* Posts by P. Lee

3200 posts • joined 4 Dec 2007

NBN Co says TWO broadband connections are better than one

P. Lee
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For home or business?

It might make sense for business to run two different ISPs, two different forms of tech which might follow different physical paths. Also, the HFC component may already be there. This means they're just adding fibre. That could be permanent or a migration path.

Get them into thinking about redundancy from the start? That would be good.

Praiseworthy, but perhaps a little distracting from their main objective, which is getting fibre to my house. :p

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Small cells are like DRUNKS. They don't use lamp posts for light, they use 'em for support

P. Lee
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>chaining through the small cells negates the bandwidth advantage that was created.

Not necessarily. The point is to reduce the collision domain. It's a little like the queue buffers in a switch/router, if data-in temporarily exceeds output capacity, you can store the traffic and send it in an efficient stream, taking advantage of its (hopefully) bursty nature.

Of course, wires are best, so only use this stuff for devices that need it. That means, stop pushing "wireless internet" for home use. Dig up the roads and lay the fibre! There are good reasons why we don't use wireless networking in data-centres.

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P. Lee
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Re: Ongoing drive,,,

>Around here there's an ongoing drive to turn off street lights between midnight and 5 am as the council's skint.

As the lights are off all day, I hope they've already thought of that!

50m Line of sight links anyone?

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Microsoft cuts Facebook Messenger, Google Talk from Outlook.com

P. Lee
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Everyone wants to think they are big enough to be the environment

I'm thinking... friend-request by email, after which an auto-responder provides presence information (skype is <here>, hangouts is <here>, sip is <here>, lync is <here>, instagram is <here>....), including, "I'm about to change my email address to <this>, update your address-book/bookmarks."

Then you can have a central place to allocate "find me" rights, give different information to different people. It can be human-readable, machine readable. when IPv6 hits and you get permanent addresses, you don't have to have a domain-name of your own, you can still use an arbitrary email address to provide SIP, for example.

Time to write a new chat client! /jk

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COSMIC FATTY from the DAWN of TIME simply can't exist – astroboffins

P. Lee
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Re: It makes sense since God created it

The much vaunted physics-based red-shift data doesn't seem support the big bang theory either. That was the point of the article, wasn't it?

So, we have two ideas, neither of which conform to the science as we know it. Red-shift might be wrong for some reason, the instruments might be defective, the instruments might not be measuring what we think they are measuring, our understanding of the formation of black holes might be wrong, or our faith in the big-bang ex nihilo might be wrong, as it does, by definition break the laws of physics, which is what we use to study it. I'm sure there are other things which could also be wrong.

Hubris was the first mistake.

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WANTED: A plan to DESTROY metadata, not just retain it

P. Lee
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Mission creep

(What's with the "meta-data" rubbish in the headline? Its data. Actually, its like having a CCTV camera pointed at your screen all the time, but which can't see the actual user. Only its less a bit less accurate than that.)

As you increase the age of data you decrease its reliability and usefulness.

IP source/destination & port numbers might be fine for today's data. What happens when it was two years ago? Who was living at the house? Now you need to keep name/address/account data as well as the traffic data. So you have another privately-held database to complement the land registry. This isn't current data, this goes back... forever?

That kiddie porn that was accessed - was the house owner's owner's daughter back from college for that weekend? Did she use Dad's computer? Has the disk or the laptop been changed, so you can't tell who had access? Is the Mr Sayeed who was living there seven years ago the same Mr Sayeed who is there now? How about the house-share full of college students? Can you track them down, do you even know if the people on the rental agreement are real ones who were there? Even for phone data - did Ms Sayeed use her Dad's phone to call her zealous boyfriend? Did she use it as a hotspot?

The thing about "digital footprints" is that they might be accurate enough for ad-slingers, but they aren't anywhere close to accurate enough for legal purposes and the further back you go, the more difficult it is to see the unknowns and the easier it is to make assumptions.

"Don't tell anyone your pin" is all well and good, but its hard to use a phone a lot and have a pin no-one has seen, even if they aren't looking. If they are trying to cover their tracks by secretly using your kit, its pretty hard to stop them. Its your phone, its been "secured" and you were in the house. "It wasn't me but I don't remember who it could have been" will be difficult to pull off, if you look suspicious.

We haven't even begun to look at what happens when websites move addresses.

The data shouldn't be collected because it is often misleading. That doesn't bother advertisers and (other) criminals who don't care about failures or historical accuracy and for whom a scatter-gun approach is valid. The longer you store it, the worse the situation becomes so you need more data to try to keep it accurate, but still, as events fade from human memory, the data becomes more and more misleading.

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'Utterly unusable' MS Word dumped by SciFi author Charles Stross

P. Lee
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Re: New version for Office for Mac coming .... when?

Office 2011 for OSX must have fixes applied. Otherwise it repaginates every time you touch anything. Try that with a 300 page document.

I'm not sure if anyone can confirm, but is Word single-threaded, even under Windows? It seems to grind to a halt on my quad-core i7, which surely can't be right!

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P. Lee
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Re: I admit, I am Word Processor inept.

So true, have an upvote.

I'm constantly telling my kids when they sit down to do a school project, "Do not format anything. Gather your content and write the text. You can format it later." Formatting is a massive time-wasting distraction and you're likely to change it all before you finish anyway.

Also at work, the number of hours I've spent having to line up table columns between different tables on a page. Styles should be a boon, but yes, they breed and can easily over-run you. Mostly, I use them for headers / document outline functions. Paste "as text" or via notepad and woe betide anyone who tries to use Excel to hold table data before bringing it into Word!

I like libreoffice because its fast, cross-platform etc, but I find it ugly to look at. ARGH those icons! Menu fonts don't look quite right - indefinably messy. It feels primitive, even next to Word, though that might just be Suse's packaging or Gnome app running under unfavourable KDE settings. I find Word a real pain with its exceedingly dumb XML mark-up which can happily include the graphic in a caption and insert it into a table of figures. "Everything is just a style" seems to be the motto with no intelligence applied. At least WordPerfect had a "reveal codes" function so you could see and fix bad mark-up. I've just downloaded the Linux beta for Scrivener and while not having used it in anger, it does look very nice!

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ACLU: Here's a secret – cops are using the FBI's fake cell-tower tech to track crims' phones

P. Lee
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How long can it work?

How soon will the bad guys get some triangulation equipment, map out the neighbourhood and get a heads-up when a mobile base-station enters the area?

Phone-security-as-a-service anyone, with SMS updates?

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Mozilla mulls Superfish torpedo

P. Lee
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Re: And how many other root CA's on your PC can you trust?

Not just CAs.

The Australian tax return software asks for root privileges to install. Who knows what else its doing? This is one step further on from "if you don't trust this software, don't run it." I think we've come to the point where we do need to execute software which we don't trust, so we need some additional controls.

Its time to get a little more serious about security.

Some sort of EXEC <binary> --additional-data-dir --net-socket-allow --ip-domain-exclude=XXX --ip-domain-include=YYY to allow the OS to control things with process-specific firewalls and disk restrictions. A kind of "noscript" for the OS, with some sensible defaults. Maybe the docker chaps could help?

As a mockup, could the disk restrictions could be done with an ad-hoc user account and a union disk configuration? With IPv6 at at least, we can run up an application on its own IP address to make firewalling a bit easier.

This could be done without upsetting existing apps, to allow untrusted applications to run without requiring root installation privileges. Apps which comply and provide a manifest get a shiny badge and good karma for their efforts. Apps which don't comply get a warning siren and booing from the gallery. The idea is to get app makers to document requirements which makes things safer for home-users and easier to manage for corporate systems.

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P. Lee
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Ban 'em

Whatever Lenovo's incompetence in the matter, siphoning off traffic traffic and subverting encryption is the very purpose of the SuperPhish software.

There is no excuse and its a business practise which needs to be staked through the heart, head removed and burnt in the sunshine in front of the public.

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May the fourth be with you: Torvalds names next Linux v 4.0

P. Lee
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Coat

Re: How much longer do we have to wait for Linux 10??

Right after Linus has had a few beers, we'll get Linux X...

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P. Lee
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Re: don't break compatibility since forever

2.6 came out in 2003, which is "forever" ago (in my book), when they still did even-prod, odd-dev numbering (which I rather liked). 2011 was the last release of that kernel.

I seem to think Linus said kernel-internal interfaces are always open to change, though user-facing ones are not. Is that correct? We still have 3c509 NIC drivers, so I'm guessing it isn't too difficult to keep drivers up to date.

I know there are certain long-lived systems, but this is open-source. If there is a business case for the drivers then upgrade them, if not, leave them as they are. If you can't do it yourself, pay someone who can - I'm sure many devs are open to having cash thrown at them. You aren't left high-and-dry without source code here. I seem to think CheckPoint were still running 2.6 kernels fairly recently.

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Why IP telephony is about more than just saving money

P. Lee
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Re: VoIP is fine...

>Until you move out to the countryside, where internet bandwidth is at a premium, and ADSL reliability takes a nosedive.

You always still have a PSTN gateway, but you move as many people off it as you can. A slightly higher internet connection is going to be cheaper than multiple landlines.

For home users, Fritzbox looks cool. I've no idea if its any good, but ADSL, DECT and VoIP in one box? How good is that!

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P. Lee
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Re: STOP!

64kbps is excellent - its the 9600bps mobiles that are horrible.

But yes, it can be cheaper, but do it properly and spend properly. You can't do it for nothing and expect good results. That QoS setup will cost, you can't just use your ADSL link with torrents (they seem to take a while to die down when you quit).

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Must-have sports tech: No, not an Apple Watch, a TOMATO GOB-STUFF BOT

P. Lee
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Devil

Re: What would Professor Gangreen say?

So many sequels its embarrassing. I'd be red-faced. ...................Killer Tom------>

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Microsoft to store deleted Exchange Online mails FOREVER

P. Lee
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Meh

All those powerpoint presentations emailed around

If you need to keep records for seven years, you'll need.... an upgrade!

Yay!

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So long, Lenovo, and no thanks for all the super-creepy Superfish

P. Lee
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Re: What is it with advertisers?

Of course advertising works:

1) blanket advertising: the idea is to gain mind share and thus market share. i.e. buy cuke rather than pepsi, McDonalds rather than Burger King. Which brands have you heard about most? This is how x-factor et al work. The idea is not that they will make people buy who don't want it, but to exclude alternatives fromt the market, so someone in the market for teeny-pop doesn't go and buy the "wrong thing."

2) Blanket advertising: to tip those "on the edge of purchasing" over into buying. Just before lunch? There will be a fast food advert for you to get you to a fast-food restaurant rather than make your own food. Nobody needs chewing gum, adverts won't tell anything new about gum, but the reminder is there to get gum-chewers to buy it.

3) Brand positioning: This is the kind of person who drives an SUV. If you want to be this kind of person, you need an OUR SUV, not a hatchback and not an SUV for plebs.

Tell a big enough lie often enough and people will accept it even if they don't consciously believe it. Without advertising, consumption would drop overall and there would probably be more new entrants into the market.

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P. Lee
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Re: They shot themselves in the head

Average Joe probably won't find the problem and if he does find it, he probably won't be making another purchase for five years or so anyway.

Personally, I'd take the money and run. There will be sales on Lenovo kit and all the Linux guys will be happy to pick them up. As will anyone with an MSDN account.

No-one does a clean install? That policy may cost you. It would have cost you before (being phished), it will probably cost you in the future (you pc may be more expensive). It will certainly cost Lenovo, but I don't think I'll let it cost me.

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Lenovo to customers: We only just found out about this Superfish vuln – remove it NOW

P. Lee
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Big Brother

>who else is on Superfish's payroll

Cue software name change in 3, 2, 1...

It also highlights the power of having a root cert installed.

Sure you can audit the list, but do you really trust all those CA's?

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P. Lee
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Re: Orange Alert!

>MS should take note as well. This is not their fault,

Oh yes it is MS' fault. They are seeding the market with cheap Windows but trying to preserve the high cost of retail/business Windows by allowing OEMs to devalue OEM-Windows by bundling rubbish into the install.

They could protect their IP by only allowing HW drivers to be included in an OEM Windows installation. "Helpful additional software" to be provided as an option afterwards.

MS could also provide clean easily accessible Windows images for DVD & USB installation.

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Didn't the Left once want the WORKERS to get all the dosh?

P. Lee
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Free markets or competitive markets?

Methinks there is a difference.

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Man the HARPOONS: YOU can EASILY SLAY ad-scumware Superfish

P. Lee
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>As if I needed another reason to nuke the entire preinstallation of any and all computers I buy

I think the point is that these system have OEM Windows with no installation media, specifically to allow this bundling mess to exist. Isn't MS great? It is so good of them to help clean it up.

So yes, if you want to buy another Windows license to replace the one you've just paid for which came with the PC, you can. Or put anything-but-Windows on it.

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Euro broadcast industry still in a fug over that 4K-ing UHD telly

P. Lee
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Re: telly?

Not sure what the downvotes are for.

UHD's last best hope is as a TV/Console/PC screen in the lounge. I projector is probably better, but might be too much fuss. As has been said, there's no point having hi-res when the compression pixelates the screen with any movement. PC's on the other hand tend to do things right, but even then, the graphics cards to drive PC games at those resolutions are not in Joe Public territory yet.

Still, it might be like HD is now - there's not much content, but may as well get the better screen if the cost differential isn't too much.

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Apple: Fine, we admit it – MacBook Pros suffer wonky GPU crapness

P. Lee
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Re: Not the first time

>Surely the solution is to lift the system several inches above your desk and drop it to reseat the chips. Worked for the Apple III.

That also worked the Apple ][+ and ][e, though I'm glad to find out at last why it worked - thanks!

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Hi, I'm Larry. I'll be your software vendor tonight. May I take your coat?

P. Lee
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Coat

May I take your coat?

I thought they were talking about their customers' coats. And shirts.

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Ads! People! love! ads! in! their! apps! Please! use! ours! cries! Yahoo!

P. Lee
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Re: Fuck ads and all who serve them up

I like ads.

In very specific places.

For example, if I'm searching for a lawnmower on Amazon, feel free to sling me an ad on the same page for other lawnmowers which might be similar to the one I'm looking at, just as long as it doesn't impinge on the one I've selected for closer inspection.

If I come back and search for a DVD, however, I'm unlikely to still want to know about lawnmowers.

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Hitachi smashes SPC-1 benchmark, boasts: We HAF ways of crushing 2 million IOPs

P. Lee
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Beware Over-Consolidation

It is not an end in itself.

It is ok to split your workload up by some arbitrary algorithm, keep a directory of what is done where and rebalance if required. That might be a little cheaper than putting in flash monsters and 40G networking links everywhere.

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Superfish: Lenovo ditches adware, but that doesn't fix SSL megavuln – researcher

P. Lee
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Facepalm

Re: @Halverflake

The application is called "SuperFish" and and nobody thought, "Hold on a minute, this might be a problem"?

With this level of incompetence, who needs the NSA with their HDD firmware mad skillz?

I'm afraid MS has some share in the blame. Not providing clean OS images is precisely to allow this sort of revenue stream and it targets those least able to fix the problem.

But don't worry Nadella, I'm sure people consumers will still want a Windows tablet and phone!

Hello, I'm a Mac and I'm not delivered with software that snoops on your bank account. etc.

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Global DNS power grab: US senators want a word with ICANN next week

P. Lee
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You can't filter out the bad guys

What are you going to do, not give address space to Somali pirates or the Taliban?

With ipv6 its even harder due to the lack of scarcity.

You can't stop people with physical access, the the Russians can set up their own DNS servers and pass all local DNS traffic to them for "proxying" before forwarding out to the US or European parts of the internet.

You can have secure, or you can have insecure, but you can't have "secure but only for the good guys." -Schneier

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Apple design don Jony Ive: Build-your-own phone is BOLLOCKS

P. Lee
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>What ever happened to the old saying "The customer is always right."

Apple generally has ridden on the idea that they know what the customer wants before the customer does. Generally, I'd agree with them there. The Lisa (lovely, if too expensive), Mackintosh, iMac, ipod, iphone, ipad all good examples of this. Apple stuff is lovely to touch, look at, hold - many people scoff at this, but it is an integral part of the experience of a consumer electronics item.

Where Apple fails is when the market moves on from this original bright idea to commoditisation. Its hard to keep coming up with good ideas, but inherent in finding a "new good idea" is that you know more than the customer. Being "totally customer driven" is normally code for "complete lack of imagination and effort."

Build-your-own-phone requires standardisation. Its a bit like shipping containers. They work well for economy and utility, but they are awful to look at and they will never be precisely what the customer needs unless they are shipping something which happens to be 8'x8'x40' - which is rare. Its an approximation to what the customer needs and always a compromise. You can compromise and rarely be "loved" or you can build something which will be loved, but only by a few.

It will be interesting to see how this plays out. I suspect it will depend on whether phones make the jump to more general compute or compute-access devices. The more general the usage, the more useful a compromise is. Not even Apple's billions will allow them to be "everything to all men." An iphone is a few-uses device and can be tightly controlled, a macbook is more general and can be less tightly controlled. Can apple keep people's faith in their goods, the cloud or drive a home-server purchase, or will they lose out to local infrastructure like an xbox or playstation or the fabled Steam machine? Using the cloud for settings and photo's is one thing, but the question comes as to whether a local host can provide CPU and latency advantages that the cloud cannot. Will tablets become fast enough to run local apps and will the devices attach to larger screens, keyboards and mice to enable better working?

It will be interesting to see where the "next big thing" comes from. We've now got portable computing to the point where we can have it anywhere. The question will be not whether we can have it, but whether we want it. Voice controlled appliances might look great in Star Trek, but Samsung TV's look less shiny. Star Trek never addressed privacy issues and Picard never treated his entire crew as criminals to be controlled and manipulated and spied upon at every opportunity, for fun and profit, even if the tech implied that he could.

Ives could be correct. A designer who makes no decisions isn't a designer, so he has abdicated his responsibility. However, that is assuming that choices have to be made by the designer, that compromises have to be made. That was certainly the case, probably it still is. Massively hi-res screens may be something customers think they want, but which negatively impacts battery usage. Giving the customer choice is nice, but its a good idea to prune that choice to maintain a good experience. That is what your brand does. You can also guide various customers towards particular options so that they don't make mistakes. Customer's don't want to have to make all the decisions - that's too hard. They do want companies to come up with a few good options for them, but when the market matures, more options can be taken as a "given" and more control can be given to the customer.

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After Brit spies 'snoop' on families' lawyers, UK govt admits: We flouted human rights laws

P. Lee
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> "legally privileged material"

i.e. You are not allowed to tell people we spied on you.

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Microsoft leaves the Rooms. How will Windows Phone OS users make to do lists?

P. Lee
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Happy

Re: the Verge nailed it

>...just a pity my hate for Skype is increasing with every update Microsoft makes. I really didn't need the advertising

Run Linux. The Linux version of Skype has no advertising.

Actually for work, I tend to do both. I run a Linux base OS with a Windows VM.

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Nutanix to release 'community version' of its secret software sauce

P. Lee
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Joke

Re: "Secret software sauce"

>Is it too much to ask that the first paragraph of an article include some hint what a product does?

I think its margarine. I'm sure I saw some at the supermarket.

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Linux kernel dev has gone well and truly corporate – report

P. Lee
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Re: Snowballing

>One of the earliest things I do is compile a version of the kernel with unneeded code (almost entirely drivers) stripped out to reduce the attack surface.

Non-monolithic kernels go one further by taking running drivers out of "ring 0" so they can't interfere with the rest of the kernel or each other.

I theory, its far more robust and secure, but real-world need-for-speed tends to override that option.

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P. Lee
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Happy

Re: Snowballing

>I doubt I'll ever understand why an OS architecture with hardware drivers built into the kernel has become so popular.

Speed. For everything else, there's HURD.

Having said that, we do have a lot of spare CPU power on the desktop, so perhaps its time to revisit the benefits of the microkernel?

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HTTP/2 spec gets green light: Faster web or needless complexity?

P. Lee
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Re: Debugging

>"Here's index.html, and I know what you'll ask for next, so don't bother: here's style.css, favicon.ico, and funny-cat.jpg."

The server could read all the content tags in a page and serve them up from a single page request, but I don't really want that. That means my browser doesn't get the chance to filter out things it doesn't want, such as flash, and save a bit of bandwidth by not asking for it at all. I might have style.css already cached too.

I don't want everything encrypted either. It isn't required. I like text rather than binary formats so I can see what's going on. I like it for the same reason I prefer text config file to the windows registry.

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SCREW YOU, BRITS: We're going through with UK independence ANYWAY – Scotland

P. Lee
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Trollface

Re: A snide and disappointing article

Wasn't it the Scots who created the Union? James I? Surely it should be the English who are asking for independence!

Anyhow, independence would have been an administrative nightmare and if they'd voted for it, they'd have got precious little help from the Southern Side.

Maybe they want to control their own finances and, er, join the Euro?

Or not.

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Australia's PM says data retention laws think of the children

P. Lee
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Liar!

I don't believe the cost is only 1% of 40Bn at all. Enterprise storage is expensive enough. Going carrier-scale would be massive.

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Samsung pulls ahead of Qualcomm in mobe chip race with 14nm Exynos

P. Lee
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If the A72 is anything to go by, there should be large performance gains.

While I would like to see the S6 do well, I'm not so concerned about phones at this point - I'd like to see if putting them in a NAS is going to turn the NAS into a useful server for home-scale MariaDB. Take your tablet, remove the screen and add 8 SATA ports and a 1GB NIC or two. Can we use the graphics chip to improve RAID5 calculations? I'd have thought vector processing would be the thing for that. Keep a small battery to power a cache in case the mains power goes away.

Seeing as current NAS vendors appear to be incapable of doing this at a decent price, perhaps Samsung or Asus or Gigabyte could make a PCIe-x16 card with these features. As cool as the technical progress is, I think Samsung needs to apply its nouse to getting decent ARM motherboard standards in place. Then it might have a larger market for its chips.

As much as I would like to see Moonshot do well, I'd have thought this would be the way into the market, rather than trying to take on Intel in the data centre.

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Samsung's spying smart TVs don't encrypt voice recordings sent over the internet – new claim

P. Lee
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Trollface

If you want to mess with them

Say, "Hi TV" and press DVD->Play

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Got $600 for every Win Server 2003 box you're running? Uh-oh

P. Lee
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The real reason Linux admins are smug

Enterprises running Linux are using it for critical tasks and they take the effort to plan and execute upgrades. *nix is higher up the critical-hardware list with mid-range systems with load-balancers and enterprise-experienced admins which make life easy. The apps also tend to be mission critical which means they play nice with HA configurations.

Windows is left to rot. Even the mission critical stuff is often tagged onto the desktop support team. They don't get the experience in dealing with mission critical systems, so things don't go well with upgrades. Windows is often put in because it appears cheap. In the service catalog, "Wintel" support is less than "Unix" support. That means resourcing is probably not up to the same standard that *nix enjoys.

Linux also doesn't do "tight integration" between the OS and applications. That means you can upgrade the kernel without upgrading the GUI and it probably won't break a server application. I run openSUSE and I find that distro version upgrades can actually downgrade me from my current versions (if I forget to ask the installation routine to pick up patches on installation) as I've acquired patches along the way, so I'm current even before I do a distro upgrade. The fluidity of versions means that Linux devs tend to code for robustness and minimal impact.

The whole VMware thing is mostly based around Windows being too hard to manage within the OS. Too much happens invisibly behind a wizard so no-one knows what's going on. Knowing what's happening is discouraged, therefore we wrap it up and treat it as a blob. You don't hear Solaris admins clamouring for VMware to make their life easier.

I suppose the summary is, it isn't all MS' fault that Windows upgrades get so much bad press. However, their business strategy involves deliberately not playing nice, so they can hardly complain when they accrue hatred and disdain. Their competitive practises have created a lovely little garden in which they can play all alone. They're welcome to it.

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P. Lee
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Re: Over a barrel. @AC

>I agree with almost everything you say but to equate Windows with one of the most robust OSs - NO !

Plus, proper clustering and file-system version control?

I'm not sure that's Windows.

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Australian government's 'cyber-security' review delayed

P. Lee
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Facepalm

We must be even more extreme...

in our attempts to destroy, er, extremism.

By treating everyone as terrorists, we'll make sure no-one attempts to say things we don't like and everyone will love politicians! That'll work - no-one will think of circumventing our security by using gmail! Yay! Go Me!

Plus, the security of the our IT networks is absolutely critical. So we'll cripple NBN's fibre network rollout and replace it with, er, whatever Telstra was going to do anyway (and we'll give them a bundle of taxpayer cash, because, well, they're our kind of people) just in case someone might use new fibre networks to say mean things, organise unpleasantness or eat babies.

Yeah, Security!

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Thecus N4310 4-bay: A NAS-ty beast for the budget-conscious

P. Lee
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Large drive data loss

The loss of data on large drives can usually be restored from... various places on the internet.

The question is, where do the backups go? If you have no other storage, my guess is that you'll be doing JBOD with per-drive volumes and separate backup disks - maybe two mirrored drives + two mirrored drives for backup? RAID5 is hardly an option with so few slots.

Oi, El Reg, all this commercial punting is one thing, but is there a chance of getting some stats on a core2 or AMD low-end desktop chip doing this sort of job with FreeNAS or something like that? Are they in the same ball-park for performance or do the NAS appliances have some secret sauce to make things wonderful?

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Google founders to offload $4 BEEELLION in shares

P. Lee
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>the current risk/reward equation in the stock market presents investors with all risk, no reward.

That's because the alternative (currency) is declining in value due to zero interest rates and inflationary money printing.

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Lightbulb moment for visible light networking: 200 Gbps without a fibre

P. Lee
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Re: What's the use case for 100 Gbps wireless?

Sure its faster than any one PC will need, but if you're looking at networking, you want to share resources.

Cross-rack traffic has been mentioned. There are security applications where you might want wireless, but you want to confine it geographically. You might want to have some high-speed networking in your bedroom which doesn't involve irradiating your head while you sleep. I might not want to turn it off in the rest of the house, but a simple cover (or sweaty t-shirt) can close it down locally. The 100G engineering might pay-off with smaller capacity consumer networking.

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Microsoft's patchwork falls apart … AGAIN!

P. Lee
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Re: A patch that breaks powerpoint?

Do even the luvvies want to see a video in a powerpoint?

The only use for that is the CEO saying how he values safety/diversity/staff in compulsory training courses.

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Kanye West: Yo, DNS... Imma let you finish, but this gTLD is one of the best of all time

P. Lee
Silver badge
Unhappy

Re: "I would have thought he's selling photocopiers"

Well, I was going for a tech joke regarding 00:00:02 (Xerox) but I guess I failed with that!

Young'uns these days, its all php and javascript!

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Violin-fiddling boffins learn that 'F-HOLES' are secret to Stradivarius' SUPERIOR sound

P. Lee
Silver badge

Re: Yet another explanation

You fail at modern philosophy which says "modern = intelligent/good; old = dumb/bad".

I think its part of the cult of evolution. Pretty much anything/one before the 1960's is considered a bit primitive, which is slightly ironic given modern music's preoccupation with banging a wooden stick against an animal skin.

I find it curious that with the rejection of religion in the West, sex, drugs and rock-n-roll drumming - three major methods "heathens" use for communing with the spirit world - become increasingly central to the culture.

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