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* Posts by Frumious Bandersnatch

1282 posts • joined 8 Nov 2007

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That stirring LOHAN motto: Anyone know a native Latin speaker?

Frumious Bandersnatch
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Re: to the pub

Yeah, sorry about that but I learnt what little latin I do have from the Asterix books which when I think about it might not have been the most accurate source.

In the same vein, how about "the sky will not fall today". A bit elliptic/tangential (being more Gaul than Roman), but it has a nice rousing feel, even if it's tinged with a sense of potential doom/failure. No idea what it is in Latin.

On second thoughts: "hic sunt Playmonaut!" (for a mix of Greek/Latin/Plastic)

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Cops nab suspect using CREEPY facial recog system

Frumious Bandersnatch
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Re: chav spotter

Kind of like only detecting tanks when it's rainy:

A network learns the easiest features it can. A classic (possibly apocryphal) illustration of this is a vision project designed to automatically recognize tanks. A network is trained on a hundred pictures including tanks, and a hundred not. It achieves a perfect 100% score. When tested on new data, it proves hopeless. The reason? The pictures of tanks are taken on dark, rainy days; the pictures without on sunny days. The network learns to distinguish the (trivial matter of) differences in overall light intensity. To work, the network would need training cases including all weather and lighting conditions under which it is expected to operate - not to mention all types of terrain, angles of shot, distances...

(from a random page I Googled about neural networks)

In practice, this sort of problem is well known, so it's unlikely to be a factor.

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Frumious Bandersnatch
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Separated at Birth

William Gibson had an interesting spin on the use of mugshots to identify people in one of his novels. Observing that people are bombarded by the faces of celebrities on a near-constant basis and that we develop really good recall of what they look like, his fictional facial recognition is based on matching faces based on similarity to known celebrities. It might work, but I guess that there might be unconscious bias based on the kinds of roles played by those actors. So if you look like Alan Rickman, say, you're probably more likely to be hauled in than if you look like Ben Kingsley (more people would think of Gandhi, I guess, though if you've seen it, it would be hard to forget his performance in Sexy Beast).

Anyway, it's definitely in the realm of fiction, but I still couldn't help wondering whether it could actually work in real life...

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L33t haxxors compete to p0wn popular home routers

Frumious Bandersnatch
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open firmware

I didn't follow any links, but I hope that they also include some OpenWRT, DDWRT and Tomato firmware in their challenges. Why should only the OEMs get some free security testing?

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Chinese biz bloke builds his OWN 3,500-mile Tesla charger network

Frumious Bandersnatch
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Grrr

So it's that Tesla. I'm disappointed. I thought he'd managed to get Nikola Tesla's wireless power transmission system working.

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Japanese artist cuffed for disseminating 3D ladyparts files

Frumious Bandersnatch
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Re: Manco

Then there's "mushi, mushi"

Eh, you mean "moshi, moshi". Mushi is an insect and mushimushi is an onomatopoeic word for hot and humid.

If you start a phone conversation with "mushimushi" instead of "moshimoshi", my bet is that you're a kappa.

Also, 'manko' really is a pretty crude word. I like 'manjuu' as a euphemism.

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Delaware pair nabbed for getting saucy atop Mexican eatery

Frumious Bandersnatch
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Re: "Burrito meets soft taco in alleged rooftop romp outrage"

Were they fish tacos? Inquiring minds want to know ...

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IBM's $3bn bet on next-gen computers: Carbon nanotubes, neuro chips

Frumious Bandersnatch
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Re: O tempora, o mores...

re: "outside of"

People having been using that for quite a while, viz.:

"Outside of a dog, a book is a man's best friend. Inside of a dog, it's too dark to read" --- Groucho Marx

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Frumious Bandersnatch
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how about this for a solution?

A quite significant amount of space has to be devoted to lines for carrying the clock signal. Instead of etching lines to carry this signal on the silicon, what about using radio emissions in selected bands to keep individual parts in sync with each other? In fact, why stop there? Tiny directional antennae would give near-perfect fanout and it might open up new parallel processing capabilities. Throw in a few diffraction gratings (created by etching regular logic areas on the silicon) and you could claim to have some quantum-level processing available too.

Of course, I know next to nothing about these things, so this idea is almost definitely a crock of shit.

Anyway, for the real reason I wanted to post: thumbs up for "scrying". Take that, spell-checker!

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True fact: Your CAT wees ... like a racehorse

Frumious Bandersnatch
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Re: Impossible, I say

re: Guinness

There's a relativistic time dilation effect going on when you first order the pint and you're watching it settle and waiting for the barman to get around to topping up the head and serving it to you. No matter what the true length of time taken by this, it always seems longer. This effect always occurs in close temporal proximity to the act of Guinness flowing through the pipes, so it will naturally occur when it's coming out the other end, too (even in diluted/semi-metabolised form).

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Frumious Bandersnatch
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Re: "... a long and wider urethra results in faster flow ..."

laminar flow?

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MPAA, meet the Streisand effect: Picture ass. slaps Reddit with takedown

Frumious Bandersnatch
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Re: A completely different Ass

It might be a different Ass., but it IS the same mindset.

OK, I'll have to climb down off my horse and agree with you ... it is an ass of the same colour.

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Frumious Bandersnatch
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Re: I guess the MPAA forgot.

Their mindset is still in the 'home taping is killing music' era.

That would be the RIAA. A completely different Ass. (as per official el Reg abbreviation standards).

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Frumious Bandersnatch
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Streisand Effect? Nah.

More like a flash in the pan. Quite like Hollywood "movies" (note: they're also "talkies"!) in that respect.

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Physicist proposes 1,000-foot state-sized walls to stop tornadoes

Frumious Bandersnatch
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Re: If we are going to build a wall

Lets build one about 50 ft high at our southern border

A noble sentiment, but it's still not going to stop people from the US entering Canada.

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Frumious Bandersnatch
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Might I suggest a better way?

If mixing of two massive amounts of hot/cold air is the problem, then why not build big air ducts with pumping stations at appropriate locations? Obviously we can't expect to be able to mix huge weather fronts, but we might be able to "pre-mix" enough of it so that the larger twisters simply don't have a chance to develop.

As it is, if the solution is to build a wall, then surely it's just moving the problem somewhere else? Unless you build it long enough that the warm fronts will have dissipated by the time they get around, I guess...

Also, wasn't there a Russian who thought you could stop hurricanes by flying around them backwards?

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Drone-assisted Swiss construct virtual 3D castle

Frumious Bandersnatch
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have a look at insight3d

For a free system for stitching the photos together and producing the 3d point cloud. As far as I know it doesn't use telemetry data (such as location and angle of the camera when the shot was taken) to stitch together the various photos. Also doesn't come with drones.

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Titan sprouts 'Magic Island', say astroboffins

Frumious Bandersnatch
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Islands appearing as we look at the planet*

Isn't that what happened in Solaris?

(*well, ok, moon)

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AMD details aggressive power-efficiency goal: 25X boost by 2020

Frumious Bandersnatch
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power arbitration

They're free to steal my idea of a "power arbitration bus" that I mentioned in another thread about a year and a half ago.

(also: gating is cool. Just came across this idea when reading the broadcom docs for RPI GPU today)

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Frumious Bandersnatch
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re: NOT ALL programs use gpu properly

Or all O/S's. My graphics card runs noticeably hotter when I boot to Linux than when I'm in Windows. So much so that I had to install an extra fan to keep the machine from freezing randomly (pretty sure the north bridge was failing because of extra heat rising off the graphics card into that general area). Of course, if AMD wanted to prioritise power savings, they could totally help out the guys making the free drivers by providing a patch (or sufficient documentation) to fix this.

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Yes. App that lets you say 'Yo' raises 1 MEEELLION DOLLARS

Frumious Bandersnatch
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re: Time to create an app called "Meh"

Complete with a "are you sure you want to send?" dialogue where the only options are "no" and "meh". Think of the bandwidth savings if neither option actually sends anything...

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Tor is '90 per cent of the net' claims City of London Police Commish – and he's dead wrong

Frumious Bandersnatch
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re: RE: Re: FUD

> >> >> > [...]

Agggh... alt.cascade.overload!

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Frumious Bandersnatch
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excellent commentary, chaps

For the first time in ages, I've been throwing out upvotes like they're confetti (and just as cheap---make of that what you will).

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Frumious Bandersnatch
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Re: @ wolfetone

Oh god yes, Jen is gorgeous. We need more of her on TV!

Was that her in half-horse-half-human guise in TV ads not so long ago? I guess some people might be into that, but I don't think it was one of her better roles.

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ABANDON CLOUD! Docker Linux containers spring a security leak

Frumious Bandersnatch
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chroot as a concept

has an interesting history. There are many web pages describing how, basically, you shouldn't treat it as being a proper security measure, like, ever. I know that things have moved on from naively trusting chroot, and Docker totally isn't just chroot in another guise, but still, I'm not at all surprised that there would be bugs like this in it... (mind you, bugs crop up in vm systems too, from time to time...)

It was probably usability that spurred the development of the first chroot systems, and I'm sure that a similar process took place around the development of containers. Let's hope they can focus on security a bit more to squelch bugs like this so that it doesn't just end up as chroot v2.0.

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Intel reveals its FrankenChip ARM killer: one FPGA and one Xeon IN ONE SOCKET

Frumious Bandersnatch
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Meanwhile ...

Adapteva is busy fulfilling its Parallella pre-order backlog. Zynq 7010 (for the most part) combining dual ARM A9 and FPGA, also coupled with their 16-core Epiphany chips (reg link here). Looks to be a pretty well-balanced system and consumes minimal amounts of power (relative to XEON, naturally).

I'm not sure what the combination of Xeon + FPGA is supposed to achieve, but that's mainly because I don't understand exactly what Intel intends users to offload to the FPGA when they've already got super-beefy cores in the Xeon part. Maybe they're targeting some sort of FPGA-driven interconnect fabric? Still, wouldn't XEON + ASIC be a much better pairing for that particular niche/application?

Otherwise, I just don't know. Customers might "dig" the reconfigurable bit, but FPGA just strikes me as being more of a stop-gap measure until the "real" peripherals can be built... maybe Intel just wants their users to do some R&D for them on the cheap.

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Finding the formula for the travelling salesman problem

Frumious Bandersnatch
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Coffee/keyboard

"So, where do the doughnuts come in?"

Damn. I was guessing (and hoping) they'd found some way to break free from the confines of Cartesian geometry for that customer and instead routed over a topology with one hole ...

Now where did I leave my coffee cup ... ?

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Internet of Things fridges? Pfft. So how does my milk carton know when it's empty?

Frumious Bandersnatch
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Re: what is needed ...

I'm sold! How much do I owe you for mine?

Only your Atman. Mwhuhaha

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Frumious Bandersnatch
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what is needed ...

is some kind of fridge Shiva (or Ganesh). The key point is lots of arms for holding things. This would know what things are approaching their use-by date and would thrust it out at you as soon as you open the door. If you're really slow about getting to use things, it could start banging on the inside of fridge door to attract your attention. You'd soon get used to this disconcerting noise and any guests you have over who become alarmed can have their fears assuaged with a simple: "ignore it; it's just the fridge Shiva."

You might be tempted to give the fridge Shiva some other tasks, such as scrambling eggs or mixing ingredients for a cake. However, this would clearly be sacrilegious and should not be attempted under any circumstances.

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Microsoft C# chief Hejlsberg: Our open-source Apache pick will clear the FUD

Frumious Bandersnatch
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Re: It is not a cancer

Windows Phone is [...] still the _fastest growing_ mobile platform year on year

I'll see your WinPho and raise you an xkcd

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Microsoft 'Catapults' geriatric Moore's Law from CERTAIN DEATH

Frumious Bandersnatch
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Re: A troupe of boffins?

Undignified? But some of the best boffinry comes from monkeying around ...

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IoT cup claims 'instant' identification of what's in it

Frumious Bandersnatch
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Re: This has GOT to be ...

... the absolutely stupidest concept ElReg has ever reported on.

What, didn't you read this part:

it can tell the difference between [...] water and Budweiser

That's an absolutely amazing feat. The man deserves a Nobel prize for that part alone!

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SPIDER-TROOP, Spider-troop, does whatever a spider troop can

Frumious Bandersnatch
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But will it get him out of the bath?

Unfortunately, the Internet has only 4 references to this, but with the aid of the appropriate Japanese chindogou (in this case, a ladder specifically designed for a spider to escape a slippery bath), the answer is "yes". (by themselves, the spider gloves, zey do nothing, though).

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IPv4 addresses now EXHAUSTED in Latin America and the Caribbean

Frumious Bandersnatch
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I'm curious

Let's say I have a dedicated server (or VPS?) somewhere that has IPv6:

* is it possible to set up a vpn (Linux-based) so that my local IPv6 traffic goes out over that link with a specific IPv6 address?

* would I be able to use the same tunnel and some config on the remote server to assign specific IPv6 addresses to, eg, my local toaster, fridge, etc.?

My local ISP doesn't support IPv6, so I'm trying to figure out how to dip my toe into IPv6 waters, so to speak...

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Frumious Bandersnatch
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Re: Easy solution

Just allow it to go higher than 255 in any Octet.

That's actually better than my idea, which was to add an extra 16 bits on the end, kind of like the new emergency phone number 0118 999 881 999 119 725 ... 3

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The Force of tax breaks brings Star Wars filming to Blighty

Frumious Bandersnatch
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The force of tax compels you

The force of tax compels you. The force of tax compels you. THE FORCE OF TAX COMPELS YOU!

(ok, wrong trope; never was a star trek fan)

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Everyone can and should learn to code? RUBBISH, says Torvalds

Frumious Bandersnatch
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Re: Depends what you mean by 'code'

Indeed. My point was, those were two examples where, for me, the money spent in trying to educate me on those topics was largely wasted.

I think I slightly misunderstood you, then. In the end, I think we both agree that not everyone will find formal teaching useful.

While not everyone will benefit from studying a particular subject, I think we should definitely looking to make sure that everyone at least has the option of studying these things (whether it be music, coding, woodwork, art, languages or whatever). In an ideal world, eh?

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Frumious Bandersnatch
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Re: @Frumious

Many of my difficulties learning music have been due to it's totally moronic way of describing things: From notation, to note names, to scales, to time signatures there is not a single part which does not make a logical person tear there hair out with the fuckwittedness of it all.

I'm not totally sure about that. I didn't actually learn music in school (all I can remember is that we did singing and I vaguely remember some messing around with a recorder or tin whistle), so I taught myself about it later. Actually, pretty much my first intro to musical "theory" was from appendix E in the Commodore 64 Programmer's Reference Guide. I must have had some other reference, too, as I discovered that each octave is double the frequency of the last one, and that each semitone is a fixed multiple of the last one too (the 12th root of 2, in fact).

Starting from that point, I found the whole topic much more accessible.

I do agree that notation is a problem, and no, I can't even sight-read very well or (quickly) figure out the scale from the key signature, or understand all time signatures, or even get my head around why A# isn't the same as B flat (the other commenter's explanation notwithstanding), or ...

I don't think that the notation for note lengths is too bad, though, since more "decoration" just means shorter notes. At least that's quite simple ...

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Frumious Bandersnatch
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Re: Depends what you mean by 'code'

Studying aspects of the culture was worthwhile, but not learning the language.

Ah, yes... I found the quote (and person who said it) that I was trying to remember to respond to your sentiment:

"To know another language is to live another life." -- T. G. Masaryk, President of the First Czechoslovak Republic

Who wouldn't want to live another life?

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Frumious Bandersnatch
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"some people don't have the sort of calm, collected, unflappable personality that it takes"

Mmmm. That's good sarcasm. I like what you did there.

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Frumious Bandersnatch
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Re: Depends what you mean by 'code'

I'm sorry to say, but sheet music is really easy to figure (well, apart from key signatures, which require a knowledge of scales). The main problem lies in sight-reading, I think. Anyone can probably learn the notation in an afternoon, but it takes practice to be able to look at the pattern on the page and distinguish an E from an F, say, without resorting to reciting a mnemonic (like "every good boy ...") or having to mentally count from your "baseline".

Sheet music is also completely distinct and separate from actual music. Even if you don't know how to sight-read (or even decipher it in the slightest), you can still be good at music. Scott Joplin, for one, couldn't read sheet music ...

As for the utility of languages, I guess it depends on how far into it you get in the first place. If you don't apply yourself enough to get beyond a few tourist phrases, then sure, it's useless and you'd be better off waiting until you travel (or will travel) to a place before diving in (so you'll have some practical application of it). I think that any serious study does tend to pay you back for the effort, regardless of how practical it might be in general. I rarely use my Japanese, but I'm still very glad that I did study it, even if it's only to get a bit more enjoyment out of Japanese films or chatting to the occasional Japanese person I meet.

Music and Japanese might seem useless to you, but it's hardly a blanket statement you can apply to everyone. Coding is no doubt the same ...

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Flying cars, submarine cars – Elon Musk says NOTHING is beyond him

Frumious Bandersnatch
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flying car, yay!

He should call it Hubris. What could possibly go wrong?

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Google to let Chromebookers take video content OFFLINE

Frumious Bandersnatch
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must be for a reason

My bet is that they've thrown in the towel with their "patent-free" vp6 (or whatever it's called) and decided that if they can't control the patents behind the codecs, they'll damned well be sure they make a play for being the #1 conduit to rival iTunes, Netflix, Spotify, Amazon and all the other delivery guys. They don't have a media store for nothing...

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Euro judges: Copyright has NOT changed, you WON'T get sued for browsing the web

Frumious Bandersnatch
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Re: OMG Mirrors!

all that type you've set up there is a mirror image of my book, pay me!

Fine, have this anti-money, freshly spun from my supercollider. Just don't mix it up with your regular money.

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Frumious Bandersnatch
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I wonder if it's legal to write "Hello, McFly!" or if it's a breach of copyright of the Back to the Future script.

Only one way to know: go back to 1985 and find out. (or get there beforehand and sue the erstwhile writers for stealing your script)

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Patch NOW: Six new bugs found in OpenSSL – including spying hole

Frumious Bandersnatch
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Re: Quick to fix in Open Source, but it leaves questions.

putting the many eyeballs idea finally to rest

Does it? Bit of a tree falling in the forest scenario. Just because people could have been looking, doesn't mean they were. Still doesn't change the fundamental idea of "with enough eyes, all bugs are shallow" (though you may argue about the smarts behind the eyes, if you wish).

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Boffins publish SciFi story to announce exoplanet find

Frumious Bandersnatch
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Re: Clever

Reynolds is a boffin himself or ex-boffin

Indeed he is, and I've read some of his books.

I don't care much for the quality of proof-reading, though. For example:

* unmeasurably old -> immeasurably old

* eeking out its nuclear lifetime -> eking out ...

* Cities as mute as sphinxes -> sphinges (ok, I'm being picky)

Man, the quality of AIs they send into space these days ...

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How I poured a client's emails straight into the spam bin – with one Friday evening change

Frumious Bandersnatch
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Re: Every sysadmin must make one really big screw-up in their career

And if executed as root, "rm" is usually aliased to "/bin/rm -i", so there is a prompt for everything

Huh? What kind of namby-pamby, hand-holding, distro are you running?

Hint: always assume the safety's /off/ and think before you sudo, rm, dd or whatever. An alias for rm is suitable only for true nincompoops.

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How Bitcoin could become a super-sized Wayback Machine

Frumious Bandersnatch
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So much potential

But also so many questions left hanging. Don't ... leave ... me ... this ... way ...

(edit: damn it! that was a Communards hit... nothing to do with Erasure :(. Never mind.. carry on)

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Broadcom: If no one buys our modem biz, we'll DITCH IT

Frumious Bandersnatch
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Re: No Point

There's no point in buying it now

Well I'd make an offer if they'd accept it. True, I've got no money and no experience (apart from having a half dozen Raspberry Pis around the place and having experience with using mobile phones), but I'm sure that the team is well on top of things and if they'll have me, I'd gladly be their leader.

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