* Posts by Frumious Bandersnatch

1403 posts • joined 8 Nov 2007

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Cunning goldfish avoided predator in tank for seven years

Frumious Bandersnatch
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Re: Sport fishing?

And a sushi knife.

I never heard of koi sushi so I thought maybe they don't taste good. Turns out that people don't eat any freshwater fish due to the risk of getting parasites. The Wikipedia page on raw fish dishes says:

Traditionally, fish that live all or part of their lives in fresh water were considered unsuitable [...] due to the possibility of parasites

I never knew this but now it makes sense to me that certain fish like mackerel (aji, saba), eel (unagi) and maybe others that are commonly seen on sushi are always cooked first...

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Hi-res audio folk to introduce new rules and weed out impure noises

Frumious Bandersnatch
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Re: Monty....

re: http://www.xiph.org/video/vid2.shtml

I didn't watch the video. I would have expected someone to give this link ("24/192 Music Downloads...and why they make no sense") instead ...

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Apple pulls Civil War games in Confederate flag takedown

Frumious Bandersnatch
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Re: Fast track to offense

Apart from historical reference this Confederate flag belongs with that swastika - in the trash.

What's wrong with the swastika? I personally like it. It's just a pity that some nutjobs decided to appropriate it for their own ends and that as a result we've been denied it ever since. Making it illegal is as senseless as making the symbol '福' illegal.

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This whopping 16-bit computer processor is being built by hand, transistor by transistor

Frumious Bandersnatch
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Re: If you really want to go off-piste ...

re: hydraulic computers, there was MONIAC but I'm not sure if it counts as hydraulic (involving water pressure in some useful way) or a computer in the usual sense.

What prompted me to reply, though, was that I just recently came across the idea of a hydraulic ram pump. Sounds like it would make an excellent component in this speculative machine.

Now you've got me thinking about powering stuff with water in Minecraft :(

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Swordfish fatally stabs man after man stabs, fatally, swordfish

Frumious Bandersnatch
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Re: GOOD

I wonder if J R Hartley used to receive abuse and death threats?

Probably not, but even if he did, it's kind of hard to kill a fictional character. I can't see them running follow-up ads like that.

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Cheesy video shows ex-Gooners pronouncing 'Huawei'

Frumious Bandersnatch
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wha[t] way do you really pronounce it?

(sorry, I don't click on video links... did I guess right?)

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Heroic German rozzers rescue innocent lamb from sordid brothel

Frumious Bandersnatch
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Is it OK to say

that that's one mighty cute lamb in the article?

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100s of Virgin Media customers hit by handset repair glitch, telco admits

Frumious Bandersnatch
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can I upvote the article?

It deserves it for the Dylan Moran/Black Books pic alone.

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ATTACK of the DINKY DRONES! US military creates ROBOTIC CARRIER PIGEON

Frumious Bandersnatch
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PASSENGER PIGEONS!?

Passenger pigeon's been extinct since 1914!

Oh, you said "carrier". As you were ...

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You say you want a musical revolution. Actually, have three

Frumious Bandersnatch
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suddenly it was possible [to have] a pop song without harmony

If that was in 1991, then I guess Napoleon XIV must have been some sort of visionary? That came out in 1966 and although the wiki link doesn't mention it, I recall reading that he was denied composition rights (iirc) because it didn't have any of the usual elements of a "song", most notably not having any "notes" (no pun intended, it's all just glissando with no fixed stops). I think that the link here might explain that in point 5... he lost certification from the American Society of Composers, Authors and Publishers.

Also, while I'm talking about pre-dating, how about Blondie (Rapture, 1980) and Gil Scott-Heron (TRWNBT, 1970) as rappers/proto-rappers? And obviously there were tons of electronic artists before the 1983 cutoff (like Bruce Haack, but many before him, too). Less eclectically, Telstar was a massive hit in 1962...

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NSA spying is illegal? Then let's make it law, say Republicans

Frumious Bandersnatch
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You also don't hear of too many Supermarkets "disappearing" their customers.

But they sometimes have Extraordinary Reductions!

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Frumious Bandersnatch
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Re: Mitch McConnell and Senator Burr are being a bit dense...

re: legislative vs constitutional change... if they gave the new law a snappy name, probably nobody would notice. In the spirit of PATRIOT, why not LOOPHOLE, "letting our own previous hacking operate legally evermore"?

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High school students' record-setting pulsar STUMPS BOFFINS

Frumious Bandersnatch
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a question about inertia...

Any astroboffins here? The article got me wondering what happens to the rotational energy of two bodies that get tidally locked. Will that get converted into faster mutual orbit and hence greater distance between the pair? If so, could initial high rotational speeds of the bodies account for the high separation now, or would the effect (if it even exists) be negligible?

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Bonny Scottish post-pub nosh neckfiller: Rumbledethumps

Frumious Bandersnatch
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Re: お好み焼き

ee, ore to ishou (kono pasokon ha nihongo no nyuuryoku dekinai kedo...)

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Frumious Bandersnatch
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best cabbage-based "neck filler"

has got to be "Okonomiyaki." I'd love to be able to make Hiroshima style, where the ingredients are layered (I don't have a hot plate), but Kansai style is an acceptable substitute and dead easy to whip up. The main ingredients are white cabbage, batter and usually cooked bacon. The Wikipedia link lists plenty of other stuff you can put in (literally, whatever takes your fancy). Just mix up some batter (flour, cold water or stock, egg, seasoning), slice the cabbage and other ingredients, mix, fry, add extras, flip, serve. You can buy special okonomiyaki sauce but I like tonkatsu sauce on it.

It's quick to prepare, but you can always prepare it pre-pub and keep it in the fridge ready to fry later. Definitely worth trying, even if you think you don't like cabbage. Try this and you may change your mind on that.

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One bit to rule them all? Forget it – old storage types never die

Frumious Bandersnatch
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OMG, you didn't just do that?

FOUR WOLVES!

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Not pro-Bono: Russian MP wants Apple to face stiff action for cramming 'gay' U2 into iCrevices

Frumious Bandersnatch
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"I [...] am the owner of an iPhone"

Well then, he should obviously realise what's going on in the pic. Daddy buys son an Apple Watch (TM'd up the wazoo). Son, being a bit unappreciative of the value of things (or the cost, at least), swallows said gizmo. The aftermath is photographed as dad tries to locate the device by listening for the ticks...

(upvotes for the best explanation of why they both need to be demi-nekkid)

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Oxford chaps solve problem in 1982 Sinclair Spectrum manual

Frumious Bandersnatch
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Boffin

I bet Rob Hubbard could have done this, no problem

He of the theme tunes of such games as International Karate, Thrust, Zoids, Commando and plenty more, for those who may not have heard of him (for shame!).

I remember reading an article where he talked about using a "Forth-like" notation to code the music and all the technical challenges involved in doing real-time music with just a scant few "time slices" (on a non-preemptive CPU, natch) to play with between all the other game code.

(the past is so bright) ... I gotta wear shades -->

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Top Spanish minister shows citizens are thick as tortillas de ballenas

Frumious Bandersnatch
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science, bitch

By Toutatis, If it stops the sky from falling on our heads, I'm all for it.

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SUPERVOLCANIC MAGMA reservoir BUBBLING under Yellowstone Park

Frumious Bandersnatch
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Re: Bah!

By which time there's no-one left to notice.

Stupid "scientists".

Yeah, let's go and burn down the observatory so this kind of thing never happens again.

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Frumious Bandersnatch
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Re: Time to develop a good exit strategy

Folks, we NEED to develop spaceflight and space habitats. Planets are just too dangerous to live on.

and

Or failing that, how about a bunch of virgins waiting for you.

Me, I'm leaning towards mine-shafts right now...

But ah with the proper breeding techniques and a ratio of say, ten females to each male, I would guess that they could then work their way back to the present gross national product within say, twenty years."

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Frumious Bandersnatch
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Re: Geothermal energy?

Unless I'm mistaken, there isn't much sewage available in the Yellowstone area

Have you forgotten how to finish the bears + woods = ? equation?

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The huge flaw in Moore’s Law? It's NOT a law after all

Frumious Bandersnatch
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Re: Spelling Police

re cat vs concat, I learned many years ago that the Unix 'cat' command was short for 'catenate' which is an obscure and/or archaic variant of 'concatenate'. Personally, I have no problem with 'catenate' as a synonym for 'concatenate' (and yes, either is probably what the OP meant instead of 'conflate').

/said in an isn't-it-interesting-that-the-thread-talks-about-both-catenation-and-proper-use-of-hyphens* kind of way

(*no doubt that's a proper word in German, but let's not get distracted)

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Frumious Bandersnatch
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Re: Spelling Police

I think it's a mistake rather than language drift. I could take a two-year sabbatical, and the hyphen is acceptable (and normal) usage there, but I'd be back to work two years later (no hyphen).

edit: I didn't see the later post by J.G.Harston that makes the same point, but uses grammar-type words.

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Radio 4 and Dr K on programming languages: Full of Java Kool-Aid

Frumious Bandersnatch
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I don't get these programmes any more

In my day they'd have a segment that you were supposed to record using your tape recorder. You could then (theoretically at least) put the tape in your computer's tape recorder and load the program. It might have even displayed pictures on the screen--video over radio, if you will.

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Dev gives HBO free math tips to nail Game of Thrones pirate leakers

Frumious Bandersnatch
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LaTeX

If you want to see the equations, try the online LaTeX previewer here. Much easier to read when it's rendered, though I tried and have no idea what he's trying to say.

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Nuclear waste spill: How a pro-organic push sparked $240m blunder

Frumious Bandersnatch
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Re: Fast Integral Reactor.

I'm quite suprised no-one has thought of storing nuclear waste on the moon.

That didn't work out so well in 'Space 1999'.

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Atmel stoops to an 'all-time low' in Internet of Things battle

Frumious Bandersnatch
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Re: Transducer supply

I was thinking something similar when someone above mentioned radiators. They may be the lowest-power chips yet, but I guess we're not going to see these powered by thermopiles especially if they're an active part of a thermostat system.

The other thought that struck me was the ROTM angle. It's a little bit frightening that they now have the capability of running in "sleeper cell" mode for decades, just biding their time waiting ... waiting ...

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It's the FALKLANDS SYNDROME! Fukushima MELTDOWN to cause '10,000 Chernobyls' in South Atlantic

Frumious Bandersnatch
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Playmobil reconstruction

Or it didn't happen.

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Encryption is the REAL threat – Head Europlod

Frumious Bandersnatch
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Re: de Boise principle

I don't know this de Boise of whom you speak, but it was Cardinal Richelieu who said

If one would give me six lines written by the hand of the most honest man, I would find something in them to have him hanged.

Could mass surveillance possibly have any unintended consequences? Nah, surely not...

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Frumious Bandersnatch
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Blame the tech companies?

What an utterly idiotic thing to say. We don't need tech companies at all to use encryption. Pretty much all the algorithms are publicly available and there are lots of free, open source implementations. Using encryption isn't hard for even beginner programmers thanks to these two points. For example, here's a really short Perl script (not mine; his) to do RSA:

#!/usr/bin/perl

# RSA Encryption example by Phil Massyn (www.massyn.net)

# July 10th 2013

use strict;

use bignum;

use Math::Prime::Util ':all';

# == key generation

my $p = random_strong_prime(256);

my $q = random_strong_prime(256);

my $n = $p * $q;

my $phi = ($p - 1) * ($q - 1);

my $e = 257; # need to figure out how to calculate it

my $x = $e ** 1;

my $d = $x->bmodinv($phi);

# == encryption

my $message = "hello world";

my $m = (join ( '', map (sprintf ("%03d",ord), split (//,$message)) )) + 1 - 1;

my $c = $m->bmodpow($e,$n);

# == decryption

my $M = $c->bmodpow($d,$n);

print join ('', map(sprintf("%s",chr), ($M =~ /\d{3}/g))) . "\n";

Complaining that the tech companies are the problem is just ass-backwards. The reason that they are implementing end-to-end encryption is that their customers (ie, us) are demanding it. One of the main reasons we are demanding it is as a direct result of the kinds of revelations (not just from Snowden) about mass surveillance. We demand the right to privacy, but if we're not being listened to, then it's our choice to use encryption and the tech companies are just responding to that.

What a tool...

(sorry about the way that < and > got messed up in the above; that's the fault of the comment entry system)

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Microsoft update mayhem delays German basketball game, costs team dear

Frumious Bandersnatch
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Re: Linux

Agree on the Linux comments, but you could still probably get stuck waiting for a disk check ("this disk has gone too long without being checked"...). Probably won't take 15 minutes, especially on a laptop, but it goes to show that Linux isn't totally immune from "randomly" locking you out of the machine for several minutes at boot time.

Kind of off-topic: kexec support in Linux kernel is cool, particularly on machines with very slow BIOS startup (eg, my old Dell PowerEdge)

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Smart meters are a ‘costly mistake’ that'll add BILLIONS to bills

Frumious Bandersnatch
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This could rapidly become "convert an edited photo of their current mechanical meter into a meaningless number" and "cost customers tens of pounds rather than hundreds".

When I read this part of the article I immediately thought of something like SecurID. Have the display present both the units-used counter and some cryptographically-generated hash or time signature (like a HMAC involving the current time, the value of the counter and the serial number of the meter). Of course, once the meter is in people's hands, you're bound to find someone who has the skill needed to hack the device (eg, to find the secret serial number) but the vast majority of people won't.

I agree with the people who suggested the smartphone app idea. Done right it would be vastly better (and more secure) than "smart" meters that need to be networked.

Without wanting to blow my own trumpet (too much), I'm sure I could knock up a proof of concept for this in an afternoon with a Raspberry Pi, a small screen and a mobile phone. Just use QR code libraries on the Pi and phone and you've got a fault-tolerant reader (QR includes error correction) that can automatically send an SMS reading to wherever. Of course, this is probably way too easy. I'd have to massively over-engineer it for the government to have any interest in it.

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Belgium to the rescue as UK consumers freeze after BST blunder

Frumious Bandersnatch
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Daylight Saving Time moaners

Consider yourself lucky you're not living in China, where they've got just one time zone despite the country spanning five (geographical) time zones.

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Frumious Bandersnatch
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Re: Timestamps

in the hour where the "clocks change" as you could get either 2 or 0[*] time-crossing occurrences depending on the direction of the change

Some systems can be configured to change the time gradually (eg, if the `date` program has a -a option on some *nix systems, or using the adjtime(3) system call), but changing the apparent rate at which time changes introduces different problems. On the whole, changing it gradually probably breaks fewer assumptions that people might make in their code but I would guess that this Nest problem would still manifest either way.

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Layla enjoys a Sanskrit makeover: Clapton set to become one of several Gods

Frumious Bandersnatch
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Govinda

So if this is a hit, it'll only be the second one in Sanskrit. As Wikipedia has it, the Kula Shaker version is "unique in being the only British Top Ten hit to be sung entirely in Sanskrit."

(so I guess that also means that Sanskrit isn't just a written language, to answer Identity's post above)

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Noobs can pwn world's most popular BIOSes in two minutes

Frumious Bandersnatch
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Re: This wouldn't be (much of) a problem...

The problem with UEFI is that it is _far_ to complex for the problem it needs to solve

Don't worry. We'll all be running systemd on top of it. That'll help manage the complexity.

Right?

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Telly chef Jamie Oliver in embarrassing infection double shocker

Frumious Bandersnatch
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Infection

Surprised to read it didn't come from the cock in cider.

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Tired of IoT hype? Internet of SLUGS and SPIDERS is the reality

Frumious Bandersnatch
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Re: Use all resources available

<groans>Yes, and my fly is now a walk</groans>

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Frumious Bandersnatch
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Re: "Better seals are being installed to keep the slugs out"

But what happens when they run out of slugs to eat?

Don't worry. It's NZ, not Oz. The seals are native and encouraging them to take up residence won't cause widespread unforeseen consequences.

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Get yourself connected: GrovePi+ Starter Kit

Frumious Bandersnatch
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Re: Random musings

Then again there was at least one programming language that [allowed you] to specify any positive integer as the lower bound of an array.

#!/usr/bin/perl -wl

$[ = 4; # least-random number? or was that 2?

print $#foo;

("but don't do that")

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Frumious Bandersnatch
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Re: argh!

they still don't even teach the fundamentals of AC theory either.

I blame that Thomas Edison chap. Electrocuting elephants? Who could stoop so low?

(probably the guys that kill them with LSD, if nobody minds me answering my own rhetorical question)

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Prawn cocktail offers hot new way to make solar cells

Frumious Bandersnatch
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So...

that's why flamingos are pink?

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Hoping for spy reforms? Jeb Bush, dangerously close to being the next US prez, backs the NSA

Frumious Bandersnatch
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Re: Just like the Jews...

If you listen and believe everything a flaming bush tells you

I haven't said a word for eighteen years till he came along!

Actually, still not bothered.

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Mozilla's Flash-killer 'Shumway' appears in Firefox nightlies

Frumious Bandersnatch
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re: Scylla and Charybdis

Not a response to your post, AC, (though I agree), just a comment to say that this particular classical reference seems to be cropping up in the register quite a lot recently. Or maybe I've just got a case of Baader-Meinhof syndrome...

site:forums.theregister.co.uk scylla charybdis (151 hits)

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M0n0wall comes tumbling down as dev throws in the trowel

Frumious Bandersnatch
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Re: Financial models matter

(2) Devise a EULA that completely absolves you from any responsibility for the egregious flaws in your software.

Everyone does that. Even (especially?) free software.

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They've finally solved it: Schrödinger's cat is both ALIVE AND DEAD

Frumious Bandersnatch
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Lao Tzu couldn't decide

If he was imagining himself as a cat or whether he was a cat imagining himself as Lao Tzu.

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Who's come to fix your broadband? It may be a Fed in disguise. Without a search warrant

Frumious Bandersnatch
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Re: Very slippery slope...

are you going to stop a repairman that claims to have been sent by the hotel to your room?

If he's there to fix the porn, probably not.

If the feds had used that simple explanation they wouldn't have to learn any telco lingo at all.

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Japan's death threat hacker collared ... BY A CAT

Frumious Bandersnatch
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Re: COPS! In the US, the beat you to death. In the Japan, you must confess.

Standard operating procedure over there, I hear.

I don't know why you're getting downvotes, as what you say does seem to be accurate. From the Wikipedia page on the Japanese Criminal Justice system:

Confession in Japanese criminal investigation

Many Western human rights organizations alleged that the high conviction rate is due to rampant use of conviction solely based on confession. Confessions are often obtained after long periods of questioning by police as those arrested may be held for up to 23 days. This can, at times, take weeks during which time the suspect is in detention and can be prevented from contacting a lawyer or family.[3]

And here's a link to a BBC article on the same topic that also suggests reasons why people confess.

These were the two top links when I searched for "japanese police confessions", btw, not just links I cherry-picked to support the argument.

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