* Posts by DavCrav

1731 posts • joined 19 Nov 2007

The web is past peak innovation: It's all negative returns from here

DavCrav
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These stupid vertical scrolling websites

This seems the right place for a rant about these websites that have decided to put their entire website on one page, and you have to scroll all the way down to find anything out, interspersed with full-page photographs, as if someone took a magazine and glued all the pages end to end.

It's stupid, it's terribly slow to load, fairly slow to scroll, difficult to find anything, and I hate it, and hate you for making it. Hyperlinks are not a scarce resource. Use them.

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Lily Cole: You'd hate me more if Impossible.com were a success

DavCrav
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"It's not even losing enough money to be a proper startup."

Maybe this is what the 'achieving scale' in the article means?

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'Geek gene' denied: If you find computer science hard, it's your fault (or your teacher's)

DavCrav
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Re: Black differently abled gay height challenged single mothers in Computer Science!

"In light of this assertion, lack of diversity in technology recruitment becomes more difficult to excuse as a consequence of natural ability.

I know where the author is going with this but lack of any significant pattern in the student population does not justify to force "diversity" on employers for the sake of it - because employers are not hiring in the same population, especially not if that population is reframed by adding more "diversified" people."

I'd go much further than all this. I'd say the author has taken a study that shows that coursemarks across a specific population is roughly normal, as with many things in life, and then extrapolated that to claim that this means that all substrata of the population are equally adept at things, which is a no-no.

For a start, the dataset is hideously self selecting, almost the epitome of such: final-year computer science undergrads. Now come on; if there were a geek gene, you would rather hope that all of these people have it in the first place, so we are looking only at the 'cans'. This is specifically against the author of the article here, not the paper itself.

For the authors of the original paper, I assume they looked at pre-moderated marks, and not those after they have been fit to a curve? I couldn't find any mention of this in their paper, but since this is trick-cycling and I actually have real maths to be getting on with, I didn't look too hard.

Secondly, finally for the off-the-top-of-my-head-reasons-why-this-paper-is-rubbish, exams are designed to get a normal distribution. We write a few questions that everyone will get, then attempt to write a few questions that some will, some won't, and a few very hard questions, to get this nice distribution of people.

To be fair to the authors of the study, they are trying to prove that computer science results at university level are normally distributed, just like every other subject. And they succeed at that, although my reasons above are a pretty good explanation for that even if the underlying population ability is bimodal. And then the trick-cycling comes in, and it's garbage from then on. They miss out one very good reason why lecturers think distributions are bimodal: because the people they see are bimodal. Interactions with students are mostly with the very weak and the very able, with those in between being largely invisible until exam time.

Final grade for the paper: 55%. A solid upper second, but not enough critical analysis to get onto most graduate training programmes at major companies.

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BBC to demand logins for iPlayer in early 2017

DavCrav
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My login for ITV Player was absolutely definitely not David Cameron of 10 Downing St, London, SW1A 2AA, DoB 9/10/1966. I guess I should update those details now...

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Unlucky Luckey: Oculus developers invoke anti-douchebag clause, halt games for VR goggles

DavCrav
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Re: Americans, again not realising there's a world outside them

"Blacks are not being killed by police in any remarkable numbers. They're actually less likely to be shot and killed by the police on any given encounter than whites. Not only that, but most of the police shootings of people of any race are justified."

Oh goody. Another misuse of statistics. It's not that blacks are being killed more often in any given encounter, it's that these encounters are much more likely to happen to blacks than whites. So if a black person has as much chance of being shot per encounter as a white person, but is ten times more likely to have an encounter, can you please tell me how much more likely he is to be shot?

"...most of the police shootings of people of any race are justified."

OK, so that means that up to 50% of police shootings are not justified? I would bloody well hope that most police shootings are justified. In fact I'd be concerned if any at all are not, and if one is not justified, then the police involved would go on trial. (Not necessarily convicted of course, but a full, public investigation involving a judge and lawyers, just as when non-police shoot people in an unjustified manner.) But who decides if the shootings are justified? Oh yes, the police.

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DavCrav
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Re: What an idiot

"He should of [sic] got a SuperPAC setup and donated anonymously like everyone else that wants to buy a piece of the action:"

I think you mean a 501(c)(4). SuperPACs have to disclose their donors, and can campaign. 501(c)(4)s don't have to disclose their donors but cannot campaign. But 501(c)(4)s can donate to SuperPACs.

As evidenced by Stephen Colbert's 501(c)(4) "Colbert Super PAC SHH Institute", previously known as "Anonymous Shell Corporation" (the official name).

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Asian hornets are HERE... those honey bee murdering BASTARDS

DavCrav
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"The Asian hornet can be identified by a single yellow band on its dark body and brown eyes on its yellow-orange face."

And the fact that it's 2 inches bloody long. Jesus.

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Jakarta be kidding me! Google gets $400m tax bill from Indonesia

DavCrav
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Re: Is this really an option?

"The Chocolate Factory had declined an earlier request to be audited.

I didn't think declining a tax office audit was an option... Maybe being a company the size of Google does give you an advantage."

I think that means something like

"Can we take a look at your books?"

"Come back with a court order."

"OK, here it is."

"Oh. Erm, OK then."

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RAF Reaper drone was involved in botched US Syria airstrike

DavCrav
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Re: Barrel Bombs vs Precision Guided 500lb Bomb

"If by 'Precision Guided 500lb Bomb' you are referring to laser guided, more accurately laser marked target bombs, they are only as accurate as their markers.

The target is identified by the laser carrying marker being identified using a 4-digit number entered by the pilot. This number is conveyed to the bomber pilot who dials it in to the ''Precision Guided 500lb Bomb". The bomb ignores all other 4-digit identifiers.

The alternative can be infra-red markers placed around/near by ground based accomplices OR a laser target marking system. These are often referred to as Ground Laser Target Designator (GLTD) and are used in conjunction with Paveway bombs and Hellfire missiles.

The transmitted marker is from a Nd:YAG laser with a wavelength of 1.064 micrometres (3.93701e-5 inches) and a pulse energy energy of up to 80 Millijoules (0.0010 watt seconds). They are good for -32 degrees C to +45 degrees C operation.

Unaligned nations are using IR receivers that decode the marker signal and transmit the codes, in real time, to alternative IR decoy markers which then become the target for the incoming weapons, thereby rendering the 'Precision Guided 500lb Bomb' less ineffective.

So much for 'precision'."

I can't tell whether I've just read a Wikipedia article or an extract from a Tom Clancy novel.

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Swedish appeals court upholds arrest warrant for Julian Assange

DavCrav
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Re: Very few commenters seem to know the facts of this case...

"If you wish to see my sources on the above, visit https://justice4assange.com/assange-case-fact-checker.html

Although it is a pro-julian website, everything listed there can be independently verified if the nay-sayers only chose to do so."

I won't bother going to your website, thanks. Your first 'fact'

"1. The UN formally found in February 2016 that Julian Assange is unlawfully detained by Sweden and the UK."

is false. A UN committee found that Assange was arbitrarily detained, not unlawfully detained. the committee consisted of non-lawyers from a variety of countries, and did not worry itself with concepts like the law.

It is clear that Assange's predicament is neither arbitrary nor detention. The leap of logic they took was that, because Assange cannot leave without being arrested, he is de facto in prison. And because he is 'in prison' according to them, without trial, this detention is therefore arbitrary.

Note that this logic would apply to anyone hiding from the law: taken a few hostages and won't come out? You are being arbitrarily detained by the authorities. It's crazy but hey, sometimes the UN just has to make political points against certain countries, and this is the only way they can do it.

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Delete Google Maps? Go ahead, says Google, we'll still track you

DavCrav
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Joke

Re: eh?

"A charger in the car brings the phone to full function in a few seconds, in the event of car trouble or other unusual circumstance. It doesn't need to charge a bit first"

Unless the car trouble is a flat battery.

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Petulant Facebook claims it can't tell the difference between child abuse and war photography

DavCrav
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"What's next? A picture of a cat fleeing from a burning house will be considered animal abuse?"

Yes, if you deliberately set fire to a house knowing there are cats in there. Of course, arson probably takes precedence.

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DavCrav
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Re: Ummm . . .

"In at least one sense of course this an image of child pornography."

I think if you'd have said 'child abuse' it would have made much more sense.

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Sony wins case over pre-installed Windows software

DavCrav
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"The national court will have to decide whether, when a consumer has been informed before the sale "that the model of computer is not marketed without pre-installed software and that he is therefore free to choose another model of computer, of another brand, with similar technical specifications and sold without software, the ability of that consumer to make an informed transactional decision was appreciably impaired," the CJEU said."

But what if there aren't any? More or less it's impossible to find such brands, so does that change the decision?

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EU court: Linking to pirated stuff doesn't breach copyright... except when it does

DavCrav
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Re: Copy protection for links

"or would the potential user of the link have to mail me, and request the right to use the link?"

I think everyone who wants to click on the link should have to send a letter to the owner of the target address asking permission to click on the link. Permission would normally be granted within 28 days by return of post.

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DavCrav
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Re: Barking up the wrong tree?

"Perhaps what should have happened is 1) a DMCA request to FileFactory and then later via the courts 2) a request for the user details of whoever uploaded the content to go after them."

Dude. This is the EU. DMCA is US law. I'm not sure why you think one matters to the other.

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DavCrav
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Re: A real Renaissance man

"It may be of help remembering that the good man is actually a fairly capable journalist, and thus perfectly able of researching the matter to a degree that he's not talking out of the wrong orifice. I can't speak about the climate things, but I do know he does indeed understand copyright shenanigans."

But he's a journalist that calls some of the most senior judges in Europe 'stupid' because he knows better than they do about copyright law. Maybe we aren't in Gove territory yet, but we are on the same scale.

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When you've paid the ransom but you don't get your data back

DavCrav
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"In my view everyone who uses a computer should be trained in general security, how to spot these emails and made to sign a waiver saying that if an infection is proven to come from them they pay the ransom if no other method of recovery is available. "

You might need to change the law first, as making employees personally liable for costs tends to be frowned upon, at least in the UK.

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DavCrav
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Re: Is it legal to pay this?

"That's no reason why we shouldn't have such a law here as every payout encourages the fraud and puts everybody else at increased threat which even if you have good defences (like avoiding the more risky OS) and solid backup it has knock on consequences.

The fact that the threat is only property and not life makes it indefensible plus the only reason they have been caught is because of BOTH inadequate defence against a well known risk and, even worse. even more inadequate backups. That's gross negligence in my book.

The organisations deserve to suffer the consequences if they don't pay up and if they do - even greater consequences. Making the directors personally culpable may be an encouragement for better and safer practices (speaking as a company director myself)."

You haven't really thought through the consequences of your statements. making paying ransoms illegal will just mean people wouldn't tell the police at all, and it's rare that criminalizing being a victim has worked.

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Hollywood offers Daniel Craig $150m to (slash wrists) play James Bond

DavCrav
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Re: Other colours are available.

"yet no-one ever mentions an Indian, Chinese or Middle Eastern bond?"

I'm not sure about Indian, but how many Chinese and Middle-Eastern people would get through the security clearance procedures, do you think?

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When Irish eyes are filing: Ireland to appeal Europe's $15bn Apple tax claw-back

DavCrav
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Re: What if taxation is inherently unjust?

"What if taxation is inherently unjust?

Think about this with great care. Taxation is unjust, in and of itself. How so? Well there's no guarantee government will return a benefit in direct proportion to what that take by force. What's more, 95% of all taxation comes out of earned incomes, while unearned incomes are virtually untaxed. These unearnds are about the same amount as the earned so would form an ideal alternate tax base. Show me any politician ready to stand up and point this out. Meanwhile, Apple and the Irish government have risen significantly in terms of nobility."

None of what you said makes taxation inherently unjust. At best, it would make our implementation unjust, not the concept itself, so it wouldn't be inherent.

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It's OK to fine someone for repeating a historical fact, says Russian Supreme Court

DavCrav
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"these are all examples of speech that is NORMALLY not protected under free-speech provisions in countries' laws."

"Sorry, but you are wrong. At least in the US, free speech means free speech."

You says I am wrong, then give one example of a country to prove that these are normally not covered under free-speech provisions. I wonder, if I give two examples of countries where I'm right, that makes you double wrong?

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DavCrav
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"Here in Canada we have free speech, yet Holocaust deniers have been convicted of spreading hate. Did any of the cases hinge on such a subtle point of logic? I have not a clue."

Free speech does not allow you to say anything you want. For God's sake, I thought we'd dealt with this when you were five. It does not allow you to phone up the Prime Minister and threaten to kill him, for example. (Most use saying "Fire!" in a crowded theatre", but threats to kill are also not protected speech.) Free speech is only as far as you are not producing harm in others. Threats to kill, denying the murder of millions of people in an obvious attempt at neo-Nazism, deliberate attempts to induce groundless mass panic; these are all examples of speech that is normally not protected under free-speech provisions in countries' laws.

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DavCrav
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"He who controls the past commands the future, He who commands the future, conquers the past."

-- Kane

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Now the Olympics is over, Theranos is withdrawing its Zika test application

DavCrav
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"As with its previous MiniLab claims, the pitch centred on finger-prick blood samples and a device that"

As with finger-prick blood samples, this paragraph that stops mid-sentence doesn't tell the whole story...

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Waze to go, Google: New dial-a-ride Uber, Lyft rival 'won't vet drivers'... What could go wrong?

DavCrav
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Re: Uber saved my ass last weekend

"There's a reason why taxi drivers are primarily immigrants: they're very poorly paid."

They might be poorly paid, but driving a taxi, especially long-distance driving like this, where you don't have to know lots of shortcuts and detailed maps, is one of the least skilled jobs out there, simply requiring a driving licence, which the vast majority of the population have. You would expect it to pay at the extreme lower end of payscales.

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DavCrav
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"For fun we could apply Terry Pratchett's actuarial approach to crime to things like big business' tax avoidance schemes: how many people died in Ireland as a result of underfunded services because Apple, et al. didn't pay the going rate."

None. However, people will have died in other European countries that were fiddled out of their taxes by dodgy Irish tax law and dodgier backroom deals.

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DavCrav
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"I'm not sure why Google would need to vet anyone in that case."

Because it would be trivia for miscreants to offer a lift from one place to somewhere a fair distance away, then mug the person on the side of the motorway? And then Google somehow claims that they bear no responsibility at all for this? At least in the UK, that sort of bullshit doesn't stand up in court.

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Labour's Jeremy Corbyn wants high speed broadband for all. Wow, original idea there

DavCrav
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Re: what level of support would indicate success to you?

"You think the leader of the Opposition is going to influence that very much?"

I'm not going to get into this one here, but note that someone would only have to convince 500,000 people to change their minds. Since the Labour vote was in the region of 10m (I made a typo in a first version of this that said 0m...), he'd only have to convince around a sixth of the Labour voters who voted Leave.

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DavCrav
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Re: Why ?

"The only real solution is to bite the bullet and start rolling FTTH, and if you're doing that, you might as well run it as gigabit - there's no technical reason you wouldn't. Of course business considerations demand that you choke it down to 10Mb/s and charge through the nose for the "upgrade" to 70Mb/s on a line which could trivially link at gigabit, but that's by the by. The only sane upgrade that leaves you overhead for tomorrow's demands is fibre - and you're going to run fibre at gigabit as a baseline."

As you said, the idea that anyone would install copper on newbuild now, especially at $4500/tonne, is crazy. Retrofitting FTTH will be expensive, none of this £25bn that's tossed around. But the point is 30Mb, 100Mb, 1Gb, it'll all look pretty shit in twenty years time. 1Gb is only about 30 times faster than 'standard' 30Mb, so by my earlier rough guesstimate, just using current growth we'd be looking at needing to upgrade that again in ten-fifteen years time.

One thing I can see that's going to need the next round of upgrades is deep learning. If we start using deep learning on lots of things, for example robots in houses and so on, they might well be transmitting and receiving large amounts of data: if a standard robot has ten cameras, each filming at UltraHD rates to send somewhere for analysis, that'll need a reasonable bandwidth.

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DavCrav
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Re: A money-saving expert writes...

"What happened to the study that reckoned the cost of laying fibre everywhere could be paid for by selling the copper that was taken up?"

It went the same place as the price of copper: down the drain. Today copper is $4500/tonne, in 2013 it was $7000/tonne.

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DavCrav
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Re: Why ?

"I have the cheapest available DSL where I live, which gives me 1.7 MB/s.

I can download films 10 times faster than I can watch them.

Does the average person *really* need 2MB/s, let alone GB/s ?"

Coming to the defence of the downvoted person, all people afterwards seem to miss that he wrote MB/s, not Mb/s. So he has around 15Mb/s, and that's easily enough for SD and even HD programming.

I personally think about 30Mb/s, so around 4MB/s, is easily enough for almost everybody right now, and perhaps we should be looking at getting more people onto 30Mb/s rather than upgrading my broadband speed in Birmingham *again* (with concomitant price increases, naturally) to something like 100Mb/s (I just tested and get 76Mb/s on WiFi, never mind wired).

Of course, one problem is that we will probably only get to do this once, so we should produce a network with room for improvement. The trouble is, this technology has changed a lot, and it's not like electricity, gas, water and telephone, where the original rollouts are more or less still fine. A 'broadband' rollout in 1996, so just 20 years ago, would have been on the 'gold standard' of ISDN, delivering a whopping 128kb/s download. We are now looking at speeds 300 times faster or more, so how rusty is this broadband network going to look in 2036?

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Replacing humans with robots in your factories? Hold on just a sec

DavCrav
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Re: Asimov.

"A robot may not injure a human being or, through inaction, allow a human being to come to harm."

What about if it topples over and falls on someone? I think that might be more the safety issues than they accidentally run amok.

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DavCrav
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Re: The good news is

"pretty much anybody with "agent" in their title , cos that pretty much means "middleman skimming off some money before passing the work on""

Some jobs that might still not be replaced by robots in the near future:

Secret agent

Agent provocateur (more of a role than a job)

Special agent

Agent orange.

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UK watchdog: You. Facebook. Get over here now. This WhatsApp privacy update. Explain

DavCrav
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Re: The problem as ever is other people

"people kept at arm's length are not close enough to stab you in the back"

Depends if they have longer arms than you. And Facebook has very long arms.

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Uber lost $7m a DAY in the first half of this year

DavCrav
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"yet they throw $16 Billion dollars for WhatsApp"

It was actually $19bn, but that's only a $3bn difference, a piffling amount by these idiots' standards really.

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DavCrav
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Re: Not my idea of a 'sharing economy'

"trouser profits monstrously disproportionate to what they put in"

Or in this case, lose $7m a day.

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Facebook, Twitter and Google are to blame for terrorism, say MPs

DavCrav
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Re: Just because you haven't seen it doesn't mean its not there

"This report is a load of crap"

I take it you read it then?

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DavCrav
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""slick and effective propaganda machine being run by Daesh"

I must have missed that. The only propoganda [sic] I've seen has been along the lines of "Join us and you get to rape and murder innocent foreigners (fellow Muslims mainly, but don't worry, they aren't *proper* ones) for a year or so before being bludgeoned yourself by the armed forces of the countries you've chosen to attack.".

The evidence is that this appeals to at most a few hundred disaffected teenagers out of a population of millions, who are resistant to the counter-propoganda [sic] not only of their own age group but also their parents and wider family. So yeah, they're really going to sit up and take notice if The Government starts telling them what to do.

So did the whole select committe [sic] sign up to this verdict, or are some of them *not* utter cretins?"

The problem with this viewpoint, and it's not just your viewpoint but held by a lot of people in the UK, is that more or less every fact and piece of information in it is false. Let's start with this:

"I must have missed that. The only propoganda [sic] I've seen has been along the lines of "Join us and you get to rape and murder innocent foreigners (fellow Muslims mainly, but don't worry, they aren't *proper* ones) for a year or so before being bludgeoned yourself by the armed forces of the countries you've chosen to attack."."

I thought it was well known that Daesh has a large social media presence with many audio and video releases of high quality, but it appears not. They are very good at it, and strangely enough don't mention any of the downsides when asking people to sign up.

"The evidence is that this appeals to at most a few hundred disaffected teenagers out of a population of millions, who are resistant to the counter-propoganda [sic] not only of their own age group but also their parents and wider family. So yeah, they're really going to sit up and take notice if The Government starts telling them what to do."

No. The UK, despite having many more Muslims of a background that would suggest susceptibility to propaganda, sends fewer fighters to Syria than Germany, per head of population, and half as many as France. The evidence is there that Prevent, working alongside the other three strands of the strategy (Pursue, Protect and Prepare), succeeded in lowering the terrorism and extremism threat that faces the UK.

"So did the whole select committe [sic] sign up to this verdict, or are some of them *not* utter cretins?"

You've been reading about this for at least ten minutes, and read the whole of this article, so of course you know more than the people in the Select Committee about this, who only had these boring briefing papers and reams of documents to leaf through.

I really do fail to see why the general population, who normally have no particular knowledge of an area, think that they are equally qualified to voice an opinion about a topic as those whose job it is to work in the area, and furthermore to brand them as 'utter cretins' on the basis of the flimsiest of evidence. This anti-expertise-ism lay at the heart of Michael Gove's 'Britain has had enough of experts' statement. What do experts know, with their education, years and experience and knowledge of the area? You can prove anything with facts.

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DavCrav
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Re: muppetry

"As for "Prevent" -- it is toxic and needs to be very publicly killed."

It is toxic, but this appears to be at least partially down to lies, half-truths, misunderstandings and propaganda in the discussion of it. Statistically Prevent has been a reasonable, but not a runaway, success, resulting in for example significantly fewer Daesh fanatical runaway children than in similar countries like France and Germany. It is currently being Sellafielded/Accentured, having its name (but nothing else) changed to remove previous stains.

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DavCrav
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Re: re: and there was me thinking it was mainly down to religion.

"Foreign policy, by which I mean invading foreign nations, is surely as much to blame. Greed is behind a lot of our bad policy desicions [sic].

How would you feel if another country's military arrived and destroyed our government? What steps would seem reasonable in retaliation?"

Attacking the citizens of a country that hasn't done anything (Germany)? Seems like a perfectly reasonable thing to do.

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DavCrav
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Re: This is a joke?

"As for "plac[ing] the blame for young Muslims being “radicalised” on those operating social media sites" - this precludes the idea that anyone can actually think for themselves and come to their own conclusions."

I somehow feel that nobody sane would "think for themselves" and come to the conclusion that what they really should do is drive a lorry through crowds of people. So either, of all crazy people, it just happens to be mostly Muslim crazy people who do this type of mass killing (although not always, see for example the Germanwings pilot, Breivik, etc., but Muslims are massively over-represented in the crazy mass killings stakes here), or someone somewhere is radicalizing them, helping the mildly crazy people move on to the proper unhinged level they need to be at to think that machine gunning a bunch of people is all OK.

Since it isn't a sane response to US military policy to attack people with an axe on a train in Germany, I think you are wrong, at least about most of the people committing terrorist acts in Europe.

"and in particular “should refrain from using the term ‘so-called Islamic State’, and should instead refer to ‘Daesh’." - Oh yes, calling people names is both very grown-up and proven to be an effective deterrent."

What are you on about? Daesh is the Arabic acronym for ISIS/ISIL/IS. I think the reason he wants to move from those and towards Daesh is to dissociate in people's mind the organization Daesh and 'Islam' as a concept. So the opposite of calling people names.

"but I don't support politicians who treat me like an idiot either."

And yet you think using the term Daesh instead of IS is somehow calling people names.

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Corbyn lied, Virgin Trains lied, Harambe died

DavCrav
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Re: FTFY

"Dont think this BLM is two sided as they are notoriously quiet when blacks (persons of colour or whatver PC moniker fits) shoot other blacks. Or whites. You wont see BLM protesting then."

What exactly would they be protesting against though? You cannot reasonably protest against the existence of Steve, who shot someone. And generally if Steve shoots someone (and he is caught) there's one of these trial things that the West seems to love to have when crimes are committed. I think one reason BLM protests is not because cops shoot innocent people, it's that cops shoot innocent people and then nothing happens.

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DavCrav
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"It was made clear at the time that there were spaces in 1st class - but Corbyn chose not to upgrade (because most people can't afford to, and the taxpayer is paying for it)."

The taxpayer had better have not been paying for it, which he did I think imply at some point. This was a Labour Party hustings and not government business, so if he claimed it off the taxpayer he should be up in front of the beak.

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DavCrav
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"BBC interviewed a woman where she stated that unlike what the CCTV seemed to imply, there were no vacant seats. Sounds like the author is a tad biased?"

Woman on BBC who swears it really really happened vs CCTV footage. Hmm, which can we believe?

It's like when black guys are shot in the US when "reaching for a gun", and the CCTV footage "seems to imply" they did nothing of the sort.

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Paper mountain, hidden Brexit: How'd you say immigration control would work?

DavCrav
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"This article continues a trend of Brexist articles in The Reg"

Aw, diddums, did the nasty man with the facts make you upset again?

"and like the others it makes out that minor issues are major problems."

Minor issues like immigration? I thought that was pretty important to most of the people who voted to leave.

"Any argument that free trade requires open borders is simply untrue. Consider any non-EU country with whom we currently have trade tariffs and immigration controls. If the trade tariff is gradually reduced to zero, the relationship with that country does not change in any way that would now require free movement of people. Claiming that free movement of people is a prerequisite for free trade is an outright lie."

Blah blah blah. It is not a logical requirement to have free movement of people, money, goods and services (the four freedoms) in order to have freedom of movement of one of them, but the EU has made it a political requirement. It's not that they can't give you tariff-free access to the Single Market, it's that they won't.

Let's use an analogy: in the Scottish referendum, the SNP claimed that after independence England would continue to act as lender of last resort to Scottish banks. The rest of the UK told them to stuff off. It's not that it was physically impossible to act as such, they just refused.

Damn people and their free will.

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Password strength meters promote piss-poor paswords

DavCrav
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"PS. Don't smarter password systems detect the "just append something to the old password" approach?"

I remember mentioning this the last time there was an article here about password stupidity. If you are only storing a hash of the previous password, you could maybe check a couple of characters added or subtracted, so see password1 from password or password2, but other than that it would take a very long time to check the hashes. Now, I've never set up a password checking system, but are the passwords hashed on the client side or the server side? If it's the client side, you cannot even do what I said above.

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Adblock Plus blocks Facebook block of Adblock Plus block of Facebook block of Adblock Plus block of Facebook ads

DavCrav
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"We're disappointed that ad blocking companies are punishing people on Facebook, as these new attempts don't just block ads but also posts from friends and Pages,"

Hold on, isn't this like a hostage taker shooting someone and then saying that the police really did it by not giving him what he wanted?

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Broken BitBank Bitfinex shaves 36% from all accounts

DavCrav
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Re: In the 'sharing economy' *you* pay when sites get hacked

The weird thing about BHS is everybody talks about the £600m odd that Green took out of it over the course of his ownership, noting how similar it sounds to the pension deficit of about £600m (not any more thanks to Brexit lowering gilt yields) but forget to mention the £600m-odd that Green spent on BHS, in terms of buying it, writing off loans and injections of capital. (He sold BHS for £1 with £64m in cash in its accounts, and over £100m in property, bought BHS for £200m, wrote off £210m in loans, etc.)

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If you use ‘smart’ Bluetooth locks, you're asking to be burgled

DavCrav
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Re: Masterlock: keeping standards as low as possible

"A few good whacks with a hammer (or a brick if you cannot risk getting lifted for going equipped) and the whole thing breaks apart."

Out of interest, if plod catches you with half a housebrick in your pocket at 1am, do you think the excuse "I'm a builder" is going to work any more than it would if you were caught with a hammer?

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