* Posts by Christian Berger

3499 posts • joined 9 Mar 2007

DARPA demands brand-new command … IN SPAAACE!

Christian Berger
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Hmm....

Well commercial satellite operators probably already have such systems to inform them of nearby objects, after all once you have the kepler data of those objects (which is usually freely available) you can just predict where they are. Or they just don't care about small objects as those aren't in the databases anyhow.

Furthermore, satellite operators can actually look up and see what's going on there.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rIesWBTUeiI

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Netflix picks fight with internet exchange industry

Christian Berger
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Re: How much do they waste on DRM?

Well but doesn't Netflix use DRM on their _own_ productions? I mean Apple also claimed they needed DRM with iTunes... until they released some songs without DRM which then outsold the rest.

Netflix could use their market position to move the market out of DRM, but they refuse to do so. Faced with the option of either loosing a big part of their market, or ditching DRM, I'm not sure if they would continue to require DRM.

The least Netflix could do is to complain about DRM like they complain about so many other things. Instead they drive the W3C into adopting DRM into the browser, spreading DRM even more.

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Christian Berger
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How much do they waste on DRM?

I mean DRM is rather expensive. For Pay-TV stations that's usually in the range of several dollars a month per user. Since it's trivial to find out users which just subscribe to the service for a month and then just download _everything_, there is no real need for DRM. The business model of Netflix would still work, just like the business model of television works fine without DRM. In the 1990s Pay-TV stations even introduced their own line of VHS-tapes.

Waste is just a fact of life in any larger organization. You will always find pointless things companies do. If you are lucky they aren't bad for the society at large, if you are they are destroying it.

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'Nobody cares about your heart-rate'

Christian Berger
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The targets aren't single individuals

Nobody will pay money for your heart rate, but when you have the heart rates of 10 million people you surely will come up with some pseudo business model raising your stock value.

The problem with such mass-produced devices aren't "hackers", the problem is the company you have a contract with, the company you give access to intimate details of your life. The current company might actually do an OK job at keeping your privacy, but whenever they fold, they are sure as hell going to sell off that data to the highest bidder. After all it's an asset in their books.

If a business model requires money to come into the organization, you are likely to be the product, not the customer, as you can always get more money by selling your data, even though you already paid.

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Should we teach our kids how to program humanity out of existence?

Christian Berger
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It's certainly not the worst way of teaching someone to program

I mean the "real" programming languages are often designed by people sitting in their room being tired of having to solve trivial problems. So they come up with special language features you'll probably never need. Those features are then taught to people who will never need them and struggle even understanding them. They still try because those features are hyped. Eventually all they do is struggling with the language, learning new features while not actually getting anything done on time. It's one of the reasons so many software projects fail.

Instead we should give children, and perhaps even professional programmers, systems that are appropriate. Children might need shiny IO features like controlling a robot or a grapics card. Adults might never need the complexity of C++-style OOP, but could work with a simple underlying principle like the UNIX-Philosophy. We must learn to use the tools we should use, not the ones we are being told to use.

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E-books the same as printed ones, says top Euro court egghead

Christian Berger
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If we would just address the underlying problem...

... and simply ban DRM. I mean you can also copy a physical book, that's what book scanners and printers are for.

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Spam King sent down for 30 months

Christian Berger
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Where to start...

Well first of all, yes E-Mail Spam is a managable problem today, it's slowly going down.

Then knowing the end point of a TCP/IP connection is not of much use, if you find that it's the NAT router of some large ISP putting thousands of users behind a single NATed IP-Address.

Then there are 2 numbers which are transmitted with a modern telephone call. One is the "User provided" Number, which you are supposed to easily fake (e.g. if you use different providers for incoming and outgoing telephony) as well as the one your phone company sets for you. Unfortunately, you usually only see the user provided number, not the network asserted one.

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Linux devs open up universal Ubuntu Snap packages to other distros

Christian Berger
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Re: It's a stupid idea

Furthermore it'll create a simple way to install such images. While before downloading a Debian package with your web browser will just give you a file you then need to install manually, it's likely that those new packages will be installed automatically as they are supposed to be "secure".

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Christian Berger
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It's a stupid idea

It gives the illusion of security by sandboxing. This illusion creates the illusion that you can simply run "apps" from untrusted sources. This means that people will just download whatever "app" they find which means they will enter "$programname free download" into a search engine and click the first link... which likely isn't the trustworthy source... and likely is malware, reducing security to a sandbox which only pretends to work against certain problems and probably will even fail at that.

Typical problems I see are something called "Abofalle" in German, where you think you download some free software, but instead sign a contract forcing you to pay money to some criminal. There probably will be downright malware in those packages, too. After all, if the user wants to execute a certain program, they will give it all the rights it want. A rights system only works if the application cannot determine if it got the rights or not and I can always edit the list of rights the application has.

We live in a sad age when people just write code without thinking about it first.

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Apple quietly launches next-gen encrypted file system

Christian Berger
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I'm skeptical

File system code requires a certain kind of programmer which is determined to write error free code, and also has the ability to write near error free code. File systems are rather delicate parts of the kernel, after all if you mess up your scheduler or memory management, your system likely will just crash. If you mess up your file system, it's likely you end up with corrupt data on your disks without noticing.

I don't know if Apple still has the right people. After all in recent years it focused much on bad UI design (relying on the transparency of fingers) and turning their products into lifestyle products. Actual engineering didn't play a big role. I wouldn't be surprised if the engineers suitable of doing this have since then moved on to different companies or retirement.

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Intel takes aim at Arduino with US$15 breadboard

Christian Berger
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Please please please more RAM

If they could squeeze a megabyte of RAM onto it that product would have had a chance as you could at least run DOS on it.

So you just have bog standard microcontroller which is barely large enough for C, and hard to program in Assembler.

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The Windows Phone story: From hope to dusty abandonware

Christian Berger
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Re: They missed their chance

"...Still baffles me how a Company on the experience of Microsoft bet all the small cattle on a single provider. There is no option but to keep research on the issue."

That's because Windows on x86 isn't seen as something important by the marketing department of Microsoft any more. They think that a stagnating x86 market means that they need to move to other platforms. To do that they have to cut their legacy branches.... unfortunately Microsoft is very much a company built on people wanting to run legacy software. MS-DOS was more or less CP/M compatible. Windows was, in its early usable days, mostly used as a way to run multiple DOS applications at once. Newer versions of Windows always had to execute old DOS and Windows applications. If Windows XP wouldn't have been able to execute Win16 applications, it would have had a much harder place in businesses. Of course this was all aided by a market growing extremely fast. In the past people simply bought more new PCs which came with the newest version of Windows so new versions were adopted much quicker. Also PCs used to have a lower practical life span. A PC from 1995 was essentially useless in 2000, today a Laptop from 2010 is still perfectly usable.

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Christian Berger
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Re: They missed their chance

Well you forget that most business critical Windows software was written at times when a Pentium 90 was still something your users would probably want to use.

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Christian Berger
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They missed their chance

They could have had it so easy if they made Windows Phone compatible to normal Windows. Since on Windows the OS usually handles the GUI toolkit, it would have been possible to adapt many forms to be useful on mobile screens. Even if that won't work, it's comparatively easy for software vendors to just add another GUI for mobile screens... much easier than to port it to another platform.

All they needed to do was to replicate what they had already done on Windows NT for Alpha. Just take a slim kernel and add an emulator so the x86 userspace can run along with native ARM applications. No recompiling is not an option as much of business critical software relies on external components which only exist in binary form. Those components range from more or less obscure database servers down to VBX-components for Win16.

For me this is a typical testament that Microsoft does not understand its customers. People who use Windows today, particularly in businesses, don't use them for their new features or user interfaces... they use them so their old crappy software from the 1990s still runs. Microsoft should have learned that with the slow adoption of Windows Vista, 7, 8 and 10.

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Berners-Lee: WWW is spy net

Christian Berger
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It's all to difficult

I mean the early web still was acceptably easy to code for. Essentially you had HTML which was a moderately simple markup language and you had no way of determining how it would actually look on the browser. And if you weren't smart enough for that, you could use Netscape Navigator Gold, which could not just display, but also edit web pages. You then uploaded the result onto the FTP-server of your ISP and had a website.

Today websites seem to be more and more complex. It's not just HTML, but also a completely different language (CSS) to define how it should look like. And today your browser expects you to actually design how it looks like. To make it work on differently sized screens, you actually need to use yet another language (JS) to mess with your layout. I don't know if HTML GUI editors still exist, but I doubt you can translate the complexity into them.

The result is that people don't make their own websites any more. If they want to blag into the world, they use a blog hoster. If they want to offer details of their life, they use a social network, etc.

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Get ready for Google's proprietary Android. It's coming – analyst

Christian Berger
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"This goes against the entire reason Android was created."

Android never was supposed to be real "Free Software". It can't be given that manufacturers have to adapt it to their system. That's essentially the same Freedom Microsoft gives to their Windows CE developers who also get much of their source code.

For Android to be "Free" it would have to be much smaller and we'd need to have a common hardware architecture... or at least a common and separated hardware abstraction layer below the kernel. Since we don't have that, all Free projects involving Android are essentially doomed to gain huge amounts of momentum. That's why Cyanogenmod, which only mildly modifies Android, already needs more resources than OpenBSD, which maintains a whole operating system.

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O2 chief techie: Light up dark fibre and unleash the small cell army

Christian Berger
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Re: "suppliers want to know what the demand will be"

Actually nobody knows if that is true. Such standards take 10 years from outlining the basic parameters to getting the first devices. That's why UMTS/WCDMA still has a "switched circuit" mindset. Back in the early 1990s when work was started, nobody in the industry thought about packet data. Things like having a 64k ISDN channel were much more important. After all that's how businesses exchanged files back then. Then the Internet and the first .com bubble came.

Maybe future networks will be about other things, like battery power... or range. Nobody really knows what will be important in 10-20 years time. For example I already don't care about speed on my mobile connection. I care about availability. And that's currently rather bad in Germany. You only get service when you don't need it.

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Christian Berger
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It's an obvious thing

Since the single most expensive part about fibre is getting it into the ground, it doesn't make sense to just have as many fibres as you need. You want to at least have one extra fibre in case something breaks. However it's rather economical to just put in much more than you need as you can always rent it to someone else.

For a mobile telco dark fibre is particularly attractive as they are dealing with changing technology. While a GSM cell happily ran with an E1, an LTE cell wants to have gigabits. Future standards utilizing macrodiversity and multi-site beamforming might need a _lot_ more, and/or rather unusual standards. In fact future standards might even move all the digital parts of a base station to more central points, leaving essentially an analogue device modulating the used spectrum onto fibres (this is already done in some GSM deployments where space is limited). You cannot do this over 100Gig Ethernet.

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Microsoft has created its own FreeBSD image. Repeat. Microsoft has created its own FreeBSD image

Christian Berger
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Embrace, Extend, Extinguish...

... it's a classic Microsoft strategy. FreeBSD is currently still seen as a saner alternative to "modern" GNU/Linux where you don't have that FreeDesktop/systemd stuff. A system that potentially just works.

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Why does an Android keyboard need to see your camera and log files – and why does it phone home to China?

Christian Berger
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Re: That's yet another point caused by needless complexity

What I want is a place where I can get some information on if someone looked at the code, or at least some information on the license of it. F-droid for example only accepts software where the source code is public... and they even warn you about software you might consider malware.

The big point is that _I_ need to be in control of _my_ hardware, not some company, not some app-store, but me. And this is currently impossible as Android is far to complex.

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Christian Berger
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That's yet another point caused by needless complexity

Android has a "security system" limiting access rights for applications, but in reality that's useless as people just install stuff anyhow.

Instead of useless security measures we should have mandatory code reviews. In the case of a "keyboard app" that shouldn't even be difficult, as such an app surely has less than a screen full of code.

Since the distinction between good and bad is often a question of opinion, we need multiple sources providing code reviews. Ideally we'd even have a whole dialogue about code and code patches. For this to happen code needs to be much simpler and therefore better written than what we currently have.

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Wi-Fi hack disables Mitsubishi Outlander's theft alarm – white hats

Christian Berger
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Obligatory Knight Rider reference

https://youtu.be/kki3MjmGtY0?t=226

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Why Oracle will win its Java copyright case – and why you'll be glad when it does

Christian Berger
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Re: That's not what free software is about

Well I'm an expert at being wrong, I've been wrong many times before. :)

The error with this is that "copyright enforcement" is not an essential point for Free Software. In fact BSD licenses even manage fine without strong copyright enforcement. If you look further you find more and more public github projects which don't even have a license.

In fact you can easily argue that Oracle winning could have been just the opposite. Essentially it would have made a Free version of Java impossible. It would have put the Samba project into huge trouble. Essentially every project re-creating any sort of API would have potentially become illegal.

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Christian Berger
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That's not what free software is about

Free Software, no matter what license, also means that your APIs are simple enough so they can be re-implemented easily. It's the kind of competition which used to make the unixoid world so good. And yes, Free Software has been reimplemented by commercial vendors multiple times. It's a good thing.

What the author is doing here is just repeating what Oracle claims. Oracle is, as we all know, not really a proponent of Free Software.

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On her microphone's secret service: How spies, anyone can grab crypto keys from the air

Christian Berger
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Just the same as thousands of other demos

They are using fluctuations in power consumption of the CPU or security chips. No you won't get the key directly, but you will get hints to what your key is. And those hints can be enough to dramatically lower your search space.

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Even in remotest Africa, Windows 10 nagware ruins your day: Update burns satellite link cash

Christian Berger
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Again, that's why we need minimal systems

The things they are trying to achieve doesn't need a Windows 10 update function... and probably none of the many features that are exclusive to Windows. We need to learn to have minimal systems again.

If we just want to use some specialized applications we should be able to run those applications on top of a slim stack of software. Ideally something like a "sign" program would just start up your Windows with the "sign" as the only executable executing. On Linux that would be the system booting up to a shell script starting up your X11 server and then your software.

If you don't need certain functionality, just try to avoid it. Should you need it later you can always boot in a different configuration.

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Is a $14,000 phone really the price of privacy?

Christian Berger
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Of course its utter bullshit

If they actually wanted to build a secure device they would not use a complex operating system like Android (or iOS or Blackberry OS, or Windows phone...) They would instead have a minimal operating system acting as a "smart terminal" with as simple as possible protocols. For a budget for $14k they would also include alternative radio technologies to ease the problem of being tracked. Certainly they would also shield the GSM parts from the rest of the system.

So yes, it would be feasible to build a much more secure device for that kind of money, but there is no indication of added security on that device. In fact it even runs _more_ software than your usual device and has added black box "security chips", which usually mean that they want to leak the key. ("security chips" are useless if you can just get that chip to sign, en- or decrypt any message by changing the code around it during runtime)

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Easy remote exploit drops for unpatchable power plant controller

Christian Berger
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I think there is a certain limit to how much "thought" you can get done

After all you have only a limited number of people with a limited amount of intelligence. Even if you add more people, the additional friction might cancel out the amount of additional work you get done.

So you have lots of things to consider when designing such a system. For example it needs to do its basic function. If it doesn't work, the project certainly has failed. Then you have other things you need to do, examples are the user interface to set it up and security considerations. Adding to that there are self-made tasks, for example trying out a new feature of your language, or adding licensing measures. This all has to be done on a limited work budget.

The big problem with this comes when you have inexperienced people. Those people will only know certain types of technology. For example when it comes to configuration many people think of having an embedded web server. After all that's how their home router is configured. Those people have never seen simple console based configuration interfaces, or file formats that can be read from an SD-card and written with a text editor. They don't know what the alternatives are, therefore they effectively waste work on things they could have done simpler.

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FOURTH bank hit by SWIFT hackers

Christian Berger
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Attribution is near impossible

You cannot tell where software comes from... or to be more precise you can always fake that. Just install a Chinese version of your development platform and compile your software there.

We will see how this is used. If the banks now simply increase their actual security, for example by banning "Office" software, HTML-mail and using other cheap but effective tricks, it may have been criminals.

If instead people use this to lobby for more Cyberwar, it is very likely a false flag operation. After all passive defense is simple and cheap, war is much more profitable.

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HP Inc-eption: Our new 3D printers print themselves, says CEO

Christian Berger
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Actually they have such printers

They have printers for "digital printing" which can work with the same types of ink you have at companies printing money. So it should be possible, given the right paper and inks, to print money.

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Coders crack Oculus DRM in 24 hours, open door to mass piracy

Christian Berger
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No they don't have the right to DRM

DRM systems essentially mean that I as a user have to give up my right to "integrity and confidentiality" of my computer, since I need to run code which works against me.

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Modular phone Ara to finally launch

Christian Berger
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There are severe technical limitations

First of all, all "high bandwidth" components like the CPU and RAM won't be replacable easily, those would have to be in a single module as external connectors would increase the capacitive load which would drain the battery rather quickly.

Then there is a "magic triangle" of connectors. You can make them cheap, small or durable, but not all three at the same time. So you'll either have modules that are huge, expensive or will have connectors that break quickly rendering the module unusable. You can work around this a bit by having low pincount interfaces which are generally cheaper, but this cannot be done for every component.

At best you could hope for a small "basic" device with the screen built in, you could slide into a larger part with extra components like batteries, SDRs or a clamshell keyboard. Maybe that part could also hold the GSM/UMTS/LTE parts since those could be done via a simple low pincount interface.

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Boffins achieve 'breakthrough' in random number generation

Christian Berger
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Enthropy

But can't you just feed "a character of English" into a pseudo random generator for every 0.6 to 1.3 bits you take out of it?

It still seems obvious that you can have a simple "mixer" (i.e. a feedback shift register) where you add the raw bits from your source, and make sure you never pull out more entropy than you put in. So for every 32 bits from your bad random source, you add, for example 7 to a counter if you estimate that it'll have 7 bits of Entropy. The function to get a random number will have a parameter indicating the number of bits it wants, and for this you substract that number from your counter. If your counter would go below 0, you wait until you have enough entropy in your buffer.

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How Nokia is (and isn't) back in the phone business today

Christian Berger
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Re: What will be their selling point?

"Keep the kernel, lose the google cruft."

Of course, however marketing won't like a system that's that bare bones. My current hope is actually on the Pyra https://pyra-handheld.com/boards/pages/pyra/ and potentially on the "Pocket Chip".

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Christian Berger
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What will be their selling point?

I mean we are at a point where we have a nearly level playing field. Even large manufacturers like Samsung and Apple are feeling the heat from lots of little Chinese company nobody even heard of a year ago.

Most software ways to differentiate themselves from stock Android only make the product worse as nobody likes bloatware installed on their systems. Adding a decent hardware keyboard would be potentially interesting, but I doubt Nokia would be courageous enough at this point.

Nokia has lost their chance. They would have had everything to shape the future, but decided to chase the iPhone... just like the rest of the industry.

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SEC warns cybersecurity is biggest threat to financial system

Christian Berger
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self harm?

"Some have argued the biggest threat to the finance markets is the financial industry itself with its very complex, opaque derivatives."

No, that's not a thread as history has shown that in those cases the financial industry will be bailed out promptly and very little harm will come to those in charge.

If they would see "cyber attacks" as a threat, they would "invest" in security. They would ban office software, they would compartmentalize systems. They would try to be less evil so they could hire competent programmers more easily.

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Hold the DRAM phone: IBM claims phase-change breakthrough

Christian Berger
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Actually a DRAM phone sounds like a very interesting idea

I mean phones typically have power 24/7 since they have a battery... plus it would make it easy and cheap to implement meaningful security measures, like making it erase its contents when it's opened or the temperature suddenly drops. Since those things can be done mostly in software you could sell "high security" phones for a decent premium without it costing you much more.

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The PC is dead. Gartner wishes you luck, vendors

Christian Berger
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"Ultramobile premium"

For Garner that probably means "Ultrabooks" which are huge slaps of a laptop... for some reason optimized to be thin. That's not portable. A portable device would be like a Palmtop.

Also all we are seeing right now is the "home computer" crowd moving towards tablets and "smart"phones. Those are the people who used to have traditional home computers and TV-sets connected to them. As PCs became cheaper, they moved to them, causing in part the "Windows Boom" in the 1990s. Now they move away from that market. What is left are more professional users, people who want to actually work with their computers...

and those people don't care about pre-loaded crap. They want to have the operating system they want, not whatever Microsoft considers fashionable at the time.

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Tintri debuts storage precog that knows what you'll need in 6 months

Christian Berger
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Fascinating...

...how you can sell simple exponential curve fitting as a feature. It seems to me like that's a feature a single person would develop in an afternoon.

There are even Youtube videos on how to do it:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ta4MZS7w2VA

I'm not very good at math, but for me the hardest thing to understand is the accent.

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Work begins on Russian rival to Android

Christian Berger
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Re: Building a more secure system than Android shouldn't be hard

"Since that burglary in the street last week, we've all learnt that locks are no longer able to securely defend our homes. So we have all done away with locks on all windows and doors."

No, that's not the point I'm trying to make. My point is that, just because you have a room you can "lock securely" you shouldn't just let any stranger into your home.

The sandboxes on mobile operating systems are there to create the illusion that you can just run any random software you download from non-trustworthy sources. They provide an illusion of security, on which people depend on. People do install "apps" without checking where they come from, relying on sandboxes somehow controlling those apps. People actually believe they can just install any app without their system being utterly compromised.

If you instead just make it clear that you should never install untrusted applications, and have safeguards against doing so, you can achieve actual security. Additional measures can be sensible, if the additional code is small enough to not cause any security problems by itself.

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Christian Berger
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Re: Building a more secure system than Android shouldn't be hard

a) Your GSM would of course run on a separate processor with only a well defined and simple interface to your main computer. Think of AT-Commands over a serial interface. All GSM stacks support that out of the box.

b) Memory protection might be one of the few things to add as a feature, however it can only protect you from mistakes. You will never ever be able to trust third party applications. That's what I mean with "misunderstanding sandboxes". Since Rowhammer(JS) we have learned that sandboxes simply are not able to contain malware securely. However there are alternatives. One would be to use the handset as a simple terminal for a server based service. Those protocols can be extremely simple. Or if you desperately need local software that cannot be audited, you can use a separate second computer inside your handset. This may sound absurd at first, but it's precisely what the SIM is doing for several decades now.

The current way of doing things, where you have an operating system running apps from untrusted sources, hoping you can somehow secure them by sand boxing simply does not work.

It's probably best to have a small memory card installed inside your handset which does contain the operating system and additional programs you trust. This card then is hardware protected to only be read from the handset. If you want to install additional software or updates, you need to take it out, place it into a different device and access it. The same can be done with a hardware switch for which you need to open the device. If an attacker already has physical access to a device, there's virtually nothing you can do to secure it anyhow. (at least not on a size budget compatible with a mobile phone)

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Christian Berger
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Building a more secure system than Android shouldn't be hard

After all most of the security problems of Android come from its complexity and its misunderstanding of what sandboxes can do.

Building a touch ready GUI toolkit as well as a simple interface for interfacing software with it. Essentially this should have roughly the complexity of TCL/TK, if you base it on the Linux kernel.

If you want to go further, you can even take an embedded kernel like the Free/OpenRTOS kernel. It's much smaller and needs very little RAM. With that you could get a design team together and make a tiny little CPU with roughly the complexity of a 6520 or a Z80, but modern manufacturing processes so it'll be fast. Such a simple CPU would be small enough to be understood by a single person so it can be audited easily.

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Opera claims 50 per cent power savings with browser update

Christian Berger
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Hey... uhm...

They also claim to be able to speed up this page:

https://blog.fefe.de/ (No images, no Javascript, only optional CSS)

by 11%

https://twitter.com/neuntausendfux/status/731320729216618496

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US work visas for international tech talent? 'If Donald Trump is elected all bets are off'

Christian Berger
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Re: We are already there

Again, dig deeper and you'll find that that war most likely was caused by someone US/USSR friendly coming to power being backed by said superpower... or if you dig deeper you will find things like the Sykes-Picot Agreement https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sykes%E2%80%93Picot_Agreement causing territorial disputes, dividing cultures and forcing artificial borders.

History isn't "good vs evil". History is more complex. I do not believe violence is not a way to solve complex problems. You cannot bomb for justice.

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Christian Berger
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Re: We are already there

"Didn't the Taliban of Afghanistan commit acts of atrocity BEFORE we came storming in, though?"

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Taliban

"The Taliban movement traces its origin to the Pakistani-trained and US-sponsored mujahideen in northern Pakistan, a loosely linked confederation of Islamist militias fighting the Soviets during the Soviet–Afghan War."

You know history didn't start in 2001.

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Christian Berger
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Who wants to work in the US anyway?

I mean it's hugely expensive, there is little infrastructure, there are only few jobs that are interresting and non destructive.

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Christian Berger
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We are already there

Look into Irak, look into Afghanistan. We already have big nasty wars destabilizing the entire world.

It's hard to believe, but before US and Russian interventions decades ago, those countries used to be rather peacefull and free.

Fighting injustice with injustice is not a way to go, and using drones to bomb places is hard to be seen as something that is justified or even a "fair fight".

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Unicorn adopts rainbow as logo

Christian Berger
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Re: Well to be honest, it was dealing with photographs

Yes, but considering they will be bought by some other company... or simply go bust, it's not really worth printing letterheads.

The bigger problem is that there is no text, so you cannot easily search for those logos.

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Christian Berger
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Well to be honest, it was dealing with photographs

So a colour gradient kinda makes sense. After all many companies have either colour gradients or rainbows in their logos. Just think about Apple which is a rainbow. (I believe it was in a circle, but I haven't seen it for years)

If anything it's more of a testament of lazyness among designers in that area.

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SS7 spookery on the cheap allows hackers to impersonate mobile chat subscribers

Christian Berger
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The problem is the mindset

There are people in the telco business which still believe that their networks are somehow sacred and that nobody with a bad intention can get in there. That's why some telcos will happily provide you with the username of the PPPoE session the user is using on the first invite.

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