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* Posts by Frumious Bandersnatch

1296 posts • joined 8 Nov 2007

Everyone can and should learn to code? RUBBISH, says Torvalds

Frumious Bandersnatch
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Re: Depends what you mean by 'code'

Indeed. My point was, those were two examples where, for me, the money spent in trying to educate me on those topics was largely wasted.

I think I slightly misunderstood you, then. In the end, I think we both agree that not everyone will find formal teaching useful.

While not everyone will benefit from studying a particular subject, I think we should definitely looking to make sure that everyone at least has the option of studying these things (whether it be music, coding, woodwork, art, languages or whatever). In an ideal world, eh?

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Frumious Bandersnatch
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Re: @Frumious

Many of my difficulties learning music have been due to it's totally moronic way of describing things: From notation, to note names, to scales, to time signatures there is not a single part which does not make a logical person tear there hair out with the fuckwittedness of it all.

I'm not totally sure about that. I didn't actually learn music in school (all I can remember is that we did singing and I vaguely remember some messing around with a recorder or tin whistle), so I taught myself about it later. Actually, pretty much my first intro to musical "theory" was from appendix E in the Commodore 64 Programmer's Reference Guide. I must have had some other reference, too, as I discovered that each octave is double the frequency of the last one, and that each semitone is a fixed multiple of the last one too (the 12th root of 2, in fact).

Starting from that point, I found the whole topic much more accessible.

I do agree that notation is a problem, and no, I can't even sight-read very well or (quickly) figure out the scale from the key signature, or understand all time signatures, or even get my head around why A# isn't the same as B flat (the other commenter's explanation notwithstanding), or ...

I don't think that the notation for note lengths is too bad, though, since more "decoration" just means shorter notes. At least that's quite simple ...

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Frumious Bandersnatch
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Re: Depends what you mean by 'code'

Studying aspects of the culture was worthwhile, but not learning the language.

Ah, yes... I found the quote (and person who said it) that I was trying to remember to respond to your sentiment:

"To know another language is to live another life." -- T. G. Masaryk, President of the First Czechoslovak Republic

Who wouldn't want to live another life?

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Frumious Bandersnatch
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"some people don't have the sort of calm, collected, unflappable personality that it takes"

Mmmm. That's good sarcasm. I like what you did there.

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Frumious Bandersnatch
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Re: Depends what you mean by 'code'

I'm sorry to say, but sheet music is really easy to figure (well, apart from key signatures, which require a knowledge of scales). The main problem lies in sight-reading, I think. Anyone can probably learn the notation in an afternoon, but it takes practice to be able to look at the pattern on the page and distinguish an E from an F, say, without resorting to reciting a mnemonic (like "every good boy ...") or having to mentally count from your "baseline".

Sheet music is also completely distinct and separate from actual music. Even if you don't know how to sight-read (or even decipher it in the slightest), you can still be good at music. Scott Joplin, for one, couldn't read sheet music ...

As for the utility of languages, I guess it depends on how far into it you get in the first place. If you don't apply yourself enough to get beyond a few tourist phrases, then sure, it's useless and you'd be better off waiting until you travel (or will travel) to a place before diving in (so you'll have some practical application of it). I think that any serious study does tend to pay you back for the effort, regardless of how practical it might be in general. I rarely use my Japanese, but I'm still very glad that I did study it, even if it's only to get a bit more enjoyment out of Japanese films or chatting to the occasional Japanese person I meet.

Music and Japanese might seem useless to you, but it's hardly a blanket statement you can apply to everyone. Coding is no doubt the same ...

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Flying cars, submarine cars – Elon Musk says NOTHING is beyond him

Frumious Bandersnatch
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flying car, yay!

He should call it Hubris. What could possibly go wrong?

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Google to let Chromebookers take video content OFFLINE

Frumious Bandersnatch
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must be for a reason

My bet is that they've thrown in the towel with their "patent-free" vp6 (or whatever it's called) and decided that if they can't control the patents behind the codecs, they'll damned well be sure they make a play for being the #1 conduit to rival iTunes, Netflix, Spotify, Amazon and all the other delivery guys. They don't have a media store for nothing...

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Euro judges: Copyright has NOT changed, you WON'T get sued for browsing the web

Frumious Bandersnatch
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Re: OMG Mirrors!

all that type you've set up there is a mirror image of my book, pay me!

Fine, have this anti-money, freshly spun from my supercollider. Just don't mix it up with your regular money.

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Frumious Bandersnatch
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I wonder if it's legal to write "Hello, McFly!" or if it's a breach of copyright of the Back to the Future script.

Only one way to know: go back to 1985 and find out. (or get there beforehand and sue the erstwhile writers for stealing your script)

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Patch NOW: Six new bugs found in OpenSSL – including spying hole

Frumious Bandersnatch
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Re: Quick to fix in Open Source, but it leaves questions.

putting the many eyeballs idea finally to rest

Does it? Bit of a tree falling in the forest scenario. Just because people could have been looking, doesn't mean they were. Still doesn't change the fundamental idea of "with enough eyes, all bugs are shallow" (though you may argue about the smarts behind the eyes, if you wish).

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Boffins publish SciFi story to announce exoplanet find

Frumious Bandersnatch
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Re: Clever

Reynolds is a boffin himself or ex-boffin

Indeed he is, and I've read some of his books.

I don't care much for the quality of proof-reading, though. For example:

* unmeasurably old -> immeasurably old

* eeking out its nuclear lifetime -> eking out ...

* Cities as mute as sphinxes -> sphinges (ok, I'm being picky)

Man, the quality of AIs they send into space these days ...

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How I poured a client's emails straight into the spam bin – with one Friday evening change

Frumious Bandersnatch
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Re: Every sysadmin must make one really big screw-up in their career

And if executed as root, "rm" is usually aliased to "/bin/rm -i", so there is a prompt for everything

Huh? What kind of namby-pamby, hand-holding, distro are you running?

Hint: always assume the safety's /off/ and think before you sudo, rm, dd or whatever. An alias for rm is suitable only for true nincompoops.

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How Bitcoin could become a super-sized Wayback Machine

Frumious Bandersnatch
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So much potential

But also so many questions left hanging. Don't ... leave ... me ... this ... way ...

(edit: damn it! that was a Communards hit... nothing to do with Erasure :(. Never mind.. carry on)

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Broadcom: If no one buys our modem biz, we'll DITCH IT

Frumious Bandersnatch
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Re: No Point

There's no point in buying it now

Well I'd make an offer if they'd accept it. True, I've got no money and no experience (apart from having a half dozen Raspberry Pis around the place and having experience with using mobile phones), but I'm sure that the team is well on top of things and if they'll have me, I'd gladly be their leader.

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Supreme Court nixes idea of 'indirect' patent infringement

Frumious Bandersnatch
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interesting, but quite specific

I doubt that this will happen, but it could weaken the power of big copyright lobby interests in pursuing sites that are merely indexing (or even just linking to) "infringing" content. In such cases, it's the user who's downloading the content, with the indexer just telling them how to access it. In both the arenas of patent and copyright law, we know who the real infringers are---the people who hold the copies and distribute them---so they should be the real target of litigation, and not the "finger pointers" (who tell you how the things work or how to find them) or the people who follow that direction.

Yeah, I know that patents and copyrights are completely different things, but I do think that the parallels are worth thinking about here. It could herald a radical shift towards sensible interpretation of "IP" ownership---if the judgement is allowed to stand, that is... Unfortunately, these things rarely follow "sensible" rules...

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Still watching DVDs? You're a PLANET-KILLING CARBON HOG!

Frumious Bandersnatch
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Re: What a load of left wing crap

But it took a whole lot of energy and hydrocarbons to make and transport....

Well, if it's sitting(*) on a shelf, it still has some potential energy due to its elevation. If you were to drop it on your foot, say, you could convert that potential energy into kinetic energy.

The internet, on the other hand, where streaming videos reside, has no such store of potential energy because, as we all know, the Internet weighs nothing.

(* as an aside, why the hell do Brits say "is sat" on a shelf? what the hell kind of tense/conjugation is that?)

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What can The Simpsons teach us about stats algorithms? Glad you asked...

Frumious Bandersnatch
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Re: The moral or the story …

Never use averages as the source of your data. Anything which combines data has already lost important detail.

Oh, I don't know about that. While reading the first article in the series (and again, with the German tank problem) I was slightly disappointed not to see Little's Law listed. Now there's an interesting (and valid) application of averages...

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Frumious Bandersnatch
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Doh

The author mustn't have got the memo at Vulture Towers. I thought the current rule was "no Simpsons jokes, please – we're adults here..." [paragraph 3],

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Are you senior enough to sit around a table with The Register?

Frumious Bandersnatch
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Headline: Are you senior enough to sit around a table with The Register?

Answer: No.

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Senate decides patent reform is just too much work, waves white flag

Frumious Bandersnatch
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"tabling" proposed legislation? (ORLY?)

A case of two nations "divided by a common language?"

"The enjoyment of a common language was of course a supreme advantage in all British and American discussions," Churchill wrote in The Second World War. No interpreters were needed, for one thing, but there were "differences of expression, which in the early days led to an amusing incident." The British wanted to raise an urgent matter, he said, and told the Americans they wished to "table it" (that is, bring it to the table). But to the Americans, tabling something meant putting it aside. "A long and even acrimonious argument ensued," Churchill wrote, "before both parties realised that they were agreed on the merits and wanted the same thing."

(NY Times, 'Origins of the Specious')

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Fanbois Apple-gasm as iPhone giant finally reveals WWDC lineup

Frumious Bandersnatch
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Much Apple

So Now. Actually old, redone.

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Frumious Bandersnatch
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Re: You too can copywrite like a wanker...

Six years ago ...

Damn it! You beat me to it:

An excellence-oriented '80s male does not wear a regular watch. He wears a Rolex watch, because it weighs nearly six pounds and is advertised only in excellence-oriented publications such as Fortune and Rich Protestant Golfer Magazine. The advertisements are written in incomplete sentences, which is how advertising copywriters denote excellence.

(Dave Barry, In Search of Excellence)

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Wacky 'baccy making a hash of FBI infosec recruitment efforts

Frumious Bandersnatch
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You walk into the interview and sing "Alice's Restaurant" and walk out

I don't think they'd let you finish the whole song. It's a bit of a shaggy dog story and they'd probably twig before you got too far into it.

Or arrest you for littering, or something.

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Recommendations for NAS-based home media set-up

Frumious Bandersnatch
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multicast

VideoLAN (and no doubt others) can do true multicast so that several screens can be tuned into the same video stream. If you've got a segmented network topology (several different subnets), you have to be aware that most routers/gateways won't forward multicast packets by default, so you need to explicitly enable it and run something like pimd to do the actual forwarding (Linux kernel, for example, does all the lower-level handling of UDP multicast networking, but you need something like pimd at the higher level to implement the network topology).

A couple of handy commands for testing this:

iperf -c 224.0.50.50 -u -T 2 # sender

iperf -s -B 224.0.50.50 -u -T 2 # receiver

(replacing the 224/* address with whatever multicast address you're using)

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Bitcoin blockchain allegedly infected by ancient 'Stoned' virus

Frumious Bandersnatch
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Headmaster

Re: Bitcoin Bomb?

Have a downvote for "viri". I stopped reading after that.

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Frumious Bandersnatch
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Re: the whole message

So this virus (presumably written by pot smokers) infected a machine which then stopped working, without even 'taking care of business' first. Why am I not surprised?

Nah, it worked. It's just that it lived so close to the top of memory that the stack area overlapped the area for the stored message (so regular subroutine calls and interrupts garbled it). For something that couldn't even "take care of business" as you put it, it was remarkably successful, bugs and all.

(this comment based on actually disassembling the code and figuring out how it worked; I'm sure I have a copy of this still filed away somewhere)

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Frumious Bandersnatch
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Re: the whole message

"why is MSE even searching for Stoned when it is ineffective on systems these days?"

For a few reasons:

* because, as someone pointed out above, it's cheap to add more signatures (things are much better than O(n) complexity we had in the very early days). If you can scan for it, and it's cheap to do so, then why not?

* because it's one of those viruses that your scanner is expected to pick up (and virus scanner manufacturers used to use number of viruses detected as a marketing tool)

* there are such things as virus droppers that will install all sorts of malware. The blockchain (or any random data file) mightn't be (isn't) a virus in itself, but if it contains the virus (which it doesn't) a dropper can pull it out and use it to infect something (so if I had an SQL database with lots of virus code, it would be nice if the av software could detect it in the db file)

* who says that it's ineffective? Some people still use floppies. (true, its not much of a risk, but the infection mechanism still works)

* by catching the floppy-only variant, you might also catch derived versions (like NoInt) that can infect hard disk boot sectors

Mostly, though, it's probably just a combination of inertia and anti-virus writers liking to keep old signatures around for historical/completist reasons. Maybe they should drop these old signatures, but imagine the embarrassment should one of these apparently "extinct" viruses have a high-profile outbreak and MS's program failed to detect it?

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Urinating teen polluted 57 Olympic-sized swimming pools - cops

Frumious Bandersnatch
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America!

You're a nation, alright.

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Hungry for humbler Pi? Check out kid-friendly LED-laden Pibrella

Frumious Bandersnatch
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Re: Decent pass through connectors aren't cheap!

If you're building your own board, there's an Adafruit through connector on the Farnell website for £1.14 apiece. I think the Adafruit stuff tends to be pretty good quality, but I haven't used this particular item.

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Frumious Bandersnatch
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Re: Connectivity?

There are stackable add-ons for the Pi as well. This solution is a bit of an abomination, but it looks like it can take any of the add-on cards so long as they don't have conflicting requirements for GPIO pins. This other supplier seems to have a saner approach, with single-purpose modules being stackable using I2C, I guess, so GPIO conflicts shouldn't happen provided everything has a unique I2C bus address.

Then, there's GrovePi (as mentioned in the latest MagPi, also this link) that does away with physical stacking and does everything through wiring up modules with a standard 4-wire connector. I think that's probably the neatest implementation for stuff like robots because you can route your sensors to where they make sense physically.

I think you were saying that in the Arduino world, it's quite common to have pass-through connectors for stacking. Using a Gertduino would let you build up a stack of such Arduino modules, with a Pi controlling the whole show on the bottom.

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Stone the crows, Bouncer! BT defends TV recorder upgrade DELETION snafu

Frumious Bandersnatch
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you are quite entitled to make any suggestions or protests at the appropriate time!

There's no point in acting all surprised about it. All the planning charts and demolition orders have been on display at your local planning department in Alpha Centauri for fifty of your Earth years so you've had plenty of time to lodge any formal complaints and its far too late to start making a fuss about it now.

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ARM tests: Intel flops on Android compatibility, Windows power

Frumious Bandersnatch
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nominative determinism in action

Gotta love that the power consumption metrics were carried out by a guy called Watt. Any relation to James Watt, I wonder?

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Denmark dynamited by cunning American Minecraft vandals

Frumious Bandersnatch
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Re: Just imagine...

Someone might even burn the White House down. Again.

Fuck yeah! That's what you get when you try to mess with Canada! Eh?

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Boffins build billion-synapse, three-watt 'brain'

Frumious Bandersnatch
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Re: As a matter of interest ....

The 64 core parallella chip seems to be about to start production

Actually, it's not. The original Kickstarter campaign included the 64-core boards as a stretch goal, which was not met. Those 64-core boards they've been testing are engineering prototypes, only going to backers who came in at a certain level.

The whole Parallella project has been something of a disappointment, IMO. I think they over-promised (at least the 16-core machine isn't really a "supercomputer for everyone") and struggled to deliver. At least we know they've been plugging away at trying to make it a success and I do have sympathy for them in terms of the unforeseen problems they ran into. They have delivered at least some 16-core boards and hopefully they'll get around to delivering the rest to all the Kickstarter and pre-order customers within the next month. I'm one of the pre-order customers, so I'm hoping that they'll clear their commitments to everyone who ordered one within that time frame.

After that, and people have the boards in hand, hopefully people will still have enough interest in the platform for them to be able to make money by ramping up to full-scale production of the 16-core boards... I'm sure they're still doing work on the 64-core (and higher, up to 1024-core) and if they can get the funding for it, that's where they do want to go. I just don't expect it any time soon...

As for your idea of neural nets, I'm sure that it's pretty feasible to run them on the Epiphany cores. There's a pretty long thread about it on their forums somewhere. It's nowhere near the level of brain simulation, of course, but you can always cluster them and even single boards should be pretty efficient, given the right algorithms and such.

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US judge: Our digital search warrants apply ANYWHERE

Frumious Bandersnatch
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Re: inevitable

The story is about a narrow minded judge using a very broad interpretation of a USA-ian law to try to do an end run around international law and treaties

It's not the first time this has happened. From an old article here: Kentucky judge OKs 141-site net casino land grab. It's almost as if concepts like non-USA law and territoriality doesn't exist.

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Minecraft players can now download Denmark – all of it – in 1:1 scale

Frumious Bandersnatch
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Re: Needs more Norway

That was also my first thought (so I'm not the only one pining for the fjords). Then I thought, why not do the Benelux countries? It's sure to come in at much less than a Terabyte, being so boring and all (geographically speaking, of course).

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DeSENSORtised: Why the 'Internet of Things' will FAIL without IPv6

Frumious Bandersnatch
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Re: And another thing

<sound of ambulance and large coves wearing white jackets>

They're coming to take me away, hahaaa!

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Frumious Bandersnatch
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And another thing

Not about ipv6, but the whole concept of Internet of Things.

I think that there are plenty of companies out there salivating at the thought of making a lot of net-connected gizmos. Most of them will be junk, but they'll be able to charge a premium for them. That's not the real issue, though. The real issue is how many of these gizmos basically won't work unless you use the manufacturer's servers for data collection and control. Like many other readers here, I would never buy a product that worked like that, regardless of how useful or desirable the gizmo was. It's this element of being able to spy on users (or simply being able lock them into a subscription service for the lifetime of the device) that I fear will be quite appealing for many companies.

This, in my opinion is the single greatest factor that is stopping (or will stop) the advance of this IoT thing. OK, I said I wouldn't mention IPv4/IPv6, but ...

I know that IPv4 and NAT issues are also another technical limitation. You can't easily connect to your server without either renting a VM or server from a hosting provider (which also might have privacy/legal issues surrounding it), can coax your ISP to do port forwarding for your incoming traffic, or simply shell out for a (scarce) public IPv4 address.

IoT device manufactures really need to provide two options for the user: first, they need to let you configure the devices so that you use your own server (and provide the server software), and secondly, they also need to make their stuff IPv6-capable. The latter is a bit of gamble considering it adds cost for a feature that not many people are using yet (and it's unknown if/when they will). On the other hand, if they don't support IPv6 then all these devices will go straight to landfill if/when the switchover happens...

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Frumious Bandersnatch
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Re: Bridging IPv4 to IPv6

As for NAT, IP was not originally designed for address translation and some internet protocols do not work with it, notably active FTP and SIP

Maybe it's ignorance on my part, but I don't think that's true.

As I see it, it's not NAT that's the problem, but the fact that it's generally a one-way only operation (eg, sNAT to modify your outgoing packets so that they appear to come from the router rather than whatever your local address is). I'd thought that any program that operates from behind the firewall should work fine so long as it restricts itself to only making outgoing connections, with incoming packets for the session being correctly identified by the router as belonging to that session and so routed back inwards correctly. Am I wrong on this?

If you're talking about running an FTP or SIP server inside your NAT'd network, then obviously you're out of luck unless whoever runs your NAT'ing firewall (most likely your ISP, because they realise the value of public IP addresses and usually charge extra for them, with everyone else behind NAT) agrees to do traffic forwarding of incoming connections. That being so, it's not a problem of FTP/SIP (or any other server that's designed to accept incoming requests) is incompatible with NAT, but rather that ISP's NAT policies dictate that regular users can't just request port forwarding so that their mail server or whatever appears to be "on the Internet" (at least not without paying). Again, that's the situation as I understand it.

The really big problem with NAT is that if ISPs allowed users to run servers behind the NAT box, you'd very quickly run into conflicts about the assignment of port numbers. Some services (like http) are quite happy moving from the default ports (80/443) so long as the client machine puts the right port address in the URL. Other applications are much more picky about what port they listen or talk on, and the clients (or peers, if we're talking about something like an online game like World of Warcraft, which I think uses a p2p system for downloading updates) simply don't have the option of trying to connect to a different port. I assume that SIP works with a fixed port number for receiving incoming calls (unless you have an external directory where you can look up ip:port for a number?), so if that's the case then you can only have a maximum of one user behind the firewall who "owns" that incoming port. This technical limitation (and, I guess, any privacy/security concerns arising from making a mistake and routing to the wrong user) makes me suspect that ISPs will generally not even entertain your request for port forwarding if you're a regular NAT user ...

As much as I hate this restriction with NAT, I'm still not sure that I like the alternative of flat routing (no hiding behind NAT) in IPv6. I know people will say that I can just use a router and drop packets like I used to be able to do in IPv4. At least I assume that's the case. My problem is basically that IPv6 is so complex that I'm not sure I trust myself to even do this routing correctly and be sure that none of my IPv6 devices can't be accessed from random machines on the 'net somewhere.

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Shocking new low for SanDisk – 15nm flash chips rolling out its fabs

Frumious Bandersnatch
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Re: 15nm

I'm replying to my own post above purely in the interest of accuracy.

Typing 'beard second' into Google gives the suggestion '= 5nm', so if Google is right, then 15nm is actually 3 beard-seconds. Google's answer may be controversial, though.

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Frumious Bandersnatch
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Re: 15nm

So they've gone to a 0.125 beard-second fab process? Very impressive. I think this could be a very handy unit for measuring things that are very much sub-linguine in length (pasta's too hard to cut up that small). Editor?

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So, just how do you say 'the mutt's nuts' in French?

Frumious Bandersnatch
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Re: Japanese

玉. is either 'tama' (kun-yomi) or 'gyoku' (on-yomi). If it's in a compound it's much more likely to use kun-yomi (Japanese style reading) and mean "ball" or a round thing. Like 'eyeball' is 'medama' (with tama undergoing a sound change, becoming dama). The on-yomi (Chinese style reading) by itself would mean "jewel" or "jade" (the material). There might be some compound words (eg, 玉石, ぎょくせき, gems and stones) that use the on-yomi, but I think that the tama/ball reading is much more usual (eg, 玉石 also has the reading たまいし, a pebble/boulder/round stone).

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Frumious Bandersnatch
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Re: Japanese

How about "inu no kintama" for the Japanese translation. 犬の金玉. Literally "dogs gold balls".

I have a copy of "Japanese Street Slang" at home. As you might imagine, it has a whole section devoted to testicles :) Kintama is the #1 word they recommend, but (as with many of the words in the book) I've never heard it spoken. It does seem to have a good pedigree, though (no pun intended).

The other word that I was actually going to suggest is in there too: O-inari. The 'o' at the start is an honorific prefix. Look up the web to see pictures of "Inari sushi" (contracted to "inarizushi"). For example, this one. From the resemblance to scrota, it should be obvious that people could understand its slang use. The only thing about using it with kitsune (as opposed to inu) as some people have suggested is that there's also a kami (somewhere between a spirit and a god) named Inari, and the kitsune are his messengers. If you said something like 'kitsune no inari", people might thing you were referring to the kami and get confused. You'd just have to try it out on a native Japanese speaker.

On another related point, I'm sure loads of you have heard the story about how the dog's bollocks could have come from Meccano sets and the "Box Deluxe". I'm sure that's pure bollocks. I always thought that the idea came because there must (self-evidently) be something good about them (the dog's bollocks) because they like to lick them so much. I've always wondered if the phrase translated literally into other languages because it would be strong support for the "self-evident" etymology theory. When I heard 'la puta madre' in Spanish I thought it literally meant 'dog's bollocks' (madra being the Irish word for dog, but that's a false friend). Alas, although it does translate to it in English, it's not a literal translation.

Anyway, this is all vital research, and I'm glad that el Reg is championing it in its pages. Thumbs up!

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Fancy joining Reg hack on quid-a-day challenge?

Frumious Bandersnatch
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Re: chickpeas [gotta love 'em]

Definitely my favourite pulse. I make tomato-based stews fairly regularly... mostly with split yellow peas or chickpeas. Makes for a very hearty and cheap meal. I used to be vegetarian, but these days if I'm making such a thing, I'll chop up some chorizo and put it in the pot at the start to crisp it up a bit and release the oils (which stay in the pot and give a really nice flavour to the rest of the dish---it's crazy, but I sometimes see recipes telling to to throw out these delicious oils after cooking ii!). I take the chorizo bits out at that point and float a few of them on top of the stew when serving it, but sometimes I leave them in. In fact, I had a version of this for dinner today and yesterday, but I poached a ray wing in the stew for about 5 min at the end of cooking, then added some pre-packed crayfish.

I guess what I'm getting at is that it's actually dead simple to make (recipes for this sort of thing abound, but I've evolved my own as I went along) a very tasty and nutritious dinner very cheaply using simple ingredients: mainly onions, garlic, spices, tomato, celery, carrots, potatoes and pulses. I haven't calculated it, so maybe it's not a pound-a-day cheap, but I'd say it's close and probably a lot better for you than some of the things people are suggesting (like Mars bars!).

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Frumious Bandersnatch
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Re: having to take a teapot to work

But taking a samovar to work would be even more hassle than a teapot.

You could always try making and selling a brew on your train to work. Or maybe barter the tea for chocolatey snacks your fellow passengers might have. I think it would probably be within the spirit of the exercise, if not the letter.

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AMD demos 'Berlin' Opteron, world's first heterogeneous system architecture server chip

Frumious Bandersnatch
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Re: computational density...

Have an upvote. I can't see any reason why someone would downvote your original post, since what you say is perfectly fine (even using "real estate", which makes for a good analogy). The detractors should take a look at FPGA programming (eg, this free introductory course) if they don't understand (or want to know) why "wider isn't always better" as you put it.

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Over half of software developers think they'll be millionaires – study

Frumious Bandersnatch
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Re: Bonkers McAfee

What, a complete nutjob?

I think it's probably the hookers and coke "bath salts*" lifestyle that people aspire to ...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bKgf5PaBzyg

* I dunno. Maybe the hip people are doing "alloy wheel cleaner" these days.

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Russian deputy PM: 'We are coming to the Moon FOREVER'

Frumious Bandersnatch
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IT Angle

Re: Since this is an IT site...

Yanks in space? Russkies on the Moon? Same thing, just different different docking music.

(yes, there definitely is an IT angle!)

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USB reversible cables could become standard sooner than you think

Frumious Bandersnatch
Bronze badge

Re: the last hardware bane of desktop hardware support

even Executives should be able to figure this out now!

I don't know. The problem with idiots, as someone once said, is that they're so damned ingenious. I'm sure they'll find some way to stick the thing in the wrong way!

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