* Posts by P. Lee

4415 posts • joined 4 Dec 2007

'Tesco Bank's major vulnerability is its ownership by Tesco,' claims ex-employee

P. Lee
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>Your "insider" speculates that a Clubcard breach is involved?

<massive speculation alert>

Maybe using the same purchase tracking system so they can "understand their customers better"?

It doesn't even need to be that system which was compromised, as soon as you start linking lots of IT systems between companies or company divisions, someone's bound to have some communication system with a flaw in it.

You've used a vpn? That's nice, now my attack is encrypted...

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UK's new Snoopers' Charter just passed an encryption backdoor law by the backdoor

P. Lee
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Re: Well...

>You can kiss the UK Software Industry good bye. Who would buy a software product from there now?

Anyone know who "an operator" is? Just the commercial ones such as telco's or is this down to individuals too?

It looks to me like a fairly logical extension of "give us your password or we'll throw you into gaol forever," to cover in-transit as well as at-rest data. Didn't MS get into trouble with the Belgians for not providing tapping capabilities to skype? Is anyone surprised its no longer p2p?

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Microsoft’s ‘Home Hub’ probably isn’t even hardware at all

P. Lee
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Re: AD for the home user?

I'll go out on a limb and suggest a windows (live?) account is probably AD - just not your AD.

MS, having gone for the slurp, has little incentive to let you (a consumer who doesn't spend) have your own infrastructure away from their prying eyes.

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Emulating x86: Microsoft builds granny flat into Windows 10

P. Lee
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Re: Cart before the horse

>Apple did this twice

But they were going from slower to faster CPUs.

Going the other way is madness, doubling down on disappointment: first with a slower CPU and then with emulation.

If you want to run arm and x86 together, find some add arm to an x86 chip package and find some way to freeze/thaw data when you power each chipset on/off so you can share data quickly or not at all.

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Hackers electrocute selves in quest to turn secure doors inside out

P. Lee
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Mushroom

Re: They're still alive after electrocution?

>(OED is in agreement - injure or kill by electric shock)

It matters not - even by those lax standards, the usage was incorrect. A "tickle" is not an injury, much less death.

Not that we were hoping for death, merely for clarity.

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Forget 'shadow IT' – it's 'self-starting IT' now

P. Lee
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You bought it, you broke it

'Tis slightly more subtle.

With some joss sticks and whalesong becomes corporately acceptable (YBI)2

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Surveillance camera compromised in 98 seconds

P. Lee
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Re: Why is this still a problem?

>why do they still insist on having them hard coded?

Because these devices are install-and-forget and if you forget the password because the last time you accessed it was three years ago then you're going to need some comprehensive password reset plan which works with your crummy-little IoT hardware.

Easier and cheaper might be to set the TTL on all your telnet traffic to 1 by default. Setting the TTL to three or four is probably enough for most consumer kit to allow for VPN access. Having a physical switch which needs pushing to allow "advanced" access to change such things is probably enough to stop the botnets expanding. This isn't a perfect solution. It falls down if you are doing something dumb like attaching it to a cloud, but nobody's perfect! :)

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Windows cmd.exe deposed by PowerShell

P. Lee
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Re: ksh or nothing, thank heavens for cygwin

>‘Why the hell a *shell* should do that?’

Because its interactive VisualBasic for Applications?

Ok, I'm talking well outside my skill-set here and I'm happy to be shot down for that comment, but there is a more interesting philosophical point in play.

I'm sure it will be great for manipulating MS applications & data. What happens with 3rd party apps? This is why *nix people like tools for handling "unstructured" text - it allows us to get at the data and do things the application writers never imagined, or more likely these days, what they did imagine but didn't want you to do.

I don't need application skills, I don't need api skills, just dump the data and I'll mess with it as required. Look at how MS use powershell - to create applications their own applications. If you don't go for the whole .net thing, you'll still need some alternative and perhaps other languages do that better.

We are basically heading to a situation where no-one trusts the ecosystem so everyone wants to own the whole stack. First they went to linux appliances, then they went to renting via SaaS. Given MS' keenness to kill on-site servers, I suspect powershell will become "Azure Powershell for MS applications" as everyone who is not Azure-only is unlikely to invest in these interfaces.

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LinkedIn officially KickedOut of Russia

P. Lee
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Re: What is LinkedIn hoping to gain?

It always amuses me that that customers "don't need to care about where the data is stored" for cloud purposes, but vendors seem incapable of managing their own cloud locations. Its cloud - its supposed to be all about modular, replicated architecture, automation and so on.

Of course, it could be that linkedin don't want to be liable to Mr Putin. The NSA generally keep their slurping quiet if they can, but I doubt Putin would be so careful. Being stuck with two competing, privacy-invading agencies might be more trouble than its worth.

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Why I just bought a MacBook Air instead of the new Pro

P. Lee
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Re: I'm in a similar dilemma with my 2008 unibody 13" MacBook 8GB ram 256GB SSD

>The blistering fast nvme ssd is a game changer. 3/2.7 GB Read/Write is unparalleled and mitigates future ram requirements as swapping ram to disk is so fast.

Sorry that's a rubbish idea because

1) Swap is a fudge, not an ideal to be aimed for. Using it on an SSD shortens its life (maybe that's the plan... /tinhat)

2) "Sorry we can't upgrade the RAM" is not a thing. Ok, it is a thing - its an Apple strategy thing, but it is not a technical thing.

Quite simply the "pro" is not a pros's machine, its a macbook up-sell for consumers who don't know any better.

For consumers, I doubt 16G RAM will be an issue for the lifetime of the machine. RAM requirements seem to be levelling out. I'm guessing the reason the RAM is not upgradable on the pro machine is that it would be embarrassing to have it non-upgradable on some machines but upgradable on others. I get that everyone has to make a profit, but this is not the way to do it. Apple is basically hoping that the rest of the industry follows suit so that it doesn't have to explain itself.

Magsafe data links might be technically tricky but the rest of it is well within their capabilities - they just chose not to do it. If Apple had left on a couple of USB2 ports, swappable battery, SSD and RAM and given us a new cable design for magsafe power with dual optical (or shielded electrical) thunderbolt3.1 links to the Apple version of the Razer Core with graphics and additional SSD slots, they would have made a lot of people very happy and people would be cooing over their "innovation."

If they had brought out a range of peripherals to take advantage of the high-speed ports, they would also have less flak. When they swapped floppy for usb drives, the actual USB drives were better. There's no apparent reason to have these new ports... except to sell more dongles so you can connect all the same kit you already have. If they had said, "Here's our new 10GbE Server/SSD RAID box. You can also get our 8/16-port 1GbE/10GbE switch that you can connect to the 10GbE link on your new pro." People would have said, "ok, its a pro box, I don't need it but I accept that its better than the old one and justifies the price hike."

I feel that consumer gear performance is probably impinging on business-system performance and the enterprise vendors don't want consumer pricing in their arenas. I'd love an 8-port switch which can take 10GbE or 1GbE SFPs. Thunderbolt interfaces can run at the right speeds, but no-one does the in-between bits to get to ethernet or the small switches. Everyone wants to do the 48-port version for $15k. Given that the complexity goes up exponentially, I would have thought a low port-count switch would have been a winner. We have PCIex16 slots going begging on most consumer desktops but where's the really high-speed networking and SSD arrays? No-one wants you to add another 256G SSD, they want you to throw out the old one and buy a new expensive 1TB one.

The problem is that my steam library is larger than many business databases and its very hard to segment the market when those who have a good reason to spend cash have the same requirements as those with no profit-motive for buying kit. This is why we are seeing a drop in innovation on the desktop. No-one wants to compromise their existing profit margins. And this is why we must tilt the playing field back towards companies who have nothing to lose and why IP laws (and the threat of IP litigation) have got to the point where they are damaging. If we stifle innovation via the law courts at home, the Chinese will do it and have the market to themselves. Sure, they'll be rubbish to start with - but so was the first iphone and so were Japanese goods in the 1970's.

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AI gives porn peddlers a helping hand

P. Lee
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Boffin

Re: Lack of Research

> last one is either brilliantly made up or genuinely silly.

Argh! It turns out google definitely isn't your friend.

Porn is like Windows 10 - destroys what you really needed and replaces it with bells and whistles you didn't want.

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UK privacy watchdog sends poison pen letter to Zuckerberg et al

P. Lee
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Re: Sounds like she actually understands the issues

>Let's see if she can actually change their behavior

Or you can change your own behaviour by not putting your data on other people's servers.

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Google Pixel pwned in 60 seconds

P. Lee
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Re: Cheaper to pay bug bounties...

>You design in the quality and security.

You need to design in the quality and security *into the OS*

Flash and the browser are software exposed to the internet taking in random data. This is a very high-risk activity zone. We know that and we *should* be in the position that, even when they have been compromised, no further damage can be done.

Browsers and other internet-facing features get updated all the time. We need to recognise there will be errors and plan for it by having better sandboxes. What's the minimum you need to get html rendered? Harden all those APIs. How about an automatic sudo to another user ID when you run a browser? How about a hardened API which allows file transfers between users, but only puts them into directory specified by the destination user's settings? (e.g. ~/downloads) and (if executable) marks the file as executable only from an interactive shell? OS's don't support that? Well, maybe its time for some new OS features.

Privacy is also now a problem. Who would trust Android, ChromeOS, iOS, MacOS or Windows not to upload their browser history to the mothership? What we want is to be able to download blacklists of the dodgy sites security wise to our local PCs, without uploading incriminating browser histories to the cloud. Without that assurance, its hard to protect users from themselves. While you might think people deserve what they get, but with DDOS attacks on the rise there's more at stake than someone getting crypto-lockered.

Security in depth please. What could possibly go wrong? Once you've answered that question, you have a roadmap for a response. Hint: patching is a tactical, not a strategic response.

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Britain must send its F-35s to Italy for heavy overhauls, decrees US

P. Lee
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Oooh. Italian maintenance!

What could possibly go wrong?

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Trump's taxing problem: The end of 'affordable' iPhones

P. Lee
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Re: If you're good at your job then globalisation shouldn't pose a threat to you. Hah!

>That of course assumes your employer has a clue.

^ This.^

Outsourcing seems to be more about CV stuffing for those managers in charge of the change. "Look what I can manage!" before the hidden costs kick in.

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P. Lee
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Re: Actually it might bring the opposite

>There might be another point. Large companies might move out of the US and set their headquarters somewhere else. Some highly qualified employees might move them,

Isn't that what is already happening? The US companies have gone multinational so they don't pay tax and they bring in H1B-visa workers, which is similar to moving those jobs abroad. The companies are "American" in terms of control, but not really in terms of tax and, to an extent, jobs. If you've got nothing left to lose, you might vote for Trump... oh look! If the government has nothing left to lose in terms of tax, it might start putting up barriers to increase the costs to multinationals and encourage local-based corporations which actually contribute to the local economy... oh look!

Perhaps what is happening is that people are looking at the iphone 7 and Galaxy 7 and think - meh! I don't really need that. Perhaps they look at their laptop and think, "the new ones don't do anything more for me than the old one, but I do really need a job." Perhaps the prospect of cheap IT just doesn't hold much attraction any more. Perhaps they see Dell hiking prices to pay for the EMC acquisition and think, "I see no reason to help Dell pay off his debt." Perhaps they look at the Apple price hikes (yes it isn't a Brexit phenomenon) and think, "Yes it is a better screen and faster CPU, but that doesn't improve my life enough for me to pay what Apple is asking." Apple has lost sight of something they have always known - you have to sell the benefits, not the tech. The tech-industry's problem is that innovation stalled a few years ago. Consolidation, the cloud and now price hikes are an effort to hide the fact that their products are not providing that much additional benefit to customers.

Razer's Core is a product which should have been in the development labs of all laptop makers - its something I've wanted for years and I can't imagine that no-one at HP, IBM, Lenovo, Sony, Acer, Asus, Apple, or Dell thought of it before. The companies have been so good at picking off consumer surplus that they have forgotten that everyone has to win for the transaction to take place.

But back to the tech industry issues. The lack of trade barriers is great while there is a competitive market place. However, we mostly have a (US-controlled) hegemony. In this scenario, higher tariffs, and more expensive imports should stimulate competition. Perhaps the Chinese and the Russians will focus on making their own better chips which will give Intel a kick, much as AMD's competition did a while back. Once we have more effective competition, we can start bringing the tariffs back down. Perhaps licensing tariffs will help put an end to the moving of profits via "intellectual property" licenses to tax havens, leading not only to more government income, but a fairer playing field for those companies too small to take advantage of complicated legal arrangements - again, more competition.

Trump certainly presents himself as an obnoxious idiot. That idiocy may in the short term lead to higher costs and a less free market, but in the long term a more competitive market with lower-cost products. That's sad for the existing producers, but rather good for everyone else.

It isn't a sure thing of course. Tariffs can hide all sorts of inefficiencies, but we seem to have arrived at monopoly or oligopoly markets with little competition. Competition is hard for the companies involved but good for the customers - and who is not an IT customer?

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The hated Trans-Pacific Partnership trade deal will soon be dead. Yay?

P. Lee
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>The truth is, of course, that no one knows what impact the (sic?) TPP would have.

Huh? Yeah, we have a sweeping new trade agreement. What does it do? Who knows!

Call me cynical, but I don't believe you.

Trade agreements are always about getting the best deal for your own industries - usually the ones which do or might fund your party.

(from http://www.theregister.co.uk/2015/11/06/tpp_trade_deal_text_published?page=2)

>The big topic that does seem to be legitimate is that the TPP will allow corporations to sue governments through so-called investor-state dispute settlement (ISDS), but that individuals will not be given an equivalent right to sue corporations.

That first phrase alone should be enough to kill it, even without the second phrase. Its designed to entrench vested interests by hamstringing governments. How nice if your multinationals can pull damages from foreign countries' tax-payers! Yeah, I'll bet that's just overblown, theoretical stuff. I mean, a company like McDonalds would never try to sue an Italian city for money it failed to make because the city refused to let it plonk its ugly self down in the middle of an historic plaza, next to a beautiful piece of architecture built before your country existed, would it?

Now we have a reputation problem. If part of the treaty is so anti-democratic as to try to over-ride governments, what's the likelihood that I'll trust the rest of it not to be bad in ways I haven't thought of?

But wait, there's more! Not only do you want to negotiate it behind closed doors (bad enough but possibly legitimate) but you want no-one to know about it until after it is signed into law? Contemptuous of democracy? Sure I trust you! Or maybe I don't. Maybe your own people distrust you and dislike the way you act so much, they would rather vote in an openly obnoxious lunatic just to try to change the way things are done.

When you effectively stamp on the people to get your own way, they eventually revolt and they start smashing things, both good and bad.

There are similarities with the Brexit referendum. Why didn't the politicians realise the political situation? I can only believe that they had isolated themselves from the people. They did not want to know what the people thought and the party machine made sure they didn't hear it. Was the media publishing their own thoughts rather than reporting on reality? They too appear to be in their own little bubble of "what should be" or (for the conspiracy theorists) what the media's owners think should be. Both party-political sides appear to be completely dishonest. In both instances the leaders of the party where the upset came from did not want the upset. There are differences too. The electoral college is an anachronism with Trump not actually being the majority choice - there are no such moral legitimacy issues stemming from the voting system with Brexit. The US issues are multiple and hazy, whereas the Brexit issue was a single, clear choice.

I suspect people asked the question, what do the trade treaties do for us? There was no answer because they weren't designed to benefit the people, they were designed to benefit the corporations. People will accept that for so long, but as the gap between rich and poor widens, the rich begin to believe in their divine right to rule and the poor's patience begins to grow thin.

What will be interesting now, is to see whether Congress has given so much power to the State bureaucracy that Trump will be able to deliver on things, or whether his own party will shut him down.

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IBM: Why our Power9 CPU is going to make data centers great again

P. Lee
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>Because Licensing EACH CORE is awesome!

I have some sympathy with IBM's position. Would you rather have different sku's and buy a whole new unit to upgrade capacity? When you pay for the additional capacity, you get a discrete and definite benefit - more cpu capacity. That's what the consumer wants.

I have less sympathy with software vendors doing this. especially when its based on physical cores in the box, rather than limiting the number of cores the software will run on. With hardware, you know the benefit you'll be getting. With software, there's an incentive to make your software run badly to increase core-count revenue. That's bad for the consumer. This is why I have an issue with "Appliances" which are just PC's which the vendor refuses to upgrade or turns end-of-life with no good reason. That's server appliances or mobile phones - both are examples of hardware which is often dumbed down for market segmentation and (unlike IBM's hardware licensing). It's worse at the server end of the market: they want you to buy all new software licenses as well as over paying for new hardware.

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Flash crash trader takes plea bargain, cops to 'spoofing' and wire fraud

P. Lee
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Flame

Re: It's OK when the thieves on Wall Street do it ...

See? No guilt on us whiter-than-white, true blue, Americans for losing $1tn! It wurz those foreign criminals what done it!

They even admit it!

-

Burn the witch!

Did you dress him up as one?

No, No, No.

Well yes, a bit. We did do the nose... and the hat.

Burn 'im anyway!

There are ways of telling if he stole $1tn off ordinary hard working Americans.

What is it? How?

We need to compare him to a duck.

etc.

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Just what everyone needs right now – an HPE chat bot wrapped in a Docker container, right?

P. Lee
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Tell the BBC about it

They'll probably recommend it as therapy, along with sex (well - this is the BBC) and yoga for those in "trauma" from not having their favoured candidate win the US election.

First world problems, first world solutions. They deserve each other.

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Cisco emits new branch box

P. Lee
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Re: Sales pitch

But can you do a wan in software?

"Well I could, but why would I want to?"

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ASCII @dventure game NetHack gets first upgrade in ten years

P. Lee
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Moria

Hehe,

Last time I played that was on a 286 with an IBM-text-only type display. I killed the Balrog.

I think with today's larger screens the tile approach is a valid one. We've become used to having easier to distinguish elements on the screen.

DF was all a bit too complicated for me.

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Tailored Swift – coming soon to a cloud near you

P. Lee
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>So people had to have virtual machines that scaled vertically and then all of a sudden they have to scale horizontally and it becomes very expensive very, very quickly.

I have to question this. If you're using something like (the very cool but expensive) F5 then yes, its expensive to set up. We really need some cheaper horizontal scaling. If you're running public cloud, renting your servers, then it is expensive. If you are licensing per CPU or core, then it is expensive.

However, If you run your own IT, if you have some cheapish load balancing and you're running open-source, then CPU and memory are not that expensive to scale out. Cloud is based on over-subscription - constant high usage ruins that model and providers cost things accordingly. Commercial software licensing is also often based not on utility to the customer, but technical characteristics. That encourages vertical scaling and discourages horizontal scaling. Just like the cloud providers, if you are scaling out, then acquire the technical skills and use lots of the relatively cheap tin.

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Trump's torture support could mean the end of GCHQ-NSA relationship

P. Lee
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re: Trump's torture support could mean the end of GCHQ-NSA relationship

Am I the only one who thinks this might be a good thing?

One of the problems with having massive military superiority is that you never have to ask yourself if a particular course of action which involves killing someone, is something you would be willing to die for.

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Computer glitches force US election poll stations to stay open for longer

P. Lee
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Need more popcorn!

And more fuel for the generator...

I'll be so quaint when it's safe to re-emerge.

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Brexflation: Lenovo, HPE and Walkers crisps all set for double-digit hike

P. Lee
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Re: Cause and effect?

>"Since the referendum, the UK's currency has fallen from $1.49 to £1 to $1.21, a drop of 18.7 per cent "

Still it appears that there's an opportunity for someone to start selling crisps who doesn't incur these costs by keeping everything local.

Hands up - who thinks leaving the EU will actually add 18.7% onto the cost of sales (to the EU)? Does this extra cost apply to all non-EU countries? Can someone explain why all this is priced in USD rather than Euros? Ah yes, that's why, if we look at the Euro-to-GBP data we find (from xe.com) that GBP is almost 10% up against the Euro's value in 2008 - a relatively recent low-point with no "We're all doomed" Brexit story. As the villain said, "there's no news like bad news!"

Excuse me while I fail to weep for Big Business and selective news editors.

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P. Lee
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Re: Brexploitation

>Probably sharing a pint with Cameron, having a laugh over leading the country into a fractured state

Ah yes, because Cameron was so pleased with the referendum result.

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Celeb-backed music TV phallus Electric Jukebox finally ready for launch

P. Lee
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Windows

... Radio

Indeed.

A one-off fee of GBP 9.99 gets you a device which allows you to access multiple streaming services forever.

Or you could visit the charity shops, pick up CD's for next to nothing and give the remainder to charity. Doubleplusgood.

All this, "I must have what I want right now - I'll pay stupid money for it" is not character building. "Charlie and the Chocolate Factory" needs to be shown more often.

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McDonald's sues Italian city for $20m after being burger-blocked

P. Lee
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>If the people don't want it, they won't buy anything from it and it will leave.

More simplistic reductionism.

If we were talking about a startup with very limited cash reserves which naturally fitted into the environment, then perhaps. However, McD can funnel vast amounts of cash in from elsewhere to fund this venture - far more than the typically smaller Italian business is likely to have. This sort of cross-funding can ruin the atmosphere and drive out local business, with profits being funnelled abroad. To quote Ms Gomez, "I could, but why would I want to?"

Europeans don't worship big business as Americans do. "It is profitable" is not the most important consideration. Government is in charge of strategy. Making Florence more like an American city is probably not ideal for its tourist industry as a whole.

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P. Lee
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Re: The real reason

> I see no difference between hamburgers and phones.

Ah, the simplistic reduction of everything to "goods and services."

As mentioned above, what's the likelihood of fanbois dropping the packaging from their igadgets all over the streets?

More importantly, when thinking of all things Italian, what comes to mind, food or mobile phones?

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Unstoppable Huawei draws level with Apple

P. Lee
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Re: There are no constants in this world.

>I'm off for a Toblerone to cheer myself up.

The chocolate formerly appearing as Toblerone.

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Putin's Russia outlaws ECHR judgments after mass surveillance case

P. Lee
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>So it's OK for Russia to do it? What's your point?

There is an implied "we are better than they are" in pointing out other peoples' flaws. The point is that we should be more concerned with actually doing something about our own flaws than thinking about how evil other people are.

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Android's Hover feature is a data HOOVER

P. Lee
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>Google will have to balance how to restrict Hover's permissions without crippling legitimate apps.

How about: "Don't let notifications look like an application" or "Notification windows always include the application name" or "No transparent notifications" or even "all notification overlays are logged along with the application they overlay" for after-the-fact checking.

Until an OS is built for the user rather than the producer, this kind of thing will be a problem.

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Fresh Euro Patent Office drama: King Battistelli fires union boss

P. Lee
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Re: Exactly what does he know about the members of the Admin Council?

>He's acting with impunity. Sounds like he has immunity.

Or he was brought in to do a hatchet job no-one else was willing to do.

Often someone is brought in to do an unpleasant job and then they leave too. The idea is that hopefully, much of the ill-will they bring from doing the job leaves with them.

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Twitter trolls are destroying democracy, warn eggheads

P. Lee
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Why do politicians like twitter but ignore online petitions?

Because twitter is a self-promotion vehicle.

Other people's opinions can be safely ignored until they embarrass the politician.

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Teen in the dock on terror apologist charge for naming Wi-Fi network 'Daesh 21'

P. Lee
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Re: B team?

or perhaps there is a missing hyphen between "medieval" and "murder."

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Swiss, geez: Robo-hooker coffee shop to be erected in Geneva

P. Lee
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What? No GTA joke?

Would you combine scalding coffee and sex?

(That's rhetorical - no answers please.)

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Stiff upper lips and sun glasses: the Chancellor bets on Brexit feeling

P. Lee
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Re: So to clarify...

Newspapers lying?

I'm Shocked and Disgusted!

Here's a little thought exercise for all those who think Leavers are mostly racist Little Englanders: What is more racist: staying in a trading club of Caucasian Western European countries with collective tariffs against Asia, Africa and South America, or Leaving and being able to trade freely around the world?

Is it racist when Anglo-Saxons vote not to Remain with the, er, Angles and Saxony? Or did you mean the referendum was decided by racist non-Anglo-Saxons wanting to get rid of the Saxon and Norman influence?

Did newspapers print sensationalist articles and outright lies before the referendum? If so, do you think they are now paragons of virtue, or still the same? What sells newspapers?

Do you think Cameron expected the referendum result? Would Cameron have had the referendum if he understood what the mood of the country was? Is there a disconnect between the political system and the populace? Likewise for the BBC - is there a disconnect between what the BBC thinks is right and what most people think is right?

Is the referendum vote more or less democratically important than Labour's pledge on foxhunting and the "constitutional crisis" and subsequent "reform" of the House of Lords to make it more accountable to the executive?

If the will of the people is clearly expressed, is a democratic government bound to follow the will of the people, or should "those who know better" ignore it? Does/did this hold true in other countries, such as Russia or South Africa? If not, why not?

Would we see all this discussion, outcry from business and legal challenges over the result of a general election? What does that say about the state of our (essentially) two-party system?

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Bookmakers William Hill under siege from DDoS internet flood

P. Lee
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Joke

Re: This does sound targetted

>On the Melbourne Cup, the biggest race in the Southern Hemisphere

And you know how the Oz hates other people betting on their events...

STATE ACTOR!

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More movie and TV binge-streaming sites join UK banned list

P. Lee
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Re: Fix content availability and usability, and "piracy" will mostly disappear

Not sure about anyone else, but I find streaming fairly abysmal.

The quality of the streaming is poor - frequent pauses. The resolution is poor. Its just an unpleasant experience.

Then there are ads. I don't like them but they are not the end of the world really. But wait there's more. This is no ordinary ad break, this is a streaming site ad break; with three delicious repeats of the SAME advert in the SAME ad break.

So its PVR for FTA or off to the DVD rental shop - an experience I far prefer to scrolling through the pitiful selections online.

Or get out the a deck of cards or a board game and actually talk to the family. The Internet provides so much of what you want and so little of what you need.

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A sorry Brexcuse! Systemax blames Brexit for car crash Q3 results

P. Lee
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> the whole industry was being cautious for the six months before the referendum

So right.

But not for the reasons you say. No-one was expecting Leave to win - not the politicians (who would not have allowed the referendum to happen), not the media and not even the Leave voters. There's a massive disconnect between the populace and the political/big business bubbles.

The reason for the caution was that despite all the pretense, most people know the economy is down the drain.

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Melbourne Cup is 'top op for hacked camera DDoS extortionists'

P. Lee
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Childcatcher

Hahaha!

I got halfway through before I realised that the "DDOS extortionists" didn't refer to the anti-ddos vendors.

Cynical? Moi?

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Cynical Apple gouges UK with 20 per cent price hike

P. Lee
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Flame

Re: The pound had been driven up to nosebleed levels from 2011 to 2015

Whaddyamean what goes up must come down?

What kind of economics is that?

Heretic!

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P. Lee
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Re: All according to plan

>But the "weak currency = jobs" myth is just that - mythical.

Then the converse must also be true, strong currency which sucks in imports rather than promoting local supply, does not reduce local employment, must also be true. But I think not.

We are talking long term here, in the short term, not much changes - that's by definition.

I'm also thinking that if we are *so* dependent on imports and sterling has devalued by 10% which should see inflation hitting similar levels to the devaluation. If inflation is only hitting 1.5% then either we are not that reliant on imports, or we've suddenly become 8.5% more productive. Good news either way. Or the figures are being massaged.

The bottom line is we have spent far more than we have and we will be poorer while we correct the deficit. Whatever you think of intentional QE with regard to the financial crisis, somewhere along the line we adopted Keynesian policies of spending more than we earnt and pretending it didn't matter. Now the piper must be paid.

Taking on debt to pay for current liabilities rather than assets creates poverty - only fools think otherwise. We need to put more money into paying off debt and less money on shiny. Depending on demand curves, price hikes (e.g. from devaluation) for imported goods divert wealth to other things which haven't just jumped 10% (or 20%) in price.

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DMCA updated – toaster penetration testing gets green light in America

P. Lee
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Devil

Re: I have a fundamental problem with the whole concept...

>One hacks a toaster in order to gain its help in persuading the Smart-Fridge(tm) to order four cases of Budweiser delivered to the home of a Real Ale fan.

And then take over his PVR and his doorbell, so that the doorbell rings throughout his favourite shows.

That's Big Data for you!

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Alleged ISIS member 'wore USB cufflink and trained terrorists in encryption'

P. Lee
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6TB Data?

An average Steam account + er, videos.

Ok, I want to know what the 2tb of data was that they used against him. Was it really terrorist data or was he just running bit-torrent through tor while wearing a headscarf?

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Belgian court fines Skype for failing to intercept criminals' calls in 2012

P. Lee
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Re: Belgians trying to deny facts.

Security is hard and expensive and repressive - more so if everyone is operating in a peer to peer fashion and you are not allowed perimeter controls.

Besides, terrorism is such a tiny threat it's hardly worth worrying about. In case anyone has forgotten the meaning of the word, it works by harnessing an ill-considered response generated by fear.

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P. Lee
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That is why we have trade blocks - to harmonise law locally, then transpacific, transamerica and transatlantic treaties to align them to the US.

One ring to rule them all.

You don't need conspiracy for this, it's the natural outcome of capitalism without restraint.

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New MacBook Pro beckons fanbois to become strip pokers

P. Lee
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Re: Very weird to be pressing an immobile price of plastic

ZX81

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Exit through the Gift Shop? US copyright chief was assigned to shop till, tweeting

P. Lee
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Re: Commentards

Both are bad, but MS (and the media cartels etc) tend to use their monopoly powers to stop me getting things done while Google tends to be an enabler.

I suspect that as we get to market saturation (or advertising saturation) we'll see Google act more like a traditional monopoly, as we are seeing with Android.

Use less tech and more brain and more planning. Use tech you control. Be Happy.

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