* Posts by DavCrav

1608 posts • joined 19 Nov 2007

Time to re-file your patents and trademarks, Britain

DavCrav
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"You have to accept the hand you were dealt. I voted "remain" but am fully resolved now to make the best of "leave"."

People have been saying this, but why exactly? Campaigns change things all the time, without recourse to the populous. Many EU referendums have been either repeated (France, Ireland) or ignored completely (Greece) so why is this one special? Especially since it is clearly causing catastrophic damage. Why should there not be a snap election and a political party runs on annulling the vote? If they are elected, they can do that democratically. Beyond a vague notion of Brexit, what is the mandate for the referendum? Leaving the common market, freedom of movement, EEA, EFTA, all trade at all, and many other partial options? Since the Leave option isn't a solid thing there is no mandate for any one of those things, and so the question is anything but resolved. Would the knuckle-draggers who want no Muslims (they do exist, and have been on the telly) be happy with EEA membership with freedom of movement? Or is that not an option because Leave promised them no people with funny accents living next door?

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Dr Craig Wright lodges 51 blockchain patents with Blighty IP office

DavCrav
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"Eh? I thought software and mathematical patents were still not allowed in the UK (& EU)? Even t though they are also not allowed in the US there is the transformational argument which opened the door to them, but the UK doesn't have that, does it?"

You're allowed to file for any patent you want.

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Kremlin wants to shoot the Messenger, and WhatsApp to boot

DavCrav
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"I bet Edward Snowden has read this and thought "Shit""

You mean Russia wasn't on the side of Truth and Justice, and was really just doing it to piss the US off?

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How's your driving, Elon? Musk tweets that Tesla Model S 'floats'

DavCrav
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Re: Missing the most important question

"I think I'd want the complete kit;" OK, let's see what I can do for you.

"rotating number plates" Seems easy enough, just don't tell the DVLA.

"ejector seat" I can make one that goes up, but I'm not sure what would happen when it came back down. It would eject, that's all I can guarantee. You also might not appreciate being next to it when it does eject.

"caltrops" Easy. Just put a bag full of them on the passenger seat and chuck them out of the window as needed. Be careful not to hit your own rear tyres.

"and of course machine guns behind the side lights." Hmm. That space is usually occupied by engine-y bits. Maybe an Uzi 9mm would fit? Might make a mess of your lights though.

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Hey cloud lawyer: Can I take my client list with me?

DavCrav
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Re: Doing naughty things 101

"With half decent IT external device being used / copied to should be logged (assuming external device use actually allowed in first place on the machine)"

Everyone walks round with a camera in their pocket now. Just take photographs of the information on the screen with your personal phone.

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Fat fibre taxes strangling us – UK broadband providers

DavCrav
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"Interesting crowbaring in of the EU into a purely British failure. Is the weather Brussels's fault as well?"

I think you might need to re-read what the OP said. He didn't say it was the EU's fault, he said just get out of the EU and complete the collection of shit, i.e., leaving would be a part of this collection.

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YouTube sharecroppers start world’s most useless trade union

DavCrav
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"Perhaps someone could buy him the Ladybird Book of Intellectual Property? It’s just a thought."

He could put it next to the Ladybird Book of Getting Fucked over by Global Corporations Regardless of the Law?

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Patent trolls, innovation and Brexit: What the FT won't tell you

DavCrav
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Re: @Steve the Cynic

"unless the Government loses a supply bill or a fails to survive a vote of confidence... sadly, there's too many Blairites who will scupper that..."

In fact, because of Parliamentary Sovereignty -- the idea that Parliament cannot bind future parliaments -- all they need is a simple majority to repeal the act.

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This is how the EU's supreme court is stripping EU citizens of copyright protections

DavCrav
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This is complete garbage:

"Those conventions are already incorporated in EU law, he said, so every judgement must be implicitly compatible with a convention."

If you write "Don't steal things", and then a few hundred pages later on write "Well, just on special occasions you can steal things", then you are in contravention, even though you definitely did write "don't steal things" at the start. It's a junk argument from someone who clearly has wool in his head.

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Microsoft's paid $60 per LinkedIn user – and it's a bargain, because we're mugs

DavCrav
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Re: I'll never get the marketing people's valuations...

" If you have ever gone to manufacturer's websites to get data on products before making a considered purchase you have responded to advertising. If ten or twenty years ago you ever picked up a copy of e.g. Computer Shopper and waded through hundreds of pages of ads to find the best deal on X you have responded to advertising."

There are (broadly) two types of advertising: information advertising and persuasion advertising. Advertisements for Coca Cola are entirely persuasion: everybody knows that Coca Cola exists, and the averts give you no information that you didn't already have, so they aren't about raising brand awareness. On the other hand, adverts for new cars are mostly information adverts, as they are making you aware of a new car on the market, together with a part of persuasion because its someone attractive driving it through Saint-Tropez, etc.

Advertisements in Computer Shopper are overwhelmingly information rather than persuasion: they are telling you what you can get for a given price. Adverts for PC World on the other hand give you very little information.

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Get ready for Google's proprietary Android. It's coming – analyst

DavCrav
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Re: Hopefully leads to devices getting patched

"That's why medical companies make treatment regimens, not cures. "

Or, you know, science is hard. I agree that stuff isn't built to last nowadays, but that's just as much a sign of people's inability to do a cost-benefit analysis when considering two washing machines, one costing three times the other.

But accusing the world's medical scientists of a global conspiracy to keep cures off the market because profit is more important to them (the scientists themselves, not the companies) than saving lives, with zero evidence, is a whole new step into tin-foil hattedness.

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DavCrav
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Re: If it works for Apple...

"I think the bigger issue here is how the EU keeps nipping at Google's heels about every other option in Android.

"You can't bundle your Search". "You can't supply your own services as a result of when people do use your search". "You can't bundle your maps". etc. etc.

If Google closes it down, then the whole thing, OS, Apps, Services are ALL part of the Google Android Experience. No more arguing that Google is locking in their search or maps, because those search and maps are an inextricable part of the new closed-source Android. Just as Safari and other Apple services are an inextricable part of iOS.

Sure, using the Oracle lawsuit might be an easy excuse, but if the EU likes how Apple does things, might as well jump on the bandwagon."

Google closing it down would have no effect on the EU's arguments. I don't see why you think it would.

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Verizon! to! bid! $3bn! for! Yahoo!'s assets!

DavCrav
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"I'm through to the second round, I offered $5, two scotch eggs and friends reunited."

I think my offer of $5 and two scotch eggs will safely beat yours.

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Why Oracle will win its Java copyright case – and why you'll be glad when it does

DavCrav
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Re: Multiple points

"The first 2 are much the same to the lay-person. In the previous trial the judge had some computer knowledge and ruled, quite reasonably, that blocking API re-use is against the whole of software inter-compatibility and so not the intended outcome. The currently finished trial said no, APIs are under copyright by the legal definition of this, so the trial was on point 2, and it ruled re-implementation is "fair use"."

Maybe I'm confused here, but you can use APIs you have a licence to, you can reimplement them in a clean room if you want, but you cannot just copy them word for word. Much the same as I can republish a newspaper article with their permission, write another article based on their news, but not copy their article word for word.

Maybe I've missed something.

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DavCrav
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Re: According to Mr. Orlowski

"What Google did was to reimplement the interface, copying 11,000 lines of the code that defined it verbatim without a license to do so. The courts have settled on them being guilty of doing that.

Now Google are trying to establish that they had a "fair-use" right to do so."

One should wonder, if copying 11000 lines of code, so about 200 pages of copyrighted material, is considered fair use, what would be considered unfair use.

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DavCrav
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Re: Author is Dead Wrong

"I have studied this case for hours--you watch, Google will prevail on this one."

Sorry, I just had to laugh at this one. You have basically said "I read websites about a topic all afternoon, so I know what I'm talking about."

I occasionally get e-mails from people who do that sort of thing, telling me about the true value of pi, not the 3.14159... that the mainstream media tell you about.

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DavCrav
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Re: The code is trivial

"If the segment of "copied" code shown in the article is representative of the sorts of claims that Oracle is making, then it shouldn't win. The code is utterly trivial, and obvious to anyone with any insight into what its doing."

You are mixing up copyright and patents. Patents are for inventions, copyright is for expression. Just because something is easy, doesn't mean you can just steal it. Come on, otherwise it should be fine to copy most music and films produced in the last thirty years.

If it's so utterly trivial, do it your bloody self, and don't copy it from someone else.

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Bitcoin to be hammered – in an auction, that is

DavCrav
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Re: Duh

"Do they auction off cash? No. Shows how stupid cops are."

No, they can use cash. Nobody in government can use Bitcoin to actually pay pensions, etc.

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EU wants open science publication by 2020

DavCrav
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Re: Short-term protection

"If the research institute wants to publish for profit, let them, but it goes public after something like 4-5 years."

They don't profit. The way the academic publishing world works is:

0) (Depends on field) Researcher gets grant for research,

1) Researcher writes paper.

2) Researcher submits paper for free to a journal. Journals are ranked based on prestige, so that 'better' journals are often those with long histories and were bought by for-profit publishers in the past who then have been putting the prices for subscribing up.

3) Handling editor gives paper a look over for free, decides on who is a good referee.

4) Sends paper to referee who looks at it for free, says whether the results look good, look correct, are good enough for the journal.

5) Paper is accepted by journal.

6) Journals adds page numbers and its title to the top, then puts the pdf on its website.

7) Libraries at research institutions that the researchers from stage 1 work for hand over thousands to access these papers.

8) Trebles all round at journal's board room.

The new model (open access)

0) (Depends on field) Researcher gets grant for research,

1) Researcher writes paper.

2) Researcher submits paper for free to a journal. Journals are ranked based on prestige, so that 'better' journals are often those with long histories and were bought by for-profit publishers in the past who then have been putting the prices for subscribing up.

3) Handling editor gives paper a look over for free, decides on who is a good referee.

4) Sends paper to referee who looks at it for free, says whether the results look good, look correct, are good enough for the journal.

5) Paper is accepted by journal.

5a) NOT HERE BEFORE: researcher hands over thousands to publisher for open access.

6) Journals adds page numbers and its title to the top, then puts the pdf on its website.

7) MODIFIED: Libraries at research institutions that the researchers from stage 1 work for hand over thousands to access these papers, because not all the papers in the journal are open access so they still have to do this.

8) Quadruples all round at journal's board room.

Note that 7 still happens because unless everyone is open access journals still have to be bought. Also note that it's not clear whether stage 5a is preferable to 7, in the sense that it might well cost institutions more under the hybrid model.

How it should work:

0) (Depends on field) Researcher gets grant for research,

1) Researcher writes paper.

2) Researcher places paper on preprint server, such as the arXiv.

3) Handling editors for that area of the arXiv look at paper, decide if it warrants being quality controlled. Note that the paper would still be there, but only some papers would be assessed in this model.

4) Handling editors send paper to a few referees, one for peer review and a few others for a quality score.

5) Refereeing process works as before, with changes made to paper.

6) Paper gets given quality score, which can be used on CVs and promotion committees in the same way as impact factor and h-indices and other metric bullshit is used now.

7) Nobody pays for anything.

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Sweden decides Julian Assange™ 'remains detained in absentia'

DavCrav
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"I could have dug a tunnel out of that embassy by now. Just saying."

You do know their embassy is on the first floor, right? It'd be a short tunnel, with a ten-foot drop at the end.

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Apple: Another bug fix. Er, thanks, GCHQ

DavCrav
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"That good enough for a conspiracy theory ? Anyone think my phone might be compromised ?"

Well, given that if people were spying on you, they have your phone number, location through GPS, probably name through e-mail and texts, and your number in others' contacts books, etc., giving it away by activating your camera seems maybe silly.

And you have to remember, you aren't really very important. Let's be honest here, there are hundreds of thousands of people, if not millions, who criticize government policy. We could call them the electorate. The idea that 'they' spy on all these people, actively, would mean tens of thousands of people paid just to read your texts, none of whom then tells anyone that that's what they do for a living.

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Google still faces legal spat with SEO biz that claimed it was wiped from web

DavCrav
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Re: It's so obvious now.

"How is Google search anti-competitive? Do they force people to be linked ONLY from their website?"

This question has been answered many times before. If you are the dominant player in a market you cannot just do whatever you feel like, and have to make sure you treat other people fairly compared with your own other businesses.

I think it's clear that Google favoured, and still favours, Google Maps over other mapping websites. Right now Google Maps is fine, but it favoured it even when it was shockingly bad, and other ones, since starved of investment because they lost all their customers, have dropped in quality.

You're not allowed to do that. It would be like Microsoft forcing all software to be installed via its app store. Which is so obviously anti-competitive that they would be slapped with a fine immediately. But some people seem to have a blind spot when Google does a similar thing (e.g., with Android).

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Radiohead vid prompts Trumpton rumpus

DavCrav
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Headmaster

Re: There was no Nicholas Cage remake

"There was no Nicholas Cage remake"

And we've managed to go three comments without spelling Nicolas Cage's name correctly...

So technically you are correct, there is no Nicholas Cage remake.

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UK needs comp sci grads, so why isn't it hiring them?

DavCrav
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Re: uk recruiters

"I think the 2008 recession ended in 2009, but then double dipped in 2011, which is when unemployment peaked."

I believe, although I cannot be bothered to check, that when revised figures came out that second recession did not, in fact, happen. Even though you might have thought it did shortly after you lived in it. It's all very strange.

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Ooh missus, get a grip on my notifications

DavCrav
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"We've got a local scaffolding company that has "Erection Specialists" on both their lorries and company fleeces."

In Birmingham I saw one with the slogan "For a better erection".

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US work visas for international tech talent? 'If Donald Trump is elected all bets are off'

DavCrav
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Re: Good for competition?

"Do business in $Area, hire someone from $Area to do the work, pay them fairly, treat them as if you value them, & don't fall into the fallacy that humans are just replaceable cogs in the grist mill of your profit machine."

Yeah, Harvard: Only employ professors from the Cambridge, MA area. And Google: don't think about hiring anyone outside Mountain View. Wouldn't want any companies outgrowing the specialist population of their local area. And if you live in a country/city without the industry you want to be in, well fuck you. Learn what the local companies do, and hope they have vacancies.

For the love of God, where do these people come from? Social mobility: they've heard of it. Bloody immigrants: sod off back to Africa where you, and every other human being, came from.

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Brexit campaign group fined £50k for sending half a million spam texts

DavCrav
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Re: Why is "Call me Dave" Cameron telling me what to think?

"Is there one? Is this something you have any experience of? Or are you playing the man not the ball?"

Pointing out that someone has gone ad hominem is not an ad hominem attack.

"2) I am glad you grasp democracy, so you must see the difference between voting for leadership here vs the massively removed and far less democratic EU. Some people see this as a good thing about the EU, to reign in the excessive of our gov and stop our gov from doing things. Even to stop the gov's we elect."

I see the House of Lords, a House of Commons voted for by FPTP, the Privy Council, PCCs elected on less than 10% of the electorate, and Prince Charles flapping his mouth at every opportunity.

I also see a European Parliament elected by STV, and a European Commission appointed in the same way as ambassadors are.

In both, deals are done by horse-trading between the relevant people involved.

Why is the UK system more democratic than the EU one, apart from the fact that it's smaller?

Now, if you'll excuse me, I have to leave this as I am flying to Sweden in a couple of hours, and need to prepare a talk. I would say 'DavCrav Out' but that would by now just be cliché.

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DavCrav
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Re: Why is "Call me Dave" Cameron telling me what to think?

@codejunky Do you go to the Donald Trump School of Debating?

"This is an important one, you may want to try to understand it"

"So from their website you manage to understand 2 (hope you wernt guessing)"

Rule 1 of not sounding like a dick: play the ball, not the man.

"1) Vague comments about savings covering a little more than you mention. Interesting you have already found another argument to leave though already. Well done."

Made-up reasons are not reasons. We wouldn't be better off: this is a reasonable statement. Even most people on Brexit side don't pretend that we would be.

"2) Democracy. Freedom of choice. The right to vote for our leaders to do what we want. This is an important one, you may want to try to understand it as people all over the world have fought for it and are."

I think I do grasp the basic tenets of democracy: the demos, a body of people, elect people to represent them. Like the European Parliament, which is elected via the demos of the people of the EU. The European Commission is appointed from the constituent democratically elected governments of the EU. Sounds about as democratic as any other democratic system.

What you appear to mean is that you have chosen the UK as the correct boundary for the demos to vote as a bloc, and any other is wrong. This argument could be equally applied to Scotland, Yorkshire, and my road, which has rules imposed on it from those terrible people on these other roads. The difference between other European countries and other roads is that you have declared France to be the Other, whereas Newcastle-under-Lyme and Newcastle-upon-Tyne as being the Same. You are free to have that opinion, but it is just that, an opinion. It's not a reason for doing anything unless lots of people agree with you that this is the boundary of the Other.

"4) Trade and looking to participate in the world at large not just that bit known as the EU."

You mean like TTIP? So you are in favour of it? Stay in the EU, get TTIP, leave the EU, get TTIP-on-steroids? Or did you mean some other type of free-trade agreement?

"Aint you glad we are not in the Eurozone?"

Yep. I said at the time, to anyone who would listen (fewer listened then than listen now) that you cannot have monetary union without fiscal transfers. Setting one interest rate isn't great for the whole of the UK, never mind the whole of the Eurozone. It inevitably leads to to asset bubbles and overheat in some parts, and without fiscal transfers to smooth things over you get Greece. And you will continue to get Greece until there are fiscal transfers.

Do you oppose fiscal transfers to Greece? To Northern Ireland? To Wales? To Cornwall? My guess is Yes, Maybe, No, No. But the reason for this is the same as the reason for choosing a size of demos: it's a matter of opinion. Broadly speaking, the younger people are the more they think that the EU is an appropriate demos for some issues, normally because of exposure and growing up with it.

(If you think that that is indoctrination, note that the same happens with racism and exposure to non-white people. Either both are indoctrination or neither is.)

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DavCrav
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Re: Why is "Call me Dave" Cameron telling me what to think?

"It is a bit concerning that those wanting to remain have no idea what is going on. This topic is pretty complex and there are many reasons for wanting out which may not even mesh with each others views of leaving. But that works perfectly fine because it is all about control of our own country to determine our own destiny. To have the freedom to choose. For our vote to actually mean something (the will of the very people voting!)."

So you are saying that the Leave campaign isn't all about immigration? I just went on Leave.eu's website, and their "vision" has five "Imagine" statements.

1) The first is fact-free, simply adding up the cost of Britain's contribution to the EU and assuming that leaving it would have no impact on UK GDP, which is widely accepted as being nonsense.

2) Aah, foreigners.

3) Immigration.

4) Aah, foreigners.

5) Total rubbish.

And that's their website.

In fact, I looked at the policy document saying that we could be up to £933/year better off, and it's laughable. Apparently, if we leave the EU, the Government could remove VAT on petrol and booze, eliminate green levies on energy bills, and other such ideas that would never happen. Also, if we leave the EU then fairies could drop £50 notes on our heads as well, in which case we'd be much better off than a mere £933/year.

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DavCrav
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"so how much are the "stay in" campaign going to fined for out and out stealing 9 million quid from the taxpayer and then sending 25 million unsolicited snail mail leaflets?"

You mean the Government, which did it? Ooh, let's fine them a quadrillion pounds, payable to the Government.

There, all better.

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DavCrav
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Re: Why is "Call me Dave" Cameron telling me what to think?

"I may be a bit dim but I'd like to know why the government is taking sides in this issue?"

The Government has a position that being in the EU is good for Britain, and so it told everybody that. But you do get to choose, next month.

"Surely as we elect the government they should follow the will of the people"

Currently the will of the people is Remain, as every poll has shown. And the vote on this is next month, where the will of the people will be demonstrated. But by will of the people, you mean your opinion.

"and they should present both sides of the argument to ensure a fair referendum. I don't trust a government that's telling me what to think on this issue."

Those sides in full:

Remain: good for the economy, trade, business, etc.

Leave: Aah, foreigners. Country full, no immigration, terror, aah.

The only argument that Leave has is immigration. This is like the whole climate change 'debate', where people say "present both sides" and if this were done 'fairly', climate change deniers would get 10 seconds at the end of a thirty-minute programme.

Just because there are two sides to an argument doesn't mean both are equally right. There are two sides to an argument about whether slavery should exist.

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Google kneecaps payday loan ads

DavCrav
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Re: Fat Tony says

"You're not familiar with chloroform are you?"

Yep. If you get chloroformed you will know about it from all the throwing up you do after you wake up. Horse's head optional at this point.

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DavCrav
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Re: Fat Tony says

"Fat Tony says

"I wonder what would happen if Larry or Sergey woke up with a horses head in bed with them.... would they change their views?""

I always wondered about this. Horse heads are big, and heavy. How would you not wake up from someone breaking into your house, coming into your bedroom, and placing a heavy object next to you?

"We would send him a message, but he's a light sleeper."

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DavCrav
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"Any attempt to convince people more than that should be treated as fraud, and any attempt to put pressure on them to pay should be treated like armed robbery."

Do you remember the loan arrangements that existed before payday loan companies? Poor people will always need money. Capping fees at 18% (which is where a credit card is) would mean there wouldn't be a legal way for people with terrible credit to borrow money. Which just leaves the illegal one. You know, where Jim has a crowbar for when you don't pay.

You cannot square this particular circle so easily, I'm afraid.

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DavCrav
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Re: Shame not illegal on TV adverts too

"If the banks had a more sensible policy when it comes to overdrafts then there'd be no need for the payday loan companies, but when exceeding my credit costs me £50 then payday loans look awfully tempting."

The people that go to payday loan companies tend not to be the ones that banks would authorize an overdraft facility for in the first place. They charge you £50 because you took their money (and they let you, which is a different story) without their agreement.

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Researcher arrested after reporting pwnage hole in elections site

DavCrav
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Re: Which bit of this do you lot not understand?

"The article's got that bit wrong - the guy in the video is a candidate for Supervisor (which is an elected position)."

Hmm. The Supervisor is elected, presumably using the insecure system that it's the Supervisor's job to oversee. Ah, now I see one explanation as to why there might be a security problem, and why the Supervisor might not be happy about it being public knowledge.

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DavCrav
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Re: Vengeful Bureaucrat?

"She is likely hacked off that:

1. He put it on YouTube before he told her department.

2. He did it whilst sat on a couch with someone who is running for her job."

Maybe he'd be better at her job then she would? Since her reaction is to have a guy arrested rather than sort the security out in the first place?

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Ransomware grifters offer to donate proceeds of crime to charity

DavCrav
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""Tips" in the plural. Surely there's only one: if you weren't expecting it or don't recognise the source, don't open it."

We can start with:

1) Don't open suspicious e-mail attachments

2) Install NoScript, etc.

3) Don't run as admin all the time

4) DON'T RUN AS ADMIN ALL THE TIME.

5) I actually meant 3). Seriously.

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Stop resetting your passwords, says UK govt's spy network

DavCrav
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"In a word, no.

You enter "Password_4".

System sees last digit is a number, replaces that number with n-1, generates hash result (for Password_3 in this example) and sees if it is a match with existing password hash. If it is, slapped wrist."

Good point, I didn't think about that. OK, ignore my statement.

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DavCrav
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"and it can tell if you are just making small adjustments. Password_1 going to Password_2 won't fly"

Doesn't this mean that they are storing previous passwords in plaintext? Surely a massive no-no.

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Facebook bungs 10-year-old kid $10k to not 'eliminate' Justin Bieber

DavCrav
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"Mickos, who is also Finnish... attributed this to its excellent school system, fast and cheap internet connections, and long, cold, dark Finnish winters."

I, who am a mathematician, would start by attributing it to the Poisson distribution, before seeing whether this other stuff makes one jot of difference. (A school system obviously does, but beyond a certain level I claim not a significant difference.)

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Daft draft anti-car-hack law could put innocent drivers away for life

DavCrav
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Pint

Re: Preparation for the new laws

"I wonder if any of that speculative fiction touched on people who knew it was about to happen and so pickled themselves with toxins and so on to render their organs useless for "donation"."

You forgot the appropriate icon.

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DavCrav
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Re: Summary Execution

"In Star Trek the next generation there was a planet where the death penalty was used for everything. Wesley Crusher tasted that justice first hand for falling on some flowers. Maybe these law makers are fans?"

In Wesley Crusher's case, it was the right punishment, but for the wrong reasons.

I mean, seriously, what a dick.

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Score one for the patent trolls: US appeals court says it's OK to shop for patent-friendly judges

DavCrav
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Re: Wait just a minute

"Most of the corporations in the United States are incorporated in Delaware in part because they have an excellent corporate law system that is fair and business friendly. Delaware has more corporations than people. When a corporation avoids Delaware courts I suspect there is something going on other than a concern about fairness of the decision."

And many corporations are registered in the Cayman Islands because of the nice weather? I think you'll find it's the lack of transparency that's the reason most of them are there.

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Google AI gains access to 1.2m confidential NHS patient records

DavCrav
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Re: revenge porn

"You have almost certainly gave you consent, which the NHS almost certainly stored at one of its storage sites or servers."

Pretty sure people having photos taken of their breasts in a hospital didn't sign a consent form for them to be perved over at Google.

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Getty on Google: It’s all about traffic, duh

DavCrav
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Re: 60 million images I won't be buying or looking at

"As to Getty's proposed solution: It’s an embedded widget that tracks use, and ensures the photographer is credited.

Sorry, that won't work. I will happily embed metadata in an image or provide attribution via caption or whatever but I won't let you spy on my visitors."

I read that as meaning it tracks use on websites, not tracks users on those websites.

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Getty Images flings competition sueball at Google Image Search

DavCrav
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"I feel dirty for saying this, but it's not Google's fault that you can right click and save as. That's the browser, not the website."

This is a well-worn argument. It *is* illegal, at least in the UK, for me to walk up to a shifty looking fellow and say "number 63 just down the road left his door unlocked. Fill your boots". It's aiding and abetting.

Google is separating the image from the website and giving you just the image. It's up the courts to decide if that's aiding and abetting.

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FBI ends second iPhone fight after someone, um, 'remembers' the PIN

DavCrav
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Re: "Remembered" the PIN

"Maybe he remembered after he'd fallen down the stairs"

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'Of course, you'd have nothing to fear from us,' said Vimes. 'Although you might trip on your way down the stairs to the cells.'

'There's no stairs down to your cells!'

'Stairs can be arranged.'

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DavCrav
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Re: Some thoughts

"In the UK I believe you can be compelled to hand over passwords. Scary. Nice place to visit but glad I don't live there!"

Much of the developed world says that about the US. Guns everywhere, no universal healthcare, no job protections. Scary place.

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DavCrav
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Joke

Re: Q: How is the government ever going to convict bad guys without access to encryption?

"As one example, there's more than enough diesel and fertilizer in my garage to make a hefty boom, but they're both there for legitimate purposes. Should I be arrested?"

No, plenty of farmers for example have Diesel and fertilizer. If I have a large quantity of both and no explanation as to why you need so much Diesel and fertilizer living in a Manhatten apartment, then maybe that should be looked into though.

"Somewhere in my basement is several pounds of silver powder. It was recovered from photographic solution, and kept because: silver! It can make a big boom too. Should I be arrested?"

Still no, although I would start to keep an eye on you, since you seem to have a lot of explosiony stuff in your house.

"Off the top of my head I can make 13 different nerve agents from the household cleaning products in my house."

I would definitely be keeping an eye on you at this point. That's a worryingly specific number there.

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