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* Posts by DavCrav

1033 posts • joined 19 Nov 2007

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Chromecast video on UK, Euro TVs hertz so badly it makes us judder – but Google 'won't fix'

DavCrav
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Re: Apple TV

"Tirk's comment amused me, so I downvoted Frank."

It must be contagious.

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Bladerunner sequel might actually be good. Harrison Ford is in it

DavCrav
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Re: weighing the options...

"Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep was written by Philip K Dick. The Bladerunner follow-ups were not, and therefore are to be taken no more seriously than any other fan-fiction."

I have this vague recollection of Jeter talking to PKD about DADoES before he died, so they would be rather more canonesque than fan fiction, if my memory is right (although it might well not be...).

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Musicians sue UK.gov over 'zero pay' copyright fix

DavCrav
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Re: Stop being reasonable - this has nothing to do with reason

"I could by a DVD, or I could pay 'extra' (currently often £0) for a DVD with Ultraviolet. If I can legally rip my DVD's to my local NAS for free, there is no reason for paying extra for Ultraviolet, and a company whose service I will never want will disappear.

I am avoiding Ultraviolet because every view is a download that will quickly surpass my ISP's limits and will almost certainly get bumpy when other people are watching Ultraviolet. With no recurring income, Ultraviolet's servers will die from lack of budget, and I will get the choice of pay per view, or my investment in Ultraviolet evaporating."

Ultraviolet is a solution to a problem that consumers can already solve themselves, albeit unlawfully. Ultraviolet is clunky and expensive (in terms of bandwidth), only available when you have a good Internet connection, and doesn't work with all your media. Strangely enough, people go with the unlawful way that's much easier and better. I can either rip DVDs onto an external hard drive that I can take with me, or I can submit my personal data to those fluffy media companies to mine, and in the end have a system that doesn't work properly. Hmm.

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MI6 oversight report on Lee Rigby murder: US web giants offer 'safe haven for TERRORISM'

DavCrav
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Re: How many clues did they need?

"If they did their job rather than rumaging our emails and spying on kids yahoo messenger webcams there would have been better outcome."

Just out of interest, what exactly does "doing their job" mean in this context? I don't mean to bring logic into this massive let's-have-a-go-at-the-security-services circlejerk of yours, but people seem to be constantly saying "do their job" a lot, without exactly entailing what that means. They arrested the guy, but didn't have enough evidence to charge him, so they let him go.

At this stage, one of three things can happen.

1) They detain him without charge while they go look for evidence, perhaps indefinitely. Doesn't look so good on a civil liberties front, and 'disappearing someone' seems somehow worse than trawling through Facebook messages.

2) They tail him everywhere he goes. Apart from the fact that it would be ruinously expensive to put 24-hour surveillance on every person MI-5 thinks is dodgy, again I think civil liberties people might not be happy with tens of thousands of policemen tailing (almost exclusively) Muslims.

3) They gather more evidence. This evidence is likely to be electronic rather than physical, as we are only talking about a couple of guys who want to kill someone, not a major terrorist plot. And apparently the good evidence was on Facebook. As the article states, Facebook does not consider itself compelled to respect the UK warrant system, and as many people on here seem to think the UK government and security services should not be allowed access to these things at all without a warrant, which Facebook ignores, so this seems tough.

So, please tell me anyone, how exactly could the security services "just do their job" in this case without infringing on civil liberties? It's one thing to say that the security services shouldn't have broad access to this sort of material, but you then cannot tell them to just "do their job" afterwards, if there is no way for them to gather electronic evidence.

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Two driverless cars stuffed with passengers are ABOUT TO CRASH - who should take the hit?

DavCrav
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I think you might find it difficult to convince people to get into self-driving cars if they contain a bit of their programming that tells the car to drive off a cliff to avoid an accident that you could well survive.

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What a Mesa: Apple vows to re-use titsup GT sapphire glass plant

DavCrav
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"Apparently, it seems that 3 people disagree. GT's mismanagement, lack of negotiating ability and greed is entirely Apples fault alone. As is the spread of the ebola virus probably..."

Just because someone is foolish doesn't mean that it's morally or legally right to rip them off. See con men and little old ladies for a similar thing where you probably have a different reaction.

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Space Commanders rebel as Elite:Dangerous kills offline mode

DavCrav
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Re: The past is a different country....

"I do realise that a lot of the backers will be middle aged gamers who played the original Elite as kids. I'm one of them. I'm just saddened that so many of my generation seem to be socially retarded and scared rigid at the prospect of having people actually talk to them."

Or, maybe they already live in a dynamically altering universe, 24 hours a day, and they play games as a form of entertainment, like reading a book or going to the cinema. In both of those experiences, people talking to you is annoying. I am not socially retarded, but if I am playing a game, I don't want a 13-year old calling me a n00b gay fag cunt, or whatever they call each other, because I occasionally play games to relax and haven't spent ten hours this week in their universe knowing everything about it.

In summary, I might accept other people around if the servers are age restricted, so <18, 18-25, 25-40, 40+, that looks about right. The people in the 25-40 and 40+ servers will largely leave each other to get on with things. If you are 40+ and want to behave like a 15-year old fuckwit, then you can petition to be "immatured" down a few servers.

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DavCrav
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Re: Cue the mass demands for refunds.

"Except Kickstarter isn't a shop. When you fund something on it, you're not buying anything; you're just giving them money, in the hope that you'll get something in return. There is no guarantee that the something will actually turn up, and the T&Cs you signed up to are totally clear on this.

I don't think you're going to find your credit card company very sympathetic."

But it's not just Kickstarter where they are selling it, and have been for some time before this announcement. If you pre-order something, not on Kickstarter, with an offline mode, and it comes without one, back it goes under the Sale of Goods Act, at least in the UK.

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Danish lit star Helle Helle, Marianne Faithfull and Jim Al-Khalili on Quantum Biology

DavCrav
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Re: (@ DavCrav)

"Just like human brains. In the case of brains it's a set of biological (genetic, chemical, physical, etc.) rules. Those rules can be 'emulated' or even 'simulated' in a 'normal' computer. The 'entity' resulting from such a simulation should show the same kind of behaviour as a human brain."

Assertion without proof. If you want to prove that a human brain can be simulated by computer, you have to prove that a human brain is equivalent to one, namely a Turing machine. This isn't some woolly philosophy exercise about complicated algorithms. This is a mathematical statement. In particular, you need to be able to explain how human brains can (allegedly) understand paradoxes, and statements like Goedel's theorems, or how I can consider uncomputable numbers, inaccessible cardinals, the class of all ordinals, non-standard models, etc. All these juicy mathematical constructs that look very bad from the standpoint of Turing machines.

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DavCrav
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"Note that in real mathematics, we are not encountering many of those for some reason and the one Gödel provided had a self-referential relationship, and it can evidently be proved OUTSIDE of the given axiomatic system."

This is precisely the problem that non-mathematicians have trying to understand something incredibly subtle like completeness and consistency of axiomatic systems.

Gödel's theorem essentially states that in any "useful" system (although there are plenty of useful systems that are not "useful") there are things that you can say about the system that you cannot prove within that system. In particular, the statement "this system is consistent" is one of them.

You can always prove any statement, including "this system is consistent", from outside the system, by creating an axiomatic system, together with the axiom "the previous system is consistent". Well, job's a good 'un. No, of course, because your new system is also "useful", and so cannot itself be proved to be consistent without inventing another system to contain it.

Why doesn't this matter? Once you know there's a certain level of granularity you are not allowed to ask difficult questions about (remind anyone of quantum theory, as an aside?) you stop asking these questions. That's the only reason it's not of concern to the real world: because we know we won't be able to do it.

Why does it matter? Because if you want to start programming computers to do things, one of those things is to check that arguments are sound, and produce automated theorem checkers (like the inappropriately named Coq). Also, if you want to say that the human brain is just a very complicated computer, well, computers have rules they have to follow. In particular, all of our computers are Turing machines; they cannot just bullshit results. So one of two things is true: other humans and I are lying when we say we understand Gödel's theorem; or humans are not Turing machines, so cannot be emulated on a computer. They can be simulated to a high degree of accuracy, for example a third of the time just by looking asleep, but not emulated completely.

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GOD particle MAY NOT BE GOD particle: Scientists in shock claim

DavCrav
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Re: Just as I thought...

"Not that I know anything about physics, really."

And yet you have an opinion on fundamental particles.

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FUTURE ROBOTS will EXTERMINATE UK jobs – study

DavCrav
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Re: it works like this:

"google scans the ever-growing number of documents on the web, and they keep tightening the matches. It's self-perpetuating, because human translators then use those translations in their own work (or "work") and this ends up on the web, when it's picked up by google, etc. etc."

I really hope Google doesn't do that. If they use all translated documents in their corpus, including machine-translated documents, then they are idiots. And I don't think they are idiots.

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DavCrav
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As said in the article, translators will take a hit as machine translation gets better. However, currently, all machine translation is done by scanning large collections of known good translations for matches. This only works because of lots of good translations by...human translators. How long will it be before each and every piece of translation will have an agreement that states that Google et al cannot use it in their corpus of translations? And would such a move be legal? Why should translators let Google use their own work to destroy their livelihoods? And what happens when the translators are replaced by machines that are good enough? With no, or barely no, additions to the corpus, the automated translations will stagnate, crystallising a way language was spoken and written at the point where translation as a human skill was largely killed off. It will be an interesting battle to watch.

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CAMERON DIAZ covers top BOFFINS in GOLD at Breakthrough Prizes

DavCrav
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Re: Publication too?

"Perhaps to accompany this prize-giving there could be a lecture set and a collection of articles where the recipients explain something of the work behind each prize. "

Nice idea. I'd like to see Jacob Lurie explain infinity-categories for a general audience. I might even pay to see that.

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DavCrav
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Science can now feel what it is like to be a footballer

Giving a few people at the top of the game millions while the rest of the industry survives on subsistence wages is how sports normally works. Yes, they are undoubtedly extremely good, but there are tens of thousands of people that do good work in these subjects, and (in the US in particular) are often on incredibly bad wages for their trouble. But yay for giving the already-rich scientific elite a few million dollars each. It's better with them than with Zuckerberg, etc., but could have been put to better use funding a thousand fellowships for postdocs or Ph.D. students.

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'Tech giants who encrypt comms are unwittingly aiding terrorists', claims ex-Home Sec Blunkett

DavCrav
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Blunkett didn't say:

[W]e should not capitulate to the big governments: they cannot be allowed to get away with the absurd idea that they hold no responsibility for what is done by the intelligence agencies they provide.

These governments may be powerful and are therefore seem not to be subject to the laws or requirements of their country. But those who run them have a moral responsibility: they must stop pretending that they are citizens of a parallel universe.

They exist in and depend on the voters around them just as much as everyone else.

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Police in U-turn as 'shop a gun-owner' hotline is scrapped

DavCrav
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"Flyer: "If you are unfortunate enough to lose your gun, or have it stolen, then... you may be prosecuted"."

That's a very disingenuous selective quotation there. A more representative quotation would be

Flyer: "If you are unfortunate enough to lose your gun, or have it stolen, then [if it is deemed you were negligent in letting a firearm get out into the wild] you may be prosecuted".

That's a rather different statement, and an entirely reasonable one. If your house gets burgled and it gets stolen from a locked cabinet, no prosecution; if you leave it lying on the back seat of your car and it gets stolen, prosecution. It's called criminal negligence.

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Brussels' transport chief demands a single European sky to end 'air traffic gridlock'

DavCrav
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But then how would French air traffic controllers go on strike?

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Apple on the art of the deal: 'Put on your big boy pants and accept the agreement'

DavCrav
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"...didn't want equipment they had paid for being used to manufacture for (potentially) competitors - unreasonable?"

LOANED. Not paid. To be repaid in very cheap, i.e., below cost, product.

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DavCrav
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Re: Two sides to this

There are indeed two sides to this, but usually, when there's a guy dead and someone holding a gun, I normally don't treat both stories with equal trust.

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Luxembourg: Engine-room of the tax-break economy

DavCrav
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Re: Never forget that "tax non-transparency" helped to get Jews out of Europe last time

"Yes, they are dodging taxes abroad, but so what?"

So we, that is you and I, have to make up the shortfall. The reason that tax rates are high on personal income, and VAT is 20%, is because other people, like celebrities and companies, are avoiding/evading tax. We could have lower taxes for the poor, or greater spending on them, if the rich weren't such complete selfish bastards, wanting their eighth or ninth million tax free, rather than paying what they fucking should.

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DavCrav
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Re: Time for reform

"You know, things like HS2, foreign aid, failed technology schemes, shredders for parliamentary expenses evidence."

And schools, hospitals, roads, pensions, etc. Which is 98.6% of government spending, whereas foreign aid to such undeserving countries as Ethiopia, Malawi, Congo, and other titans of industry, is 1.4% of government spending. If HS2 costs £50bn over ten years, that's 0.7% of government spending for each of those years. These numbers aren't much, because almost all government spending is on education, pensions and the NHS. If a company dodges £500m of tax, it's those budgets that it has to come out of, because that's almost all government spending.

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Pop starlet Taylor Swift DUMPS Spotify: It’s not me, it’s you

DavCrav
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Taylow Swift left Spotify

and nothing of value was lost.

I'm not entirely sure who she is, but I'm pretty sure I don't want to hear her music. She would have got nothing from me, and she is now getting nothing from me.

As for Spotify cannibalizing music sales, you cannot have it both ways. Either streaming is big, in which case there really is a much larger audience, or it is small, in which case it won't reduce sales by much. If it is just your current audience, people who already buy your albums, who move to streaming, then you're in trouble, but that also suggests that there's nothing you can do to increase your audience. So stay off streaming and sell to people. But this argument seems to work for all people. Use streaming to get big, then leg it once everyone knows you.

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Google’s dot-com forget-me-not bomb: EU court still aiming at giant

DavCrav
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Re: The World Awaits Zimbabwe's Right to be Beaten to Death Quietly Ruling

"There's some bollocks comes out of Brussels but this surely etre le bouquet."

They are saying "Google operates in both the EU and US. It cannot simultaneously obey both US and EU laws. Therefore shut down, pull out of one jurisdiction, split the company, or come up with a solution that obeys both sets of laws. Choose."

Since Google doesn't like Options 1, 2 and 3, unsurprisingly they'll go for 4.

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DavCrav
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Re: Geo-location?

"Yeah, but the problem is: which law? EU, or USA?"

Well, if you cannot obey laws with your business, you shouldn't be operating a business. If a business model is legal in the US (e.g., gun sales) and illegal in the EU (e.g., gun sales) then you cannot run a transnational US-EU company that operates in this sector. The solution? Split Google into Google US and Google EU. Or pull out of one of the two jurisdictions, because you cannot say "obeying your law would break the law in $favouriteJurisdiction, so I will break your law instead".

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China set to be buried under mountain of surplus robots, warns biz chap

DavCrav
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"Bubbles are financially ruinous but do tend to leave us with some cool leftovers..."

Dot com bubble. I felt that just had to be said.

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This is why we CAN have nice things: Samsung Galaxy Alpha

DavCrav
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"Think of anything you can buy in a metal version or a plastic version. And which is more expensive? Which is the premium product? The metal one of course. Every time.

I can't believe I had to write that..."

You mean like cars? Metal cars versus carbon-fibre ones?

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Apple spent just ONE DOLLAR beefing up the latest iPad Air 2

DavCrav
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Re: What about the VAT?

"Err, no indeed. The clue is in the name: VAT is a tax upon value added. Not retail price."

OK, everyone needs to shut up unless they *actually know how VAT works*. It varies depending on the goods and services, but for most things, 20% is added onto the retail cost and then this is the price you pay. One sixth of the price you pay in a shop is VAT, that goes straight to the government. That's it. It's value added tax because it's added to the value of the goods, not it's a tax on the added value. Jesus wept.

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This Changes Everything? OH Naomi Klein, NO

DavCrav
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Re: Not as simple as that indeed....

"This being said counterarguments based on the wisdom of unspecified "experts" doesn't cut it for me either."

Sure, using arguments from one person to attack another might not be great, but Tim is showing logical inconsistencies in her arguments, and using experts to do so.

If you present an economic theory that uses half of a body of research but not the other half, then what you are doing is wrote. You cannot pick and choose which bits of a theory you like, for example accepting the hypotheses but not the conclusions, or vice versa. If you want to produce a new theory you have to base it on assumptions. These assumptions need not be sound, but they have to exist. If you weave in and out of standard economic theory, using some parts when you want and rejecting other parts when it contradicts you, you have a weak argument.

But about not mentioning experts, it is possible to write a 540-page book on motor racing without mentioning Ferrari, but it would look a bit weird, and might suggest that you hadn't done your homework.

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Silicon Valley scrooges paid staff $1.21 an hour in a 122-hour week

DavCrav
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Re: How dare he/she...

"I think you summed up your personality by the phrase "even foreign employees" ."

While she's probably vile (as she is an executive) you know full well that she means foreign-based people who come over and work temporarily for a week or two, and not foreign-born people living in the US on a permanent basis.

It's quite easy to deliberately misinterpret -- overlook? -- someone's obvious meaning in a sentence to find a negative potential secondary meaning. It doesn't help debate.

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Wanna hop carriers with your iPad's Apple SIM? AVOID AT&T

DavCrav
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Re: Roaming?

"go to the US for a few weeks and you just select an AT&T..."

Did you actually read the article?

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Trips to Mars may be OFF: The SUN has changed in a way we've NEVER SEEN

DavCrav
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Re: Nuclear

"Actually, some decades ago some smart people got together and thought of the problems involved in running a nuclear reactor. They designed something called the NERVA (Nuclear Engine for Rocket Vehicle Applications). It got around the cooling problem by realising that most of the cooling was needed when the nuclear reactor was providing power for propulsion. Which it did in that design by heating an exhaust gas."

I'd got to just before your comment by the time I'd come up with that idea. Sounds like I was pipped to the post by a few decades.

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Satya Nadella's $84.3m pay packet: Did he use the 'female superpower' to get it?

DavCrav
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Re: Average?

"And the solution any government (outside of North America) would be equally appropriate, simply advise the company that they are welcome to sell their products somewhere else. No significant numbers of employees locally should automatically mean a complete ban on all sales of all products by that company. And that means employees right up the chain. They want to move their production to Asia? No problem, please feel free to stop selling anything made there here."

How exactly would that work with things like software, or music for an even more fun example?

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Hey, iPhone 6 fanbois: Apple's bonk to 'Pay' app IS GO

DavCrav
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Re: Sounds bloody insecure

"The card information is stored in the same place as fingerprints, which has yet to be "broken in to"."

You should always say not yet known to have been broken into. You think if someone could do that they'd tell everyone? That would be a difficult thing to do, and so perhaps they might want to keep quiet about it.

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SCREW YOU, EU: BBC rolls out Right To Remember as Google deletes links

DavCrav
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Re: Hoorah!

"That would have nothing to do with Google, DavCrav. That would be an unsubstantiated rumour and there are existing laws about that. He could sue you and get the article taken down."

Good luck with that. If he's in a different jurisdiction, if the server is in a different jurisdiction, etc. Ask the music industry how difficult it is. Shall we see? If I said big_D is a squirrel botherer, maybe El Reg would take it down, especially if you complained, but another website, in a different part of the world, might just tell you to sod off, you big squirrel lover you.

"This is for accurate articles that are no longer relevant or no longer of public interest, but are public record and cannot be removed (accredited press etc,)."

It's actually for irrelevant, outdated, *or inaccurate* information.

And all these people moaning about freedom of speech should presumably be complaining about the new tougher sentences for abuse over the Internet. After all, freedom of speech.

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DavCrav
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Re: Hoorah!

If you would be so kind as to supply your name and address here so I can post scurrilous, and of course completely unsubstantiated, rumours about your squirrel fetishes then I would be much obliged. Of course, nobody looking you up on Google would worry about these squirrel love-in rumours but, you know, no smoke without fire.

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'Dancing Jesus' file-sharer found guilty

DavCrav
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"Homeland Security officials seized the servers in Texas in September 2011"

On the 10th anniversary of 9/11 Homeland security finally scored one for the Good Guys against the terrorists by, er, seizing a server in Texas used to download music.

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Martha Lane Fox: YEUCH! The Internet is MADE by MEN?!?

DavCrav
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Re: Barking @Yet Another Anonymous Coward

"The biggest problem with Australia's voting system is not just that it's mandatory, it also uses what are called "preferences". Now, remember you HAVE to vote, and if you don't want to vote for Labor or Liberal, you could vote for a minority party like the Greens, the Sex Party, the Pirate Party, Hemp Party, One Nation and so on. But all of those parties are forced to stipulate "preferences" to other parties

[...]

Even an informal vote (e.g. a blank ballot paper, or one with a penis drawn all over it, or simply turning up and signing your name off and not putting a ballot in at all) is counted as a vote for the incumbent party, so you can't escape voting that way either."

Are you sure that's right? Although I'm not Australian, I (and Wikipedia) believe that Australia uses two forms of preferential voting system, a form of AV and a form of STV, and in both cases it is the voter who lists preferences.

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DavCrav
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"that something that is now fundamental, like the water, for everybody’s daily life has been entirely produced by men."

I hope she feels the same anything that was invented over about a hundred years ago, because these were almost certainly invented by men. Women have only really been inventing stuff in a way that means it's likely to see the light of day for the last hundred, maybe even fifty, years, and so she presumably turns her nose up at the following male inventions (in no particular order):

democracy;

the periodic table;

the car;

the railways;

the sewerage system (she might literally turn her nose up at this);

the telephone;

the refridgerator;

bricks;

dwarf wheat;

the anti-slavery movement;

penicillin;

the television;

etc.

She is such a blithering idiot.

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Google in 'right to be forgotten' snub probe: Ireland tackles moans

DavCrav
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Re: @Ian Michael GumbyHere's the rub...

"If he does not like it he should complain to the web sites of the reporting press, not to Google for finding them."

That wouldn't do much good. Newspapers are protected under public records provisions. However, Google isn't protected, and while they cannot know a priori that the information is wrong or out of date, this is personal information about people stored on their servers that they are making money from, and they should have a duty, when informed by people, to make sure that they sanitize their records of lies and outdated information.

Basically, it's Google trying to have its cake and eat it. Media companies are protected from this kind of data protection legislation because they are keepers of the public record. Google didn't want to be a media company, as they have other duties, telling the truth about things, etc., and can get fined if they don't. Google didn't want any of that old-fashioned law stuff being applied to it, so said no to being a media company. However, it still processes personal information, and stores it all over its servers, and spews it out to anyone who asks. As such it has a duty to people to make sure it's up to date and accurate.

It's a natural consequence of the data protection act, and if you are from the US you are probably not used to this whole government-doing-things-for-the-benefit-of-its-citizens thing, but occasionally it's pretty cool. We get holidays from work, companies cannot just fire you for no reason, the police can't just steal, sorry cause you to civilly forfeit, your stuff because they think it would be better if they had it, and so on.

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Economics prof denies digital pirates plundered €20bn from EU coffers

DavCrav
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Re: Freetardonomics

"Spotify (which only exists because the alternative is zero revenue amid piracy) pays 0.007 USD per stream. So if you had a million plays that'd be 70 USD. You would get paid more working at the checkouts in Tesco."

Let's do a quick comparison. Generally, the creators get about 10% of revenue from an album sale, which has roughly ten tracks on it. If that album cost $10 (all numbers are chosen for simplicity) then each song gets the artist 10c. So an album would have to be played 1000 times for us to get roughly the same amount of revenue for the two.

But another point here is that it's possible to actually get a million streams fairly easily. Most of the people who are paying artists a pittance via Spotify wouldn't actually pay them anything at all otherwise. the idea is that a hundred times as many people will play your songs ten times, versus one person buying your album. Whether it's true or not, I don't know. If Spotify is too small for this effect to generate meaningful revenues, then it also cannot be cannibalizing album sales either, for exactly the same reason.

But the real question is: does Spotify make any money? If it doesn't then they cannot pay any more. Demand more, and Spotify goes bankrupt. It won't be replaced by a magical money tree, but back to copyright infringement.

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Inequality increasing? BOLLOCKS! You heard me: 'Screw the 1%'

DavCrav
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Re: Apologetic.

"That simply means that income inequality is rising.

The measure has no meaning outside the country being measured, it's deleterious effects are psychological and result from comparing self to those at the top in your community and country. The only importance is your relative wealth in society.

That inequality between countries is dropping is nice, but has none of the positive effects on society which reduced inequality within a country does: reduced crime, reduced mortality, reduced child mortality, reduced unrest, increased trust, increased well-being, increased longevity."

This just sounds like rubbish. Reduced inequality across the globe has far better effects *for the average human* than keeping most people poor so a few working-class people in Europe can keep getting tax credits. Of your list, reduced mortality and reduced child mortality, increased well being and increased longevity are far better served on a global scale by taking money from the 80-90 decile and giving it to the bottom 50%. This will increase unrest and crime in the rich countries, but obviously reduce crime and unrest in poor countries, so again we are better globally.

Sure, your country or city will be in flames, but there won't be a war in Syria killing hundreds of thousands, so as a globe we are still doing better.

It's OK to be selfish, we have to be otherwise we'd give all of our money to poor countries, but we should also recognize that we can be selfish even while seemingly being selfless, because we are also generally ignorant of the big picture. Of course, taxing the 1% in the West and giving that money to the poor in the West doesn't appear to stop companies doing very well, and hence standards rising in poor countries as well, so we can maybe even do both!

But I want to take special issue with this line of rubbish: "The only importance is your relative wealth in society." That is complete garbage, as it is only true once you don't really have any problems. Poor people have to worry about clean water, shelter, food, how they would feed themselves if they get ill, access to medicine, etc. That you have to worry about whether you can afford a second flat screen, and you should because everyone else on your street has two, means that you don't have any actual real problems, and should shut up on a global scale. On a local scale, you might be right, but clearly what is important to *you* might not be important to *everyone else on the planet*. You getting that second flat screen might feel important to you, but is it worth killing a thousand children in Mozambique? You might think so, but morally surely it isn't.

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OECD lashes out at tax avoiding globocorps' location-flipping antics

DavCrav
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Re: Its not about taking more...

"Let’s have a vision, and a target, for what the state could achieve on 10% taxation, instead of the 50% it currently consumes."

This isn't a great vision. In the UK (the only country I know well) state old age pensions are about 10% of GDP, at about £100bn (roughly, it's order of magnitude). Your 10% nonsense would mean that's it. No schools, hospitals, roads, army, police, fire, benefits, repayment of debt (third highest expenditure by department), government, parks, cleaning, universities, research, anything else you can think of.

Well done, you just broke the world. Or rather Herman Cain, with his idiot 999 plan did. It's fun because in the UK, 999 is the number for the emergency services.

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DavCrav
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Re: Political garndstanding and fiscal wankerisms

"In other words, Ireland's extortion result would be down by £100m a year, and the UK's up by £200m a year. The £100m clawed back would not go to investment at Google, but to various preferred taxfeeders in the UK. This is also going to help a lot towards paying back the national debt of £1'000'000m (that's not a typo)."

For investment at Google, notice that this is 1) most likely in the US anyway, not the UK, and 2) would probably really be money into a massive cash pile in the Cayman Islands, not investment. See Apple's $100bn cash pile as an example.

As for paying back the national debt, no £200m/year is not a lot. But 500 global companies avoiding/evading £200m/year each is £100bn/year, and that's the deficit.

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JINGS! Microsoft Bing called Scots indyref RIGHT!

DavCrav
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Re: Vote Yes

"Oh dear - you probably don't even drink it (let alone spell it) Whisky"

He could prefer the Irish stuff.

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Super Cali goes ballistic, Uber Pool is bogus: Ride sharing biz is illegal in the state, says regulator

DavCrav
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"+1 for article title of the year."

In which case you should +1 the original authors of the headline, The Sun, of which this one is an homage/copy. It was after a football game where Inverness Caledonian Thistle beat Celtic, which is unlikely.

"Super Caley go ballistic, Celtic are atrocious".

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What the BLOCK? Microsoft to gobble Minecraft-maker 'for $2bn'

DavCrav
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Re: Absolute stark raving, swivel-eyed, dog fingering insanity

"The company has revenues of $2.9 billion, but a tiny profit of $150 million. It looks like they're being fleeced by their infrastructure costs (or someone's building an volcanic island lair in the Caribbean)"

Or they are not making much profit per unit because they price is low? Although it isn't really for an indie game, so yes, no idea where Minecraft (couple of guys in an office) spent $2.75bn in a year.

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DavCrav
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Re: My only thought

"Did you ask him why he decided not to turn down two billion dollars and keep it real in his bedsit?"

$115m in profit last year? That's some bedsit.

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BBC Trust candidate defends licence fee, says evaders are CRIMINALS

DavCrav
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Not Establishment?

"I wouldn't count myself as an Establishment figure and I am independent of mind and of view. I represent the audience," she had insisted earlier."

Hmm. [clickety] Rona Fairhead, born Rona Haig, went to Yarm Grammar School (est. 1590), then St Catharine's College, Cambridge. President of the University Law Society, and a double first in law. MBA from Harvard, stints at Morgan Stanley, BAe, ICI, Pearson and the FT.

If she isn't an Establishment figure, who is?

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Tinder sexual harassment suit settled in undisclosed deal

DavCrav
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What happens if the relationship pre-dates them joining the company?

This isn't a question about these people (not enough detail given in the article for this question to even be relevant in this case) but what happens if a couple both join a company after they get together, then the relationship goes south and they start slagging each other off, or as in this case one does it to the other? Does the fact that the relationship predates employment have any bearing on the law?

I'm just wondering if you can claim your texts to the person were sent in the personal capacity as 'biiter ex-partner', rather than co-worker?

I suspect the answer is that the law doesn't care about the relationship predating employment, but I wonder if such cases have come up before.

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