* Posts by P. Lee

4067 posts • joined 4 Dec 2007

US data suggests Windows 10 adoption in business is slowing

P. Lee
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Re: did Microsoft kill it's cash cow?

>the equivalent of persistently assigning a drive letter to a NAS share, which in Windows takes about 30s, in Ubuntu would involve plenty of Googling, firing up the good old terminal, editing fstab, ...).

Maybe you should run Suse... ;)

Yast->Network Services->NFS Client

or from the file browser, click on "Network->Samba Shares->(workgroup/domain)->Server->(share)

Admittedly, there is still work to be done. KDE (& probably Gnome) should push their file system configs down to the OS.

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The EU wants you to log into YouTube using your state-issued ID card

P. Lee
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Re: Brexit?

>As things stand the European courts can slap down UK surveillance attempts

So you're giving up on making the UK democracy work and hoping someone else will over-rule our democracy.

What happens when they turn against you?

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Microsoft joins the 1c/GB/month cloud storage caper

P. Lee
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Sounds good!

Until you do the maths

USD$0.01=AU$0.013

8tb (8000G) = AU$510 (WD NAS drive, retail)

8000G on Azure = AU$104.00/month

ROI in < 5 months

That isn't cold storage either. I know, there are other costs, such as electricity, fancy storage management and chasses etc, but with storage this cheap, you hardly need to manage it and if its archive storage, you hardly need fancy slice & dice management layers.

My ancient core2 mobo with dual Gig ethernet has 8 sata ports giving 64TB of raw storage (say 32G usable) which would bring in $416/month mirrored, $728 if you go raid5, for data which essentially sits there doing nothing.

Yeah, so MS has a mountain of engineering it needs to do to offer this commercially and at large scale. The question is, why would a customer care about that? Why wouldn't they do it themselves?

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Windows 10 handcuffs Cortana web search to Bing and Edge browser

P. Lee
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Coat

"What's a Cortana?"

The best selling UK car of the 1970's?

What the slimy merchant did in Frozen?

The answer to the questions, What do you think of Kiera Knightly? Would you like a coffee? Would you like a copy of Windows 10?

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The case for ethical ad-blocking

P. Lee
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Re: First questions first

I'm not sure "who doesn't filter adverts" is the first question.

The first question is, to what extent should artists be paid when they aren't performing?

A couple of things stood out in the article:

1. there is no natural "right" to "intellectual property." IP is a fiction. Perhaps a useful fiction, but complaining that your monopoly is legally protected enough seems like a bad PR campaign. You might not notice a dip in revenue if youtube disappeared, but quite frankly, if most of the artists disappeared, most people wouldn't notice. Some people would, but you could lose an awful lot before most people noticed. Excludability might be the most "property-like" property of Intellectual Property, but intellectual property isn't property and in the UK at least, we often have public rights of way which (Horror!) trump private ownership.

2. "The all-powerful middleman today is Big Tech. But changing copyright in favour of the little guy takes time, and isn't easy" Would that be the "little guys" like Sony BMG et al? Do we need to strengthen the rights holders like Simon Cowell? How many "little guys" are there who would have made it, if only youtube and the ASCAP/PRS hadn't tragically taken the money that was meant to feed their starving children? If we did what the article suggests, are we just shifting profit from one middleman (big tech) to another (the music label)? Which serves the public good better?

My personal opinion is that it isn't generally the artists' skill which brings success, but the marketing. Certainly, skill is important, but the real money in the media industry comes from taking a cheap product and running a successful marketing campaign. Rinse and repeat. I'm not convinced that the film and music industries, while fun, actually improve the world that much.

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Ding-dong, reality calling: iPhone slump is not Apple's doom

P. Lee
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Windows

"To many, this is will be inconceivable."

I do not think it means what they think it means.

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Microsoft's Windows 10 nagware storms live TV weather forecast

P. Lee
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Re: Oh, yeah...

>A lot of people here will now start to cry, whinge an moan about how this will impact bussiness, blah blah blah.

"Hey, you didn't pay us for the most expensive version of Windows, so we're going to punish you with annoying and disruptive adverts, and we think that's a valid business model. Here's DaddyHoggy

to explain why this is acceptable. In the meantime, please buy more of our stuff."

Oddly enough, Suse doesn't nag me even though I'm two versions behind, neither does it listen in on my conversations in case I want to use voice control nor does it randomly upload my data to some cloud. It lacks all that functionality without me even having to reconfigure it!

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Microsoft fingered for Western Euro PC tragedy

P. Lee
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Re: Microsoft

>>The impact of this was seen in distributors’ official sales data compiled by venerable analyst Context, with units falling nine per cent in Q1 versus the same quarter a year ago.

>Netbooks mk II - can't they just whack Mint or Ubuntu on the things this time?

If you can avoid it, you don't want to build your business on someone-else's. They will eventually try to eat your market. That's why HP and IBM and so on do Linux. If Redhat try any funny stuff it is easy to switch and the mere threat of switching pretty much prevents them trying.

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IBM says no, non, nein to Brexit

P. Lee
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Meh

Re: Being in the EU...

>Just as easy to shuffle the money to IOM and Channel Islands and Gibraltar

True, but it doesn't have the same veneer of respectability.

As for IBM's opinions, meh.

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Meet the malware that screwed a Bangladeshi bank out of $81m

P. Lee
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Re: Follow the money

>When was the last time you heard of GCHQ or the NSA being short of cash?

Didn't the CIA run drugs to help fund their activities?

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Planning to throw capacity at an IT problem? Read this first

P. Lee
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Re: Errr

>Nope, but you can buy or sell a gigabyte of storage, or an hour of compute, or a thousand DNS queries. Those things are definitely commodity.

Not really. Yes you can buy "compute" but the key thing about commodities is that they are interchangeable regardless of supplier and they can be traded.

As a business, you can't substitute an hour of compute time from AWS for an hour of Azure compute time - at least probably not easily. Got a TB of storage on Azure? You probably can't swap that out for AWS storage without having some adverse impact on your applications.

Cloud companies like to pretend its all just a lump of generic compute and its a bit like trading iron or coal, but that's just marketing to make you think they aren't locking you in.

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Microsoft, Google bury hatchet – surprisingly, not in each other

P. Lee
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Re: Detente for a reason

And the reason is Amazon.

AWS is replacing Win32 at the server end and it ain't running on either Azure or GCloud.

My enemy's enemy....

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What the world needs now is... not disk drives

P. Lee
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Re: Just bought 5 4TB drives

Well you could, but why would you pay more to buy more kit to obtain more performance than you can use?

If you have 8 SSD's and it's in a NAS, You'll need 40G links before you start on the expanders.

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P. Lee
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Re: Just bought 5 4TB drives

And when you start looking at high-capacity systems and adding RAID, you can easily get to the point where SSD's saturate your network link long before you've got the capacity you want. In more recent systems, there may also be a problem getting enough ports (SATA3 or PCIEx) if your drives only have a few hundred Gig each.

SSD's are great for client-facing and speed-critical (e.g. VM-serving) systems etc but there's no reason at all to move a media collection to SSD. There's usually little reason to put backups on SSD unless you need to backup while a system is down. That MythTV database.... you're probably better off with a bit more RAM than faster disk. Maybe run two instances, one off a ramdisk and the other off spinning rust. The ramdisk version is the one you access, the spinning rust just sync's off it.

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Bypass the Windows AppLocker bouncer with a tweet-size command

P. Lee
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>>"what non-admin would ever need regsvr32"

>Make sure it's unavailable, then. Job done.

Security comes at various levels. Accidental user breaches, like flash exploits, which should be fairly easy to contain with jails and stub resource areas.

Combating users who are trying to subvert the system is much harder. You can govern the executable flag (e.g. on unix) but we're at a whole new (but possibly required) level of system examination when we are passing data which may turn out to be executable as a script.

I think one of my favoured solutions to this would be, "any system executable that takes a url as a parameter passes it through a system proxy." and its extension, "most applications use http/smb/nfs etc and therefore can use a system proxy rather than being given generic network access." Sadly, these days many a commercial OS itself can hardly be trusted, so that may not be acceptable.

With the proxy (or probably audit facility) we have some enforced auditing and possible control and the system can do the encryption/decryption so you can't sneak dodgy data in - or at least if you do, there is a record of it.

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Will Comcast's set-box killer murder your data caps? The truth revealed

P. Lee
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Re: One word: Monopoly

Yup!

When you have that much power, you (should) have the various parts of your business operating at arms length to each other. That means no free-passes by the internet/transmission business to the content side of the business, or vice-versa.

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Australia admits to running offensive cyber-ops team

P. Lee
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Unhappy

re: he'd rather be disappointed that so very few who heard* of '1984' actually got the message.

They heard it, got the message... and thought, "Fantastic!"

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Utah declares 'war on smut'

P. Lee
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Re: Sex Education

>Pornography, in itself, isn't a public health hazard. Not educating teenagers about the realities of sex is the health hazard.

And there's the, er, rub.

Porn is fake relationships and fake sex, but it isn't just video like other films. It is designed to provoke and link to a very real, very strong physical reaction in the viewer. It is anti-education. It works really (ahem) hard to undermine what might be learnt intellectually about it, by tapping into strong hormonal reactions. As the age of sexual maturity/puberty has dropped, but the age of intellectual maturation has not dropped in sync with it, we have a few years where children become sexually mature before their thought processes have the maturity to deal with it. Why in general do people think that its ok to have sex once puberty hits, but getting married at that age would be foolish?

If you look at most of the motivations listed in the bill the concerns are actually quite valid to one degree or another, and the resolutions basically amount to, "do more research and try to limit its spread if you can." Perhaps the high-usage rates in Utah make it more of an issue there than it is elsewhere.

The commercialisation of sexual satisfaction, where it becomes a transaction with a vendor and a customer with demands which should be fulfilled in order to warrant payment seems to me to be one of the most tragic mindset-outcome, especially as increased availability makes that the norm during formative years. Even if its non-commercial porn, there is a sense of "I go and get/download it and she becomes part of my collection. I like her." The self-centred nature of it works against what makes a stable relationship, which is putting the other person first and yes, the breakdown in the relationships and support networks has health impacts - it is a public health issue. If legislators step aside while commercial interests attack the mindset-glue which holds relationships together, is that a good thing or not?

This is not prohibition, this is just suggesting that maybe we've let commercial pimps have a little too much freedom to put their goods front and centre in society. Maybe we should think about whether the top shelf is a better place for it.

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Sneaky Google KOs 'right to be forgotten' from search results

P. Lee
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Re: Syntax

Maybe they complied with the law and then issued themselves with a "right to be forgotten" notice.

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All-Python malware nasty bites Windows victims in Poland

P. Lee
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re: dot and source only work for scripts written in the same language as the shell.

True, but /usr/bin/python or %WINDOWS%/Program Files/python/python.exe isn't exactly hard to guess.

What we want is a jailed browser process by default, and a prohibition on launching any executable (mime/extension recognition?) from disk areas the browser has write access to. I'd settle for a ramdisk with all the executables in it which gets copied and deleted after use. The browser is a high-risk interface - we know that. From a security pov, you should be able to completely compromise it and still not be able to compromise the user's general files, install persistent threats or compromise the system as a whole. i.e. (pun intended) the browser is an app controlled by the OS, not part of the OS. If you want a high-privileged (what we normally get now) browser, that should be a launch-time option, not the default.

This isn't a windows only problem - I want this for linux too. A chroot without all those interpreters (python, bash, cmd.exe, screen saver config, word.exe, excel.exe) would be a good start. The option of a non-kernel (slow but safe) display system would also be good, even if it were a boot-only option.

Linux is free - it is hard to complain about a lack of features. Windows has no excuse.

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Catastrophic 123-reg VPS cockup deletes Ross County FC website

P. Lee
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Re: Victim blaming

The problem is that if you use a service/asset, you should understand what you are using and at very least the T's & C's.

If the football club had a website, someone should have assessed what the cost of the website and/or data going away was and made contingency plans. If something is important to you, make your own plans to preserve it. Worst case, have some USB sticks with a copy of the website on it, or pay a different provider 14.99/month to host a manually replicated site, in case the whole provider goes away.

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P. Lee
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Re: And where was... Their local backup of the website?

I think the first article mentioned that the "backups" were online rather than offline so the rm -rf {foo}/{bar} took them all out at the same time. No news on whether the script ran as root or an unprivileged user but the backups were held under the same user privileges. That's Agile DevOps!

This is where automation is a bonus if you use something well tested. The point about automation is that you get people who know what they are doing to encapsulate their expertise and experience (check your parameters before you delete) which can then be safely reused by those less skilled.

You deployed a script straight into Production? Smack! The rm -rf {blank}/{blank} legend is pretty much the first thing you read if you read any unix shell scripting book. I wonder if 123-reg is reconsidering whether hiring really cheap admins is a good business decision?

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NYPD anti-crypto Twitter campaign goes about as well as you'd expect

P. Lee
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Facepalm

Re: There are few supportive tweets

Maybe all their supporters had their passwords stolen and accounts hijacked.

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The beginning of the rise of the Planet Of The LUN Monkeys

P. Lee
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Re: Technical Architects?

I want people who look at complex systems and can break them down quickly: Solution Architects

The ones who understand different types of application interactions and who understand the difference between IOPS, latency and throughput: Technical Architects

Ops: Admins

Dev: Project Team

DevOps: An BA+IT team which isn't dysfunctional or functionally unbalanced. Sometimes the misguided idea that one person is likely to be good at a variety of things which require very different mindsets. To quote Cabin Pressure's Swiss airline CEO, "I'm a fly by the seat of my pants guy, but my pilots... I like my pilots to do things by the book - and you memorised it!"

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NIST set to shake up temperature with quantum thermometer

P. Lee
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re: The only cat fur lining that's apt to get up, mew a bit and then walk off....

apt-get cat isn't mews, er, news (which you can also apt-get)

And news shouldn't be consigned to alt.bin.history.

I'd add to the joke, but I think that's fur enough.

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Idiot millennials are saving credit card PINs on their mobile phones

P. Lee
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Trollface

Re: PINs?!

>They're unencrypted but somewhat obfuscated

It's the easiest way. Create an addressbook entry with a name you'll remember and have the pin as part of the telephone number.

If you're using a phone with lots of apps, your security and privacy is probably already shot and bleeding out. Keep a couple of related pins for important stuff (things that spend your cash), some for identity-important things, and keep your email secure. Most of the rest is unimportant.

Really, if someone nicks your facebook account, you can email or call your real friends to let them know. You didn't do something dumb like single-sign-on with facebook did you?

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NZ Pastafarians joined in noodly wedlock

P. Lee
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Unhappy

>something to tell the grandchildren

Perhaps... though perhaps they won't be doing it together.

A wedding is about commitment and while a bit of fun is a good thing, turning the entire concept/event into a joke may indicate the level of seriousness with which they regard it. The point of the gold rings and so on is permanence and untarnished endurance. Pasta is no viable substitute. It mocks, it tastes great, but it doesn't last.

Making the celebration of commitment to each other into a joke pretty much negates the the whole point of the ritual. Not that I'm terribly surprised - the anti-religious tends to also be anti (the traditional) family too, in effect, if not explicitly.

The bride has given up:

Will you love her, comfort her, honour and protect her,

and, forsaking all others,

be faithful to her as long as you both shall live?

Instead opting for a promise to salt the pasta water. That seems... sad. What value does the groom place on the bride if he can't even bring himself to publicly promise something more worthwhile than salt-water.

This isn't to say that a traditional ceremony makes everything rosy. I'm just sad to see people treat each other with so little respect. It's one thing to have a little fun at a wedding, but while the commitment may be merely a sad joke, the divorce is more likely to be a heart-wrenching tragedy with inter-generational damage. What will be be the reaction of his Noodliness to that?

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Apple pulled 2,204lbs of gold out of old tech gear

P. Lee
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Alert

>>"22m pounds of steel is a lot.

>Those weights include iPads and computers as well as phones.

Includes a couple of G5's then. That'll do it.

Icon: Heavy

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Czech Republic to rebrand

P. Lee
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Coat

Re: Will the Czechs change their name to Czechians?

>Scotland -> Scotch

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NZ hotel bans cyclists' Lycra-clad loins

P. Lee
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There's a reason we don't eat in group nudity and the same reason applies to men wearing lycra.

You can wear the lycra, just add something over the top.

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'Bring back xHamster', North Carolina smut watchers grumble

P. Lee
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Re: Detail?

Are we talking transexuals? The noise I've heard recently (including a TED talk by Ivan Coyote, BBC.co.uk etc) is from those identifying as "transgender" which (according to the Intersex Society of North America), 'are usually people who are born with typical male or female anatomies but feel as though they’ve been born into the “wrong body.”'

That's a whole different, er, ball game.

The "prove it" angle I suspect comes from the issue of transgender rather than transexuals. I'd be questioning the State's fulfilment of its duty of care in schools if a group of the (male) class clowns at my daughters' school decided to put on a bit of eye-liner, declare themselves transgender and had legal rights to use the girls' locker rooms, no questions legally allowed to be asked. Then you've got the issue of parent help. What happens if some forty-year-old male parent declares themselves to be transgender and wants to help supervise the fourteen-year-old girls getting changed for swimming lessons? The birth-certificate thing is never meant to be used, its meant to be a threat to prevent abuse of the system.

I'm sorry if that you feel you've been born that way. If you are one of the tiny fraction of people who consider themselves transgender, I'm really sorry but you should really be able to see how this is open to abuse and why it shouldn't be allowed. I don't know if its a "modern" thing, a "youth" thing, an American thing or a transgender thing, but some people find it hard to grasp that it isn't always about you.

There's more that needs to be noted with regard to the legislation in the US. Just because it is supported by some very unpleasant and bigoted people, that doesn't necessarily make it a bad piece of legislation. Just because it is opposed by some very successful and/or popular people doesn't make it good legislation. Bruce Springsteen's concert cancellation, Paypal's "reconsideration of its business plans" and all the others are amazingly hypocritical. They are exercising the the very right, (to not conduct business based on an ethical stance) that the legislation they oppose seeks to safeguard.

No-one cares who you want to sleep with or if your brain doesn't align with your body. No-one is denying you access to toilets, no-one is forcing you to use second-rate toilets, but if you deliberately walk into toilets designated for people with different primary genitalia, we are no longer talking about what you are, but about what you do. That is not a civil rights issue.

Slightly OT: The TED talk was interesting. The story was told of a little four-year old tomboy who wet her pants in prep and "learned the lesson that there was no safe place for her to pee." It was told with great humour, sadness and empathy. It is also completely irrelevant to the discussions in the adult world. Playing with tonka trucks and wearing camouflage doesn't make you transgender. Being a tomboy doesn't make you transgender. Going into the wrong toilets isn't uncommon for really young children. Kids laughing at that and generally being mean to each other is normal, even if it isn't nice. But you know what? Kids don't hold grudges and have "issues" like adults. They will often be mean to each other and then ten minutes later play together quite happily. Stop projecting adult issues onto children. The whole talk was a superbly executed piece of propaganda but it basically amounted to "Look! Kittens! If you disagree with me, you're responsible for killing these cute kittens." That is not a good basis for legislation.

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Flying Spaghetti Monster is not God, rules mortal judge

P. Lee
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Re: Theological Canons

>TL;DR - the number 6 is the number of man. Three is the number of truth. So 666 is truely man (ie evil).

And there's the problem with going for the short version. In the original language six hundred and sixty-six isn't the number six repeated three times - that's a decimal/base 10 counting thing.

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P. Lee
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Facepalm

Re: Excellent

>Straining the pasta through the collander symbolises the rising of the FSM from the primordial soup of the universe at the beginning of time.

No wonder it got struck down. That's evolution.

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Line by line, how the US anti-encryption bill will kill our privacy, security

P. Lee
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Re: I don't see how this would be a problem for Apple

The problem is the passcodes. Proper security requires high-entropy but no-one is going to do that every time they want to unlock their phone. Hence the ability to brute-force it is wanted.

The other option is to have a high-entropy passcode just for software upgrades which don't destroy the on-chip data, but a rarely used password is going to be forgotten or shortened.

Realistically, if a terrorist is going out to die, he's now going to destroy his phone first, regardless of what any phone manufacturer does.

But this was never about terrorism, was it? This is about the State asserting its right to Total Information Awareness. That's mostly to protect against another Snowden, in my opinion. We can't have the serfs knowing what's really going on.

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French thrash Brits, Germans and Portuguese in IT innovation

P. Lee
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Re: DevOps === The latest Fad

A quick look at "the agile admin" website indicates "devops" means getting all the stakeholders to talk the devs during the development process.

Communication, eh, who'dathought that's a good idea?

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Symantec.cloud portal limps back online after day-long TITSUP

P. Lee
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Re: the 70's are calling, they want their TIMESHARE systems back

The Cloud: Over-provisioned capacity, primitive load-balancers, excellent automation and very limited configurations.

You can do it yourself, but most companies lack the discipline as well as having holes in expertise. Plus companies nearly always have in-house expertise which picks up the slack when the cloud fails to be the right architecture. Cloud is great when you have an IT department which can do the difficult things cloud can't.

The question is, will commoditising the low end, reduce the skill pool available at the high-end. When the large companies are all running O365 & GMail, who is going to try to write a new mail & calendar system? Will cheap, universally availability and integration lead to complete stagnation? How far do you think you'll get hosting an email and office suite package on Google's cloud or Azure?

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Grab your Hammer pants – it's the '90s again: Facebook brings Virtual Reality back

P. Lee
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Re: Pr0n!

>Advertisers love all sorts of filth, but they don't like porn.

They love porn, they just don't want people to call it what it is because that limits their market reach.

e.g. Fifth Harmony... doing a show at Disney or on earliteen/pre-teen shows.

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Cutting edge security: Expensive kit won't save you

P. Lee
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Re: Two factor authentication is a start.

>Except if your computer resides on the same device as your phone

Or indeed, if you run "unified comms" like imessage, it is unexpectedly no longer two-factor. Malware can make the banking request and receive/process the SMS auth codes without compromising the phone.

Of course, it should be possible to tell imessage not to sync messages from your bank or with messages with some specific text in it, but that puts the onus back on users who rarely realise that there is even an issue.

I suspect a large amount of effort should be directed at OS design, preventing successful attacks even if the users do something stupid, like running flash or some other randomly downloaded executable. I'm thinking of things like, jailed execution of web interfaces, manifests for executables which may include an "origin https url" which can have certificate and md256sum checks built in. Flags for executables which have the same name as other well-known executables from different domains. Flags for "you're installing program X, but it is trying to mess with something in the directory tree of program Y - are you sure you want to do that?" Clear library separation, so OS utilities can't be infected by application-installed libraries.

I don't think all of these things are exceptionally difficult, neither do they prevent ultimate stupidity, but at the moment OS providers of all stripes (and yes, that includes my favourite FOSS OS as well as the OS' people actually pay money for) are not doing enough.

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USB-C adds authentication protocol

P. Lee
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This sounds like a good thing

But I can't help thinking... vendor protection... HDMI/HDCP

Cables should be dumb.

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Symantec cloud portal goes titsup after database crash

P. Lee
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Facepalm

Re: More woes

>The above report strongly suggests they didn't implement their backup regime very well.

Also, it points out that the service isn't a cloud.

A cloud would have multiple replicated instances spread across various data centres, service health monitoring and dynamic DNS and IP load-balancing across known good servers.

Well, at least they and their customers have saved money by outsourcing the function to a specialist company with in-depth expertise.

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Half of people plug in USB drives they find in the parking lot

P. Lee
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Better than Glue!

Get those people who write your OS to run the USB drivers in a separate protection ring.

USB is not normally a speed-critical system in most cases (unlike the NIC or SAS/SATA interfaces) and we know dodgy stuff get's plugged in. So why isn't the OS written properly?

I can understand free stuff you haven't paid for, or stuff which runs on multiple architectures doing it wrong, but if you pay for your OS and it is single architecture only, you should be demanding more.

The security software people know it is required. The OS people know it is required - they just can't be bothered and dumb is cheap for the vendor.

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Would you let cops give your phone a textalyzer scan after a road crash?

P. Lee
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>Proper analysis of the phone could determine that.

>Honestly, I don't know what the objection is.

The answer is in the first poster's comment. The police are unlikely to be able to determine the exact time of the accident, and therefore the likelihood of the data helping is low. Well, I say "help." Given that using a phone while driving is illegal in many places, it might help secure a conviction, but may have little to do with whether the phone use had any impact on the events leading to the accident.

Any distraction is a problem while driving. Having an important conversation on a hands-free or with a passenger is a problem, more so than feeling for the volume button on the radio or phone. Strictly policed speed limits I also find dangerous as it is easy to engender road-rage for travelling below the speed limit and blocking those behind who may have cruise control, but also constantly looking at your dashboard to ensure you aren't 3km/h (yes, that is half walking speed) over the limit on a motorway.

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Telcos yet to receive metadata retention funding AFTER A YEAR!

P. Lee
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Telcos should take revenge

Provide users with the facility to see the data being retained with DNS lookups. Make it available to anyone using that internet service, just so they know that the data is out there and freely available.

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Uber hands over info on 12m passengers, drivers to US officials, cops

P. Lee
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Re: Taken for a linguistic ride

>The CPUC serves the public interest by protecting consumers and ensuring the provision of safe, reliable utility service and infrastructure at reasonable rates, with a commitment to environmental enhancement and a healthy California economy.

And they are checking the fares paid by all 12m passengers to make sure they haven't been overcharged? How nice of them.

I know "who benefits" leads to all sorts of conspiracy theories, but I get really nervous when governments start slurping vast amounts of very precise data on people.

Stop collecting this kind of data. That goes for the government and Uber. The way things are going, riding a bicycle while not carrying a mobile phone is going to get you arrested as a suspected terrorist and economic subversive.

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Huawei's P9 flagship: There's a lot to Leica

P. Lee
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Joke

Re: Still copying Apple...

Also lined paper which has been around since before the 1970's.

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Dear Windows, OS X folks: Update Flash now. Or kill it. Killing it works

P. Lee
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Re: Trust? Adobe?!

How about the OS?

Surely what we should be aiming for is an OS which can contain malicious software. What we really want is an OS which can be told to lock the about-to-be-executed process in solitary confinement.

Internet browsers do not need access to all the files under a user's account. Even if the flash executable is full of holes, browser should have asked the OS to jail that tab (all new tabs by default) so that it can't output to anything but the screen. The browser itself should be launched in a jail. How often do you need to pass data from your filesystem (outside your own browser cache) to a browser. I'd suffer per tab caches if that meant extra security. If you do need to pass a file to a browser, the browser should ask the OS for access and the OS should ask the user. The browser process should not have general access to the file system. Why can't the OS have a high-security prison where even saving files to disk goes through a secure request mechanism: "I'd like to save some data to disk, here's what mime-type it is, here's what I think the name should be, and here's the data, please ask the user where it should go and put it there."

The days of "it runs as user X, it has all privileges of user X" should be well and truly over. Drive-by download compromises should be a thing of the past.

I seem to think elreg mentioned that MS had done quite a bit of work on this for W8, but only for store apps... and then they undid it for W10. Doh!

Even swiss-cheese software should not be a problem. That is the point of an OS.

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Australia's broadband policy is a flimsy, cynical House of Cards

P. Lee
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Re: Pretty dreadful not to support 4K TV

>Fibre was never going to go to people that did not already have decent internet. The money would simply run out.

Wasn't the point that the expensive bit is not the cable, but the cable replacement, which to a large extent was going to have to happen anyway.

The point about fibre is that it scales really well bandwidth-wise with new tech and it has excellent range. Copper is cheaper when its already there, but fibre means symmetrical high speeds.

That symmetry is important. Today's crop of Big Tech have made a fortune out of targeting consumers - those who download rather than upload. ADSL caters to this and it may be the majority, but innovators are those who devise new ways to provide services. That means more uploading, being able to provide services. If nothing else, how about multiple outgoing video streams for group video chat? You soon hit the 1mbit barrier there. With 1g upload capacity, perhaps more people would be interested in hosting their own services from their own premises, which might spark greater interest in developing those services, increasing the tech skill pool. Not all programming needs to be outsourced to India. Rubbish home connections leads to higher consumption of commercial offerings which means less on-shore energy being put into tech.

The nbn might only be used for porn because that's all the politicians have allowed the design of the network to be good for. Sadly, the political machinations from the Liberals regarding the nbn were always about Telstra rather than the broadband network. Once they got hold of it, it was never about a network for the Australian people.

As for the 4k screen, did anyone think that was ever going to be anything other than a large computer gaming monitor which doubles up for normal TV viewing?

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Power9: Google gives Intel a chip-flip migraine, IBM tries to lures big biz

P. Lee
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Re: Interesting niches...

>Apple told IBM to shove its power somewhere else

The power chips are for when you need massive compute and have a devil-may-care attitude to power consumption. That isn't most of today's desktops, not today's laptops and certainly not today's tablets, which is where Apple wanted and needed to be. You don't put Intel's latest and greatest xeons in consumer PCs either and it doesn't make sense to have laptops running intel and mac pro's running power chips.

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We bet your firm doesn't stick to half of these 10 top IT admin tips

P. Lee
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Facepalm

Re: tailgate - oh the joys

Who needs to tailgate?

I just go to reception, tell them I've forgotten my pass and they give me a new one, access all areas, no manager checks, no identity verification, access all areas.

And I don't know the receptionist, as she's in a different building from mine.

Security? Wassat?

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P. Lee
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>It was still locked, with the laptop in it, parked about 200 yards from where he thought he'd parked it

Thieves will often move a car and leave it there to see if it is lo-jacked before trying to sell it on.

Or he may have forgotten where he put it.

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