* Posts by P. Lee

4170 posts • joined 4 Dec 2007

BlackBerry's licensing strategy looks smart – and a lot like Nokia's

P. Lee
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Noobs

> If Chinese industry can out-engineer and out-manufacture the West, it hasn’t yet show it can out market an Apple or a Sony.

I remember when "Made in Japan" meant cheap, low quality rubbish.

Marketing isn't magic. Good quality products at reasonable prices backed not by startups, but by companies which have made billions in manufacturing and are in it for the long-haul, will arrive. Xiaomi is just the in the first wave. Chinese brands based out of China. Just wait for the good quality Chinese brands with European sounding names and European branches who know how to sell locally - they will be here shortly. Then it will be game-over, and not just for phones.

The IT market is maturing and slowing down. That means the gap between leading-edge research IP and market-commodities is narrowing. The value-add of market-leading tech companies will drop as the lower-end catches up and eats their bread and butter and large corporations with the skills in making things take the market, like Lenovo has. If you think Brexit will make people poor, you ain't seen nuttin' yet. Over the last 30 years the West has done the hard-work in globalisation. Now its an off-the-shelf product.

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Tinder porn scam: Swipe right for NOOOOOO I paid for what?

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Facepalm

Re: As a rule of thumb...

>PayPal excluded, I assume...

and "Verified by Visa"?

Shock news: "Site mixing Adult content and social media is dodgy. More at 10."

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Oops: Bounty-hunter found Vine's source code in plain sight

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Re: Wait a minute.

I'm not sure there's that much difference between storing the keys in the code and storing the keys in the deployment image...

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Saudi Arabia to flog man 1,000 times for insulting religion on Facebook

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Re: A right is something that is inherently deserved.

I wonder what would happen if you stood up in an English secondary or tertiary educational institution and said you thought Jesus was the only way to eternal life and sodomy was wrong.

Whether or not you think those statements are true, I think you'd quickly find find the limits of "freedom of speech" when departing from state-sponsored moral orthodoxy are not as far away as you might imagine. There can be no discussion of such matters, certainly not by staff and not by students either.

We aren't into flogging, of course, that's barbaric. We don't do evil by getting our hands bloody, we do it by shuffling bits of paper - an academic suspension, a dossier slanted in a convenient direction, business deals which bring in millions of GBP of benefit to one group, at the expense, hardship or deaths of others.

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nbn™ talks up HFC upgrades to gigabit speed

P. Lee
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>Why do it at home? It will almost certainly be cheaper and more reliable to use a cloud. And then your home broadband connection won't be an issue.

How about the principle of "my data, my control."

I run a vpn on my home system because its quite convenient to to have access to all my stuff from wherever I am. I could punt my desktops into the cloud, but I'd rather have it at home and just use VNC or RDP or SFTP when I need it.

One of the problems with cloud is that it isn't just a facility, its a particular application. Cloud storage isn't like a big remote SATA drive, it is a proprietary application. The onedrive doesn't work with linux (it barely works with windows), dropbox requires a particular proprietary client that only one vendor makes. It is like going back to the 80's where you had proprietary hardware that only worked with one vendor's system. In short, it isn't commodity because it can't be easily exchanged.

What if facebook is the victim of massive fraud and goes under? How many people use it as their only photo album storage. Even if they have their photo's stored elsewhere, how many people only manage their photo collections in facebook and wouldn't know (without the data in facebook) when and where most of those photos were taken or who was in them? How would you get all that data out of facebook, as it sinks under financial collapse. How much of the photo-management market has facebook destroyed... but despite appearances, it doesn't allow you to manage your photos, it allows you to manage the photos you have given to facebook.

How rubbish is the consumer IT compared to the enterprise? I'm not talking about scaling, that's easy, I'm talking about the poor quality of the facilities. Unless we encourage the lower end of the market to do IT, everything will be dumped on the the ever-more consolidated, ever more proprietary, ever more locked-in, ever-more data-abusing cloud. PC's are ever more powerful, but the PC software industry appears to be decline and as the alternatives disappear, the T's&C's and taking not just of operations, but data-slurping gets worse.

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Alleged skipper of pirate site KickAss Torrents keel-hauled in Poland

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Re: Big content: 3

Our video shop rents the old (six months or more?) content out for AU$1/week.

Even the latest releases are three for $8.

Streaming services are grossly expensive in comparison, the quality is awful, the selection tiny.

Or you can visit the second hand shops, buy for less than a stream and donate it back afterwards if you want.

The real cause of the industry decline is people spending all their time on facebook.

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The cloud ain't making it rain for Intel right now: Tech giants pause server chip sales

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>They've finished constructing their latest data centers and have more than enough workload capacity available for now, hence a cut in spending on Intel's x86 Xeon chips which investors didn't expect.

In that case, investors paid zero attention to the industry and the business and made all their decisions based on recent numbers.

Don't make beancounters the decision-makers.

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Nitwit has fit over twit hit: Troll takes timeless termination terribly

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Re: Evidence?

>We used to make the point that you were under someone else's roof and their rules. Most people got it then.

Not related to this thread really, but Twitter et al want to be seen as infrastructure. They want to be the roads, not the houses with roofs and rules and gates. That's how they want to be seen, but it isn't what they are.

With the abandonment of open protocols and software in favour of clientless, closed, remote-server-based applications like twitter, users lose the ability to do useful things. We've known for years that you have to have a "contact-acceptance" system or you get spam (smtp), phishing (skype), or just more noise facebook) but twitter is a self-promotion platform so a contact-filtering system rather defeats the point.

The abuse is horrid, but in the same way that ebay has gone from a car-boot sale for individuals to a direct sales platform for business, so twitter is basically a commercial promotion machine. If that assessment is correct, get someone who isn't personally involved to either filter/proxy the requests through or answer on your behalf. That doesn't excuse the abuse, but the abuse is commercially facilitated, if not commercially motivated. An obnoxious troll is bad enough, an obnoxious troll with ratings to maintain will be worse. I don't use Twitter, but it appears to be usenet with just a single top-level of topics (user handles). Cross posting is still an issue.

As far as the trolls' claims of racism go, people need to remember that the internet is bigger than their issue. In a town with just black and white people, blacklivesmatter may be relevant, but it is playing the race card. My first thought was, "Do brown lives matter? Are you interested in what happens to Mexicans? For that matter, do you care when white people are the subject of police brutality?" blacklivesmatter seems to exclude concern for non-black people. Maybe blacklivesmattertoo would have been better? Would that not be snappy enough for the soundbites so the campaign went with the more aggressive-sounding version? The point is, if you draw distinctions based on race, you encourage others to do the same. The ensuing conflict might be great for those who live on publicity (the trolls and the SIGs), but it doesn't actually help. Don't refrain from shooting someone because they are black, refrain from shooting them because shooting people is bad. Rather than "don't shoot black people" perhaps the rules of engagement in general need to be updated or more frequent training and equal opportunity courses need to be taken. That's nowhere near as twitter-worthy but I suspect closer to what is actually needed.

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EU Net Neutrality debate heats up as Tim Berners-Lee weighs in

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>This is really so frustratingly simple.

Not really. The issue is that the carriers want to charge both the consumers and the suppliers. Who decides then?

Net Neut is about making sure only the consumers pay and therefore only the consumers have a voice.

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For $800 you can buy internet engineers' answer to US government spying

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>Seriously what kind of idiot actually puts their real date of birth on the internet with the full name and address.

Someone who wants to buy something with a credit card and have it delivered?

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Ban ISPs from 'speeding up' the internet: Ex-Obama tech guru

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Re: why can't I pay for "better service" ?

The issue is not faster links. The issue is that ISP's try to become toll-gate-keepers which locks in the current data *suppliers* as the only ones who can afford to pay for decent service.

That kills innovation "out there" on the internet since new suppliers can't get access to consumers. It adds cost where there doesn't need to be additional cost.

Take for example the current Optus advert - "Stream music for free" I'd wager that's not actually what's on offer. I'd bet if I streamed music to an Optus mobile from home, it would come off my data allowance. My home is excluded as a service because it isn't Spotify or Apple music or whatever company they've done deals with. That pushes up the cost for Spotify and Apple, which in turn gets passed back to the consumer via higher fees. It also excludes new-comers who may not be able to afford to pay Optus or be global enough to conduct business with every ISP in the world. So you pay for your ISP and then your ISP charges the provider who charges you (more) to use the service you've just paid your ISP for. It is double-dipping, dishonest (it isn't free, they are just getting someone else to charge you) and corrupt.

If you want fibre rather than adsl, knock yourself out. That's not what the article is about.

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P. Lee
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Re: Slow it down, speed it up

Forget the speed and the queuing priorities.

Ban pay-for-preferential-access and most other things resolve themselves.

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Brexit has left a regulatory black hole for digital, say MPs

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Re: Iain Wright MP, chair of the BIS committee, urged the government to set out its plans

>We can't copy and paste stuff from Brussels any more

Actually they probably can, and should, until there is a good reason not to and the capacity to get things together.

Brexit doesn't mean you *have* to reject everything from Brussels.

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Windows 10 a failure by Microsoft's own metric – it won't hit one billion devices by mid-2018

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>So do I get her a Win 7 version?

I understood that all the obnoxious bits of W10 have been backported to Win7

You don't need to upgrade to get slurped.

Others may be better informed than I.

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Ad blockers responsible for rise in upfront TV ad sales, claims report

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Re: Want people to watch your ads.

I seem to think ads in the 70's were better - catchy enough to sing and only 3 of them per 20 minutes of TV time.

I especially remember the Woolworths one from one Christmas "Harry's hover mower, just look how fast he's going! ... everybody needs a Woolworths so-ome time" So much better than, "OWN IT NOW ON DVD" (liars, its licensed...), and "THINGS YOU WON'T WANT TO MISS", er, yes actually I do want to miss it and I'm just plain tired of being bombarded by high-impact advertising which thinks it can force itself into my brain.

I don't know if I was more easily pleased or they were actually better ads, but they seemed fun. Now I"m likely to miss it all, because I'm playing XCOM instead of watching TV programs which have been spoilt by adverts.

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Dear Tesla, stop calling it autopilot – and drivers are not your guinea pigs

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Re: Do we want to advance or not?

This issue is not, "is it a good idea," but, "is Tesla misleading drivers with regard to its abilities."

My snake-oil detector goes off whenever I see "intelligence" applied to to IT stuff. "Autopilot" might work well on an aeroplane in an obstacle-clear sky with radar, objects in relatively predictable trajectories, coordinated air-traffic control and two pilots at the ready, but in a cluttered ground environment even speed-maintenance alone is dodgy around town.

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Microsoft open sources Azure bill analysis tool

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Windows

>Redmond under Satya Nadella is, however, still struggling to compete with AWS

FTFY

also

"Engineering for global scale is quite expensive! Maybe more than you need."

"Renters shocked that renting is more expensive than buying!"

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UK gov says new Home Sec will have powers to ban end-to-end encryption

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Re: A legal work around?

I know this thread is going to go in the wrong direction, if it hasn't already.

The target is comms providers - those providing the e2e capabilities. There is no ban being proposed, "only" the ability to decrypt sessions. That means what they want is the ability to tell comms providers to subvert their client functions on demand.

My guess this would be something like: on a given signal, the client should turn into a comms tap or (if both ends are under the comms provider's control) (also?) use a "trusted provider's" key which can be intercepted and decrypted.

The targets are Apple, Facebook and the like, not Joe Bloggs with his FLOSS. This really isn't any different from the existing PSTN arrangement where telco's can tap on demand.

Moral: Do your own encryption.

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A little image magic gets Curiosity's wheels turning again

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Paris Hilton

Re: As the (no doubt made up) Chinese apothegm has it:

>And if a million people use 'data' as if the word were a singular noun, they are still wrong.

I would usually agree with you, but I think it is used as a collective noun rather than a singular noun. Even if not, it is so difficult to determine what is singular in IT.

Take, 65 (decimal) for example. Is it a single byte or is it a collection of 8 bits or is it two nibbles or is it the letter "A"? Perhaps its just part of a word or two digits. In the real world, it may be an abstract concept, whereas in IT, it may be many different things.

So is it a datum or a particular set of data (a collective noun)?

I'm not sure its all that important. What we should really be doing is hating those who use "of" when they mean "from" and those who use "was like" instead of "said" and those who use "like" instead of "um" or "er."

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Facebook offers end-to-end encrypted chat – if you find the right setting

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Re: Meh

>I don't anyone who would even be slightly interested in what I've go to say.

Now perhaps, but what happens when your government gets aggressive towards you because of a policy not yet implemented and no one has an infrastructure which supports privacy?

What happens when "if you're not for us you're for the terrorists" becomes an active policy?

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Kotkin on who made Trump and Brexit: Look in the mirror, it's you

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Re: "lazy economics ... allow migration to give us economic growth"

>Is the working class better off than 30 years ago -- on an absolute scale, or compared to their peers?

I think very few people are better off. In Aus, salaries have risen to twelve times their 1970 amount, but house prices have risen forty times.

I think we've spent more and received more stuff. But new iphones and other trinkets are nothing compared to the massive increase in debt (mostly mortgage and government). Now we *need* two salaries just to pay for the house and who can afford three children, even if you want them? You can forget the old meritocracy of the best and brightest going to uni because education is a good thing... now uni fees are just a mortgage for your job.

I suspect the immigration issue with Brexit is overplayed. I'm sure it plays some part - there's little financial benefit to be seen to migration into the UK for voters. More of an indictment is how the political classes and the chatteratti had no idea what most people think. The BBC doesn't help by being a very large echo-chamber for that sector of society. I remember reading an article on the reaction to the "you may beat your wife lightly" decree from some Imam in Pakistan. *All* (eight I think) of the "vaguely related" articles on the side bar were about homosexuality. Whatever you think of the debate, its actually not a topic which adversely impacts over 95% of the population. All the "woe is us for Brexit" from the BBC completely misses the fact that over half the population disagree. All the articles were also exceedingly speculatory - little more than random statements about things which had no reason to take place, "but might." There is so much ideological irrelevance to the lives of the populace ingrained in the institutions of the establishment.

Brexit isn't about immigration, its about control. Its about having a voice in politics and both Westminster (with its centralised party machines) and Brussels (with its "ever close union") demonstrably take power away from the not only the ordinary people, but even the grass roots political activists. It doesn't matter how "perfect" the democratic process is, if the decisions are made behind the scenes (hello TTPT, hello council of ministers) and if the details are manipulated (hello ward boundary changes) then people are quite within their rights to put a stop to the whole lot. Cameron accidentally gave the people some power in the referendum, never dreaming they would have the audacity to use it. Being under the delusion that people follow politicians, he thought people wouldn't follow Farage et al. They didn't follow Cameron, they didn't follow Farage, they just don't like where the EU is going. Europe's fine - a nice place to visit, but why cede control to it? How many of the voters trade with Europe? How many of the voters think Europe is financially stable? How many will be devastated if French Brie becomes more expensive than Somerset Brie?

Even in the worst case, with Brexit a mess, its our mess, and that's ok. Was it "populist"? Not in the sense of people being led (astray) by a charismatic leader - Farage is not, Boris is not, May is not, Gove is not. A hint of democratic power was given to the people and the result was self-determination. That is the point of democracy is it not? Though I'm pretty sure it will be quite some time before a politician makes that mistake again. Let's hope the next revolution is just as bloodless.

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Blighty will have a whopping 24 F-35B jets by 2023 – MoD minister

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Re: bad move.

>Yeah, and the AI was running on a Raspberry Pi, not an IBM Watson.

So it can beat a human who doesn't know how the AI makes decisions. I wonder how long that will last and if the human will get an RPi to help them soon.

As for out-of-date miltech... remember the battleships of the early 1900's? Useless by WWI. Miltech moves very quickly - you get what you can knowing it will probably be out of date before you use it. Part of the downside of drones is that they are strongly controlled from the centre. The likelihood of a pilot showing initiative is extremely low, which is probably a bad thing. The likelihood of a pilot refusing to do something unconscionable is also very low.

The other thing is that one-sided warfare can backfire. If you put soldiers in the field and you lose and go home, that might the end of it. If you can't be touched in the field, the enemy will be forced to go looking for your house to get rid of the problem at its source. Rant against terrorism all you like, but if that's the only effective method of fighting your operations allows, that's what you will get.

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P. Lee
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Re: Questions for a select comittee...

>Brexit pound means imports necessary to make exports are expensive again.

That isn't a problem - the worst case is if you aren't adding any value, so the status quo is maintained. In that case, don't expect profit.

The more value you add (perhaps reflecting more work done in the UK) the more competitive the export.

https://www.ons.gov.uk/economy/nationalaccounts/balanceofpayments

I'd say we actually need to do without stuff for a bit and correct our balance of payments. More expensive imports and cheaper exports are a good thing. And no, you can't blame those horrible figures on Brexit.

Something has gone very wrong with finance. In the 1970's one man's salary typically supported five people. House prices have grown four or five times more than salaries since then. Now on average two salaries support two and a half people. Are we better off? We have more stuff, but are we actually better off of have we just borrowed to buy things we can't really afford? All that government debt... we will have to pay it off one way or another.

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P. Lee
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Re: "preparing perfectly for the last war and ignoring developments that have happened since"

>That's hardly fair. Iraq is firstly several groups that pretty much hate/distrust each other,

... and you think any other part of the world is different? Do you think the US didn't know this beforehand?

Give them a secular government? That's pretty much what they had with Saddam until we destroyed it. Saddam had to use an awful lot of brutality to maintain it, as well, because the people don't want a secular government.

If Blair had studied History instead of Law he might have learnt what the British concluded last time they were in Iraq, "this place is not governable by civilised means."

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Bomb-disposal robot violently disposes of Dallas cop-killer gunman

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Re: @YetAnotherLocksmith ... It makes sense, but...

>He started shooting at the police so no, they couldn't take the chance to wait him out.

Why not? They had a bomb handy to blow him up but nothing slightly less lethal? Has no-one developed a weapon system where you can calibrate the range and hit someone in body armour hard enough to knock them down without killing them?

Perhaps getting to the point where we are bombing criminals is an indicator that someone's been watching too much robocop? It might have been effective this time, but what happens next time, when the gunman knows high might be on the bad end of a bombing run? Does he start carrying sticks of dynamite to lob at the robots... or the police hiding around the corner?

At least the prospect of a trial where he can "say his piece" has the chance of calming the situation rather than forcing him to go down all guns blazing.

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Idiot brings gun-shaped iPhone to airport

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Coat

Re: Destination.

You wait your whole d*#$& life, get that badge,

Then you're not even sure, if its orange...

Isn't it ironic, don'tcha think?

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P. Lee
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Re: Not THAT realistic

I appear to be in a minority but why are we so willing to accept the situation where a bit of plastic in the back pocket is seen as a legitimate cause for concern?

Yes, the guy's an idiot because its a stupid looking case - you'd have thought that anyone old enough for a phone has grown out of their love of toy guns, but is it any more sensible to imagine that someone with malicious intent is going to act like this? Ask him to put it in his checked bag and not to do it again because it slows down security checks. Actually I'd be curious to know which bit of the "gun" causes concern. Is it the handle, which is fairly non-lethal, or the metal barrel bit, which is iphone shaped? If all you need to do to get a gun through security is make it oblong with rounded corners, we're in serious trouble. If security can easily deal with this sort of thing, why are the police making a big deal of it? I forget the name for it, but I do expect trained security and police not to fall for the fallacy of intensely fearing the unusual out of all proportion to its likelihood.

To put it in perspective, do we fear this sort of thing at an airport more than outside Morrissons? Would the police act differently there than at the airport? Surely we should expect that the standard security processes at airports will catch someone trying to take a real gun on an aircraft, which means we don't need to invoke an extraordinary response outside of those processes, unless those processes are useless and don't do what they are supposed to do. If he's trying to get his toy around a scanner, or something like that, that's the time to take a "special interest" in him.

Admittedly in the US the police are likely to shoot you with or without a gun-shaped case, so that isn't going to help you there, but I'd rather hope that our saner security methods mean we can cope with childish phone cases without making an incident of it.

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'We shall overcome' net neutrality, sing Euro telcos in the key of 5Gs

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We don't need no innovation

We don't need Tel-co control

No dark sarcasm from PR flacks

Just a pipe, no tiered service

Hey! Voda! leave our bits alone

All in all we just want a r p u to fall

No corruption, no back room agreements at all

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UK.gov wants to fine websites £250,000 if teens watch porn vids

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Re: And of course the funny thing is...

>Each and every one of us - even members of parliament - is the descendent of a long line of ancestors, each and every one of whom chose to follow an interest in sex instead of denying it.

Pro-sex and pro-porn are not the same thing. Had those ancestors spent their time watching sex instead of having it, "we would not be."

There is also a tendency for porn to spoil relationships which would otherwise involve sex. There are plenty of good reasons for this. Firstly, if you spend lots of time with someone more attractive, younger and better endowed than your partner, the likelihood one of you is going to be dis-satisfied. It doesn't even have to be "lots of time." In most relationships involving sex there is usually an expectation of exclusivity. The person on screen might only be pretending to like their partner, but if you choose to deliberately increase your (very real) arousal level with someone who doesn't even know you exist, instead of your partner, it indicates something about how you regard sex with your partner.

There are problems with impulse control. Delayed gratification isn't only something that's useful in financial planning!

There's something really rather sad about taking something which is wonderful bonding activity for two and turning it into an activity for a lonely one. Perhaps if the porn was turned off, and the company of real people (rather than MMOs or facebook) was worked on or some books which enhance cognitive processes were read, things might be better. Perhaps the attitudes and expectations expressed in porn mislead viewers as to what relationships are all about. Viewers may not expect sex when they walk through the door, but making sex "the main thing" between men and women might not be a winning attitude to acquire.

I'm not saying these exact issues are always in play, or the uk.gov is right in what they are doing, but its best not to see stupid government policy and conclude that the opposite is actually a good thing. Its one thing to give people the freedom to do something stupid, its another to endorse it as "good." We give far too much credence to the law as defining what is good and we expend far too much legislative effort in making sure that the law only allows what is "good." That just leads to sledgehammer-nut (ouch!) situations, taking the law where it should not go and increasing legal intolerance for diversity.

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P. Lee
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Headmaster

Re: Just what is the definition of 'porn'?

I believe the word comes from the Greek, porno = flesh, and graphic = writing.

These days, I think "graphic" covers things which are descriptive and or illustrative, rather than being merely words.

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Microsoft's cringey 'Hey bae <3' recruiter email translated by El Reg

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Re: HAHAHA

>I'd say it was written by Tay, but there's no mention of a final solution.

Hahaha!

The first rule of Windows 10 Club...

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Sociology student gets a First for dissertation on Kardashians

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Re: it is spelt

>Cardassian

You've missed the point - that's someone's IP and there might be legal battles if you try to flog a line of toy spaceships.

"Keep control of your IP." Thus saith the Oracle. /IT angle

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P. Lee
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Re: Validating your life

>I remember when that meant getting a job and not behaving like a twat for all the world to see.

And getting paid a lot of money for it. These people aren't idiots, they are pretty smart but money-guided people making cash from playing a dumb role.

These people will continue to thrive as long as their vapidity is is cheaper than producing other media content. Its a whole lot cheaper than GoT and has a far larger audience. Its cheaper to throw a lot of money a few people who will do anything for it, than it is to be creative.

Visual media in itself has a compelling effect on the brain. Look what happens when you turn a tv on in the corner of room while everyone is doing something else. Attention drifts to the TV (or ipod...) I've noticed that even clever shows suddenly become far less interesting if you can break the habit of watching them for about three weeks. TV has sunk costs and is desperate for content. Serve it up in a nicely managed media package with magazine interviews and "news releases" designed to stop people taking a break from the show, becoming disengaged and realising they can live without it, and they'll lap it up.

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Prominent Brit law firm instructed to block Brexit Article 50 trigger

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Re: Bollocks

>[The PM] does not have any of the powers required to prepare that notice so it is legally binding.

Is that relevant?

The question is whether the rest of the EU decides article 50 has been invoked and from their point of view, a simple statement is sufficient. Assuming they think its been done, it happens automatically. I don't see how what the UK courts think is relevant or what they could do - impose their will on the French and the Germans? What would they do? Interfere with internal UK affairs? I think we just had a referendum about that.

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Re: What a horrible waste of time and money

It appears that the effort is not really aiming to find the proper way to do it, but an effort to override the vote of the 52% of those who turned out for the referendum.

Surely neither the Prime Minister nor Parliament decide - both of them should be seeking to enact the expressed will of the people.

It would be a brave new PM indeed who took up the job and said, "er, well, I'm not going to do what you asked, I'm going to do what I want to do, instead."

Trying to block Brexit with a legal challange? That's ambulance chasing for autocracy. "Have you had a referendum that didn't go the way you were hoping? Are you tired of being out-voted by the majority? Call Legal Challenges now on 0800 NoMo rales. That's 0800 NoMo rales and talk to one of our specialists about getting your minority opinion made law, regardless of adverse electorates or past inconvenient referendums."

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Android tablets too bitter a pill for Dell

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In other news

Dell discovers business doesn't need tablets but does need laptops.

Pundits are surprised. No one else is.

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Liberal Party of Australia: why are you paying so much for ancient software?

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Re: Dodgy is as Dodgy does..

I can't believe your comment is so far down the forum.

I thought it was immediatly obvious: tax goes in, party funds come out.

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Lindsay Lohan ‘happy’ to turn on Kettering

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Flame

If you turn on Kettering

can you then have a hot drink? ---> Gas stove ---->

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Sterling's post-Brexit dollar woes are forcing up tech kit prices

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Holmes

>A fall against USD costs everyone, especially those who drive, use public transport or buy food and other goods transported by road or rail.

So imports are more expensive, and exports are proportionally more competitive.

Isn't that a *good* thing for British business? Even if you import your raw materials, your value-added end product will be more competitive on the world market. More cash to be made trading from the UK, more stuff made and consumed locally.

That's assuming that that the currency effect is all its being made out to be, rather than fluff and spin...

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Apple, Amazon and Google are screwing us, warns Elizabeth Warren

P. Lee
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Re: Surely she could have come up with a better example for Apple

>It's all about subscriptions inside the app and payments. This applies to all apps on the App Store.

I think that's the point of the article isn't it? The platform forces everyone to play by Apple's rules which favour (surprise!) Apple.

This isn't a problem in a competitive industry, but Warren's point is that consolidation means that it isn't a competitive industry any more and what would otherwise be a legitimate position is not acceptable in a monopoly (or duopoly) environment.

Think of it like "indirect discrimination." e.g. All policemen must be at least 5'10'' The rule applies to everyone equally, is born of good intentions (a strong physical street presence), and doesn't explicitly forbid women from joining up, but it is structured in such a way that effectively bars them from service and brings imbalance to the force.

None of this is news to most of us, but the network lock-in effect we have built in IT today is unprecedented and is not something the market appears to correct. Big Tech has saturated its market and cloud/rental is its solution to continued profits. This strategy should be questioned as it kills competition in new ways we haven't had to deal with before.

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Fear and Brexit in Tech City: Digital 'elite' are having a nervous breakdown

P. Lee
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Re: The current plan does not matter

>The best plan I have is for 350 MPs to ignore the current party politics and vote a motion that explicitly forbids the Government from invoking Article 50.

The "Leave Campaign" was always a fringe thing in terms of party politics - the vast majority of the mainstream politicians didn't want it. Those that did want it were Boris (buffoon with no eye on the top job in the Tory party), May (mostly hated), Gove (mostly hated). Farage - UKIPs *only* MP. Hardly a compelling team of winners.

Despite that, most of the electorate did want it, however. What you are suggesting is that politicians ignore the the explicitly declared will of the people, because they (or perhaps you) know better.

Perhaps the fact that UKIP only had one MP despite over half the turnout voting "leave" is an indication of just how strongly the political elite have manipulated the system so that it serves only their purposes. How could all the major parties be so out of touch with the electorate, unless they have an effective way to insulate themselves from them? Perhaps if the parties allowed more "loyal opposition" they might have been able to see where the people are and negotiate for an EU more in line with what people are willing to accept, rather than pressing ahead with their own agendas.

The parties are supposed to represent the people. They've stopped doing that and when one small chink in the armour was spotted, the electorate took a wedge and jammed it in hard. It isn't just Westminster either. If MEPs represented the people and created an EU the people wanted, we wouldn't be in this situation.

Meanwhile Project Fear continues apace. Why try to bury bad news when you can blame it on Brexit? Of course we can't blame "the people" so we'll blame "party politics," "the politicians" or "the campaign." While its true that revolutions are generally ugly, even Obama is lining up Brexit as the cause of worldwide economic disaster. I guess there will be no let-up, with all bad things blamed on it. Obama, Vodaphone and everyone else... all their problems will not stem from years of financial mismanagement, mountains of debt and poor judgment, nope, its because England didn't want to play nice with France. Your racism has doomed us all! How dare you not let other countries write your laws!

There doesn't need to be a conspiracy to cause this situation, I suspect that its merely that politicians and much of society are so focused and dedicated to winning their arguments, that they cannot hear or admit any alternative explanations or plans to the ones they wish to put forward. How can you keep a grip on reality when "what is effective" trumps "what is true"?

My view on the "cheap labour" issue is a little different. Those who want to go for the cheapest things will do so, be it to eastern Europe or India and their products will reflect that quality. More significantly, how did our economy get so out of sync with the rest of the world? If it was due to EU protectionism was that ever a sustainable position or would it require ever more subsidy to maintain? If we go it alone, should we replace EU protectionism with UK protectionism or will that damage us in the long term? Would reducing household debt be a more effective way to raise the standard of living than to prevent some wage competition?

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Trans-Pacific FASTER fibre fires first photons, finally

P. Lee
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FTFY

Lay just a little more fibre,

Run it just a little bit faster,

Make the web a bit stronger,

Thanks for data, Goo-Fibre!

/sorry Christina

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Honey, why are porno apps on your Android?! Er, um, malware did it!

P. Lee
Silver badge

Re: Within the next 18 months there will be a massive Android infection

>Why buy a new phone, when firmware flashing is enough?

Indeed, why is there no during-boot button combination which drops you into a really simple rom which gives you the option of deleting the disk volume and starting from scratch or downloading from either a fixed or user-specified URL

Ah yes, they would be the urge manufacturers have to get you to buy a new phone rather than upgrade your existing one. That's the root of the problem with not being able to do clean installs. Its a vendor problem. It would be so easy to do a fresh install, sign into your store and pick which apps you'd like to re-install and which ones you think might be dodgy.

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Body of evidence: Biometrics and YOU

P. Lee
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>It’s a spin-off from its Welcome home security product that also relies on deep learning.

... and there goes all credibility, off out the window to join the pigs.

To be fair, I know nothing of the products, but electronic home security products don't have a great record.

The real knife in the heart is "deep learning" but I suspect the victim was already dead.

The absolute most you want from biometrics is "Hello Mr X, please enter your passcode now."

Or you could just put the key in the lock and turn the key without any of that junk.

Quite frankly, paywave doesn't require any authentication up to $100 and a pin after that, so why bother? Anything more is going to be a hassle the customer doesn't want (along with "please swipe your reward card now or press.,,")

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What Brexit means for you as a motorist

P. Lee
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Re: On the plus side...

So many contradictory statements, no arguments, no evidence... no meaning.

>Duty Free for anyone travelling between the UK and the EU...

or they might just do the sensible things and say, "carry on as before," pretty much as is the response in every single area.

Hello Bong? I've got your nephew Ryan here. He says he works for you.

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Those Xbox Fitness vids you 'bought'? Look up the meaning of the word 'rent'

P. Lee
Silver badge

Its all fun and games...

until people realise what's going on.

No MS might well consider that the content they have provided far exceeds what customers would have received had they bought a static video.

Customers on the other hand, are likely to see this as a betrayal.

Appliances are bad long-term business. They benefit the customer in the very short term, the vendor in the medium term but in the long term, the vendor is tied to stuff they don't want and the customer hates the vendor's (required but poor) support.

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My plan to heal this BROKEN, BREXITED BRITAIN

P. Lee
Silver badge

Re: From the 27

>Germans strongly back EU membership, oppose referendum - poll

So you're saying the Germans are so strongly in favour of EU membership that they oppose being asked if they are in favour of the EU membership?

Perhaps their leaders have more sense than Cameron had, then to *actually* ask people what they wanted.

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P. Lee
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Re: I'm a leaver

>you'll see that it's a perfectly democratic organisation.

The democratic structures are not in doubt, but there are two problems:

1. the real power doesn't reside with the parliament, it resides with the council of ministers who can make decisions and then claim it was someone-else's fault.

2. Democracy isn't an end in itself. Its a means to the end of self-determination. When you scale a democracy up, you start squashing the individuality of those below as they all conform to one law. You reduce the power of any given vote and any given voting block, which leads to those at the top being insulated the effects of a small revolt, giving them time to quash it before it grows. You can have perfectly democratic structures but make the voting base so large that no-one can influence the executive. What's the point in a democracy if it doesn't reflect the wishes of the people?

In this case, the people have said they wish to leave. Its downright frightening that Bong can write such a cynical piece and we all recognise his ideas as those playing out.

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P. Lee
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Re: "Such diverse cultures?

Not to mention that Europeans have been fighting each other for a very long time.

The Greeks went rampaging around the world. The Italians brought them down and occupied much of Europe up to the edge of Scotland. The Germans attacked them and brought down their empire... and we haven't even got to 500 AD yet.

Europe isn't a country. The people who live there don't see it as a country. If cancelling an international trade treaty causes this much pain, we probably shouldn't have signed it.

Personally, I suspect there are major problems in the financial system. If GBP can drop 10% overnight then its grossly disconnected with economic reality. In that case, the pain was destined to arrive at some point and its probably better to get it now than let the problems pile up for later.

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Microsoft releases cross-platform .NET Core 1.0 at Linux event

P. Lee
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>>"New .NET Core workloads can now be easily moved from a Windows Server environment to Red Hat Enterprise Linux"

>God knows why anyone would want to though.

Licensing.

MS knows that its licenses costs scare off cloud-provider-services who have no desire to track licenses on deployments or cramp their instance spin-ups.

MS also knows that if all the cloud devs ditch them, they'll be left with very little at the server end.

But the sentiment is correct. You really wouldn't do this. If you're MS-based product isn't going to make you money on an MS-hosted platform, you need to re-think your plans.

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