* Posts by John Riddoch

237 posts • joined 12 Jan 2009

Page:

Put me through to Buffy's room, please. Sony hackers leak stars' numbers, travel aliases

John Riddoch

Re: Just wondering

The aliases are probably used more in hotel checkins to be fair.

2
0

That dreaded syncing feeling: Will Microsoft EVER fix OneDrive?

John Riddoch

Synctoy

Synctoy is basically rsync wrapped up in a GUI. That said, it does the job passably well and has a command line interface for scripted usage. I use it for a few tasks, mainly ad-hoc backups and syncing the MP3 collection from NAS to SD card (to go into my phone). It might not have advanced in 5 years, but it doesn't really need any more features/bloat.

2
0

Feeling safe in your executive hotel suite, Mr CEO? Well, DON'T

John Riddoch

Re: Consider the target

Article mentions fake downloads for software (e.g. Acrobat/Flash) which loads on Malware. At that point, you're pretty much giving away control of your laptop to the writers of that "update" so no zero days required.

It's still a slick way of breaking into your target's computer, though.

2
0

If only 0.006% care about BLOOD-SOAKED METAL ... why are we spending all this cash?

John Riddoch
Joke

Misleading article title...

Oh, /that/ Blood Soaked Metal - I thought this was going to be about Slayer...

7
1

Recovery-ware upstart Zerto: From Hyper-V to VMware and back again

John Riddoch

Hrm....

Selective views of the facts...

"other replication products from, for example, NetApp, are based on snapshots and don't offer continuous data protection"

EMC & Hitachi offer continuous replication, synchronously or asynchronously depending on configuration.

"while having more of a performance impact on the source server than Zerto's low-touch replication"

Both of the above have no performance impact on the source server as it's handled within the SAN.

That said, it's an option for those who can't afford the enterprise level storage solutions from EMC etc, particularly because it allows heterogeneous storage solutions, but marketing it correctly would build more trust.

1
0

SCREW YOU, EU: BBC rolls out Right To Remember as Google deletes links

John Riddoch

Re: Don't often find myself praising the BBC

It's getting there. There was the case of a girl being abducted (not exactly against her will, to be fair, but she was under age and hence not officially able to provide consent) by her teacher. For about a week, her name was all across the news. Not very long after, it was considered contempt of court to mention her name, despite it being readily available on various new websites.

7
0

Mobile coverage on trains really is pants

John Riddoch

I put it down to problems getting a solid signal at speed and the fact you're in a big metal tube which isn't particularly condusive to good radio signals. Add in the fact that many rail lines are flanked by embankments and it's little wonder you struggle to get a decent reception. I know my recent train journeys were a nightmare for getting 3g on vodafone.

3
0

Antarctic ice at ALL TIME RECORD HIGH: We have more to learn, says boffin

John Riddoch
Joke

"We have more to learn"

Cynical translation: "Give us more funding!"

1
0

What’s the KEYBOARD SHORTCUT for Delete?! Look in a contextual menu, fool!

John Riddoch

Re: Your shortcut gems?

Mr Dabbs gets an upvote for giving me a giggle :)

As for favourite shortcuts, I use a lot of the Windows ones:

Windows key+L - lock screen

Windows key+M - minimise all windows (aka show desktop)

Windows key+E - start explorer

Windows key+R - open "run command" box

2
0
John Riddoch

Text editting

For plain text, I still find my quickest editing is done with vi. My theory is that vi commands were designed to be brutally efficient over a slow link (RS232 or 400 baud modem) and as a side effect, you can do a LOT with minimal keypresses (e.g. 5dd to delete 5 lines - try doing that as quickly in Word or Notepad). It also helps that your fingers don't have to leave the keyboard, vs a GUI where you're constantly switching hands from keyboard to mouse. Of course, I learned touch typing on Amstrad 8256 & 9512 machines, which always helps typing. Very glad I did that all those years ago, even if I was very much in the minority in the class as a boy.

9
0

Apple Pay is a tidy payday for Apple with 0.15% cut, sources say

John Riddoch

I don't think there's a significant "improvement" on the tech, just better marketing of it and, possibly more significantly, improved trust level. Regardless of your views on Google, the iPhone platform is more locked down and hence more likely to be trusted by banks & retailers.

1
1

Finally, a USEFUL smart device: Intel boffins cook up gyro-magneto-'puter bike helmet

John Riddoch

For divers, there are already dive computers to control depth, air pressure and ascent rates, normally worn on the wrist.

5
0

It's time for PGP to die, says ... no, not the NSA – a US crypto prof

John Riddoch

The. Only.

That last part is the core; there is currently nothing to usurp PGP which is widespread in use already. Any replacement would have to offer something substantial over the current implementation and simply saying "more secure" isn't going to sway anyone other than the security paranoid. Any replacement has to be at least as simple to use as PGP, or users will simply not bother with it.

And finally, the kicker - until it gets sufficient momentum, people will stick to the incumbent (PGP). There's no point having an uber-secure way of sending mail if no-one you send mail to can read it...

3
0

MYSTERIOUS Siberia CRATER: ALIENS or METEOR not involved, officials insist

John Riddoch

Re: Giant Gofers

Sinkhole was my first thought, but that doesn't account for the debris round the hole. The idea of some trapped gas underground exploding makes more sense, it would explain the debris round the hole and its depth.

Certainly it doesn't look like a normal impact crater, it's too deep for that.

13
0

Intel teaches Oracle how to become the latest and greatest Xeon Whisperer

John Riddoch

Re: Smells like copy-protections

Is paying per core really such a bad thing? It opens up a good capacity on demand model which will suit some customers down to the ground. If you want all the capacity, you just pay for it.

As for shutting off cores when behind on licensing, that would require them to have privileged access on the system in question. If you trust your vendors with that, you probably should keep up to date on your license fees/support costs!

Being less paranoid, it seems to be all about being able to squeeze higher clock speeds out of the chips dynamically for single threaded workloads. Given that clock speeds on Intel have stuck at about 2.5GHz-3.5GHz for several years, anything which can push that single threaded workload through faster has to be a good thing for end users.

2
0

Running the Gauntlet: Atari's classic ... now and then

John Riddoch

Ah, fun...

Mine was the speccy version, with about 4 levels loaded before you had to load more from tape... Favourite for me was the wizard; top notch ranged combat, top notch magic and survivable if you played it smart and didn't let the bad guys get near.

Gauntlet Dark Legacy was also fun on the PS2 - played it a lot while laid up with a broken ankle :)

0
0

El Reg nips down IKEA's 'I've Got A Screw Loose Street'

John Riddoch

Edinburgh

On the outskirts of Edinburgh, we have an Ikea and Costco next to each other. The road is call "Costkea Way". I don't know if they'll bother renaming the road if either of them leave/rebrand...

0
0

PayPal 2FA mobe flaw chills 'warm and fuzzy' security feeling

John Riddoch

That should have been obvious to a smart coder - you never trust anything a client tells you, even if it's from an app you supply because someone may fiddle with it (either like this or as a MITM). This was obvious to me 15 years ago when the internet wasn't as scary a place as it is now; I remember a discussion about how client side checking on the WWW was great because it saved your web server CPU cycles before I pointed out the flaw. Quite how Paypal can let this slip through I can't fathom...

3
0

Chromebook Pixel owners' promised free data plans being prematurely axed

John Riddoch
Thumb Down

Re: It is what it is ...

@nematoad - yes, invitation to treat (or US equivalent) is one thing, but if you use that argument, it's a classic "bait & switch" trades description issue.

1
0

Canon offers a cloud just for still photos, not anything else. Weird

John Riddoch

Re: Marketing bollocks

Yeah, quite - what's it doing new that Flickr doesn't? Note there may well be some fantastic features, but the marketing blurb doesn't tell me what they might be...

1
1

Queen's Speech: Computer Misuse Act to be amended, tougher sentences planned

John Riddoch

Re: Shark Jumped!

Seems to be actually mean child grooming for dummies

I'm not sure that banning them is right as it's verging on legislating "thought crimes", although I can see the reasoning for it. There's certainly a case for having some of that information to safeguard children ("Spotting child grooming for dummies?").

4
0

Feds crack down harder on 'lasing'. Yep, aircraft laser zapping... Really

John Riddoch
WTF?

14 years?

While I appreciate the potential risks & repercussions such actions invoke, there are probably people convicted of manslaughter with a shorter prison term. It does seem to be an excessive punishment for the actions...

22
12

The hoarder's dilemma: 'Why can't I throw anything away?'

John Riddoch
Thumb Up

Re: Platters as mug mats

I use a couple as mirrors for when I'm camping. They work very well for that.

2
0

Oh GREAT: Your factory can Heartbleed out

John Riddoch
FAIL

Re: Head Scratcher, this one is...

"Are people really that stupid????"

Yes. Next question?

7
0

Did a date calculation bug just cost hard-up Co-op Bank £110m?

John Riddoch
FAIL

So how does this work on leap years? Does this give borrowers a way to get out of paying interest on leap years?

0
3

Tesla in 'Ethernet port carries data' SCANDAL

John Riddoch

Re: I'd guess none

Not entirely - they're "shipping" GPL'd code which means a customer has the right to request the source code for everything. Now, it's entirely plausible the entire code stack is stock Ubuntu etc and they can just supply that, but they still have to pass it on if requested.

2
0

iFixit boss: Apple has 'done everything it can to put repair guys out of business'

John Riddoch

Re: mac book air screen

the extra weight of screws cant be that much, the extra size of the device (a mm or something?) wouldnt be such an issue would it?

It would be enough. See the Reg's Z1 review which states "it weighs 25g more and is 3mm taller, 6.5mm broader and 2mm thicker." If the iPhone used screws and wasn't glued together, it would probably take up a chunk of those size differences.

I have sympathy for the manufacturers - they're being challenged to make devices smaller, thinner, prettier, more resilient to dust etc and still being pushed to make them repairable. The goals are (mostly) mutually exclusive.

Deliberately making something unrepairable when there isn't a valid design reason is just being a jerk, though.

7
0

MH370 airliner MYSTERY: The El Reg Pub/Dinner-party Guide

John Riddoch

Re: What if it was ditched and sunk intact?

As has been pointed out, you can land on water, but the vast majority of water landings are catastrophic. The Hudson landing was on relatively flat river water, a sea based landing would be harder.

In any case, sinking an entire plane would be difficult. Many parts of the plane will float as they escape/break off and unless the passengers were restrained, you'd expect some of them to have remembered their life jackets.

Still, the Indian ocean is huge and finding debris would be difficult without some kind of way of narrowing down the search area.

My guess is someone knows something they're not telling - the Malaysian radar info was released very late after the event, I'm guessing something else will come out sometime.

9
0

Why can’t I walk past Maplin without buying stuff I don’t need?

John Riddoch
Terminator

I still have a guitar amp I bought from Maplins catalogue about 1990. Still works fine :)

1
0

I NEVER DONE BITCOIN, says bloke fingered by new Newsweek

John Riddoch
Joke

ObPython

"Only the true inventor of Bitcoin would deny his divinity!"

6
0

Anti-snoop Blackphone hits shelves in June: NOW we'll see how much you value privacy

John Riddoch
Black Helicopters

"Why not just use a Silent Circle app on our current, cheaper phones?"

Because all it takes is one rogue app installed on your current phone to bypass the security. Remember this is using a locked down Android OS, not your stock OS so it should be more secure than your current phone.

7
0

Antarctic glacier 'melted JUST as fast LONG before human carbon emissions'

John Riddoch

Re: does it matter?

"If we carry on burning hydrocarbons as we are we are going to run out before my Grandaughter retires."

This. Regardless of whether you believe the climate is changing or if any change is man made, making a scarce resource last a bit longer should be reason enough to minimise our usage of fossil fuels. When we add in the pollution & health impacts, it should make it a no-brainer.

13
0

Facebook pays $19bn for WhatsApp. Yep. $45 for YOUR phone book

John Riddoch

Re: OTT?

From the Wikipedia article:

"Over-the-top messaging refers to a similar idea, where a third party provides instant messaging services as an alternative to text messaging services provided by a mobile network operator."

Sounds like an exact match for WhatsApp.

0
0
John Riddoch
FAIL

Re: OTT?

Search Google for OTT. First hit. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Over-the-top_content

2
4

Intel's new Xeon: Easy to switch between dual memory modes? Uh, no

John Riddoch

Re: So performance mode is unreliable somehow...

Bit errors are presumably seen as not allowed, otherwise it's a pointless technology. What's more likely is that RAM transactions have unreliable timings; i.e. it might take longer one time than another which would be the bane of anything latency critical (high frequency trading was mentioned, anything realtime would likewise be affected).

1
1

Is FCoE faster than Fibre Channel? Who knows? Just run your own tests

John Riddoch
Thumb Down

Re: "what hope do the non-technical and the uninitiated have to find out the truth?"

"Shouldn't they be asking the technical and initiated as to which is the best solution to get?" - yes, but how many PHBs out there trust their techies over a shiny brochure and pushy sales droids who take them for a free lunch? There are too many non-techie managers who sign off on a purchase without checking with their IT department who are then expected to make whatever's been bought work.

1
0

Woz he talking about? Apple co-founder wants iPhones to run Android

John Riddoch
Facepalm

No, for one very good reason...

We (the consumers) need to have some kind of competition in the phone operating systems. If Apple did the unthinkable and adopted Android, it would remove competition from the market and leave competition essentially between Google & MS with Blackberry a distant 3rd.

For reference, I prefer Android and use that, but I wouldn't want it to become too dominant in the market for the reasons above.

5
0

UK internet filtering shouldn't rely on knee tappers, says Tory MP

John Riddoch
Joke

Re: Sorry... am I reading that right?

Quite, although it also reminded me of the joke (which is also somewhat appropriate, given the discussion material):

"In a survey on men's taste in womens' legs, 11% said they preferred skinny legs, 6% said they preferred fat legs and 83% said they preferred something in between."

21
0

Sinclair's ZX Spectrum to LIVE AGAIN!

John Riddoch

Re: Promise the world

For £6k, you should have done a small claims court action.

9
0

Google Glass driver told she CAN wear techno-specs while on the road

John Riddoch

Re: lack of evidence

There are various options here:

- prosecutors screwed up & didn't present the evidence

- It wasn't recorded correctly (e.g. the cop was only following and took speed from car speedo)

- defence found a technicality to render presented evidence invalid

2
0

Huawei dismisses NSA backdoor claims as profits soar

John Riddoch
Black Helicopters

Not quite, read the article: "deny allegations made in a Der Spiegel article published last month that the NSA had installed back doors in kit made by Huawei"

i.e. there are reports that the NSA had managed to backdoor Huawei kit which is fairly plausible, given what else they're purported to have done.

This is a different allegation to previously which is that Huawei kit wasn't safe in the US because it had Chinese state sponsored backdoors installed. The irony of USA complaining of state-sponsored backdoors in light of the Snowden revelations isn't missed, though.

5
0

IBM's Watson-as-a-cloud: Is it a bird? Is it a plane? No, it's another mainframe

John Riddoch
Thumb Down

"it looks like you're trying to setup inter site replication"

Just what we need - Clippy on steroids....

6
0

Two Brits face criminal trial for sending 'menacing' tweets

John Riddoch
Trollface

Re: Feminists are irritating

In a similar vein (including Sarcasm):

"Women can be sexist too. It's just that men, as in most cases, are better at it."

6
0

Massive! Yahoo! Mail! outage! going! on! FOURTH! straight! day!

John Riddoch
Thumb Up

Re: It's only a matter of time.

"If only email addresses were portable in the same way mobile phone numbers are. Something to do with DNS queries?"

Your own domain name fixes that problem. Get domain name, cheap mail hosting and use GMail's ability to slurp mail via POP3 to get it into GMail. I can now access my mail from mobile, web browser and even IMAP on my desktop.

I used to run my own mail server on a home server, but after issues getting that working on my Qnap NAS, I moved to Gmail, haven't regretted it since. If Gmail started being an issue (e.g. privacy concerns), I can move to another provider quickly without changing email address.

0
0

FTC torches Android flashlight app for spying on users

John Riddoch

Re: Not too bright ?

Simple - people usually carry a phone on them, but rarely a torch. If you need a torch at short notice, it's usually easier to grab the phone and use it vs finding a real torch.

2
0

Send in the clones: Oracle, CentOS catch up to Red Hat Linux 6.5

John Riddoch

Re: What's good for the goose....

You're right about the copyright. There is a lot of copyright held in RHEL and Linux. Thing is, the license to use said copyrighted code allow Oracle to do what it's doing, that's the cost/benefit of the GPL.

6
0

REVEALED: How YOU PAY extra for iPHONES - even if you DON'T HAVE ONE

John Riddoch

Re: Message to mobile operators

Can't see it working for various reasons. The cult of Apple means that people will move to another provider if it means they get the latest shiny. Secondly, the negotiations with Apple are almost certainly tied up in reams of NDA so the most you'd be allowed to say is that you didn't have a deal with Apple to sell their products.

It would take a majority of carriers to do this for it to have any effect and even then, I'm not convinced. O2 had a monopoly on the original iPhone in the UK and people still bought them. Heck, I considered going back to O2 on that basis at the time, even though I'd found reception to be crap.

5
11

Revealed: How Microsoft DNS went titsup globally on Xbox One launch day

John Riddoch
Thumb Down

Re: The "Cloud"

Because, of course, internal systems never, ever fail, do they? Provided your cloud solution is as reliable as an internal system, there's no issues. Just because all companies now have their outages at the same time, it becomes public knowledge and more widespread.

1
3

Mystery traffic redirection attack pulls net traffic through Belarus, Iceland

John Riddoch
Black Helicopters

Nice sales pitch at the end...

"Everyone on the internet ... should now be monitoring the global routing of their advertised IP prefixes"

With the subtext of "which we'll be happy to provide. For a fee, of course..."

3
0

Richard Stallman decides Emacs should go WYSIWYG

John Riddoch

Re: @ Rampant Spaniel (was: I use VI! ;-))

Technically, ed is the default Unix text editor (try unset EDITOR; crontab -e), but all major Unix distros have vi installed by default. As a result, most Unix admins default to using vi as the text editor because no matter how bad you might think it is, it's many times better than ed.... Sure, you can install emacs, nano, pico or whatever onto AIX/Solaris/HP-UX, but you'll be SOL when you have to recover a system from CD.

Added to that, for a lot of work, I find vi far more powerful than a standard text editor, mainly due to being able to repeat commands (.) and searches (n/N).

10
0

Page:

Forums