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* Posts by Frumious Bandersnatch

1313 posts • joined 8 Nov 2007

Jimbo Wales: Wikipedia servers in UK? No way, not with YOUR libel law

Frumious Bandersnatch
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Re: "world's largest unreliable collection of factoids"

In other words, yes, Wikiland still has a way to go before the label "reliable" can be applied.

Unlikely, since it's based on UDP*. Building a BGP** layer on top might make it a little better though.

* Unreliable Dictionary Protocol

** Byzantine General Protocol

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Apple pounces on Samsung doc as proof of 'slavish copy' claims

Frumious Bandersnatch
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Re: This is where it gets ridiculous...

given what most Applytes I know are like ...

Jobs forbid that this trial opens their eyes and they become Applostates ...

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Frumious Bandersnatch
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Boo Hoo, Your Honour

Their ARM-based, colour screened, touch sensitive, mini computer with telephone, camera, sensor and internet capabilities looks like our ARM-based, colour screened, touch sensitive, mini computer with telephone, camera, sensor and internet capabilities. It's not fair!

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Console content can cause crime, claims cop

Frumious Bandersnatch
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Of course video games don't affect children

If they did we'd all be running around munching pills in darkened rooms listening to repetitive beat music.

Oh, wait.

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Judge rejects Apple's calls for Samsung censure

Frumious Bandersnatch
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Re: Of course...

Having a choice of one does rather smack of a Stalinist ideology

A choice of one (aka Hobson's choice) strikes me more as being a Fordist ideology. Goes to show that a monopoly can form under political systems of either extreme, I guess.

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Valve: Games run FASTER on Linux than Windows

Frumious Bandersnatch
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Re: Better FPS? Why didn't you say so. Shut up and take my money....

Valve are blatantly using this as a starter to "STEAM OS"

I'll get this in early before any announcement: vaporware.

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Frumious Bandersnatch
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Re: re: [static linking]

Another possibility is to allow for dynamic linking, but include the .so files as part of the steam infrastructure. You can have a totally sandboxed environment for playing the games (ie, only use those libs provided by steam rather than depending on whatever cruft you have installed on your system) by using LD_LIBRARYPATH, or you can pick and mix between the game/distro-supplied libs by using LD_PRELOAD. All this can, of course, be hidden behind a graphical game config screen or launcher with simple toggles to choose between game or OS-supplied libs.

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Post-pub nosh deathmatch: Bauernfrühstück v bacon sarnie

Frumious Bandersnatch
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Re: Dangerous suggestion

Majo on anything hot is just weird

I used to think the same, but tuna melts without mayo just doesn't work.You may need to lightly toast the side of the bread that gets the tuna mixture to keep it from getting too soggy though.

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Million-plus IOPS: Kaminario smashes IBM in DRAM decimation

Frumious Bandersnatch
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what's with the name "kaminario?"

I know kaminari (雷) is Japanese for "thunder"(*), but what's with the 'o' at the end? Is it actually deriving from some Spanish word?

* Jim Breen's JDIC also lists kaminarioyaji (雷親父) as an irascible old man (a Victor Meldrew type, no doubt) but that's surely not what the name is hinting at...

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Gabe Newell: Windows 8 is a 'catastrophe' for PC biz

Frumious Bandersnatch
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Re: taken out of context???

HTF can a one word answer be taken out of context? it IS the context

Read the article a bit more closely. To paraphrase it seems that the Gartner man meant something like "we usually write paid-for reviews, and in this case we weren't paid to say nice things about Metro without a touch interface. Summing up the experience as 'bad' was an obvious thinko on my part in the context of getting paid for further shill work".

Yes, I find it quite astonishing that he'd say something like that, but that's what I read the article as meaning.

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Microsoft picks October 26 for Windows 8 launch

Frumious Bandersnatch
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101 is obviously code ... for something

The simplest explanation is that 101 in binary is 5 decimal, which is a tacit acceptance that windows "8" is actually two steps backward and in no way an advance on Windows 7.

(sure as every second Star Trek movie is shit, ...)

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We'll punish crims faster... with lots of shiny new tech - minister

Frumious Bandersnatch
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punish crims faster... with lots of shiny new tech

Reading this I was expecting them to announce a Judge Dredd style "Time Stretcher".

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Microsoft to announce new Office version on Monday

Frumious Bandersnatch
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Coffee/keyboard

Re: Near-beer. "Small gains in productivity in the office"

> OK, show us the small gains ... and we'll be pleased yo add them up.

Oh, I don't know. Here are a few productivity boosters I've come across...

^t to transpose the last two letters (if you've types teh instead of the, for instance). Alt t does the same for words and ^x t does it for lines.

^x n n to narrow to a region so all your global (ish) search and replace and reformatting is restricted to just where you want it (^x n w to "widen" again after)

alt / to autocomplete (cycles through all previous words with the same prefix; also works after a word)

abbrev-mode to save typing on common expressions (like fwiw, atm, otoh, etc.). Put in common misspellings that you make to have them corrected (teh, embarrased, whatevar)

^x r m to mark a bookmark at the current point and file, ^x r b to jump to a saved bookmark

^x 2 to split screen into two horizontal panes, ^x 3 to split vertically, ^x 1 to go back to single pane view

^x o to jump to the other (next) pane in a multi-pane display (a good one to assign a keystroke like keypad-enter to)

^ space to set a mark (one end of a region) ^x x to jump back to it (previous point then becomes the mark)

Alt c capitalise word at point (or the region, if set); alt -c capitalises last word (also u and l for all upper and all lower case)

alt $ spellcheck current word

alt a, alt e jump to start/end of this/next logical section (paragraph)

^x (, ^x ) define a keyboard macro, ^x e to execute it (or alt number ^x e to do it that many times)

^x tab indent region by default amount (or prefix with alt number for a particular delta)

I don't know about you, but all these features are great time-savers for me. I'm sure I could go on, but I think you get the point.

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Tablets, copycats and Weird Al Yankovic

Frumious Bandersnatch
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Re: <raises hand>

Indeed, respect to Weird Al. Loved his take on Subterranean Homesick Blues with the Dylan/Ginsberg style video, but all the lines are palindromes*. Called, fittingly enough, "Bob".

* Note, doc I dissent. I diet on cod. A fast never prevents a fatness.

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CERN catches a glimpse of Higgs-like boson

Frumious Bandersnatch
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"God" particle nomenclature

It's definitely too late to get that nomenclature out of the minds of regular folk, and even techie sites like this still succumb to using it despite knowing how wrong it is. I think I may have a solution: wherever you'd write "God", simply write "God*" instead. You could put a footnote at the bottom of the article if you wanted (eg, "Not your God", "No relation" or "Yes, we know") but I think it would be even better without the footnote. The asterisk has a fine tradition as a way to let people say "fuck" to prudish audiences, so why can't God* stand in for "Goddamn"? Occasional hilarity from readers confusing God* with a completely irrelevant footnote could be seen as a bonus.

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Users enraged by Cisco's cloudy 'upgrade' to Linksys routers

Frumious Bandersnatch
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Re: huh?

"administrate"?

What wrong with him wanting to ply his router box with ads? I think he should have the right to do that if it's what turns him on.

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Chess algorithm written by Alan Turing goes up against Kasparov

Frumious Bandersnatch
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Re: I think I'm hungry

There's a much more efficient algorithm for dealing with sparse rarebits:

// how many bit(e)s in rarebit?

unsigned int bites (unsigned long rarebit) {

for (bites=0; rarebit; ++bites) {

rarebit &= (rarebit - 1);

}

return bites;

}

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Tesco grabs Peter Gabriel's musical streamer

Frumious Bandersnatch
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Re: potentially embarrasing purchases

Rather than be embarrassed, you could take the approach from this xkcd strip. (probably nsfw)

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Music Biz: The Man is still The Man, man

Frumious Bandersnatch
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Re: And the solution is?

> Take the skinheads bowling of course

Well I don't know what the world may want ... but what [it] needs right now is another folk singer like I need a hole in my head.

(thanks for the jog down memory lane, btw)

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Universe has more hydrogen than we thought

Frumious Bandersnatch
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@new weight unit

I'm all for bizarre units, and this one is even better than most in being "small, but massive"(*) all at the same time.

I for one welcome our small and very far away overlords, etc.

(*) refer to article, obv.

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Pints under attack as Lord Howe demands metric-only UK

Frumious Bandersnatch
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re: Metric units are abstract

Well then, I'm sure a litre of water out there somewhere will be very surprised to find that it weighs exactly(*) a kilogram, and that it fits in a cube of 10x10x10 cm. What could be a better and more concrete basis for a shared measurement system than the physical properties of water?

* Well, that was the intention behind the system, but what with measurement error and subsequent redefinitions, the SI measurements for volume, weight and length don't exactly meet this ideal.

The one thing that the French obviously got wrong in their zeal for base-10 measurements was the idea of the ten-day week. Sure, it'd be marginally better to have 3/10ths of the week off instead of 2/7ths, but who wants to have to work 7 days in a row? I guess they didn't take into account that weeks (and calenders) are more of a social construct than a scientific one.

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Russian upstart claims BitTorrent-killer

Frumious Bandersnatch
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Re: What part of "Denial of Service" don't you get?

"Denial of service" doesn't mean "overspamming".

Absolutely. You could also add a Slowloris-type attack to your list of possible DoS methods. You don't need huge amounts of traffic to effectively knock out a vulnerable server by starving it of file handles for handling legitimate connections.

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UK milk wastage = 20,000 cars = actually completely unimportant

Frumious Bandersnatch
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Re: As with all these Eco stories...

reminds me of King Canute trying to hold back the tide, pointless and above all arrogant.

Except that Canute most likely did it to prove a point (that he did not have the power to command the tides), and not out of arrogance or power-drunk madness. From the wiki page:

It is believed that, on this site, Cnut tried to command the tide of the river to prove to his courtiers that they were fools to think that he could command the waves.

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Best and the Rest: ARM Mini PCs

Frumious Bandersnatch
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256MB RAM is not much for running a modern graphical Linux desktop

I keep seeing this comment here on the Reg. It kind of bugs me to read that given that the PS3 only has 256Mb of main memory and it's completely capable of running Linux + X/Windows. OK, so there is a slight proviso in that large compile tasks sometimes need just a little bit more swap space, often borrowed from unused video memory, but you could just allocate an equivalent amount of disk-based swap and everything's copacetic.

So--256Mb--it may not be enough for everybody, but it's definitely enough for Linux + X/Windows.

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US gov boffins achieve speeds FASTER THAN LIGHT

Frumious Bandersnatch
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Re: @GitMeMyShootinIrons

Those pesky apostrophes 2...

Back in my day we had a thing called "alt.possessive.its.has.no.apostrophe". Kind of hard to forget when there's an entire newsfroup dedicated to it.

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America, China go ape for tablets

Frumious Bandersnatch
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Windows

Re: I still don't know

> what [...] tablets are good for

I dunno. You could tape it to the underside of a glass table, attach a couple of joysticks and buttons and use it as a retro gaming station. Provided it's got USB connections and whatnot.

TBH, I don't really have a clue either.

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No sex please, we're Telstra

Frumious Bandersnatch
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Re: "videos that objectify women"

I thought it was going to be a screen capture (probably done with a shaky camcorder) of a SHRDLU session.

> PUT THE WOMAN ON THE PYRAMID

THE WOMAN FALLS OFF THE PYRAMID.

> PUT THE WOMAN ON THE RED CUBE.

THE WOMAN IS ON THE RED CUBE.

(with apologies for all caps... it's all we had back then)

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Suspected freetards to face piracy letters in 2014

Frumious Bandersnatch
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Re: A reward could be set up

A kick in the balls from Mr Orlowski, perhaps?

Sounds more like a job for the Special Projects Burro.

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Bit9 wants to bin 'broken' antivirus, install whitelisting tech

Frumious Bandersnatch
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Facepalm

What is a program?

I'm not convinced that whitelisting can really work in real-life situations. While it's impressive that they've committed themselves to building such a large database of known programs, there are a few big problems that I can see.

First off is the problem of what a program is. In this day and age so many packages have programming languages built into them. Either that, or the packages are actually development platforms in their own right. In the case of packages that have some form of scripting included as a non-core feature (spreadsheets, word processing apps), it would seem to be impossible to whitelist every single "program" embedded in ordinary files (shared by people) or included in the standard corporate install image (eg, company templates). The problem here isn't just the volume of programs that would need to be whitelisted if you take this expanded (and more correct) view of what a program is, but there would also be confidentiality issues if your company had to send samples of all your in-house macros/script collections for hashing. Even if you could set up the hashing/authentication server in-house, there's still plenty of scope for cock-ups.

Another problem with malware is that quite a lot of it (perhaps the majority?) is exploiting bugs in particular packages. Almost any program that reads in user data has the potential to have bugs which renders what should be just input data into live code. So even though a PDF or a particular set of inputs to a web-based service ostensibly doesn't come under the rubric of "programs", they do become a way for malware authors to trick the application or server into executing whatever they want. The whole whitelisting philosophy completely fails here since user input, data files, and so on simply don't get counted as programs when actually they are.

I noticed in the article that someone attached to the company said that false positives with whitelisting technology were "bad in the early days". It beggars belief that the people building these systems don't even seem to understand the Birthday Paradox when it comes to picking a hashing scheme... That certainly doesn't inspire confidence.

All in all, as it's reported here, the scheme is pure hyperbole, possibly verging on snake oil. IMNSHO.

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Swiss, German physicists split the electron

Frumious Bandersnatch
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re: Bohr model was abandoned 40 years ago

Maybe so, but not AFAICT the standard model which says that electrons are, eh, infrangible.

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Lesser-spotted Raspberry Pi FINALLY dished up

Frumious Bandersnatch
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Your school had an abacus?

You were lucky. In my school, we were the abacus. The headmaster would slap us left and right across the classroom whenever he needed to work on the heating bill, payroll, rent we had to pay for the classroom, etc.

Of course you try telling ...

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So what's the worst movie NEVER made?

Frumious Bandersnatch
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Re: Reeves playing Spike.

> The TV Sessions and Movie are among my all time favourite Anime

If I had to choose, I'd rank Samurai Champloo a notch higher than Bebop. Shinichirō Watanabe did both of them.

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Frumious Bandersnatch
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live-action version of cowboy bebop?

Oh God, no.

Although he's been OK in some roles, no amount of mind bleach can eat away the memory of the steaming turd that was Johnny Mnemonic. To be fair, it wasn't just his acting--the whole screenplay/treatment was just atrocious.

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Frumious Bandersnatch
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zenith - I do not think that word means what you think it means

I assume you meant 'nadir'. But I suppose you could be living in the antipodes. That would work, right?

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Life on Mars found – in 1976

Frumious Bandersnatch
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nobody suggesting "take off and nuke from orbit" yet?

Good job too... it didn't work very well in The Andromeda Strain.

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Bacteria isolated for four million years beat newest antibiotic

Frumious Bandersnatch
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Paris Hilton

Re: Now, that's strange

noticing how widespread this nonsense is becoming.

Of course this "Creationism" stuff is nonsense. These bacteria are obviously immune to our antibiotics because of morphic resonance!

(that's it Paris... use your brain waves!)

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Commodore founder Jack Tramiel dies at 83

Frumious Bandersnatch
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re: disk drive (1541 an expensive peripheral)

Yes, that's true, but considering that it had quite a few of the same parts as in the c64 itself (less sound and graphics chips, naturally), the price wasn't that surprising. Basically, it was a fully-fledged computer in itself, albeit one dedicated to working as a drive controller.

I could never afford the 1541, but by the time I'd outgrown the tape drive, some clone drives were available that were a lot cheaper (and more slimline). I bought one of these clones (I can't remember the name, but I think it might have been by Evesham Micros) and never had any problems with it.

With this news, I'm tempted to pull the system out from the cupboard to see if it all still works. I loved playing Uridium and Zoids, but I'm sure there are dozens of other excellent games I've completely forgotten about. I just hope the floppies still work.

Thanks for all those (great) wasted hours and all the memories. RIP, Jack...

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Minecraft maker plots ultimate videogame for coders

Frumious Bandersnatch
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Coat

Loving the C64-style colour scheme and boot message

And if you squint, the assembly language isn't that far removed from 6510 assembly either. Well, the JSR, addressing modes and limited range of registers look similar anyway. The 16-bit opcodes look a bit bloated and strange though--definitely not like a C64. Then again, A9 30 only stores an 8-bit value there.

Off to read more about the instruction set.

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Google shows off Project Glass augmented reality specs

Frumious Bandersnatch
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Project Glass?

They should have pissed everyone off by calling it iWindows.

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HTC sues fans for premature unboxing

Frumious Bandersnatch
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Re: These hackers got off lightly

> Guys, its Morris (who normally hides behind Anon Coward) DO NOT FEED THE TROLL!

Er, no. But top marks for spotting the reference.

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Frumious Bandersnatch
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Facepalm

Re: These hackers got off lightly

No, I'm not delusional. It was a joke. The clue was in calling them "hackers" and also the "I'll get my coat" icon... usually denoting humour, isn't it?

I'm surprised so many people didn't get it. A classic example of Poe's Law, it seems.

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Frumious Bandersnatch
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These hackers got off lightly

They should have been given a jail cell with Bubba instead of just having their toys taken away from them.

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Use the holy word of God to stay secure online, says bishop

Frumious Bandersnatch
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re: sibboleth (*)

Heh... came here to make exactly the same comment.

(*) It seems google doesn't recognise my spelling... perhaps it would make a good password?

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Lucy in 3.4 million-year-old cross-species cave tryst

Frumious Bandersnatch
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Re: "hominin"?

re: that town in Kentucky... here was me thinking it was just a homonym.

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Chinese to burn iPads in upcoming celebrations

Frumious Bandersnatch
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$3.20 for a paper iPad?

Does that include any apps?

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Frumious Bandersnatch
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Re: Voodoo its all voodoo

> leaders in Necromancy in it's [sic] day

Do a search for hopping zombies. Quite an interesting twist on the Haitian style zombies we're more familiar with. Chinese zombie films often make for some quite hilarious viewing.

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BOFH: Dawn raid on Fort BOFH

Frumious Bandersnatch
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Windows

"turd divination"

I'm sure there's a word for that. I'm guessing "scatomancy".

What I'm sincerely hoping for is that there's also an app for that.

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Fujitsu's King K thrashes Top 500 rivals

Frumious Bandersnatch
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Re: (beer because there's no saki)

You're right... there is no precedent

(先きの無いコンピューターでしょう...)

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Sony intros Xperia Sola with no-need-to-touch screen

Frumious Bandersnatch
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Harry Potter fans should love this

Sendus Emailus!

On second thought, maybe too much wand-waving would be required to actually type anything...

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Tony Blair closes RSA 2012, denounces WikiLeaks

Frumious Bandersnatch
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Of Simulation and Dissimulation

Francis Bacon's essay of the same title starts off:

DISSIMULATION is but a faint kind of policy, or wisdom; for it asketh a strong wit, and a strong heart, to know when to tell truth, and to do it. Therefore it is the weaker sort of politics, that are the great dissemblers.

http://www.authorama.com/essays-of-francis-bacon-7.html

Besides still being a relevant observation on the value of privacy (rendered as "closeness, reservation, and secrecy"), it's also telling as an indictment of Bush and Blair. All politicians lie, and we expect them to "dissemble" (pretend not to be what they are) and "simulate" (pretend to be what they are not) to some degree of another, and as appropriate to the circumstances. However, these men have taken simulation and dissimulation to such a level that one wonders if they are the only ones who cannot see their lies as anything but transparent falsehoods. Such people are beyond being merely immoral---they are outright dangerous.

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