* Posts by Adam Jarvis

265 posts • joined 17 Nov 2007

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ISS pump-up space podule fully engorged

Adam Jarvis
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The Glastonbury Module

Given what gets left in tents at Glastonbury, I'm sure the Astronauts/Cosmonauts/new recruits will be sligthly wary entering that module in a few months time.

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NASA: We'll try again in the morning after friction ruins engorgement

Adam Jarvis
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The Glastonbury Module

It should really be given the honorary nickname 'The Glastonbury Module', hope that sticks.

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Boring SpaceX lobs another sat into orbit without anything blowing up ... zzzzz

Adam Jarvis
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Speeded up view from Stage 1's perspective of landing.

https://youtu.be/4jEz03Z8azc

Impressive how it stops the spin, very early on. Then well, just nails it!

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Microsoft force-feeds Win10

Adam Jarvis
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Its about time the RNIB took MS to Court, for disability discrimination.

In the UK, the upgrade notification process seems to be in clear breach of the Equality Act 2010.

An organisation such the RNIB (Royal National Institute for Blind People) really needs to start a prosecution against Microsoft under the Equality Act 2010.

Does no one at Microsoft Marketing realise their responsibilities to People less fortunate than them?

(Sends all the wrong messages and undermines the hard work other teams at Microsoft have done regarding the Ease of Access Centre, can't someone in that team at least highlight this)

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90 days of Android sales almost beat 9 months' worth for all flavours of Win 10

Adam Jarvis
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Its about time the RNIB took them to Court, for disability discrimination.

An organisation such the RNIB (Royal National Institute for Blind People) really needs to start a prosecution against Microsoft under the Equality Act 2010.

Does no one at Microsoft realise their responsibilities to People less fortunate than them?

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Microsoft shifts Windows 7 and 8.1 fixes to 'rollup' bundles

Adam Jarvis
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Re: 187 updates

Sounds like you used Paragon Hard Disk Manager.

Paragon Hard Disk Manager 12 works (32bit-linux bootable ver) will work with non-PAE processors still, Paragon Hard Manager 14/15 (linux bootable ver) switched to PAE processors only. Try an older version if you can, HDM12 will work with Windows 7. Its one of those quirk's thats worth knowing,

(Linux Based recovery tools (getting underneath Windows) are the support life line to Windows. I'd have ditched Windows completely years ago, if you couldn't backup/restore Images via linux, to save re-installing Windows.

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Adam Jarvis
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Re: Time for a test, I think...

You have a program GWX Control Panel that is actively preventing MS runnng 'their code'/preventing installing recommended updates (the updates which, are trying to force Windows 10 on you) from installing.

I said this before, I expected GWX Control panel to be marked by MS Security Essentials as Malware and be removed, it will probably happen sometime in July, which would see a 'nice uptick' (in their eyes) for MS, before the end of July.

MS want GWX Control Panel removed from Windows machines, make no mistake.

...and have the tools in place (MS security essentials), to remove it.

(Maybe GWX Control Panel should be nicknamed 'Swampy' given its good intentions against the forced rollout by a Multinational company)

PS. 'Swampy' was a person who protested against the building of the A30 in Devon the 1980s, by locking his arms through underground tunnels, to prevent the build from taking place,

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Adam Jarvis
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This method doesn't work for restored images. Also, the original KB3102810 (rather than its update KB3138612) still works for a fresh install.

The reason I stick to the older one, is it works still, the only thing MS would be adding to its successor is more ways to prevent you restoring Windows 7 from an image, so that Windows 10 upgrades are a one way path (once the 30 days are up).

KB3102810 was released to solve the problem of slow updates, I'm not sure the newer versions of it have the same intentions.

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Adam Jarvis
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Re: Yes, well...

Joel,

If its a new install KB3102810 still works for fresh installs (but it no longer works for restored Disk images)

There is a knack to it though.

On completing a fresh install of Windows 7 SP1.

Select Manual updates (Check for updates but let me choose whether to download and install them)

Deselect - Give me recommended updates the same way I receive important updates check box.

Check for updates, allow it to install the new version of Windows Update, this will close Windows Update and relaunch the Window, once the new Window 'checking for updates' relaunches, shutdown and restart the machine. Once rebooted Apply KB3102810 (you need to manually download this).

Once applied, check for updates again.

This should take not longer than 8 minutes on an SSD with fast internet connection 20Mbps+.

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UK digital minister denies legal right to 10Mbps is 'damp squib'

Adam Jarvis
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Re: Lets Cap all Senior BT Management and Politicians.

If BT want to invest in G.fast that fine, but its not a technology the UK taxpayer should be backing.

FTTrN / FTTdP are pilot projects, not real deployments in the UK at the moment, and none are self powered using redundant copper cores (as has been suggested, UK Health and Safety sees to that) , the schemes currently rely on the same power supplies as existing larger FTTC cabinets (it may have changed but that was the case initially, and powering the units was a key problem in the pilot project).

None of the pilots are on the scale of deploying 25 FTTC / FTTrN /FTTdp (cabs/Pole Equipment per 2Km2, to give blanket coverage at 330Mbps speeds.

You're completely missing the point - per 2Km2 area (thats are very small dot on the map of the UK), you need to install 25 FTTC/FTTrN/FTTdP cabs/Pole Equipment to blanket cover to achieve speeds of 330Mbps for everyone in that 2Km2.

If the general public knew that, I doubt they would be wanting to back it as taxpayers, because they realise that sort of deployment is never going to happen Rurally. They'd understand the fundamentals, that its a lot of equipment to maintain for such a small area, to achieve a relatively modest outcome regards headline broadband speeds (even if you do later, as you suggested to tweak it up slightly, with modified protocols)

I don't accept G.fast represents the solution for Faster Broadband services going forward, either been cheaper, but more regards its shelf life , with its lack of ability to ramp up to Ultrafast speeeds.

Everything you have stated is theoretical Lab stuff, that doesn't work the same, when you potentially have Welsh Hills / Scottish Mountains / Wind swept roads - water logged junction boxes, multiple cable connections, parallel cables over a distance (crosstalk), aswell as multiple protocols in adjacent cabling - it just doesn't stack up in the real world to achieve those sort of 5Gbps speeds your proposing, over copper. And that theoretical 5Gbps you talk about is over distance as short a 20m max (which you fail to mention the shorter cable distances, to achieve higher speeds, inherent part of G.fast).

I've already stated why apathy will set in, because its impossible for the average subscriber to fathom why they are suffering from a slow internet connection. More needs to be done in this area. Its not helped by Ofcom's acceptance of the inherent 'upto' characteristics of BT's FTTC technology.

(Odd also to have the Managing Director & Chief Executive Officer - Vodafone India Ltd, sticking up for BT FTTC/G.fast plans too, if that's who you are),

Thanks for taking the time to reply, but can't agree with your sentiment at all regarding so called errors, the fundamentals/essence of what I'm saying is correct. 'Yes men' will say different.

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Adam Jarvis
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Re: Lets Cap all Senior BT Management and Politicians.

The biggest reality check you need is how quick 330Mbps services will be the 'norm' / expected service level by subscribers and how little leeway BT will have with FTTC over copper going foward and the flak they get will be a lot worse than today, when People/Companies can't compete against Countries with a real Fibre Networks.

Once you have a UltraFast 1Gbps+ connection and have to go back, boy, do the complaints start.

'The let's get rid of Copper' enthusiasts have fought backward looking People like you for years and years.

I heard the same with ADSL roll-out, from Regional Development Agencies - 10 years ago. Remember vividly been told 'There is no chance a small little market town will ever get ADSL, its just not needed, no one is interested'.

This is by people that are supposed to be forward looking business types FFS.

Look at it now, everything delivered online, by Amazon and others. Order 10pm, get at your door 9am next day. Everyone in my road using either ADSL2+/VDSL2+ 80/20 Broadband (even the technically illiterate ones), wondering how they ever coped without it.

BT have 'kept their hands in the pockets' resisting change, every single time from:

28Kbps Dial up PAYG,

to 56Kbps Dial up PAYG,

to 56Kbps (Unlimited),

to 64Kbps ISDN,

to Bonded 128Kbps Home Highway,

to 512Kbps ADSL,

to 2048Kbps ADSL,

(avoided 'expensive' Syncronous SDSL Networks, saying not required for consumer use)

to 8192Kbps ADSL,

to 24Mbps ADSL2+,

to 40Mbps VDSL (BTInfinity),

to 80Mbps VDSL2+ (BTInfinity2).

And so on, always saying the next higher speeds aren't needed, taxpayers need to fund this, if we are to move forward.

Adding in traffic shaping / network management as these services launched, its the same approach everytime, holding back the tide of change, heavily advertising the older technologies like Home Highway, at the time 512Kbps ADSL was launching. BT have to be dragged kicking and screaming everytime to the next logical step, always looking for handouts, saying its just not competitive to invest (yet reaps most of the 1Bn+ profits once the taxpayer stumps up the cash)

As said, Copper is not a solution to lines of more than 250m in length, in terms of Ultrafast 1Gbps+ Services, so why are we spending vast amounts on a dead end copper based technology, that can't make the leap to faster network speeds without been ripped out, to start the process again (and all the upheaval that entails), it won't be seemless.

We were told FTTP 6 years ago was coming by BT to an exchange for areas on the outskirts, everytime the ball has been kicked back into the grass, in the hope the FTTrN / FTTdP is the 'golden solution' to this problem, when its still on the drawing board.

BT covering the bases, hovering over the dead carcass of their copper network, in case anyone decided to think about laying actual FTTP, in the same way B4RN has been successful.

Why is BT replacing end of life Copper with Copper.

Why is BT been sneaky, replacing Copper lines with 0.9mm copper to 'just meet contract specs' , for longer lines, rather than do the right thing as part of the Superfast Broadband Programmes and install Proper Fibre, which was the clearly the point of the programme. (That's just pure public deception)

Why isn't their a programme, where streets that are due to have their Poles/Circuits replaced, are upgraded to true Fibre. Why is the taxpayer having to subsidise this twice?

There is only one person deluded (stuck in the past) round here and it ain't me.

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Adam Jarvis
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Re: Lets Cap all Senior BT Management and Politicians.

The BT solution is no better, and isn't value for money in the longer term, some would say its dishonest/obfuscates in what it portrays as technically achievable with FTTC/G.Fast.

BT offers little hope to the notspots in the UK.

To cherry pick, to obfuscate actual achievable speeds (with the direct blessing of Regulator Ofcom to accept this obfuscation as been an inherent characteristic of FTTC 'upto' speeds), to play down the technical complexity / the exponential increase in roll-out of Cabs/Pole equipment required to achieve blanket G.Fast 330Mbps coverage using current FTTC technologies. To fail to mention the increased maintenance costs / increased line rentals required from maintaining the legacy dead carcass copper network.

It also avoids mentioning the complexity of what happens when the G.Fast bottleneck/brick wall is hit - the technical limits of FTTC/G.fast 330Mbps is reached and if and how the demands for 1Gbps+ services will be implemented.

That transition won't be cheap. Most believe the topology of the network design won't be suitable at that point, for the transition to true optical fibre - FTTP.

And that's the point, for lines longer than 250m, its already obvious that Legacy Copper / G.Fast doesn't fit the bill in terms of future Ultrafast 1Gbps+ services, going forward, so why not start to get it right now for those longer rural lines, because we know today, FTTP is inevitable for these lines, its going to be a slow process, but its a start.

Let's stop the lies and deceit (with Ofcoms backing) that somehow G.Fast is going to magically solve the problem of long lines and slow internet. It won't.

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Adam Jarvis
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Re: Gravy train

->Both are solved. The kit is available to buy from Alcatel Lucent.

If it was solved and available to buy, why are BT dragging their feet, regarding their previous commitment to FTTP rollout as part of the Welsh Superfast Cymru Broadband Programme?

Is that kit directly compatible with Huawei FTTC kit? (Most of BT's FTTC network)

Assuming a firmware update will solve that (yes, and its something else that needs to be maintained, along with both the Copper power feeds and the Pole fed Fibre).

--------------------------------

OK, so explain what (do) you need to get blanket coverage of 330Mbps (not 'upto' speeds, blanket coverage at 330Mbps using FTTC - not cherry picking), how many FTTC/FTTdp/FTTrN(s) are involved to do that per 2km2?.

Go on, I'm all ears. Let's get this out in the open.

I think its about right, you need around 25 FTTC or newer equivalent FTTrN/FTTdP Cabs/Pole Mounts per 2Km2 (with some overlap) to get true G.Fast speeds of 330Mbps, to get blanket coverage (not 'upto' speeds) with a maximum distance of 125m (crow flies), 250m by cable, in real world conditions.

You (Mr BT representive) sell this as a solution to rural broadband, but its just not going to happen and its a crap foundation to building a robust future network for Britain.

Subscribers will never get blanket 330Mbps coverage (it maxes out 330Mbps at 250m distance), because apathy will set in, already has to a point with FTTC at 'upto' 80Mbps.

Why has Apathy set in? because BT/ofcom have made it almost impossible for a consumer/subscriber to work out the reason for a slow connections, often signing up to 80/20 FTTC finding they get 50Mbps at best, 5Mbps at peak times, with contention, traffic shaping, ping latency and if not traffic shaping - traffic shaping by another name - network management kicking in to maintain the network.

The complexity 'sweating' of FTTC is all designed to gouge the Customer/Subscriber.

There is no logical extension of FTTC G.fast technology after been sweated/maxed to 330Mbps. To jump to 1Gbps speeds and above, without bonding copper lines (which has the same expense of connecting true fibre to the subscriber) - You hit a wall in terms of speed with G.fast, hence why its a Cul-de-Sac Technology.

G.Fast is a dead end technology from the start, if BT want to promote it - fine, but it sounds more and more like BT are looking again at future subsidies to roll out G.Fast.

We need a network that isn't beholden to BT and paying subsidies to them, each time they perform an incremental upgrade, which is what we have now (and going forward) which could have been avoided from the start by proper investment/proper legislative framework, which didn't involve subsidising BT's legacy copper dead carcass of a network.

Once over a barrel, always over a barrel.

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Adam Jarvis
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Re: Gravy train

Then imagine the maintenance costs regards maintaining 25 FTTC cabinets (more likely still theoretical FTTdP / FTTrN Equipment) per 2km2, keeping firmware between customers equipment and the DSLAM equipment upto date, with potential for rogue firmware routers to cause interference/cross talk, the practicalities of maintaining this can of worms is just crazy and expensive. Fault finding will become a nightmare.

And that's why Rurally its never going to happen. Notspots will remain Notspots if we carry on with FTTC. Yes, you can target certain areas with FTTC, but en masse Ultrafast is never going to happen.

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Adam Jarvis
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Re: Gravy train

You need an exponential rise in the number of FTTC cabinets in a 2km2 area to achieve an average 100Mbps speed per customer, its just not feasible using FTTC. Thats why its known as a Cul-de-Sac Technology, to upgrade it, you need to reverse out (of the Cul-de-Sac) and mostly start again, to achieve 1Gbps average speeds using real fibre.

Per 2km2, you need to add a minimum of 8 cabinets to reduce the maximum line length to 500m (as the crow flies), from a maximum line length of 1km (as the crow flies) per 2Km2 area.

To achieve G.Fast at 330Mbps you probably need a maximum line length of 250m by cable.

If you plan it so you meet in the middle, you have your 250m distance (as the crow flies), but cable routes are not that structured or straightforward, and often quoted as twice the length. To half this distance still further to 125m, you then need another 16 FTTC cabinets per 2km2.

That makes a total of 25 FTTC cabinets per 2km2, each cabinet having a maximum line length (as the crow flies) of 125m, which by cable would give you a more realistic 250m distance to meet the G.Fast quoted speeds of 330Mbps.

The Cabinets on the edges of the theoretical 2km2 area would in theory, feed the adjacent areas, so there is some overlap, but you still need 25 Cabinets (connected to Power too) per 2km2. for near Ultrafast speeds en masse for everyone, by that I mean not 'upto' but actually 330Mbps for everyone. 1Gbps speeds - well you just need to lay real Fibre, and chuck out everything you have so far.

It would be better to show it as a diagram, I have to say. Basically the whole wonderful Ultrafast 330Mbps G.Fast Technology parade by BT and Ofcom is utter tosh (being polite), its never going to happen, well not in the next decade. It will need some serious miniaturisation/clever self powering to achieve it.

The point being, if they knew it was going to be this complicated to achieve faster speeds why were the likes of ofcom hoodwinked into going down this route, other than technical incompetence, dare I say - bribery/greasy palms.

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Adam Jarvis
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Lets Cap all Senior BT Management and Politicians.

Lets Cap all Senior BT Management, Ofcom numpties, Politicians to a random and patchy 'upto' 10Mbps for a year, better still, make that 2Mbps - see how they cope. Nothing like forcing them to eat their own dog food.

Interesting how Ed Vaizey, toes the BT line, mentions top speeds of 100Mbps (which is within BT's remit for FTTC (just), not FTTP speeds of 1Gbps and up). In other words read that, as your stuck with FTTC for at least the next generation.

BT are going to sweat their copper to buggery, before they give in to laying real Fibre to the Premises, with all that entails. Unreliable, expensive to maintain - connections, upto speeds, contention issues, weather dependent services. FTTC is a legacy Cul-de-Sac technology Britain is now stuck with, while other Countries just lay proper fibre. What a Mess.

FTTC needs an massive exponential increase in FTTC Cabinets, to achieve a mass roll out to achieve average speeds of 100Mbps, its expensive (so expensive it will never be done especially rurally), each FTTC Cab needs a dedicated connection to the Mains/Grid, with the rental that entails.

We had a choice, and we definitely made the wrong one, regards backing BT/FTTC-copper based technologies, as taxpayers.

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Acronis testing blockchain for backup

Adam Jarvis
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File Formats...

You can always open an Excel 97-2003 '.xls' in LibreOffice though, handles the file as well as any non-Windows version of Microsoft Office, i.e. MSOffice for Android, iOS etc.

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Official: Microsoft's 'Get Windows 10' nagware to vanish from PCs in July

Adam Jarvis
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Re: W10 not all bad

->I find the most annoying thing about Windows are the lengthy updates

Especially when you can install Linux Mint 17.3 (to fully updated, updates applied during install) from a USB/ISO Installer in the time it takes MIcrosoft to find and update the definitions for Windows Defender, FFS.

Windows 10 really needs to stop trying to impress, get back in the background, become 'boring' again where it belongs, its an OS, to enable you to do things, not an entity in itself. Boring is good, you can still appreciate something/someone who quietly gets on with their job.

Windows Update is like someone flailing arms their arms, everytime you ask them to do something.

There is a lot Microsoft could learn from the latest Linux Mint approach to Interface design, house-keeping.

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Adam Jarvis
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Modern Interfaces have designed-in 'annoyance'.

Comparing the History of Road Building, with the History of Computing, we've reached the equivalent point in history at which Speed Bumps were invented and implemented.

There is nothing new from here on (everything will take longer from now on), its all about revenue streams / 'bumping heads', tripping up People so they pay fines/generate revenue.

And its not just Microsoft, Google's Privacy Check-up is the most irritating interface ever designed, purposely designed that way so you don't turn off Google's data slurping. Its actually a total of 30 clicks to turn off all settings, which could be achieved in a tenth of that (and be persistent, not stored as a 'Cookie').

Firefox's new tab feature exactly the same, (how many go straight to options to make the new tab a blank page)

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Google slaps Siri with Assistant and Amazon with Home device

Adam Jarvis
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Never had divorced Parents?, well you have now.

The future is voice because as a technology its difficult to Open Source. (Cloud based AI core voice interface engines)

We're heading back to the 1980's/proprietary systems/lock-in. No one will understand you better (the same) than either Google AI - Voice, Microsoft Cortana, or Apple Siri, but like a family feud, none of them will talk to each other.

It will be a bit like chatting to each of your divorced Parents.

Google realise this is their future, because its how to continue to control the Search market.

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GCHQ's Twitter move: Wants to be 'accessible', people to 'understand'

Adam Jarvis
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Re: Who pays?

Recruitment? If you're really good at Security, only a fool would take their salaries...and not sure they will manage to employ anyone (going forward) with any moral high ground, given the way Snowden has been treated, but maybe that's the idea.

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Ofcom is keeping schtum over BT Openreach plans until end of year

Adam Jarvis
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Narcissistic Regulators

If you think @ofcom are bad, just try dealing with @ofgem regards energy suppliers such as @CoopEnergy which are a complete and utter shambles and have been for 14 months now, with no improvement. Not a single sanction against them, all swept under the carpet. (Just see the historical @CoopEnergy twitter feed)

The fundamental problem with regulators in the UK, is (like the South Yorkshire Police force with regards Hillsborough) are narcissistic organisations that actually care more about their own reputation and funding, than actually dealing with inherent problems/issues, that really need dealing with.

Because dealing with it, brings the problem into the mainstream/public domain, along with the bad publicity that also brings. So if they can fob you off, pretend they are doing a good job-keep the status quo, they will, everytime.

Basically it reflects badly on the regulator, so they prefer the sweep under the carpet method, kick the ball into the long grass. The cross employment opportunities between Regulator @ofcom and BT really needs to be severely curtailed too.

Could we be in a worse situation regards future FTTP/Mobile mast rollout in the UK if @ofcom didn't exist, I doubt it.

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A cracked window on the International Space Station? That's not good

Adam Jarvis
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Re: Don't worry...

Nah...Microsoft Windows wouldn't be Windows, without a few holes in it.

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Linux 4.6 now a week away

Adam Jarvis
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Windows 7 Checking for Updates...

I'm sure even Satya Nadella is testing Linux 4.6 right now ('so to speak' ; yep, we know where you're going with things), given how fed up everyone has become waiting for the borked clunky code of Windows 7 (and to a lesser extent 10) to check for updates.

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IE and Graphics head Microsoft's Patch Tuesday critical list

Adam Jarvis
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Re: Do keep up, people!

Dropbox works for that scenario, sharing files across Android, Chrome and Linux Mint, so probably not a good example (as it shows up the limitations of OneDrive, which needs to work in a few more places first)

You just waste hours with Windows 10, due to forced updates, or you can waste hours just waiting for updates with Windows 7. Choices, Choices.

Windows 10 resurrected the old chestnut of the Synaptics Touchpad driver v19 this month, to overwrite the older working version Synaptics Touchpad Driver v15, which allows two finger scrolling.

(This was an annoying issue on release of Win10 July15, as it kept reinstalling itself (as it does again)).

The hardware - manual driver update setting (System->Advanced System Settings->Hardware Tab) only seems to work if you install the existing driver via 'Browse my Computer..Let me pick'.

It doesn't prevent the Synaptics Driver v19 reinstalling itself again if you use 'rollback to the previous' - Synaptics v15 driver, even with manual driver updates selected. (Another example of rushed coding by MS)

I assume the reason - MS are/were getting Paranoid by all the two finger gestures they were getting, via Telemetry.

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Intel has driven a dagger through Microsoft's mobile strategy

Adam Jarvis
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You say that...

You say that, but when it comes to it, when users genuinely have the choice, having a nice slim aesthetic phone that fits in your pocket and looks good, wins the money ever time, in terms of sales, over chunky phones with a slightly better battery life. Yep there is a market for chunky phones but its a lot smaller.

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US data suggests Windows 10 adoption in business is slowing

Adam Jarvis
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Re: It's a disgrace!

Given the methods Microsoft are using, you can see now why they didn't call it Windows 9 / ('Nein').

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Intel loses its ARM wrestling match, kicks out Atom mobe chips

Adam Jarvis
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Re: Collateral damage?

Windows Phone is (was already) Dead. Universal Apps? Not so important now, so a lot of dead wood already in Windows 10, making Windows 7 look the leaner choice, trouble is, MS has now purposely 'borked' Windows Update for Windows 7, making it unusable if you reinstall, restore from an Image. Manually installing KB3102810 worked for a while, not now.

MS literally seem to be putting a hammer to Windows 7SP1 to kill it.

Microsoft have always biased themselves towards Intel, this time it appears Microsoft is having the rug pulled from under them, but maybe Intel saw the writing on the wall, and pulled the plug first.

This stems back to 2012, Microsoft failing to upgrade WinPhone 7 users to Windows 8 Mobile, then getting caught trying to do the same with Windows 10 Mobile, getting asked the question directly and stating 'No - everyone will get a free upgrade' , then realising this wasn't technically possible.

It looks like Joe Belfiore took the can for that one.

I'm sure someone will describe it as 'growing pains' though its more getting old pains.

What a Mess.

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Adam Jarvis
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Don't see Intel succeeding at IoTs.

Raspberry PI is a seed that will be flowering fully in about 5 years, both Industry controllers and Education. Intel's IOTs idea is a non starter, even now. You don't need an Intel processor to do IOTs.

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Microsoft's Windows 10 nagware storms live TV weather forecast

Adam Jarvis
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Aesop's Fables: The North Wind and the Sun. If only there had been Sunshine forecast.

I posted this previously (Aesop's Fables: The North Wind and the Sun) but its a little more omnious now, well, now we have this Video.. ;)

"..has been indicating heavy amounts of rainfall" (if only it was Sunshine, poor MS) "across South West Iowa. Argh, Microsoft recommends upgrade to Windows 10, Argh, What should I do? Don't you love it when that pops up. Argh. Erm. Hmmm..".

"The Winds have been vey gusty overnight aswell. Its that Windows 10 right, that's what people are going it say - Don't do it!"

Here again, if you missed it last time (esp. for Microsoft)

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Aesop's Fables: The North Wind and the Sun

(Have the folk at Microsoft never heard of it? They really need to)

The North Wind boasted of great strength. The Sun argued that there was great power in gentleness. "We shall have a contest," said the Sun.

Far below, a man traveled a winding road. He was wearing a warm winter coat.

"As a test of strength," said the Sun, "Let us see which of us can take the coat off of that man."

"It will be quite simple for me to force him to remove his coat," bragged the Wind.

The Wind blew so hard, the birds clung to the trees. The world was filled with dust and leaves. But the harder the wind blew down the road, the tighter the shivering man clung to his coat.

Then, the Sun came out from behind a cloud. Sun warmed the air and the frosty ground. The man on the road unbuttoned his coat.The sun grew slowly brighter and brighter. Soon the man felt so hot, he took off his coat and sat down in a shady spot.

"How did you do that?" said the Wind.

"It was easy," said the Sun, "I lit the day. Through gentleness I got my way."

------------------

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Stalled cloud growth, software flatlining, hated Lumias unsold... It's all fine, says Microsoft CEO

Adam Jarvis
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So can MS finally admit...

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Windows Phone is Dead, OK mothballed, if MS won't admit dead. (it's dead though)

Joe B is not on a Sabbatical.

(If he ever was, he chose the worst time for leave of absence)

The App Store needs some love.

---------------

Microsoft need to use Topcashback / Quidco in the UK, to promote Windows 10, giving cashback in the form of App credit, with every install of Windows 10. Create a slush fund for developers to go after.

Have a totaliser (Blue Peter style) to show how much free credit has been given away for Developers to see.

(Hence my reasoning why Windows 10 shouldn't be free after July).

Charge, give free App Credit back, it makes sense to build an MS Universal App Ecosystem.

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How to not get pwned on Windows: Don't run any virtual machines, open any web pages, Office docs, hyperlinks ...

Adam Jarvis
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Patch Tuesday? Now if only I could prevent Nvidia from updating.

Microsoft, if you are reading this, give us back some control. This is becoming ridiculous.

Really struggling here (and why you should really avoid Windows 10 1511 or using a Mac to do anything that doesn't involve OSX). Anything off the beaten track with Apple is a no no.

We need to run an older Nvidia Graphics Driver on an iMac in BootCamp running Win10 1511 (latest). It must not update/replace itself with a Windows Update Driver. Simple you say?

Windows 10 Update thinks it knows better, updates the Nvidia Driver to a generic newer Nvidia one through Windows Update (replacing the one from Bootcamp 5.1). The iMac freezes and is generally unstable with this Windows Update Driver (designed for PC's running Windows obviously). Oddly (which becomes important) Windows Update is offering two identical Nvidia Drivers at the same time. (Is this because the Bootcamp driver only supports Win8.1?, so is offering Win8.1 Update + Win10 Update)

I remove the updated Nvidia driver, replace it back with (older) BootCamp 5.1 Driver, Windows Update downloads and replaces (as above).

I've tried System->Advanced Settings->Hardware: Device Installation Settings, 'Do you want to automatically download manufacturer's apps and custom icons that are available for your devices'

Set to 'No'. Makes no difference - still downloads and installs.

I've tried using local Group Policy Manager to block Hardware Device Drivers by Hardware ID (but this still allows the Nvidia setup.exe to be run, hence installs all the support software, ovewrites everything, installing the driver a different way (that doesn't check GPM) shows all the software updated, machine freezes. Duplicates and leaves the older Nvidia 3D Control Driver in place.

Had some partial success with this, in that it prevents the BootCamp driver been reinstalled manually, but doesn't prevent Windows Update running Nvidia setup.exe files and reinstalling all the driver software, i.e with no graphics driver installed, this method prevents the BootCamp driver from been installed.

Tried setting Group policy for Downloads to Notify and download, still installs.

Tried using the KB3073930, to hide updates, doesn't work, because Windows Update is offering two identical drivers at the same time, if you hide one, the other is still visible, and installs.

Tried installing Powershell Windows Update Module add-on, using Powershell commands to prevent any Windows Updates beginning with 'NVIDIA', still installs, again because WindowsUpdate is offering up two identical drivers at the same time, catches the first, second installs.

Another option is to prevent execution of any drivers signed by Nvidia, and also prevent device drivers by Hardware IDs at the same time, but Windows Update still offers the Nvidia Driver for download, and then tried to install, filling the Windows Update log with multiple failed driver installs.

I generally know what I'm doing, how can something so simple have become so f'in frustrating!

FU Microsoft and you controlling tendencies.

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Windows 10 debuts Blue QR Code of Death – and why malware will love it

Adam Jarvis
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Re: Penguin

Yes. but the cryptic blue screen message meant the average user hadn't a clue it was a hardware problem or driver problem. Windows is still shit at explaining the difference.

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Adam Jarvis
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Support Windows? Linux tools have been providing the sticking plaster for 20 years.

If it wasn't for Linux providing the sticking plaster for Windows 95 and on, i.e. imaging tools by getting underneath Windows, allowing restoration, rather than re-installation from scratch, I'm pretty sure I would have ditched Windows long ago out of sheer frustration.

Using a Android mobile to scan a QR code is just an extension of that, you have to wonder why it took so long. Linux based tools (and now mobiles) are the only thing keeping Windows alive.

Windows update has become bag of rusty nails, it should help you protect against malware, but seems to do the complete opposite of late. When are we all going to dump this MS crap (including me), instead of apologising for its inherent problems/quirks.

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Windows 7's grip on the enterprise desktop is loosening

Adam Jarvis
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The new Microsoft...

Given the new Microsoft, I'm actually reminiscing and warming to Steve Ballmer in a big way. OK, he bet on Windows 8.0 (Hate, point none) / Julie Larson Green, we all make mistakes.

If Metro had been implemented as an add-on option to the core OS, I think it would have been better received and have had more installs, than it ever got. Microsoft need some self confidence, that people will actually use their products even when they aren't been forced onto their machines.

Smashing the plates of Windows 7 is just pure madness.

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Microsoft drives an Edge between Adobe and the web: Flash ads blocked

Adam Jarvis
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Something we should really thank iOS/Android for, the demise of Flash.

If it wasn't for the vast array of iOS/Android devices coming to market, Flash would probably be a lot more prevalent today than it is. The BBC were slow to catch on what a wretched platform it is, proving content providers are still king over technical common sense.

Steve Jobs rightly called this one, long before it Bill Gates / Ballmer ever did, at the time it appeared somewhat protectionist, but time has come to show it was a rational, calculated decision by him. It was a good call by Jobs, whether you like Apple or not.

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How do you build a cheap iPhone? Use a lot of old parts

Adam Jarvis
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Actually a cool thing to do. Apple's next step?

I'd love to see a recycled phone made by Apple where they gave you say 2-3x the Warranty for piece of mind, but you get a cheaper phone made from returned parts. A certified 'Frankenstein Model', bettter than doing the same by buying a used one from Ebay.

Let's face it, The World's Landfill is full of Mobile Phones from just the last 20 years, you can't keep sticking this stuff in the ground indefinitely and not contaminate drinking water sources with heavy metals.

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We wrap our claws around latest pre-Build Windows 10 preview

Adam Jarvis
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Re: Stay with 7

Under Ballmer, that was the plan with Windows 8.x and its 'rapid release cycle'. Then it moved to bi-yearly-cumulative 6 monthly updates under Win10, the last under this plan - Redstone is still on schedule (ish). After which they are dropping the 6 monthly updates, to concentrate on releases linked/in-line with new MS Hardware announcements/updates. It all sounds very Apple like.

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Adam Jarvis
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Re: These Microsoft engineer's comments

They'll just be AI Generated by Tay.

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Mud sticks: Microsoft, Windows 10 and reputational damage

Adam Jarvis
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Re: It's not the UI that's the problem

Noticed this too, an SSD - Trim at work?

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Adam Jarvis
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Telling people they are doing it wrong, when it comes to copying a file, is about as desperate as it gets.

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Adam Jarvis
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When I hide an update...Microsoft you need to respect those decisions.

Microsoft, if you lose the trust of your customers, you've had it.

If a customer has selected the Windows Update option:

'Check for updates but let me choose whether to download and install them.'

in Windows 7 SP1,

then de-selects and hides that update to prevent it installing and showing up next time, that means categorically, that the customer does not want to install that update 'point blank' or be offered a revision of that update in the future.

Its not a difficult concept to respect.

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Adam Jarvis
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Those 3 Weeks to Launch...

Microsoft need another 3 Week time period like that, because the transformation over that period was incredible, some real work was done in that period, it was the equivalent of cramming the night before the exam and passing. Several MS folk realised if they missed that deadline there were serious consequences and stopped forwarding emails, started to answer them.

Yep, the release was rough around the edges. Fundamentals like trackpad drivers from Synaptics really letting the side down, but the bulk of what made it through was thankfully 'good enough', and somewhat surprising at the time, given the insider release of 3 weeks before.

Windows Update is the team member with the broken ankle, though.

I think MS missed that fact, how much customers would still need to use Windows 7 Update to get to Win10. And its been awlful, the nags, the endless 'checking for updates' , 0% downloaded - waits, and of course 'Something happened' errors. Assuming customers have 'upto' 16GB of free space on their C: drive, in the era of SSDs was just stupid.

Windows Update desperately needs those 3 weeks of Genius, with a seamless Dropbox style managment of updating system files.

It takes a while to familiarise with a new Desktop, Microsoft need to back off a little, give customers a bit more time. I've run Vista, 7SP1, and Windows 10 on the same HP machine(s) for testing and the progress of improvement on the same hardware is impressive (especially with an Samsung SSD added since Vista), but then I can equally say the same for Linux Mint over the same period.

But the product itself, Windows 10 is OK, its not VistaRTM (VistaSP2 was fine) if you know what switches to switch, how to install it, many don't.

Worryingy, I've had file corruption on transfers from a Linux based NAS to/from Windows 10 running on an SSD, so I'm slightly untrusting of it at the moment- in the file transfer department and this is not happening in OSX/Mint transferring the same files.

5
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Govt: Citizens, we know you want 10Mbps. This is the last broadband scheme for that

Adam Jarvis
Bronze badge

Re: RE: subsidy

BT Retail charge £18.99 a month, so that covers the majority of line rentals, though not sure of BT Retail's exact share of the consumer line rental market, with bundled deals from Sky, TalkTalk etc, but given we're talking rural subscribers with derisory BB speeds around 2Mbps, many will still be on BT Retail, paying £18.99 a month line rental, just so they can get their line faults fixed quicker (in theory, it shouldn't matter, but in reality, it seems to)

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Adam Jarvis
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Re: RE: subsidy

A 'token' separate USO is possible, but only because of the announcement in the drive to make broadband costs transparent and separately charged, independent of the landline charges.

There will still be a maintenance element for the line and likely no different to the current £18.99 charge which will instead be included in the headline broadband monthly fee . So its mostly an accounting change, thats all.

But given there is no timescale on the length of time to install, to highlight new line subsidies is wrong when the vast majority will already have a landline and a derisory intermittent BB service of probably less than or equal to 2Mbps to even make it worth bothering, with no current subsidy on offer.

Its this 'pay up or shut up - just make do attitude' by BT/Ofcom, and it sets an 'apathy approach' in the way this is geared, if you have a 4Mbps-8Mbps its hardly worth spending thousands to get 10Mbps. Its not anything like a USO, it's bullsh.it.

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Adam Jarvis
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Re: RE: subsidy

Given we have a Universal Service Obligation for Voice, most people asking for a 10Mbps BB minimum aren't going to be new installs.

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Adam Jarvis
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Re: A matter of units

Mbps, there sorted it for you.

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Adam Jarvis
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I'd like to see BT blocked from areas for a minimum of 10 years, if BT decide now that it is uneconomical to invest in a particular area.. Give people a clear answer and just Fcuk off, leave Rural communities to it, we'll get it done ourselves because its that important. BT hovering over the dead carcass of an outdated copper network helps no one, rurally.

5
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Microsoft introduces yet another Skype for Windows 10

Adam Jarvis
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iPhone, Macbook, iPad & Work Desktop and sometimes a Home PC. Its not really that excessive. Its more a case of they don't make it easy to log out completely.

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