

>It's not big and it's not clever.

Especially when perspective is used to make large numbers look larger and smaller numbers look smaller, than they actually are, to fit the story.

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What's that, Microsoft? Yep, a Lumia and Surface SALES BOOM

P. Lee
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Re: Surface 2 with Win 8 RT-edition

Does RT allow full domain authentication?

The MacBook Air still looks like a much better idea, even if you just install Windows on it.

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Switch it off and on again: How peers failed to sneak Snoopers' Charter into terror bill

P. Lee
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Re: Holy shit!

>"I don't understand what the threat and risk really is, but let me in my ignorance suggest that we pass far-reaching legislation to combat this threat that I haven't bothered to understand."

It works for Check Point, Cisco, Bluecoat and all the others.

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P. Lee
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Re: Organising the Techies

>We should create an ISP that goes into administration every 6 months,

I have an easier plan. Put the MP's internet providers' archives on pastebin.

You'd only have to do that once.

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P. Lee
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Re: Experts?

>I remember it gave Blair some trouble during his tenure.

For which city-based Labour provoked a constitutional crisis over the manner in which rural farm pests are put down.

The article was far too kind by describing them as incompetent. They are compromised puppets. Give me real incompetence over efficient corruption any day.

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A Bombe Called Christopher, or A Very Poor Imitation

P. Lee
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Re: The Hodges biography

The Russians army may not have been as effective as General Winter, but they posed a threat which created war on two fronts.

Having said that, the German economy was shot before the war had even really got going. The war just allowed the politicians the excuse for greater hardship than the people would have otherwise tolerated.

Any similarity with present-day events is strictly coincidental.... etc. etc.

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Microsoft brings SUNSHINE – but it's a CLOUDY DAY

P. Lee
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Year-on-year figures - a reasonable indicator?

My initial thought was that people who bought last year won't be buying this year. You don't buy more Office licenses if you've just got rid of 57,000 people (HP) and so on. Bought an xbox last year? Great, but its unlikely you'll do it again this year. These are capital purchases. Ditto Surface. With large companies laying off large numbers of people, simplistically, I'd be nervous about increasing revenues if unit sales aren't going up when looking at a company with as much market power as MS. It looks like short term profit grabbing which might do longer term damage as home buyers scurry to LibreOffice and just grab Windows 10 with no intent to lock themselves further into the Windows ecosystem. Windows only has games to make extracting home users from Windows difficult - games which users will probably grow out of.

Revenues may be going up, but is that just due to price hikes? That isn't the whole story. How many of those Office 365 licenses are cheap/freebie OEM-type deals for the first year, which won't be renewed? I would guess that many home purchasers will purchase it bundled into the capital cost of a new PC (under the hazy notion its like the last time they bought Office), but they won't renew it later.

It will be interesting to see if the subscription model keeps people on-board with lower payments, or allows them to jump ship and achieve faster financial reward for doing so.

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Welcome to Spartan, Microsoft's persuasive argument for... Chrome

P. Lee
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Re: Wedded to Legacy

>In order to keep the other two honest, I wish they would start a 'skunkworks', and throw out something new that would eat the old. Not going to happen. :(

That would actually be the best way forward for them. Their problem is that businesses need that legacy support and if they just ditched it, there would be cries of outrage - not from techies but from businesses who have to upgrade their OS to keep Outlook support, but then their browser-apps break. This is what happens when you tie your application stack to your OS and try to use the lock-in to force upgrades. IE6 may have crushed Netscape, but Netscape used to be a cost option - around $50 IIRC. At that time, I don't think anyone foresaw the rise of open-source in business and it made very good sense to code for the free browser that came with the OS everyone used. At that time, RFC's were for UNIX and UNIX was not the desktop with OSX barely out of beta, Linux 2.4 just released but hardware not up to running the Java-based Office suites.

Re-writing apps is very expensive and very annoying. Why re-write an app because the OS has changed? The OS should support the app, not the other way around. It comes back to tying the browser to the OS to force upgrades. Why could you not just set an environment variable to indicate the default browser? Then legacy application X can just have an environment variable set and can kick off the standalone browser app Y which it needs to run. There's no need for that browser to run for general browsing or by default from the command-line or GUI shell. Even if you want to go non-standard, pick a 3rd party which comes with all its own libraries. Then at least you are decoupled from other upgrades.

MS isn't going away as the standard business desktop environment any time soon, but IT directors need to seriously assess just how much Windows is costing them in support and change costs.

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P. Lee
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Joke

>The fact that the "new" Spartan and Internet Ecplorer (IE) browsers still run on Windows OS base only puts them at a distinct disadvantage

You forgot Windows Phone (or Windows 10 or whatever they are calling it)!

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P. Lee
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Re: "having to build for not one but two Microsoft browsers"

> it drops all the legacy cruft that is IE non standardness

So it won't support activeX?

That's nice and all, but it still means you'll need two MS browsers. Any time a website detects an MS browser, its going to spew out MS-specific HTML and extensions. It could go with a completely new user-agent, in which case you'll be asked to upgrade to IE, FF or Chrome, or it could pretend to be FF, in which case... it will need to be an intrinsically better browser. I don't mean, "5% faster" but obviously far superior from a user perspective so that they are willing to run two MS browsers.

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P. Lee
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Re: Sensible companies don't allow Chrome at all. Mozilla is far better.

Chrome generally seems to work better with sites "designed for IE" (i.e. company internal) than firefox.

I normally stick them all on and use FF for internet, Chrome for internal corporate. I hate the single search/url box, but sometime it just renders drop-down menus and so forth more clearly. I'm guessing it was designed to tolerate IE incompatibilities.

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Should Google play carriers at their own game? There's never been a better time

P. Lee
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>There is too much competition in this space for Google to accomplish anything meaningful.

The point is, Google own the handset which makes things very different. Like iMessage for Apple, they can deliver services between handsets and fall-back to telco services in order to maintain reliability. You can do it with text messages which are async and time insensitive, but voice isn't really an option unless wifi-cellular hand-off is really good and there is no connection fee. That means that the phone is fixed in place -still a profitable area if you want to take a slice of the profitable business VoIP hardware market, but is Google ready to take on Cisco networking?

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Official: Whiteboxer Super Micro is a $2bn server company

P. Lee
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Ok they might be good, but adding perspective to a bar graph? Oh el reg, where is thy cynicism?

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NSA gunning for Google, wants cop-spotting dropped from Waze app

P. Lee
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Re: Just radar, not police.

I think you give criminals too much credit. Any criminal who obtains that awareness is probably not worried by a traffic cop.

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Never mind those touch apps, full Office 2016 is coming this year

P. Lee
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Coat

1960's?

That's a bit harsh. My first Apple ( ][+ )had upper-case only and that was in the 1980's. Oh how we longed for a ][e....

Anyhow, they're only going back 34 years, not 54.

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Why Microsoft's 3D HoloLens goggles aren't for Google Glassholes

P. Lee
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The problem with hololens

It does really cool demo's, but like G-glass, you'd never wear it out. And for games, you really want VR, not augmented reality, unless you're playing some sort of laser tag with added flying aliens.

Any game which requires significant physical movement is going to lose out to key-pressing, mouse-wielding opponents.

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Free Windows 10 could mean the END for Microsoft and the PC biz

P. Lee
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Re: WTF.....- "supported lifetime"

I think what's going on is people are looking at this and saying, "if it seems too good to be true, then it probably is."

Dirt cheap upgrades from vista/7 to 8, free upgrades from 7/8 to 10. The question of where/when is MS making their money makes people really nervous, especially when we know they are keen on the subscription model. If they had said, "W10 will be free to buy for a year and include free support until at least 2025, the expected end of the support for W10." then things would have been rather easier. Don't tell me they haven't got an EOL date for W10.

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P. Lee
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Re: Stop and think a bit, please...

>A VM is forever.

Unless the W10 upgrade invalidates the W7 license. Which would be normal in an upgrade. W7 was the first version of windows to successfully enforce the licensing, so comparisons with XP are likely to be misleading.

You'd have to be sure it never talked to the MS' license servers to make this work.

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P. Lee
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Re: Stop and think a bit, please...

>There is no way they are going to entice users off full Windows 7 & 8 licences, and then pull the rug out from under them a year later. It's just not going to happen.

The question is "who will qualify" - is this just W10 Home Edition? People on W7 don't feel the need to upgrade, so no sale there anyway. If MS start rolling out one version of Windows per year, after one or two years you might lose security fixes without a subscription. That means people on W7 will have had 4-6 years on windows without paying for an upgrade - probably about right, in MS' thinking. The question is, how would MS degrade the experience in general, even if people knew they were buying "W10 as a service"? Drop the screen resolution to 800x600? Nag dialogues every 5 minutes? I can't think of anything acceptable to great-aunt Ethel.

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How do you solve a problem like Willowra?

P. Lee
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Re: Don't Use Windows

It depends if the apps they need only run on Windows.

I seem to think an earlier article said Windows was mandatory - or was that for something else? Otherwise yes, if there's no onsite technical expertise, OS choice probably depends on who wants to support it, though an ssh session might be lower bandwidth than RDP. If FLOSS is on the cards, LTSP anyone?

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Flash zero day under attack

P. Lee
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Trollface

Why is "forever" crossed out?

Would it be churlish to ask how Google has managed to make chrome safe but MS hasn't?

Yes, yes it would. Maybe Spartan will fix it.

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NO WARRANTS NEEDED for metadata access, argues Oz A-G

P. Lee
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So he's saying that warrants are a bad thing.

If warrants take days or weeks to complete, surely the case is made for improving the warrant process, not for ditching it. Why does it take so long? I'd like that to be explained.

It's like change control, either you know what you're doing and its not too hard to fill in the details (assuming the interface for doing so is ok) or you don't know what you're doing, in which case, you shouldn't be doing it. "We're going to download the latest copy of exchange and install it on our mail server in order to upgrade it" isn't going to fly.

If you want to tap comms links, get a warrant. Then the public can be a little more certain that law-enforcement knows what its doing, there is an audit trail so law enforcement can demonstrate that they know what they are doing and we don't have vast amounts of data lying around to tempt the power-hungry, the corrupt, the criminal and the corporate. "Don't collect data you don't need," should remain the guiding principle. This is not like accessing bank-records. This is like intercepting telephone calls - for which you need a warrant.

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Windows 10: The Microsoft rule-o-three holds, THIS time it's looking DECENT

P. Lee
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Re: Read the whole thing...

> Gotta say I agree with this. Windows 10 free for life - great, I'll take two. Windows 10 free for a year - they can shove it: I'll stick to 7, thank you.

+1

Windows has two uses: work and games: Work Windows gets installed into a VM. Nice for moving it between hardware and, ahem, testing upgrades. Gaming Windows gets W7 or W8. It really doesn't matter two hoots, since Steam is set to start automatically.

There will be consumers who upgrade because it looks like a free upgrade and support is being pulled. That won't be me. Even if MS drops security fixes, it doesn't really matter because I have golden images for Work Windows and Games Windows doesn't browse except to very well known sites, it doesn't deal with email, IM (except Skype). Games Windows can also be re-installed if required. It's no big deal. All my important stuff runs on Linux or OSX.

For Small Biz it will be great to keep paying out for stuff they didn't upgrade for years. I'm sure they'll love it! Not. A lot of these places are not tied into the MS ecosystem. No Exchange or Lync to help drive upgrades. They use gmail and some Word/excel macros to generate invoices. Apps are the thing. Click on the "X" or the "W" or the "E" is all they need.

Medium Biz is probably in the same boat, except that they do have windows server products which drive upgrades, because externally connected servers do need patching. I'm reasonably sure they don't like to upgrade so frequently though and they are price sensitive.

Big biz will carry on as usual. There ain't no upgrades coming through until they've been tested. I'm pretty sure they'll resist because they never really did the 3-year windows-upgrade thing so they won't want a subscription model which is going to double their costs over 5-6 years. They still have to do all the testing so there is no pain-relief for them from MS here. Rolling upgrades won't fly. They won't want to move from 7 to 10 any time soon.

The upshot is, no-one likes upgrades except the vendors. Users like features. Hey Cortana, why is voice control very cool but slower and less reliable than other UI's? Hey Cortana, why is MS tying application features like games streaming to an OS rather than keeping them layered as applications on top of the OS? Why do they think streaming is a killer feature when Steam has been doing it for a while now and, quite frankly, it isn't that useful. Hey Cortana, do most browser-users think browsing is too slow and the reason is their local software?

Don't get me wrong, I suspect W10 will be better than 8.x and will have interesting things in it. I'm just not convinced that most users want to pay for their OS as a service, or indeed that it offers enough to make it worth paying for, again and again and again. Compute as service, storage as a service has had a difficult enough time with dirt-cheap providers. When compute as a service turns out to be more expensive than the other option, it will be a hard sell.

That's assuming it is an option. If MS has saturated their market and looks to increase revenue by charging existing users more, the value proposition begins to look shaky. Upgrade every three years instead of six or nine or twelve and you are seriously increasing your desktop costs. Home users might start looking more seriously at Apple. Lovely to look at, lovely to hold, free upgrades. Hmmm. When great uncle Albert's PC stops working because he didn't know he had to keep paying, some little pip-squeak is going to either replace it with an old mac or a linux installation. Maybe linux running on an old mac.

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Microsoft will give away Windows 10 FREE - for ONE year

P. Lee
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Re: I'm free! No, you're an idiot

>"upgrades" which create an asset of dubious value.

So then you depreciate the asset, which gives you your tax deduction?

Rental might be easier, but I know banks who were still running XP last year. I would hope a CFO might take a 13-year sweating of assets over paying four times that, just to get an easier tax deduction.

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Judge to Dish Network: your Hopper's hip, it ain't no Aereo

P. Lee
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Re: And now we know

> Hopper does not store content at a third-party location"

I wonder what happens if there is a network accelerator with de-duplication?

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SECRETS of the LOST SCROLLS unlocked by key to HEALTHY BOOBS

P. Lee
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Re: The Sun

Given that its from Herculaneum and given what we know of Pompeii, its likely to be a lot more graphic than page 3.

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Will fondleslab's fickle finger of fate help Windows 10?

P. Lee
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Is it noscript...

or are all the pc's in the Windows 10 graphic on page 2 running 4:3 screens?

Not that that's bad, its just er... retro cool?

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Wizard of Oz OFFICIALLY 'most significant movie' EVER, says PNAS

P. Lee
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Re: proper link!?

>Why is it so hard for media outlets to link to the actual scientific article rather than just the home page?

Because media organisations hate "deep-linking." They want to show all the adverts as people bumble around their website.

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Prosecutors have 'EVISCERATED' my defense, cries Silk Road lawyer

P. Lee
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Re: Imagine that...

>a key role of the jury is to determine what is fact from the evidence that's presented.

The jury, yes, but what about the judge? Ruling out testimony from one of the investigators of Silk Road seems to me a bit heavy handed, even if he is just presenting his theories. This isn't testimony from his mother's uncle's step-father's cat.

I've no idea if Ulbricht is guilty or not, but I get the feeling guilt isn't going to be relevant to the outcome. The US has been embarrassed by recent internet happenings and they require a win. Justice needs to be seen to be done and that means allowing leeway for dubious evidence to be presented and confirmed or exposed, especially if it comes from the investigators.

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Polish chap builds computer into a mouse

P. Lee
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Re: I do not see the value in putting it in a mouse

While I agree technically, there may be some benefit to having a single device. It's probably better though to have a mouse with a USB plug into which you can put all the other gubbins. HDMI is also good because its likely that port on the monitor will be available and people won't be too worried about leaving an HDMI cable around, whereas they probably don't want to leave a USB stick plugged into the back of the screen.

Marketing-wise, better to sell a mouse which gives you android than a stick, a mouse, a keyboard, an SD card which people hope might work together, though admittedly, perhaps a mouse with an "HDMI receiver" with all the electronics in it might be better.

How about thunderbolt, though, giving you displayport rather than HDMI?

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Bush-first NBN build was back to front says NBN Co CEO

P. Lee
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Doing one tech was too hard. We're going to try doing lots of techs instead?

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Latest menace to internet economy: Gators EATING all the PUSSIES

P. Lee
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> it probably was leaving those for later after filling up on the dogs.

Or the cats are just dog-bait.

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