Feeds

* Posts by Frumious Bandersnatch

1313 posts • joined 8 Nov 2007

MEGA ASTEROID could 'BLOW UP EARTH' - Russian space boss

Frumious Bandersnatch
Bronze badge

What I'll be doing

Provided I'm still alive, it might be a good time to grab the "Fish Story" record from the shelf and take it for one more spin.

0
0

Behold, the MONSTER-CLAWED critter and its terrifying SPIDER BRAIN

Frumious Bandersnatch
Bronze badge
Alien

Re: "Giant" is not a valid metric unit

Giant? The article says the critter had a length of three centimetres

To be fair to the OP, the article also describes it as a "massively clawed beast", which might suggest a giant beast, even though it probably only means that the claw is massive (relative to the creature's size). And OP is talking about dreams, not reality, so accurate measurements or units hardly apply...

1
0

US parents proclaim 811 'Messiahs'

Frumious Bandersnatch
Bronze badge

Re: here on the edge of sunny Norfolk...

He'd probably pronounce it "Cumble", especially if he comes from Cholmondley.

Which reminds one, obviously, of calling one's child "Raymond Luxury Yacht" (pronounced Throatwobbler Mangrove, obviously).

0
0

Cannabis can CURE CANCER - cheaply and without getting you high

Frumious Bandersnatch
Bronze badge

ellipsis ...

That bit you copied from their statement:

Importantly, they had an increased effect on cancer cells when combined with each other ...

So did they just trail off there before finishing the paragrap? Were they under the influence when they started to write it? Enquiring minds want ...

0
0

Yahoo! To! Switch! On! Webmail! Crypto! By! Default! Next! Year!

Frumious Bandersnatch
Bronze badge

OMG...

That last line ... Yahoo! didn't actually say that it "takes the security of it's*users very seriously", did they?

1
0

Diamonds are forever POURING down on Jupiter, Saturn - boffins

Frumious Bandersnatch
Bronze badge

Re: Best. Line. Ever.

If only there were some Yahoo angle. Best! Subhead! Evar!

0
0

MS Word deserves DEATH says Brit SciFi author Charles Stross

Frumious Bandersnatch
Bronze badge

Re: The customer is always right.

Equally, you could say that the publisher's job is the care and feeding of its stable of writers. Take Jack Kerouac's On the Road, which was famously written longhand on a long spool/scroll of paper. Evidently the publishers saw merit in the manuscript as it was delivered, and did all the work needed to get it into publishable form. Otherwise, we wouldn't have such a great work of modern literature.

Also, as GB Shaw said, "The reasonable man adapts himself to the world; the unreasonable one persists in trying to adapt the world to himself. Therefore all progress depends on the unreasonable man." Stross's "unreasonableness" is the kind I can get behind.

8
0

Google: Now your mom will try to sell you toilet paper

Frumious Bandersnatch
Bronze badge
Headmaster

Re: whatever will they do next...

The gran[d] plan it seems is to elimnate

I assume you meant "e-limn", which as any fule no is "e-" (for electronic) + limn (depict or describe in pictures or words). The -ate suffix is entirely unnecessary.

Anyway, in fact that's just what they're planning on doing, as described in the article ... (Do keep up, [007]).

3
0

Who here needs to explain things to ELEPHANTS?

Frumious Bandersnatch
Bronze badge

So does that mean they might enjoy magic tricks?

Observe this simple salt cellar ... observe this napkin.

So would the pachyderms "get it?" Maybe the boffins could do a follow-up experiment?

0
0

Brew me up, bro: 11-year-old plans to make BEER IN SPACE

Frumious Bandersnatch
Bronze badge

Re: Interesting

On earth the head floats to the top of the pint.

Never mind the head, where's the yeast going to go during fermentation. ISTR that yeasts are either "top-fermenting" or "bottom-fermenting". I wonder how that will work out in zero-g?

6
0

Web Daddy Berners-Lee DRMs HTML5 into 2016

Frumious Bandersnatch
Bronze badge

Re: I am quite...

And also:

6) crackers exploit holes in DRM and the new raft of "you need to install a new plugin to view this video" style of messages, meaning that HTML5 will be no more secure (and possibly less) than before.

1
0

TWELFTH-CENTURY TARDIS turns up in Ethiopia

Frumious Bandersnatch
Bronze badge

Highly Salasie

Ay...

8
0

Microsoft: We're nearly OUT OF STOCK of Surface 2 and Pro 2

Frumious Bandersnatch
Bronze badge

Stupid comment, about as relevant as what GEC is doing in the diode lighting market.

Of course GE isn't worried about the LED market. It's too busy electrocuting elephants.

0
0

GitHub wipes hand across bloodied face, stumbles from brutal DDoS beating

Frumious Bandersnatch
Bronze badge

Re: GitHub & businesses

Who let grandpa on the internet again? Time to give him his pills.

Pfft. It was "grandpas" that built most of this Internet of yours ...

0
0

Down with Unicode! Why 16 bits per character is a right pain in the ASCII

Frumious Bandersnatch
Bronze badge

Re: The historical accident of little-endian

said Frumious Bandersnatch on the 4th of October, 2013

Ah... touché! I had to read it several times to figure out what the problem was. I do prefer the Japanese date system, but the point is well taken.

3
0
Frumious Bandersnatch
Bronze badge

And if they don't understand, just REPEAT IT IN CAPITALS.

I prefer to just xor it with spaces.

1
0
Frumious Bandersnatch
Bronze badge

Re: Agreement

Isn't BOM just a NOP in UTF-8?

Not if you use it for steganography...

3
0
Frumious Bandersnatch
Bronze badge

Re: The historical accident of little-endian

On a purely technical basis, little endian representations of numbers are much easier to parse and handle. I'm meaning proper numbers, not the arbitrary computer representations. Take the number 12345675679274658. Quck now, is that one quadrillion, twelve quadrillion, 123 trillion, or what? You are going to have to do a right-to-left scan of the number to find out.

Huh? That makes no sense:

* easier to parse? in all the (human, natural) languages that I know of, we start with the biggest quantity and work down (even in expressions like "four score and 7", "vingt et un" and "eleventy one")

* is that quadrillion, ... : you don't have to scan right to left---you just count how many digits there are (and last I checked, counting left to right gives the same answer as counting the other way)

You should have icon privileges revoked for such a silly post.

6
7
Frumious Bandersnatch
Bronze badge

Little endian (x86/Windows) being COMPLETELY WRONG of course.

All my machines here (bar one) are little-endian. They're all running Linux, so it's not an OS-specific thing. You have to blame the CPU manufacturers.

2
0
Frumious Bandersnatch
Bronze badge

Re: There's UTF-8 and utf8 in Perl

And there it is. My fledgling interest is learning perl. stone. cold. dead. Life is just too short to deal with so much silly.

Don't let it put you off. Unicode in Perl more or less "just works". The only times I've had problems with it have been in trying to correctly convert stuff from other code pages and broken MS document formats. That, and sometimes forgetting to tell my database that the incoming data is UTF-8 rather than ASCII (though sometimes Perl needs a hint, too, to tell it not to do a spurious conversion).

Speaking of MS documents, I find it really incredible to come across HTML on the web that obviously came from MS Word initially and that has completely messed up rendering of some trivial glyphs (like em dash and currency symbols). I find it hard to believe that in this day and age, Word can't even convert to HTML properly. OK, so maybe the problem isn't with word, but with the options the user selected for the conversion, but still...

7
1

TUPPERWARE FOUND ON MOON of Saturn

Frumious Bandersnatch
Bronze badge

It makes one think

Many (hopefully in multiples) years from now, if a travelling alien probe happens upon the remains of the civilisation here, perhaps they'll find all the various plastics we've left behind. They might find the variety of chemicals fairly unsurprising (given that at least propylene seems to form naturally in some places), but hopefully we'll give them cause to scratch their heads (probably in multiples) wondering what natural forces could have given rise to such a range of shapes and colours :)

0
0

Windows 8 fans out-enthuse Apple fanbois

Frumious Bandersnatch
Bronze badge
Coat

Re: Sigh....

For the minute however, I am suffering utter pericombobulation trying to work out why 81...

For why? They're obviously preparing for IPv6 and the "Internet of Things". Having 81 licenses/machines should definitely be enough for anyone!

1
0

Rare gold iPhone 5s goes up against 50 caliber high precision rifle

Frumious Bandersnatch
Bronze badge

32 feet/second^2?

I think that there's something wrong with the Register's Unit conversion page. I can convert 32 "feet" (whatever they are) into Linguine easily enough (it's apparently 2.1772lg), but what are these weird "seconds" squared? A bit of research on the web tells me that 1 "second" is approximately = 1/Pi nanocenturies.

So 2.1772lg/(1/Pi nanocenturies)^2. Hardly accelerating at all, in other words. Not impressed with this "iPhone" thing!

1
1

BOOGIE BALLMER: Steve Dirty Dances at tearful Microsoft leaving do

Frumious Bandersnatch
Bronze badge

Re: how about...

Penguin in Bondage --- Zappa

0
0

Congrats on MP3ing your music... but WHY bother? Time for my ripping yarn

Frumious Bandersnatch
Bronze badge

Re: And another thing

It saddens me a little to think how infrequently the care and thought that goes into putting together an album as a whole is noticeable once we get to mp3 players on constant shuffle.

It's funny how deeply ingrained that idea (sequential play) is. As far as I know, there's only one album that was deliberately designed to be played on shuffle: Minidisc, by Gescom. Exactly how "musical" it is is open to debate, though.

Granted, not all albums benefit from specific ordering. It's often a case of sticking the "hit" tune at the start or the end, with little musical merit in any particular ordering. There are exceptions, though. I couldn't imagine Dark Side of the Moon played in any other order. Sadly, nobody really makes albums like that any more.

0
0
Frumious Bandersnatch
Bronze badge

my wife tried putting ours in alphabetic order in racks

A classic mistake. You need B-Trees.

1
0

Thorium and inefficient solar power? That's good enough for me

Frumious Bandersnatch
Bronze badge

That's a kilowatt over... a thousand seconds... ummm... 20 minutes... is that all?

Damn it! There's another of my dreams cruelly dashed :(

2
0
Frumious Bandersnatch
Bronze badge

Sounds like it would be a good way for apartment blocks to create and store energy

Well apartment blocks are generally multi-storey, so there's an easier way of storing energy: have a big fuck-off weight that gets raised over the day when there's a glut of energy and then lowered at night with some sort of energy-recovery system in train. Kind of like clockwork for the <checks watch> 21st century.

3
0

30 years on: The day a computer glitch nearly caused World War III

Frumious Bandersnatch
Bronze badge

Re: Don't fret

In the middle is where we find balance.

More like "where we get run over by both sides", unfortunately.

6
0

Google reveals its Hummingbird: Fly, my little algorithm - FLY!

Frumious Bandersnatch
Bronze badge

Re: Is it Christmas already ?

If old Google was like C, Hummingbird is like Python or Ruby.

New one is more like COBOL (or SQL), IMO.

SHOW ME the page THAT HAS some tat or other WHERE YEAR = 2009 FROM the register

4
0

Apple ups revenue estimates in wake of nine million–phone weekend

Frumious Bandersnatch
Bronze badge

@toadwarrior (Bronze badge)

There aren't too many comments here. The fandroids must have to get over some serious butt hurt before they come in.

Meh. I'm a "fandroid". Never used an Apple iThing because I didn't want to be locked into a closed ecosystem. My reaction to the news? Good on them. Competition is good.

1
0

Microsoft: Surface is DEAD. Long live the Surface 2!

Frumious Bandersnatch
Bronze badge

@BlackKnight(markb)

for someone who very quickly loses patients with technology

I really hope you're not a doctor or someone in the medical profession ...

11
0

New iPhone sells out, millions in hands of lucky fans, Cook cock a hoop ...

Frumious Bandersnatch
Bronze badge

Re: So much for the talk of failure

Of course they can. Most people are idiots!

Not sure about that generalisation, but I know for a fact that half of them have below-average intelligence.

12
1

Phil Collins' daughter 'will give you A VIRUS' – security bods

Frumious Bandersnatch
Bronze badge

Re: Real information...

... or just a VIRAL promotion hoax for the actress?

I think you meant "hacktress", there.

0
0

THE TRUTH about beaver arse milk in your cakes: There's nothing vanilla about vanilla

Frumious Bandersnatch
Bronze badge

Re: @Robin: financially viable ?

It's not like real vanilla grows on trees...

True... it's a member of the orchid family.

2
0
Frumious Bandersnatch
Bronze badge

beavers

The hunters drive them extinct, confectioners use it as a sly substitute and tv cooks can't get enough of it in their fancy recipes. Just one question---who's the real vanillin here?

6
0

Microsoft no longer a top Linux kernel contributor

Frumious Bandersnatch
Bronze badge

3.10 comes after 3.9.

Well, yes and no. The kernel uses even numbers to indicate stable releases, with odd ones being more experimental. So after the 3.8 (stable)/3.9 (unstable) pair, then you can go on to the 3.10/3.11 branch.

Also, all kernel releases are defined by three numbers rather than two, eg, 3.4.1, 3.8.17, and so on. Also, to be totally pedantic, everything after a dot is treated as a regular "decimal" number when it comes to sorting (like 'sort -n').

In Perl: :

print join " < ", sort {

my @A=split /\./, $a; my @B=split /\./, $b;

while (@A or @B) {

$apart = shift @A || -1; $bpart = shift @B || -1;

next unless $apart <=> $bpart; return $apart <=> $bpart;

}

return 0;

} ("3.10.1", "3.2", "3.1.2", "3.10", "2.0", "2.1.4", "3.4.1", "3.8.17");'

Which prints

2.0 < 2.1.4 < 3.1.2 < 3.2 < 3.4.1 < 3.8.17 < 3.10 < 3.10.1

(apologies for formatting, since we don't have working "pre" HTML tags)

0
0

Angry Brazilian whacks NASA to put a stop to ... er, the NSA

Frumious Bandersnatch
Bronze badge

Re: not from Bierce

@Irony Deficient:

I was ready to downvote you for that, but a search suggests that you're actually correct. Have an upvote instead for being all edumafiying and ting.

2
0

Server hack heads up the stack for a new challenge

Frumious Bandersnatch
Bronze badge
Pint

"I can only say that English is not my first language"

All I can say is "bon voyage", since I don't know how to translate it.

<--- wasn't my pint over there a while ago???

1
0

Torvalds: 'We're not doing Linux95 … for a few years, at least'

Frumious Bandersnatch
Bronze badge

wacky release naming/numbering

Perhaps he can take a leaf from Knuth's book (figuratively) and switch to using pi-based release numbers once he gets to 3.14. That is, 3.14 -> 3.141 -> 3.1415 -> 3.14159 -> ...

0
0

NASA: Humanity has finally reached into INTERSTELLAR SPACE

Frumious Bandersnatch
Bronze badge

Re: makes it tricky to get good data back from the old fellow

Eh, just an update on this. I decided to get a second opinion on whether vehicles should be male or female. I asked the wisest guy I know---my karate instructor. I asked him if my car was male or female. Definitely female, he said. Why? "Because each Nissan, she go!"

4
0
Frumious Bandersnatch
Bronze badge

makes it tricky to get good data back from the old fellow

old girl, surely?

4
0

Apple’s iOS 64-bit iUpgrade: Don't expect a 2x performance leap

Frumious Bandersnatch
Bronze badge

@AC: Unless it has 8GB there's no need for 64-bit.

I think this has been amply dealt with by previous posters, but for another example, what if you want to mmap a file (or device) that's bigger than 4Gb? The switch to 64-bit means a bump in addressable space, which isn't the same thing as physical RAM!

0
0

Intel shows off wine-powered processor and biometric boffinry

Frumious Bandersnatch
Bronze badge

Re: "unlocks the phone when it recognizes the sound of its owner from voiceprints read"

What could possible go wrong, do you think ?

Well I suppose there's the off chance that you might transform into a fly and the voice recognition software wouldn't recognise you. You know, like in that thing ... "Metamorphosis".

(OK, I deliberately got the film name wrong)

0
0

iPhone 5S: Fanbois, your prints are safe from the NSA, claim infosec bods

Frumious Bandersnatch
Bronze badge

Re: Pinky

Bruce Schneier got it about right ...

Don't forget that this is the same Bruce Schneier that thought it was fine to start displaying passwords on screens. Also the same man that never complained about Phorm, despite working for BT. Sure, the guy's a legend, but he's not always right.

1
0

First rigid airship since the Hindenburg cleared for outdoor flight trials

Frumious Bandersnatch
Bronze badge

Re: Why compress helium...

> when you can take in and compress air instead?

Notwithstanding the excellent reason given by another poster, compressing air rather than helium could also be quite handy for giving the ship an extra push when taking off or as an aid to manoeuvring. You wouldn't mind ejecting compressed air at all, as opposed to expensive helium. Given the quantities involved it's probably not practical, though.

0
0
Frumious Bandersnatch
Bronze badge

Re: I'm curious @Frumious

> never met a flying iceberg!

There was a Michael Caine film called "Blue Ice". Imagine some mixup in plumbing between the toilet systems and the gas compression system and voila: lighter-than air icebergs :)

1
0
Frumious Bandersnatch
Bronze badge

Re: I'm curious

I am sure a Hydrogen airship could be built segmented enough that even a gas bag exploding would not destroy the whole ship)

ISTR that they used that logic with the TItanic, too. Interestingly, they reckon that if the captain had just ploughed straight into the iceberg the ship wouldn't have sunk. As it happened, the evasive action gouged all along the side, breaching many bulkheads in series. I can imagine that an airship pilot would probably take the same sort of evasive action in similar circumstances.

Now if they had something like an aerogel with the ability to absorb a lot of hydrogen in the case of a leak ... though maybe not (since the resulting fuel/air mix might actually make any explosion more potent than pure Hydrogen).

0
0
Frumious Bandersnatch
Bronze badge

Re: Rigid Airships have a place

but never as military transport unless well to the rear

So a force of Scouts and Dragoons on the vanguard, backed up by long-range fire from your Carrier, then? Preferably backed up by Arbiters. Got ya!

0
0