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* Posts by Alan W. Rateliff, II

570 posts • joined 21 Nov 2007

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The... Windows... XPocalypse... is... NIGH

Alan W. Rateliff, II
Paris Hilton

Glue USB ports?

Given the Ghostbusters bit, I guess Trevor might be exaggerating about gluing the USB ports. I could just as easily disable USB in the BIOS. Saves me the trouble of hanging a PCI USB card anywhere and having to pull out the screw driver to open a case.

In most environments I am able to keep cases fairly clean. In others, opening a case is an archeological expedition through layers of dead skin cells, the mites eating them, hair, dander, fur, spider webs (sometimes owner-occupied,) dead bugs, maybe a small rodent, etc. Ick.

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VMware patches man-in-the-middle vSphere vuln

Alan W. Rateliff, II
Paris Hilton

Likelihood of attack minimal...

Right. TJX and Target were both protected networks, not exposed to the public, too.

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'Yahoo! Breaks! Every! Mailing! List! In! The! World!' says email guru

Alan W. Rateliff, II
Paris Hilton

Re: Yahoo shmahoo YES THIS

"Otherwise, one is constantly playing with the filter to let the spam leading domain traffic through, then catching merry hell for the spam coming in."

This is pretty much what I have to face. Though I catch hell either way: someone's legitimate email gets blocked because of a very poor reputation of the delivering server, or a shit-storm of spam from those servers. It is difficult to get the affected customers to understand either scenario, so I just lower my head, say "yes, ma'am" and "yes, sir," and try my damnedest to keep things operational.

I believe this is the lot of the email administrator.

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Alan W. Rateliff, II

Re: Yahoo shmahoo

Not to mention just ridden with spammers. No other service trips up our anti-spam system as much as Yahoo!, to the point that eventually Yahoo! servers just get blocked out-right because the amount of spam coming from them is far greater than the amount of legitimate email. I clear out the scoring cache and blocks, and within 30 days the internal reputation is so bad I have to do it again.

I contact Yahoo! in the past and the response was chilled. I was told that Yahoo! email is a free service and their users are free to use other services if the outbound mail servers are over-weighted for spam filters or just plain blocked. I also tried to obtain a list of their outbound servers to try to introduce balance. Crickets.

The problem is Yahoo! does not just provide free accounts. It also provides egress for SWBell, AT&T, SBCGlobal, and other email accounts for paid services. But they all route through their standard Yahoo! servers, and even worse they wind up going out through servers which seem to be marked for bulk email transmission. Unless its definition of bulk in email context is different than the rest of the world.

It is difficult to care about a service which does not seem to care for its users.

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SPARC and Solaris will live until at least 2019

Alan W. Rateliff, II

Re: Better than I expected

Customer service: yup. Still can't get a support contract for my machines.

@Evil Auditor: I have a few Sparc machines which I still have fun with. An SS20 with dual 200s for home play, a SS20 clone (Axil 320) with dual Ross 100 and 512MB RAM which is an actual production machine, and an IPXstation which runs like a champ but takes FOREVER to compile anything useful (and is also limited to Solaris 7.)

Really fun stuff. I feel more comfortable with Solaris than other Unixes, for whatever reason.

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I QUIT: Mozilla's anti-gay-marriage Brendan Eich leaps out of door

Alan W. Rateliff, II

Re: Animals

"If not, can you see how this man's bigoted beliefs, publicly expressed and acted upon negatively impact his employer!"

Your statement assumes that his opinion on gay marriage is, in fact, bigoted.

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What took you so long Apple? 26 remote exec bugs die in OS X Safari

Alan W. Rateliff, II

Re: Yet no updates for many working apples

I thought Apple pulled Safari for Windows back in version 5, anyway?

Microsoft's failure with Vista in regard to drivers wasn't necessarily the driver model not being supported (vendors don't really have a choice in that matter,) but that Microsoft kept letting the release date slip so few vendors were willing to invest in drivers for the release. ISTR reading that a lot of the native Vista drivers in the RTM release were Vista-wrapped XP drivers.

Later on I found that a lot of x64 drivers were interchangeable between XP x64 and Vista x64. And so far as that goes, even Windows 7 has limited support for some XP video drivers, which allows older systems (laptops running 845s, etc.) to have at least functional video which doesn't prevent the system from going to sleep. Just no Aero. Darn.

Anyway, yes, XP is a cooked goose. Not that it isn't a capable stable operating system in its current form, but in my experience Windows 7 is a much more capable (and compatible) OS on all hardware I throw at it. I appreciate there are some instances where moving to 7 is impossible -- Trevor Pott lamented in an article today about a CNC machine, and I have seen a couple of old plotters running an XP-based controller.

I see this a similar to back in the mass movement to 2000 and XP with older systems which could not run anything newer than Windows 98 or NT. Eventually those systems were replaced as they broke down beyond repair or newer replacements were offered off-lease or otherwise less expensively, but in the meantime special policies and rules were put into place for those machines. Granted, the threatscape has changed drastically since then, so more special provisions need to be taken.

Heck, if the coming Windows 8.1 update does indeed fix up the UI, it may wind up installed on my six year-old Latitude D430.

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IBM PCjr STRIPPED BARE: We tear down the machine Big Blue would rather you forgot

Alan W. Rateliff, II

Re: Floppy drives

Right, the Amiga can handle a lot of formats and there are tons of examples on AmiNet. The DSDD format for Amiga is 880k via MFM with more sectors and no sector gaps as the controller reads a full track at once. DSHD in the Amiga is 1.76MB, but the speed is 1/2 normal as Paula is limited to 250kb/s. This requires a special drive to reduce the rotational speed when an HD disk is inserted, as well as communicate to the OS that the disk is capable of more sectors per track.

I have copied over plenty of CP/M, MS-DOS, and 1581 disks using my Amigas, including modifying the hell out of the 1020 5-1/4" drive to read 1541 disks and other formats. I have a third-party 5-1/4" drive which is capable of HD floppy reads. Fun stuff.

Also getting to play with TI-99/4A stuff these days, which are really throw-backs in terms of floppies: original SSSD 90k and what-not on the original WD1770-series controllers. Woohoo!

The Commodore 64 shares video and system RAM, but things seem to work much better than the PCjr, even at a lowly 1.02MHz. Could be because the VIC-II video processor was designed specifically for this purpose. It also asserts ownership of the RAM buss when needed against the 6510 and the Commodore 64 Programmer's Reference Guide talks about this contention. I think the only time it really becomes a problem is handling tapes as the timing is extremely critical, so the VIC-II display is disabled.

I had a brief flirtation with the PCjr as my aunt had one. I picked up one up later in life after I had move on to the Commodore 128. A cheap home-made circuit board and I was able to use the PCjr monitor with my 128's RGBI output. The PCjr wound up somewhere else. "Shamus" simply did not hold the same fascination as before. Not to mention the flat double-row of pins disguised as peripheral ports with nothing to differentiate between components other than the number of pins in a block -- made it feel cheap to me, like IBM said "let's put a lot of technology through this beast, but here at the very end we'll just make it seem like poor version of a Heathkit."

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Mozilla takes Windows 8-friendly Firefox out back ... two shots heard

Alan W. Rateliff, II

Re: @ Not That Andrew

"You have no idea how relieved I was when my custom GUI migrated with the latest FireFox update from my 3+ years old layout/images etc."

Not for lack of trying, mind you. Every major "Nightly" release changes something in the GUI which moves stuff around and resizes other stuff on me. The new curved tab "feature" does not really sit well with me, though I handle it. What I really miss is the add-ons bar at the bottom, as now I do not have access to some of my favorite add-ons which still otherwise work even after over 9,000 iterations of Firefox, and the page title in the window title bar.

DOH! I take the latter back... I just found the "title bar." Now if I could just as easily stumble across a way to REALLY disable to built-in media player (directshow and the other media layer setting just didn't fix it.)

Firefox alphas -- adventure waiting to be discovered!

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Alan W. Rateliff, II

Re: no surprise here

"It solves a nearly nonexistent problem (boot sector viruses -- I haven't even seen one since I owned an Amiga!)"

Oh, thank $_DEITY! I am relieved to know pre-loading rootkits were just figments of our imaginations.

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EVE Online erects mashed-up memorial to biggest space fight in history

Alan W. Rateliff, II

Un-salvageable?

I am curious whether making the Titans un-salvageable will affect the game economy. This move would also prevent the ships' owners unable to regain parts and ISK, would it not?

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Tesla is on fire! Model S car sales are red hot – just like their chargers (yow)

Alan W. Rateliff, II
Paris Hilton

Re: Has potential but too expensive

You mean like an over-valued bubble? Sorry, I'm a tad bitter from my experiences in the last decade.

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Target hackers: Woohoo, we're rich! Um. Guys? Anyone know how to break bank encryption?

Alan W. Rateliff, II
Paris Hilton

Re: Er - too much information?

Good info. Now I wonder how that pad interfaces with the POS. The pad is capable of displaying messages and advertisements, which means there is some kind of assertion from the POS terminal. If that data transfer can be abused it could be possible to break a few things.

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Alan W. Rateliff, II
Paris Hilton

Re: Er - too much information?

Putting aside whether or not the terminal needs to communicate the PIN to the gateway, think about this: the malware used in this breach scraped RAM used by the POS software to capture data in-process. Since you have to enter your PIN into the terminal to use your debit or Redcard, the assumption is that the pad does not handle the PIN itself but rather hands that off to the POS terminal, thus putting that PIN into RAM. Seems they missed one minor detail and knowing this they will not make the same mistake next time.

I have popcorn waiting for the Great Reveal of how the malware got into the system in the first place.

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How the NSA hacks PCs, phones, routers, hard disks 'at speed of light': Spy tech catalog leaks

Alan W. Rateliff, II
Paris Hilton

Re: @Phil O'Sophical

When the iPhone was introduced I knew it would be a stellar success. Not because I am an Apple advocate, but because I saw what happened with the iPod, I know the iFanboi mentality, and I have always noted how Apple just "gets" the user experience.

Top Men came to similar conclusions as I for much better reasons than I.

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Alan W. Rateliff, II
Paris Hilton

Re: Ok, not so quick and easy

And from where do you think we will obtain trust-worthy hashes?

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Alan W. Rateliff, II
Paris Hilton

Re: hahahaha

"Well it's still less-worse than Russia"

Pfah! Putin expressed his jealousy.

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Feminist Software Foundation gets grumpy with GitHub … or does it?

Alan W. Rateliff, II
Paris Hilton

Re: An unsolvable decision problem

Bah! I don't need to eat the bacon, I just need the drippings!

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Alan W. Rateliff, II
Paris Hilton

Seems about right. Often times my lady friend tells me "no" when "yes" is the real answer, vice versa, just a "whatever," or the answer is transitory. Many times my answer or "yes" or "no" is not the correct answer. Well, all the time, really.

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Silk Road 2.0 busted! At least two arrests as federal crackdown begins

Alan W. Rateliff, II
Paris Hilton

Re: Exactly.

Especially if he *is* a fed...

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Look behind you, T-Mobile US: Sprint wants to GOBBLE you – allegedly

Alan W. Rateliff, II
Paris Hilton

Re: Combining GSM and CDMA?

Sprint already has provided CDMA-GSM combined phones which work just fine. So has Verizon, so I do not see this being a problem. Far less so than the Sprint/Nextel-PCS/iDEN merger which was largely a disaster.

I definitely agree that Sprint's own words on the T-Mobile/AT&T merger should be used against it to prevent this. If you want anti-trust then what is good for the goose is good for the gander.

In terms of customer service, I hear a lot of horror stories about every company. AT&T, while sometimes doing stupid things in practice, has always taken great care of me. For my customers and family, I have had to work with all of the others and the experiences were all very good.

I do have to consider Sprint's operational practices which are polar opposite of T-Mobile. Sprint is more hostile toward unlocked phones than Cingular or AT&T ever could have dreamed of being. As well, roaming in a service area is a frequent and annoying thing (ffs, who ROAMS in 2013??) I have friends on Sprint who I can pretty much forget calling if we get separated at an event or even in the same store.

I think the Sprint merger with T-Mobile would be an opportunity to completely scrap its old way of doing business under the guise of merger-related policy changes. It eases the blow to the higher-ups.

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Bigger on the inside: WD’s Tardis-like Black² Dual Drive laptop disk

Alan W. Rateliff, II
Paris Hilton

Re: Linux support... well, who can say?

Requiring a "driver" to activate the 1TB rust disc is a fail on WD's part. It stinks of the Good Old Days(tm) when we used a boot wedge (hack, kludge) to activate drives larger than the BIOS could handle, but seemingly less necessary. Since SATA supports multiple devices on a single link, would it have been a problem to provide a SATA hub on the driver controller and allow the drive to be seen natively?

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Grace Hopper gave us COBOL, 'debugging' and inspiration. So Google gave her a Doodle

Alan W. Rateliff, II
Paris Hilton

Re: Creating COBOL

That would be Windows 1.0.

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Microsoft: Don't listen to 4chan ... especially the bit about bricking Xbox Ones

Alan W. Rateliff, II

Re: Consumer protection

This is absolutely the wrong way to handle it. Instead of going bawling to Daddy Government, you should be indignant enough to sue the company. There are plenty of hungry lawyers out there who would take a case like this on contingency, especially if there is a chance for it to go class-action.

The government invariably screws things up when they get involved with all kinds of unintended consequences of a now suddenly broad legislation attempting to cover all cases, or the intended consequences of lobbying from those who want their bit cast in or given exemption.

Let the people start their own narrowly-tailored case and self-regulate. If they refuse to take care of themselves then, frankly, they deserve what they get. Once a case is decided, given the fear of litigation is not enough to dissuade future transgressions, it is easy enough to translate into an equally-tailored industry regulation by people who are actually involved, rather than those who look down their noses at everyone, lacking the experience of those being scrutinized, passing laws with reckless abandon leaving others to clean up and suffer the mess.

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Alan W. Rateliff, II

Re: I genuinely do not understand...

Two things on this. First, given surveys for the past decade, formal and informal, in the gaming, virus-writing, hacking, and forum worlds of the Internet, this lone stereotype has not been valid for a very long time. Middle-aged miscreants serve as good portion of the population of these dark corners of the technology world. They may have started out as basement dwelling PFYs and tend to help usher in the same via their antics, but they are indeed middle-aged giving a healthy mix of children of all ages.

And secondly, I noticed this in the DM article, amongst others: that the 4chan thread "has since been deleted." This gives the false impression that 4chan mods or admins actively killed the thread in an attempt to hide it or give them cover. As has been noted by numerous tear-downs of 4chan, threads will age-out of the system and be replaced as newer threads are posted and thrive. Then to be more accurate, this prank originated in /b/, not just 4chan, so give the 'tards credit (or infamy) where due and let the others live in peace.

Not a rally for 4chan, I just prefer factual journalistic analysis.

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How Google paved the way for NSA's intercepts - just as The Register predicted 9 YEARS AGO

Alan W. Rateliff, II
Paris Hilton

Re: secure?

You are making unwarranted and uninformed assumptions about how his system is set up and communicates with other systems.

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Your kids' chances of becoming programmers? ZERO

Alan W. Rateliff, II
Paris Hilton

I love/d working in 6502 and its Commodore 64 and 128 descendents, the 6510 and 8502, but I have to admit that every so often I have a slum tryst with TMS-9900.

I feel so dirty.

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Google in PRODUCT RECALL for its Glass spy-goggles

Alan W. Rateliff, II
Paris Hilton

I was thinking Rayban. Imagine "Top Gun" re-shot with Google Glass.

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Post-PC era? Post-MAC era! OS X Mavericks 'upgrade' ruins iWorks

Alan W. Rateliff, II
Paris Hilton

Re: If they keep this up...

We can still find "TI Writer" and "Microsoft Multi-Plan for the TI" on eBay.

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If there's somethin' strange in your network 'hood. Who y'gonna call? Google's DDoS-busters

Alan W. Rateliff, II
Paris Hilton

Re: Set up a charity in a country that respects human rights for all humans

Of the Centauri Republic? I think not!

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Got a mobile phone? Then you've got a Trojan problem too

Alan W. Rateliff, II
Paris Hilton

Re: Smart phones not so smart

Right on, brother. This is why I don't get my flu shot every year like the rest of the medical-industrial complex lemmings.

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Alan W. Rateliff, II

Re: Only dumb devices are secure ...

The terminal is secure in that manner, sure, but what about the mainframe or whatever server which powers that? If you are expected to be able to run code of your choosing then the terminal server would be vulnerable in some degree.

Beyond the 90s definition of downloading code, even just simple browsing opens up a whole a world of infection vectors. Java, Flash, or other "rich content" plug-ins which the user will want (or need) are not just ripe, but actively being used for remote vulnerabilities. Then we are again stuck with the notion of the black box we use being secured.

The only protection I see at that point is a fully virtualized environment at the terminal server end, where your session is built on-demand from a template and injected with the software you have selected or, in the case of enterprise environments, has been provided to you. You can play all you want, and if you become infected your session is destroyed and subsequently rebuilt from the original template. There is still the concern of your data being affected, such as with CryptoLocker, but good versioning should help with that factor.

Of course, this scenario relies upon the security of the underlying virtualization platform which is going to be a black box to us as, let's face reality here, how many of us perform a full source audit of every open software we deploy?

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Hey banks: Use Win XP after deadline? You'll PAY if card data's snaffled

Alan W. Rateliff, II
Paris Hilton

Re: It ain't that damn hard

"Got specialized software you need to run but is no longer compatible with Win 7 or Server 2010. Update you lazy git! You should have done so years ago"

Unless you are using software which *is* prohibitively expensive to upgrade, was made by a vendor no longer in existence but who promised it would be around forever, was bought by a new company who has made the software a shadow of its former self, or moving data to a new program is a prohibitive expense (if possible at all) on top of the extortion charged for the new software.

I have seen all scenarios above. As well as a perpetual license which turned out to not be so perpetual.

That said, I have had great success in running old software in compatibility mode, Windows 7 XP mode, or just plain Virtual PC. It took some time, fumbling around, obscure forum searches and link resurrection, and a smidgeon of intuition, but I have not yet been unable to move a program to Windows 7 or Server 2008R2. Not to say doing so is always possible, I just have not failed, yet, and it is worth a try every time. Yet *sigh*

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You put up with CRAPPY iOS 7. You can put up with Obamacare too, says prez

Alan W. Rateliff, II
Paris Hilton

Re: Smartphone users have more choices.

In 2009 I was promised that if I had a insurance policy I liked, I could keep it. Recently, Senator Bill Nelson told me the same thing in an email -- responding to a copy of my policy cancellation letter because my insurance provider would no longer be allowed to contract my policy with me.

The premium for a replacement policy provided through the "marketplace" is lower than my premium, but the policy comes with a deductible whereas mine has a co-pay, and over-all my out-of-pocket expenses will increase.

I have lifetime warranties on my US Robotics 56k Sportsters. During a firmware upgrade, one of them "bricked." When I contacted USR I was told that the utility they provided on the product page was bad and I shouldn't have used it. When I asked about the lifetime warranty, they guy asked me if I had registered my modem. Of course I had, and I even still have the box which notes the lifetime warranty with a serial number which matches the modem. Then I was asked if I still had confirmation of my registration. Well, actually, no, I don't. You see, we moved away from that old system a long time ago and no longer have access to those registrations, so unless you can provide proof of registration we cannot honor the warranty.

A lifetime warranty with no promise of service.

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Microsoft relents: 'Go ahead, install Windows 8.1 on clean PCs'

Alan W. Rateliff, II
Paris Hilton

Re: No preservation of data during upgrade?

If you would JUST. USE. OUR. CLOUD. Really! C'mon, users! Trust your data on our servers. Don't worry, Danger never touches them! Put all your files up here, and upgrades to your computer become so much more painless. Use our Application Bazaar and you never have to re-install your programs again.

G'osh!!

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Google chap reverse engineers Sinclair Scientific Calculator

Alan W. Rateliff, II
Paris Hilton

I know that feeling. At the same time, though, if you cannot build up the courage now, will you ever? If it's left behind after you, would you prefer that someone with noob hands give a go at it, supervised only by your spiritual presence?

If it's meant to be just a display piece, no problem. But I can feel the niggling in your heart. Deep down in some deep corner of your psyche, eating away... no, screaming... at you every time you lay your eyes on its wondrously beautiful and tantalizing enclosure, even just out of the corner of your eyes, until one day you realize that while in those boring meetings you're doodling it, tracing its silhouette over and over again on your note pad. You start seeing it everywhere you look. It haunts your daily existence. The batteries... they're so close, and yet the distance you put between them is agonizing.

Dude... I know that feeling.

Paris, hooked on a feeling.

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Alan W. Rateliff, II
Paris Hilton

Re: One in front of me now.

I know that feeling. At the same time, though, if you cannot build up the courage now, will you ever? If it's left behind after you, would you prefer that someone with noob hands give a go at it, supervised only by your spiritual presence?

If it's meant to be just a display piece, no problem. But I can feel the niggling in your heart. Deep down in some deep corner of your psyche, eating away... no, screaming... at you every time you lay your eyes on its wondrously beautiful and tantalizing enclosure, even just out of the corner of your eyes, until one day you realize that while in those boring meetings you're doodling it, tracing its silhouette over and over again on your note pad. You start seeing it everywhere you look. It haunts your daily existence. The batteries... they're so close, and yet the distance you put between them is agonizing.

Dude... I know that feeling.

Paris, hooked on a feeling.

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Nasty BOFHses. It burns us! It burns...

Alan W. Rateliff, II
Paris Hilton

QOTW

"no-one had calculated the terminal velocity of a turd after falling 12 stories"

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US court: Dell can't hound debtor with robocalls to her mobile

Alan W. Rateliff, II
Paris Hilton

Re: PAY UP!!!

Not always that easy. Dell Financial Services is abusive. Period. They treat everyone as dead-beat debtors, even if you just miss a payment by accident or they receive payment a day late. I have filed complaints with the Florida and Texas AGs over its practices.

For instance, if you are a day late on a payment they will call numerous (minimum six, the most was 14) times in a day. They demand TWO months payment and require that you use their payment system to do so. On top of that they will demand a "convenience" fee to use check-by-phone (direct debit from your checking account) but sometimes they'll be considerate and waive it for you.

Of course, you never want to give someone like this direct access to your financial accounts. If they make a "mistake" it can take anywhere from 30 to 90 days to get your money back, and they're not responsible if a massive "accidental" draft causes you financial difficulties including NSF for other transactions. I have dealt with that in the past and it isn't always as easy as calling the bank, and you may need to get an attorney involved.

In one instance my payment arrived a day late and they were already harassing me, at one point the guy says they'll call back every two hours. A couple of days afterward they were still calling even though the payment had cleared my bank. Fortunately I'm done with them and have been for a long time. Though, when I closed my account I apparently over-paid somehow (oh yeah, ask how they calculate your pay off!) Even though they had my address on-file and continued to send me offers and marketing for financing, DFS sent my over-payment to state unclaimed funds.

DFS is a scum operation and denigrates the Dell name.

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Google goes dark for 2 minutes, kills 40% of world's net traffic

Alan W. Rateliff, II
Joke

Re: What time was that then?

I go to "theregister.com," so I don't know what you're whinging about

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Alan W. Rateliff, II
Paris Hilton

HA! They DMCA'd the entire Internet! Makes me think of a commercial I saw a while back about reaching the end of the Internet.

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Alan W. Rateliff, II
Paris Hilton

Re: Upgrade Complete

Don't bother. We're already in the process of economic self-destruction over here.

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Alan W. Rateliff, II
Unhappy

Re: Er…

One of the few times we have seen, or will ever see, any kind of reprieve from .GOV and I missed it...

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Alan W. Rateliff, II
Paris Hilton

Nothing worthwhile in this post.

I believe that is 4.4.4.4. I have seen this all over the place as a DNS server forward, or in individual workstation settings at sites where Active Directory refuses to work properly. ISTR that used to be owned by MCI/UUnet (or some other equally obscure provider,) and is now Level 3.

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Alan W. Rateliff, II
Paris Hilton

Re: Holy undergarments

This, exactly. I noticed a bunch of websites which would not render properly, if at all. Normally Ghostery is blocking analytics for me, so the Google NMI had an interesting result.

Schmidt says to us, "This is but a small sample of my powers."

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The terrifying tech behind this summer's zombie assault

Alan W. Rateliff, II

Save the planet: stop the Hollywood movie machine!!

Hollywood is killing us all! Given the specs and usage described on page two and HP's own carbon footprint calculator, one production can produce almost 96,000 tons of carbon. And that doesn't take into account actual production during filming, food, transportation, networking, climate control in offices, and so on (see "I, Pencil.") With all the bombs produced this summer, it seems like we could put Global Climate Warming Change into a tail-spin by simply stopping, or at least putting the brakes on, Hollywood's incessant production of crap.

Sure, some people like that "crap," but there are bigger, more important things about which we must be concerned.

Call your MP, Congressman, EMP, whomever, and tell the to stop the Hollywood-industrial climate-killing machine, now, before there's still time!!

Paris, TOO LATE!

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Arrr! Comcast working on new tech to nudge PIRATES to go straight

Alan W. Rateliff, II
Paris Hilton

Downloading Microsoft CDs... blarg!!

I don't condone pirating software to any of my customers. I have, however, found myself turning to torrents to find install discs for software customers own but are missing the install media. I'd be pretty pissed if I got the boot for doing so.

I always rolled my eyes at the "Do not make illegal copies of this disc" warnings Microsoft stamps on its media. Why? The magic is in the KEY, not the CD. I mean, Microsoft pretty much gives is full okay to making copies of its software since it's almost all downloadable now. Well, you know, except for the warning not to make copies of the download. Seriously?

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Mobe networks hacked phones to fix SIM hijack flaw, says bug-finder

Alan W. Rateliff, II
Paris Hilton

I hope that's what caused my phone to crash...

Some day last week, or maybe it was over the weekend, my phone crashed. This isn't a normal thing for me as this C905a has been stable since I got it. (The K850i was another story altogether, but I digress.) It occurred to me today that maybe AT&T was probing SIMs to look for vulnerable ones and my SonyEricsson didn't react well to the probing. It crashed once, then after rebooting it crashed again, like since the first hit didn't elicit a response maybe we need to hit it again.

Maybe. Who knows.

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Google Chromecast: Here's why it's the most important smart TV tech ever

Alan W. Rateliff, II

Re: AC@12:44

Too bad you posted that anonymously. You should earn the up-vote attributions.

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BOFH: Don't be afraid - we won't hurt your delicate, flimsy inkjet printer

Alan W. Rateliff, II
Paris Hilton

Re: The first inkjets were alright

"Yeah, when if you had no driver, you wrote one."

Right! Remember the books that came with printers showing you how to send ESC sequences to the printer to get it to do all sorts of neat things!

"Today, you'd need to bribe the OS vendors for a digital signature..."

Nah, some people just steal them. (Search Google for "stolen code signing cert" and you'll find Opera, Microsoft, Adobe, and other vendors have fallen victim.)

Paris, ain't nothing but a victim, kid!

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