* Posts by DavCrav

1789 posts • joined 19 Nov 2007

Internet Archive preps Canadian safe haven to swerve Donald Trump

DavCrav
Silver badge

Re: Over reaction?

" The US will still have rule of law, and the various Houses and courts will continue to play their parts."

This would be a Donald Trump White House, a DT-appointed Cabinet, republican-controlled Houses of Congress, and a Supreme Court to which he will appoint one, possibly a couple more Justices.

Yeah, don't necessarily count on it.

6
0

UK's new Snoopers' Charter just passed an encryption backdoor law by the backdoor

DavCrav
Silver badge

Re: In other news...

"If they are operating in the UK they have a legally mandated provider side backdoor now."

You mean, if they have an office here. If they are based abroad, why exactly would they give a fuck what British law says?

29
0

Give BAE a kicking and flog off new UK warships, says review

DavCrav
Silver badge

"but they design the sections to actually fit neatly together."

There's a difference, particularly in government contracts, between 'designed to' and 'actually do'.

2
0

Ofcom to force a legal separation of Openreach

DavCrav
Silver badge
Headmaster

"fibre-to-the-premise"

Why do people insist on thinking that the word 'premises' is plural? Fibre-to-the-premise would be laying fibre up to the previous statement about laying fibre to the premises, or something. El Reg isn't the only offender in this regard.

9
3

Donald Trump confirms TPP to be dumped, visa program probed

DavCrav
Silver badge

Re: oh yea..

"Our tolerance for those who speak and write English as a second language is probably why English took over from French as the world's lingua franca."

I don't know about the US, but in Europe I find that non-native speakers frequently have a better standard of English than most natives.

16
0
DavCrav
Silver badge

Re: oh yea..

"It is important to remember that English is a second language for many people. I worked for many years in a very large office building where our workforce included people from 94 sovereign states. It was part of our culture to accept that smart people from diverse backgrounds can bring skills that more than compensate for "second language" level written English. It worked. As long as emails and internal documents were readable and their intent was clear, spelling and grammar were of very little concern."

1) The mistakes that were made don't appear to be those of an educated but non-native speaker: irregular capitalizations, missing demonstrative pronouns, and so on are the errors here, whereas for example a Slavic background would find missing or misplaced articles (errors like 'we need the jobs', for example), those with European languages would not remove demonstrative pronouns like 'that', or misspell 'meant'.

2) I would guess that it is highly unlikely that someone railing against the H1-B scheme is himself a skilled immigrant.

3) Regardless of the background of the person, badly spelled and ungrammatical comments look really bad when placed in front of a potential employer, at least if that employer can themselves spell. (I was in a bar yesterday and on the 'Help Wanted' advertisement in the bathrooms, helpful patrons had made five corrections to the spelling and punctuation.) Good grammar and good diction are significant factors in employability.

18
0
DavCrav
Silver badge

Re: oh yea..

[O]h yea[h]..

H-1B visa program needs to be looked at bad[ly]. It was me[a]nt to be a way for companies to get workers if there [were not] enough to fill the need of the job. It has turned [into] a way for companies to fire American workers and bring in cheap labor at the expense of the American worker[, who] has to train the cheap labor how to do their job. Just like a lot of [laws] that [have been] abused[,] and this is [one] law [that] should be canned.

Corrections are given in []. It has often been posited that better education would be how Western economies differentiated themselves from those with a cheaper workforce. Some work still needed in that respect, evidently.

43
5

Kids' Hour of Code turns into a giant corporate infomercial for kids

DavCrav
Silver badge

Re: As a Dad

"I dont think rationing time is necessary as I was never rationed time on computers when I was a kid and the result is im now a competent IT guy with over 20 years of hands on experience (even though im only 33).

However, I do think it is important to ration the software kids have access to and have faith in their curiosity.

I didnt have access to games in the same way kids do now. My primary source of games was cover disks and competitions."

I agree that it isn't necessary, but only because I don't think there's much in common between people who played a lot of games when they were children. Ignoring the fact that the plural of 'anecdote' is not 'data', of the people I know who played a lot of games when they were a child, we have

One STEM professor (me);

One junior civil servant office worker;

One former bricklayer;

One who works in a logistics company;

One who was murdered in a gang feud with a brother in jail.

So a bit of a mixed bag, really.

1
0

China gets mad at Donald Trump, threatens to ruin Apple

DavCrav
Silver badge

Re: And theres the deficit

"Why do you think Apple, with it's mountains of cash, issued billions in bonds rather than dip into their cash reserves?"

Because the cash is sunning itself on a beach in a tax haven, and debt has favourable tax status.

24
0

Race for wireless VR headset heats up

DavCrav
Silver badge

Re: Lucid dreaming

This is just a side comment, but I only recently discovered that people *don't* lucid dream very often. I have them regularly, at least once a week, both knowing I am dreaming and being able to influence the environment. I thought it was entirely normal until I was talking to my partner and she said she never or almost never had them. Apparently this is the more common situation.

In the last lucid dream I had, a couple of days ago, I demonstrated to my interlocutor that it was a dream by forcing the sky to go into a grid pattern like the Holodeck from Star Trek, then jumped 30 feet into the air and hovered for a few seconds. I have also explained, in various dreams, to other characters (I think this is the best word in this case) that they aren't real as this is just a dream. Once I realized I was in a dream when I decided that the best way to do what I needed to do was to switch to third-person view, so I could more easily see around me.

A recent piece of research explained that gamers are much more likely to have lucid dreams than non-gamers, which might explain it.

3
0

Spain's Prime Minister wants to ban internet memes. No, really

DavCrav
Silver badge

Re: I don't understand.

So, in Spain can I still has memes?

3
0

Drubbed Grubhub bub scrubs anti-Donald-dubbed snub sub-hubbub

DavCrav
Silver badge

Re: Simple questions, simple answers

Bombastic Bob claimed:

"I don't believe he exhibits any racism, bigotry, nor misogyny"

I don't know where he's been living the past year or two, but here are a few direct quotations from the Donald:

"What can be simpler or more accurately stated? The Mexican Government is forcing their most unwanted people into the United States. They are, in many cases, criminals, drug dealers, rapists, etc.”

Sounds a bit racist-y to me.

“You know, it really doesn’t matter what the media write as long as you’ve got a young, and beautiful, piece of ass.”

Sounds a bit misogyny-y to me.

“If I were running ‘The View’, I’d fire Rosie O’Donnell. I mean, I’d look at her right in that fat, ugly face of hers, I’d say ‘Rosie, you’re fired.’”

Sounds a bit misogyny-y to me.

There are more. Many more. Face it: he has said a lot of outrageous things, that if you said them in a workplace you would get fired. And that's all the original e-mail said.

5
4

Robot solves Rubik's Cubes in 637 milliseconds

DavCrav
Silver badge

Re: As for that time...

"Since the robot in the video would be totally unable to solve a 4x4x4 cube, I'd say that the complexity in this case is "worse than exponential"."

Now I see what the previous commentator might have meant: the nxnxn cube, whether finding the optimal solution is in P. I very much doubt if it's in NP, and since the symmetric group on n points has order n!, I would hazard a guess it's not soluble in O(a^n) time for any a>0.

0
0
DavCrav
Silver badge

Re: As for that time...

"Has anyone learned if finding the optimal solution to any Rubik's cube is considered a P or NP problem?"

I'm going to take a wild stab in dark and say you don't know what P or NP is. Because if you did you would know that solving any specific problem is very much in P. In fact in C: constant time algorithm.

1
0

Angry user demands three site visits to fix email address typos

DavCrav
Silver badge

Re: So you didn't fix root cause

"Yes the user was a dick, but you fixed the symptoms rather than the cause."

I don't think IT support is allowed to fire the bursar.

24
1

Trump's taxing problem: The end of 'affordable' iPhones

DavCrav
Silver badge

"As an IT worker in the US, I'm quite happy that President-Elect Trump will make it harder for a foreigner to compete with me for a job."

OK, but have you noticed how most of the world's consumers don't live in the US? You think they will be 100% happy with your protectionism, and won't, you know, do the same?

29
1

Brexit judgment could be hit for six by those crazy Supreme Court judges, says barrister

DavCrav
Silver badge

Re: Was'nt one of the " reasons" for these referendum reasserting the soverignty of Parliament?

"The 16-page propaganda leaflet sent to every household before the referendum said:

"The referendum on Thursday, 23rd June is your chance to decide if we should remain in or leave the European Union." and "This is your decision. The Government will implement what you decide."

IANAL but that seems pretty bloody clear to me and any attempt by an unelected cabal of lawyers and bankers to overturn the democratic result is likely to go down very badly."

Indeed, you are not a lawyer. If you were, you wouldn't spout such rubbish.

3
0
DavCrav
Silver badge

Re: Thursday's explosive anti-Brexit judgment

"The "once in a generation decision" leaflet that was sent to every household in the country to explain the referendum had been quite clear. It read:"

Again, yet again, that was a Government leaflet. Like a manifesto promise. The Government can only carry out things that it has the legal authority to do. It doesn't have the legal authority to execute A50 without Legislative approval, as was clear before the judgment, and has been confirmed now.

17
1
DavCrav
Silver badge

Re: Media and entertainment

""It's not bound by the arguments the parties put forward," continued Callus, of media and entertainment law practice 5RB"

What does this even mean? And what insight has a media lawyer into constitutional law?"

It means that the Supreme Court can set judicial precedent, in other words, make law, in cases not foreseen by the body of law currently at hand. That said, I do not think that this situation qualifies as there is a quite clear legal status of the referendum, and that is of expensive opinion poll, nothing more.

As for lots of people voting, turnout was 72%, lower than elections pre-1997. It's not unprecedented numbers of people voting.

43
6

We're great, you don't understand competition law, Google tells Europe

DavCrav
Silver badge

Re: How about making things a lot simpler...

"...and instead of trying to make incomprehensibly abstract laws about how to regulate "competition" between advertisers, just make some simple tax laws which force all these companies pay a decent amount of tax in all the countries in which they operate."

We have regulations. You might not see why this one is useful but lots of people do. Do you see why company stores, private police forces, debtors' prisons and so on are not allowed any more? Those are very real things, outlawed by abstract laws.

2
0

'Inventor of email' receives damages from Gawker's collapsed empire

DavCrav
Silver badge

As I don't have $750k to give Shiva Ayyadurai, I will refrain from saying that he didn't invent e-mail and he's full of shit, and leave that to the Wikipedia article on him.

12
0

Brexit may not mean Brexit at all: UK.gov loses Article 50 lawsuit

DavCrav
Silver badge

Re: @ werdsmith

""This is your decision. The government will implement what you decide," a pamphlet issued by the government at the time said.

That sounds a fairly solid statement."

Yep. But it's NOT UP TO THEM. Jesus Christ, the High Court has just ruled on this, and you are commenting on an article which says that the Government doesn't get to decide, only Parliament.

For the love of God, it's like people have no idea that the Government and Parliament (Executive and Legislature) are two different things. In issues of domestic law, the monarch doesn't get to decide, and hasn't done so since 1689. Parliament is the only body that gets to implement and repeal domestic laws. It was the Glorious Revolution, and the Bill of Rights 1689.

I know that facts aren't so important nowadays but Jesus, get an education.

16
0
DavCrav
Silver badge

Re: Re:

" If you abstain in a democratic vote, you're stating that you're happy to go along with whatever the majority decide. So that's 2:1 in favour of Leave."

Fuck off. That's a complete pile of rubbish. How can you agree to be in favour of leave if you don't know Leave would win? You cannot be in favour of both positions.

You are talking drivel, and it's embarrassing.

15
2
DavCrav
Silver badge

Re: By "project fear", I presume you mean the inconvenient facts

"Could you point us to one of those "facts", so I can learn ?"

People said the pound would tank if UK votes to leave. UK votes to leave, pound tanks. There's a fact.

Leavers said they wanted to 'take control' (whatever that means) so that the UK Parliament and UK judges are supreme. So when a UK judge rules that the UK Parliament should be supreme in this process, idiot Brexiters moan about it. (I can use the word 'idiot' quite correctly now, because at least these people have now been shown to be completely full of shit by this decision.)

Maybe the Leave voters who are moaning should shut up and accept the ruling? Parliament will vote, you lost, get over it?

15
5
DavCrav
Silver badge

"But the BIG difference is that MPs now know how their constituents voted in the referendum. And most areas of the UK - outside of London, Scotland and NI - voted to leave."

I live in Birmingham, where it was 50.5/49.5. So which side do you want to vote with in order not to be thrown out at the next election? It has 25-odd constituencies, so will make a difference to the vote if it's close. I don't envy MPs' task in places where the vote was tight.

7
0
DavCrav
Silver badge

"The country voted to leave the European Union in a referendum approved by Act of Parliament. And the Government is determined to respect the result of the referendum."

Well, grand. But in the UK, the Executive doesn't get to enact domestic legislation on a whim, backed by referendum or not. The legislation passed for a referendum could have, but explicitly did not, state that the referendum was binding, merely advisory. Thus standard procedures apply, and legislation such as A50 need to be voted on by by Legislature. What they do is up to them but, you know, they were elected as our representatives to decide on UK law and they will.

It's the only legal option. We wouldn't want the Government to override Parliament and use Royal Prerogative to push domestic legislation, that way lies dictatorship.

124
11

Smart Meter rollout delayed again. Cost us £11bn, eh?

DavCrav
Silver badge

Re: What's the advantage to the consumer?

"It's like the weird attitudes people have towards lightbulbs. I want a 900-1200 lumen bulb in a e27 fitting, with 10-20k hour lifespan. My options are a filament bulb (100 watts, 1 euro), CFL (23 watts, 2 euro) LED 900 lumen (12 watt, 12 euro) and LED 1200 lumen (17 watt, 20 euro). The CFL are head and shoulders above the others, but get pretty much all the hate. The LEDs will pay back their additional costs at roughly a euro per thousand hours(20 cents per kwh) , so for normal use after about 6 years. Which is around the lifetime of the bulb."

1) I'm surprised that you claim that an LED bulb lasts no longer than a standard incandescent bulb, but OK.

2) Your LED bulbs are ludicrously expensive. Even in Brexit Britain, with a pound that's worth nothing, I can get LED bulbs for about €7.

3) CFLs are not liked because of the light they emit, the time it takes to warm up, and the presence of mercury.

4) I think your calculations are way off. A 100W bulb uses €1 of electricity in 50 hours at 20c/kWhr. An LED, with your wattages, uses at most a fifth of that, so you say more than 80c every 50 hours. After a thousand hours the difference is more than €16.

1
0

Obey Google, web-masters, or it will say you can't be trusted

DavCrav
Silver badge

Re: The whole mechanism sucks

"What about foreign states?"

They also have the heavy mob. You know, US, Israel, Russia, are all known to do wetwork on foreign soil, and the others probably do too.

1
0
DavCrav
Silver badge

Re: The whole mechanism sucks

"P.S. It's always possible to beat a Web of Trust with enough shills, and States are particularly well-resourced regarding identities and shills."

Right, but this is to stop criminals, not state actors. If a nation state wants your data really really badly, they can probably get it, even if they have to send round the heavy mob.

1
0

Uber drivers entitled to UK minimum wage, London tribunal rules

DavCrav
Silver badge

Re: Optional

"Two licenced cabbies, pretending to be uber drivers, get a uber ruling that suits taxi drivers.."

1) It's 'licensed' in Britain, possibly the US as well given the red underline of 'licenced'.

2) I believe the OP was referring to 'had took'...

2
0

Self-driving cars doomed to be bullied by pedestrians

DavCrav
Silver badge

Re: Brave New World for walkers

" I'll leisurely stop in the crosswalk and check my text messages."

I'm just saying, you know these robocars will have cameras recording what is happening, right? The technical term for that is evidence.

0
2
DavCrav
Silver badge

Re: Non-issue.

"Seriously, pedestrians in Norway cross without looking. And - I have to stress that - it really does work."

Well, except more pedestrians die in Norway than the UK, but if it works for you.

(Of course more die in the UK. I mean, per capita, per car and per km driven. In all cases Norway has more deaths than the UK.)

Edit: two other posters have mentioned Vietnam and Estonia. Vietnam obviously has a much higher death rate on the road, but also Estonia. So going by deaths alone,

Vietnam < Estonia < Norway < UK.

Edit 2: I actually bothered to order that list. The UK and Sweden are the two safest places in the world, it appears, for RTCs (road traffic collisions).

2
1

Password1? You're so random. By which we mean not random at all - UK.gov

DavCrav
Silver badge

"In a UK government pitch designed to persuade the public to adopt better password security,"

Might be better directed towards companies, since they are the ones responsible for the mega-dumps?

"consumers are advised against using words related to their personal lives that may be easy to guess or share."

I think if you have blue eyes, are 25 and live in Kent then 2kentEYEblue5!! is going to be pretty tough to break. Even Iliveinkentandhaveblueeyesandam25yearsold is pretty good.

2
0

First World Problems: John Lewis clients forced to re-register after website 'upgrade'

DavCrav
Silver badge

Re: Somewhere in this...

"Never Knowingly <something>"

Never Knowingly Under Maintenance?

1
0

Uber's robo-truck makes first delivery of ... Budweiser in Colorado

DavCrav
Silver badge

"Now, admitted American mass-market beer is thin, but it's apparently what sells. Bud Light is IINM the best selling beer in a America which tells you something. And it's not like more robust options aren't available, either."

That's obviously false, because Bud Light isn't a beer in the first place.

9
0

Swedes ban camera spy-drones for anything but crime fighting

DavCrav
Silver badge

Re: Muppets

"So hyper zoom compact even on a ten foot pole and self stabilizing gimbal OK but low resolution FPV camera on a small drone in a race is is considered a threat.

Strange how sex attacks on local females from groups of migrants is considered barely news worthy but this is a real threat to society."

And today's winner in The Register's How wrong do you have to be for me to log in just to downvote you? competition: this wrong.

7
4

Paid Wikipedia-fiddling on wheels

DavCrav
Silver badge

Re: So

"What is the elReg unit of scumbaggery?"

The Nixon?

6
0

Smoking hole found on Mars where Schiaparelli lander, er, 'landed'

DavCrav
Silver badge

Re: 4 Kelvin Moles?

"Grampa: "The metric system is the tool of the devil! My car gets forty rods to the hogshead and that's the way I likes it!""

Your car gets seriously shit mileage then. 40 rods is a couple of hundred yards. A hogshead is about 50 gallons.

2
3
DavCrav
Silver badge

Re: Metric and imperial

"I was just watching a documentary about the Voyager probes last night (recorded, not sure when it was broadcast) and it's still amazing to me that not only is it in our lifetime (well, some of us here anyway, youngsters need not apply) that the three body problem was solved but the guy was still around to be interviewed."

In what sense has the three-body problem been solved? In the 19th century it was shown that there is no general solution to the three-body problem.

Since you are talking about the Grand Tour, Wikipedia suggests you mean Gary Flandro, who satisfies two conditions for being the person you are talking about: 1) he is alive, and 2) he noticed the alignment that allowed the Grand Tour to take place. But of course, since Pluto wasn't discovered until 1930, it would be difficult to know this until after that date.

Edit: Having seen other comments now, it appears people are talking about Michael Minovitch. His Wikipedia page is full of incorrect statements about the three-body problem, but because of that inaccurate BBC documentary, they are referenced, so the fact they are false is not that important...

0
0

Despite best efforts, fewer and fewer women are working in tech

DavCrav
Silver badge

Re: Yup, women are smarter.

"In 2016 its still ok for your average 20 to 30 something to say "I dont really know computers".

I get asked some truly basic shit more often than is reasonable."

Get to the back of the queue! I'm a mathematician and we've had numbers for quite some time, significantly longer than we've had computers, either the original human type or machine. The number of people who say they can't do basic arithmetic is probably comparable, and possibly heavily overlapping, with the tech illiterati.

7
0

Trump vs. Clinton III - TPP looks dead, RussiaLeaks confirmed

DavCrav
Silver badge

"She mailed it in from one of her e-mail servers..."

Then TPP text wouldn't have been secret for so long...

3
0

Basic income after automation? That’s not how capitalism works

DavCrav
Silver badge

Re: Don't think of BI as a welfare replacement...

"Yes, thank you capitalists, you raised us up to this level. But going forward, you're going to have to share now. The times they are a changin'."

Unfortunately, we have lots of productivity now because of capitalism. Get rid of the capitalism, and see how long your centrally planned economy keeps productivity that high

1
4

Marmite's not the only national treasure hit by Brexit. Will someone think of the PCs?

DavCrav
Silver badge

Re: When all else fails ...

"When all else fails ...

Blame Brexit!"

You think the 20% fall in Sterling is unconnected to the EU Referendum result? Interesting position.

17
0
DavCrav
Silver badge

"As for currency fluctuations, It would be nice (for us in the UK at least) if the BoE and Government could stop talking the economy down and start bigging it up."

Oh for fuck's sake. The only reason anyone listens to the BoE is because it doesn't lie through its teeth about things like this. Boris Johnson is bigging up the UK economy, but nobody believes him because he's an idiot. Experts -- don'tcha just hate 'em -- use logic, reasoning and data to make predictions. If the BoE said "everything will be amazing, trust us", traders would say "Why? Nobody else is saying that. What secret data and models do you have?" No response: the sell off continues, but with the added bonus of traders don't trust BoE statements as well.

The trouble is, you cannot fool clever people who know things with it'll be all right bullshit, just stupid people. Hence Brexit.

14
2
DavCrav
Silver badge

"You should thank the financial sector, they the ones that are causing it.

They have the power to bring down companies (or even countries) with their dodgy dealings."

Question: How stupid do you have to be for me to log in just to downvote you? Answer: This stupid.

20
1

Verizon!'s top! lawyer! ponders! walking! away! from! Yahoo! gobble!

DavCrav
Silver badge

"They might have a reason to reduce the offer, but what they got still isn't a bad deal."

Really? They are buying Yahoo!, and the price had a bn at the end. I think that's a bad deal, personally. I think at the time someone on the comments here accurately valued it as being worth 18p, three buttons and a pen top. Not a whole pen, mind.

13
0

Tax-swerving IT director disqualified for 8 years

DavCrav
Silver badge

Re: And yet ...

"And yet Philip Green is still allowed to be chairman of the Arcadia Group despite paying his family and himself massive dividends whilst driving BHS into bankruptcy. I guess he must have invited the Right People to his lavish parties."

Did he do it while insolvent? No. So he cannot be done for trading while insolvent. Note that he sold BHS as a going concern, and also wrote off more in loans and the price he paid for the company than he made out of it in dividends. The pension problems are primarily the fault of low interest rates, and are replicated all over the world: the BHS deficit is significantly wider now than it was when the company went into liquidation, for example. But let's not let a few facts get in the way of a rant about billionaires.

4
0

A robot kitchen? Whatever. Are you stupid enough to fall for this?

DavCrav
Silver badge

Re: How do they deal with this little problem?

"The company started three weeks ago, and it give it nine more before it folds. Any more than that, and the scam risks becoming too blatant even for the gullible."

And yet a quick Google search yields this BBC article from April 2015:

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-32282131

where apparently the tech was being demonstrated later in the year... Something doesn't add up here.

Edit: they have a video of the robot arms working there. Yeah, that's not going to work in real life.

3
0
DavCrav
Silver badge

Re: Just trying to work out

"Not that I'd do either; I'm one of those old fashioned people that prefer the food un-deconstructed, un-in-a-small-pile-on-an-interesting-plate, and most particularly, in quantities large enough to provide nourishment. With chips."

You won't get chips, and it might be in a pile on an interesting plate, but you are absolutely full after a 9 course tasting menu. And drunk too, if you went for wine with each course.

7
0
DavCrav
Silver badge

Mark Oleynik is a Ph.D. mathematician

Maths Genealogy project has no mention of him. Pics of his thesis or GTFO.

On an unrelated note, I heard that many foods come in different sizes, so when the robot observes the human with a carrot, it might not be exactly the same size as the next one the robot has. How do they deal with this little problem?

3
0

Forums