* Posts by max allan

239 posts • joined 8 Mar 2007

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BrowserStack HACK ATTACK: Service still suspended after rogue email

max allan

I bet there are a lot of people suddenly wishing they'd spent more time looking at the little documented "-only" option to keep "local BrowserStack" tests restricted to the ports you tell it to access and not giving it unrestricted access. (Kind of makes you wonder why you need to specify the ports in use when it gets all of them anyway)

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Is your cloud server in the same bit barn as your DR site?

max allan

Eh?

I don't get what you're trying to say about Amazon. Their requirements are that you have systems across different availability zones. So you use EU zones a and b. Then because you know what you're doing, you have a DR site in US and your backups get stored in Rackspace's APAC site and mirrored to somewhere else.

What does it matter who else might be using the same datacentres? It's the cloud. It's out there, you don't care where. If you're going to start worrying about exactly where stuff is, you may as well start buying your own datacentres.

Do you pay lots of money for a BMW and then start asking if they've actually installed the side airbags in the car you bought and pulling off the door panels? No, you trust them.

Do you pay some money for AWS and then start asking exactly where they host things and trying to figure out if there are shared datacentres? No, you trust them.

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Amazon HALVES cloud storage prices after Google's shock slash

max allan

Re: cheap my ass

Only 6 digits a month for a solution that includes DR which spans multiple continents and has huge amounts of untapped capacity. Sounds like a bargain to me.

I've seen businesses spending that sort of money per month on a single data centre. By the time you've paid your rent/rates, power for running the kit, cooling the kit, maintenance contracts for all the kit, startup cost of getting the local grid to install resilient power and comms, wear and tear and maintenance of the building, a security guard or several if you're 24*7, etc. etc... Even stupid things like paying someone to come in and mow any grass, clear any leaves, keep the car parking free from snow.

If it wasn't a viable economic solution, people wouldn't be doing it. I'm sure there are people who are doing it wrong, but there are also a lot of people doing it right and making huge savings.

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Amazon's cloud dwarfs all others, Gartner finds

max allan

Re: amazon the bookstore?

It's baffling why you would be reading the reg and not understand.

I have never seen an outage in the Amazon "bookstore" which suggests to me their infrastructure is pretty reliable. And tell me you don't really think Amazon is just about books now?

With so much flexible compute power available, you can scale your app up or down according to demand. Sure you can do that with Rackspace and others. But how many other providers offer 3 tiers of storage, databases (as a service), DNS, load balancers (as a service), firewalls (as a service), etc. etc.

I like Rackspace, but they aren't set up for an environment with hundreds of instances, that for example, you want to be sure have the same firewall rules applied. (That means an off box firewall, sure I could do it with iptables on the box, but then what stops a deranged developer flushing the rules so he can make something work)

Amazon is the one stop shop for this stuff.

Why should buying compute time be any different from buying a book or any other commodity? If they can sell books, they can sell compute.

I just had a look at the CSC website trying to find their cloud services. Eventually did. Couldn't find a "buy now" button, so followed the "getting started in the cloud" link and got a pile of whitepapers to read. I was hoping for a "click here to create an account" button. Eventually gave up. They clearly don't want customers. Their lack of experience selling books has spilled over into their inability to sell compute.

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Aha, I see you switched on your mobile Wi-Fi. YOU FOOL!

max allan

Ultra-secure?

Any ultra-secure location I've been in would have shot you as soon as you walked through the door with wifi turned on. Or even a phone or laptop about your person.

Wifi of any kind I'd describe as only averagely secure.

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Hackers break SSL encryption used by millions of sites

max allan

Doesn't NEED Javascript!

For everyone getting het up about the existence of Java in this exploit, that is just an example of how it could be released into the wild. (If you can decrypt SSL, then you can probably add extra text into the connection to include your java)

BUT I don't think you need it.

I suspect you just need a packet sniffer and the code and away you go.

So, for example, sit in a public place with a dodgy wifi AP and everyone surfs through you thinking "haha, I'm safe, I've got a green padlock". In the meantime you've captured all their login/password information etc. Presumably you can decrypt it all at your leisure and then login to their paypal/bank account a few days or weeks later and pay yourself a little bonus.

If it takes java 10 minutes to decrypt, then a bit of nicely written OpenCL with a pile of GPUs will probably crack it realtime. That's something I'd like to see! (not on my connection)

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Jeff Bezos patents retro jets, and airbags, for telephones

max allan

Hard materials are harder to use...

When your material gets tougher, then it's probably more rigid, which means if you drop it less deformation and higher G for any connected components. (like the display)

The spongier materials need more thickness/weight to make them man enough not to bend/break in normal pocket environments.

All your case is just keeping a very brittle glass screen safe and dirt off the PCB. (and keeping it in one piece)

I reckon 90% of dead phones I've seen have been display breakages. As soon as someone invents a flexible display panel, this airbag patent is history.

Then the entire phone can be coated in the display instead of having a separate chassis!

(Then just need a method to wire all your internal components together with flexi wires rather than a rigid PCB.)

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Will the looters 'loose' their benefits?

max allan

@ Danny 5

The scary thing about reading "Danny 5" is that he seems to believe that himself.

I am less surprised about the riots, if people like Danny, who have at least got enough brains to spell most words, think that they would have joined in the rioters.

I think we need an urgent dose of "community" lessons in school.

I like the book of "Starship Troopers" and the concept that only people who put something into society were able to get anything out of it. It did at least seem to recognise that some people were less able to contribute than others.

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$25 toy radio used to knock out feds

max allan

I'll have a couple!

I have no desire to hack FBI radio (don't live in the land of the massively oppressed) but it seems like these things are text based radio comms devices... Which could be quite handy.

Of course, it looks like I'd need to print a new box for it, the one shown looks a bit naff...

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Boffins shine 800Mbps wireless network from flashlight

max allan

What's wrong with IR?

So, why do we have to use visible light and disturb people with the light. What is wrong with IR at various frequencies, in the same way as they are using visible at various frequencies?

I know my TV has a much lower bandwidth but it seems to work reasonably well at receiving signal from the remote even when there is stuff in the way. OK, if you block the tx/rx close to the device then it does fail, but "shadows" from objects in mid distance aren't a problem. A couple of tx/rx pairs per room, well spaced should be able to cover most of the room.

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BOFH: This buck's for you

max allan

Fiction?

About 2/3rds of this is completely true.

The number of times I hear people recommending sub optimal solutions because they know the customer won't pay for anything more.

You've got to hit them with the gold plated option and when they decline it's their decision.

If you take the decision from them, they sue you for saying that taking a USB disk with all the company's data home every night was a secure off site solution.

Pushing people down a lift shaft for not taking holiday is probably not something I'd immediately link with that policy. Particularly as it's normally me who ends the year with 90% of my holiday allocation.

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Boffins demand: Cull bogus A-Levels, hire brainier teachers

max allan

Highers???

Unless they've changed things recently, kids with highers at scottish unis were expected to do an extra year before the course really got going. So a 3 year course would be a 4 year course.

I went from the England with a-levels to Scotland for a degree and found the first year was about half n half "easy" and "new".

I think degrees are too narrow focussed myself. I found after 2 years of studying electronics to what seemed to be pointless levels of detail, I just wanted to do something different.

I don't work in electronics now, but I can't imagine being able to work out the impedance of a cable from first principles AND how electrons flow through a transistor junction is going to be useful to most people. You might need to know the nitty gritty of some of the areas, where your work is focussed, but not all of it.

I'd suggest more vocational A-levels followed by something like an apprenticeship program in whatever the company want you to do, nationally recognised etc... so you could move jobs and keep your course going. AND continue that through life.

Unlike most companies I work for where you keep getting thrown new technologies and expected to figure it out because it's sort of similar to the old one you were working on. Actually have some sensible budget allocated for training. (One UK wide banking institution allocated about £500 per employee per year and then threw VMware at the Windows admin team. No surprise it was a bit of mess)

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2011 Games Preview

max allan
Troll

Trolling?

"Yes, if you limit yourself to PC gaming where the only FPS title of any note is Half-Life and an id release once every 5 years or more"

Sounds like a troll to me.

I can't resist biting though. I loved Crysis on the PC and can't wait for 2. It seems that it set a bit of a high h/w requirement which people are still bitching about now, years later.

Console ports are generally dismal. I recall playing through a FPS game and there was a cunning section where you could sneak round the back and explode some barrels in a room and kill a load of guys. Quite "entertaining" in a way. I was round at a mates and he was at the same section "here watch this" I say and what happens, no sneak entrance to the room and no barrels in it when you got there. It was like it was a different game, all the good tricky bits sucked out of the map.

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max allan

My god, this is like iPhone vs Android...

This argument is almost as good as an iPhone vs Android argument, except here there are 3 sides, PC, PS, Xbox.

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PC World website went titsup on Boxing Day

max allan

Service?

Asking for service with your computer products is like asking for ketchup with a gourmet meal.

All I want is to slap down some cash and walk out with the item I went in for.

I do not want to be asked if I want an extended warranty. If I wanted an extended warranty I would have picked one up and presented it at the till, but I didn't so I don't please stop trying to second guess me.

What's next? I see you've bought a computer, would you like an extended power lead. You've bought an MP3 player, would you like an extended headphone cable. You've bought an iPad, would you like an extended penis. You've bought a webmail account, would you like an advert for an extended penis

I consider it to be sort of a disclaimer "We realise our product is crap and bet you it will fail within 3 years. Of course by the time it fails (probably only 6 months) it will be worthless so we're prepared to give you a *chuckle* 'new one' when it goes wrong"

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max allan

Or get inferior and a mortgage

Apparently your local computer shop will :

"tell you that it is inferior to whatever they have in their PC at home and that they can sell you the best one if you are prepared to mortgage your house"

Unlike PC world who will sell you the inferior model and require you to get 2 mortgages.

Can I suggest you take the price you would have spent at PC world (check their website!) and quote this as how much something costs if challenged by her indoors/parents/PHB/etc... THEN go to your local shop/cheap internet retailer, buy 2 of the normal performance type and still have money for a bus fare and a pint of beer.

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Yes! It's the Reg Top 5 FUTURISTIC GUNS Thanksgiving Roundup!

max allan

So who's trying to look clever now?

Are you trying to look clever by explaining all the faults in the original article?

Does that mean you're stupid or European?

Your post impresses nobody with your intellectual abilites. You couldn't even be bothered to look up the source for your quote.

Can I suggest you go back to reading something .com instead of .co.uk?

And in case you're wondering, in this country it's a "smart arse".

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WTF is... up with e-book pricing?

max allan

Won't someone think of the trees?

Consider the cost of making real books and what happens if it doesn't sell well. You print a few million copies anticipating some demand and only sell a few thousand. You've got a few trees worth of paper to recycle.

If you print a few thousand and it's popular, then you get told off for restricting supply etc...

I bet a large proportion of the initial cost of a physical book covers the risk. Compare new books costing >£10 with 6 months later when you can pick them up for under 5. I expect 5 is nearer the "real cost". So to inflate the eBook price to match the initial cost of a paper book is effectively susidising the publisher's risk on the paper book.

If they took the plunge and went all E, the prices should fall.

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max allan

Direct sales

"Where authors and their agents sell their books directly to the consumers via an electronic marketplace"

That sounds perfect to me. Why do we need the middle men to do all the marketing BS. I very rarely want to buy a book that has been marketed (mass market trashy romance novels etc...)

I would be quite happy to pay the author directly for what they write.

They probably get a lot more cash that way than letting the publisher take their cut.

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AV Receivers

max allan

It stops being a receiver then...

If you AV receiver starts streaming video and audio then it kind of stops being just a receiver and starts being a networked media player. It will probably require firmware updates to keep up with all the new codecs etc and generally be a huge PITA for the manufacturers. Who can charge you another few hundred quid for a different box instead.

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How I used Space Shuttle tech to insulate the living room

max allan

Price vs performance

Comparing aerogel with K17 you said it's twice the performance and then said with a big discount you did the room for £1500 as opposed to £170 with K17.

I'm all in favour of saving energy but comparing the £1500 with the cost of energy to heat the room, how long before it's cost is offset by the fuel saving?

Or you could loose another 4cm per wall and spend almost a tenth of the money... I think most people would find alternatives to aerogel when the bill came in.

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World's most advanced rootkit penetrates 64-bit Windows

max allan

UAC : waste of space

As far as I can tell UAC is completely useless.

"A program would like to make changes to your computer, do you want to allow it?"

What changes, where, why, etc....

There is a lot of apps that are borked by UAC and need to be "run as administrator" to work properly (like inability to create files even in areas you can create files in without being administrator)

And a lot of apps that require UAC confirmation when really they shouldn't need it.

So you get in the habit of pressing "Yes" because if you don't, you don't get to run 90% of what you want.

Next question, why does the MBR actually affect Windows? Surely you can replace the MBR with something else like lilo or grub and I wouldn't expect that to affect Windows' policy on deciding whether to allow unsigned drivers FFS.

Sounds like an easy fix/preventative would be to install lilo/grub and make sure that you see their boot screen before you get into Windows. If the MBR is changed then you wouldn't see them unless it's really f-ing clever.

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max allan

Mainly because it was useless...

I had MBR protection turned on and did several tests changing the MBR, none of them were blocked.

I think BIOS writers realised it was useless and dropped it.

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Reg reader stitches PARIS right up

max allan

After previous performance....

After the performance of the PARIS chase team, I'd reckon LOHAN could be:

Lost On Highway And Needing beer/tea/cigarette ?

Unless the Reg is just messing with us?

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Co-op cashier's breasts overcharged for fruit and veg

max allan

Doesn't happen in Sainsburys

I once leant on the partition by the till behind me's scales and was asked to move. Even though I wasn't touching the scales they seemed to get very upset if there was anything within a couple of feet.

Maybe my arse is more of a threat to accurate weight measurements than this lady's breasts were....

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Hacker unshackles Kinect from Xbox

max allan

UPDATED NEWS : Do they care?

Microsoft issued the following statement: "Kinect for Xbox 360 has not been hacked -in any way - as the software and hardware that are part of Kinect for Xbox 360 have not been modified. What has happened is someone has created drivers that allow other devices to interface with the Kinect for Xbox 360. The creation of these drivers, and the use of Kinect for Xbox 360 with other devices, is unsupported. We strongly encourage customers to use Kinect for Xbox 360 with their Xbox 360 to get the best experience possible."

So what they are saying is that to hack something you have to change it's hardware or software. This distinction may come back to bite them/their peers.

"I didn't change your code to play that game without a serial, I wrote my own and put it in a wrapper around yours, therefore it's not a hack"

"I didn't hack my iPhone, I'm just running my own code on it instead of yours"

etc...

Obviously whoever made that quote has no clue what "hacking" entails.

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Clive Sinclair unveils 'X-1' battery pedalo bubble-bike

max allan

Not like these modern IT companies then...

"Sinclair overdelivered on the hype and underdelivered on the execution, again making shortsighted technical choices"

So not like Windows Vista or OSX or pretty much any IT project that ever gets reported in the Reg?

Comparing the hype in the 80s with the hype these days, Sinclair was way behind the curve for hype and way ahead of the curve in actually delivering computers/etc.. that were slightly ground breaking.

OK, they may not have been 100% successful or reliable but they were generally more different than the rest than the difference between for example : OSX & Win7 or Vista & 7 etc...

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max allan

Has anyone watched the video???

ROTFLMAO. The video looks like it was shot on a mobile phone and edited by someone with their eyes closed!

Wobbly shooting and clips that only appear for a fraction of a second. I'm watching in the office so have no sound, I'm guessing it's just as bad.

What a great advert...

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Toshiba ships Folio Android tablet

max allan

Battery life

"Folio will deliver up to seven hours' battery life, on the basis of a lot of web browsing, a little movie viewing and a quarter of the time in standby mode."

Does that mean that it will only standby for a quarter of 7 hours?

Or that they quote the battery life including some time as effectively switched off?

Why don't they claim a life of 5 hours of real usage?

Otherwise I can see this going like "unlimited" broadband <small print> with a cap</small print>

"My tablet has 12 days battery life <small print> with 4 hours use</small print>"

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National Rail tweaks departure board API, 'orders' coder to kill site

max allan

Go to OPSI and vote

Go to the OPSI website (listed above) and vote for those data to be opened up.

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max allan

Now 118

Now it's 118 and from a quick look at the list of others that's nearly twice as many as the best of the rest...

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VMware's vSphere cleared for military spook servers

max allan
Headmaster

Poured?

"had its internals poured over by propellerheads"

Should that actually read "pored" or "pawed"?

Or does it mean >EAL5 must have some sort of sauce poured over the source.

Which begs the question, what's the propellorheads' preferred sauce? Ketchup, Wasabi, gravy...

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DfT to install new motorway tech

max allan

I don't get it

How does making people drive more slowly by imposing variable speed limits make traffic flow more freely.

Simple physics shows that if you put a restriction on a flow, the flow needs to speed up or pressure will increase until ... someone has an accident.

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iOS bug unlocks iPhones sans password

max allan

Serves you right for upgrading

I'm still on 4.0 and my phone can't be frigged like this. "Upgrade", Pah!

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Sly new tactic sneaks hackers past security dogs

max allan

Lack of information

For more information check out Stonesoft's site "antievasion.com".

The only bit of real "example" of what they mean is :

"A: Technical: Consider the well known method of packet fragmentation, this alone would be caught. However, if this is combined with random IP options and a manipulation of how data is interpreted on the target, the attacker can successfully deliver a payload containing any attack."

Which means absolutely naff all to me. If a firewall is going to block a fragment, then it doesn't matter what options you put on it, it'll be blocked. If we're talking about a remote exploit, then how can you manipulate how the data is interpreted on the target? If you can affect your target remotely, then you've already hacked in far enough that the target is fubar.

They've fudged the whole issue of explaining these AETs to the community at large :

"Stonesoft is announcing the concept discovery, but it is not providing any details or tools that would arm criminals with the information needed to use these techniques. AETs are complex, and require the resources and funding that average hackers do not typically have"

Those "details" would not only arm the criminals with the attacks but also the world's security people with the defences.

Sounds like the biggest FUD scam for years!

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Q: Why pay for DNS?

max allan

Why is important to outsource DNS?

It's important to outsource DNS because it seems some sysadmins are not capable of understanding the difference between traffic routing a certain way because of BGP routing failures and traffic routing the right way by BGP but being told to go to the wrong IP address by DNS.

And as for some random DNS provider claiming it is fixing DNS's security problems by introducing it's own systems to combat cache poisoning etc...

What ? Why ?

Joining in with DNSSEC would be a more sensible solution than trying to shore up the existing technology. OpenDNSSEC is a open source package, so anyone can join in.

Then you just need a decent network/security administrator to put a security wrap around your systems and most of your "security" problems are solved.

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Tape backup could be binned soon

max allan

No robot required?

Your suggestion that no robot is required is based on current usage patterns.

"You won't need a robot because every device in the drive will be connected."

But, with more "slots" available it probably makes sense to have a pile of cartridges ready to use, in a hopper, and an output hopper.

Then the robot can swap new RDX cartridge into drive and when it's written dump it in the hopper. Maybe even allow it to push daily rewritable carts back in the input hopper.

I can't see anyone producing a library that I can afford that allows me to connect my entire cartridge stock for the next year's worth of backups at the same time.

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British bank cuts 4,500 IT jobs

max allan

It's cultural

A lot of Indians I've experienced seem to be loath to admit that they can't handle something personally. A slightly different slant on the "disloyal" suggestion.

In some ways it is nice that someone takes a personal responsibility, BUT:

It can be annoying when you, as a customer, realise it's not going to be resolvable by a person at their level but you can't get them to transfer you to someone more senior who can make the change you want.

Which also agrees with your point of view that problems get sat on until something blows and it has to be escalated.

My suggestion is to put on a lot more excess pressure in the first place compared to talking to a Brit. Instead of "this might cause a problem if ...." try "This is causing major problems right now"

Of course, if it's a problem you aren't aware of, then you're screwed...

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Jobsian fondle-slab in SEXY FILTHGRAM CRACKDOWN

max allan

Or...

How about the Amish town of "Intercourse" in Pensylvania

Or the amusingly named Wank mountain in Germany.

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Microsoft confirms Russian pill-pusher attack on its network

max allan
Troll

Nobody said it couldn't be pwned

No one ever said a badly configured box couldn't be pwned. In fact a badly configured *nix box is likely to offer more opportunity to the cracker than a windows box because windows protects you from being an idiot, whereas *nix assumes you know exactly what you're doing.

Of course as has been suggested, MS probably have excellent skills at securing windows and not much at securing *nix. So the box was likely not patched or configured with some insecure services running with bad config (like maybe NFS sharing the root filesystem to the world without mapping root to a different user, which is a common mistake).

If you want to get the "frother" community going, maybe we should mention that MS who WRITE their own operating systems, firewalls, mail, web and other software STILL feel the need to have Linux in their environment. Presumably because whatever they've paid millions to write and punt to the rest of the world isn't up to the job.

I don't think there is a single bit of software where MS haven't stuck their oar in, so what do they need Linux for? Unless their offering isn't actually any good... "Froth at will"

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Aggrieved boffins to march on Whitehall

max allan

Given a choice?

OK, so you've got a choice between police and firemen today or no police/firemen today and a wonderful new anti crime/fire robot thingy next year, maybe.

I'd rather have the safety today thanks.

Of course, you could probably make some cuts somewhere else, but that's what the gov will propose as the only other option. Something you need vs something you'd like.

At the end of the day, they'll do whatever they want anyway.

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Tesla says 40% of its Roadsters may catch fire

max allan

Let me guess, you're an IT amateur...

"detach a cable, slip a sleeve on, and reattach it?"

You've missed out checking pre-requisites :

Check the car's serial number against affected models.

Check car hasn't already been fixed.

Visually inspect existing cable and decide if it needs replacing or patching.

Test entire system for faults so you can be sure that you haven't caused any new faults.

I'm sure I could think of a few more if I could be bothered.

Then, the "detach cable" part doesn't include the time where you have to extract it through a hole about 2" diameter hidden underneath some other panels that require you to remove half the car to get at.

Similarly, if you've bought a new car recently, you might have seen that headlamp bulb replacement is something that is a "main dealer" only task. They'll probably bill you an hour or so's labour just to change a bulb.

At the end of the day it's probably just that an hour is the smallest unit of time their maintenance process system can cope with. "Check your oil level sir? Takes an hour.", "Refill washer fluid sir? Takes an hour" etc.... "Charge your battery sir? Takes a week."

(I know a Tesla won't have engine oil, but presumably it still has gearbox oil.)

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Youth jailed for not handing over encryption password

max allan

Can you remember 50 characters for 6 months?

Can you remember 50 characters for 6 months?

I have enough trouble remembering a handful of 9 character passwords after a couple of weeks on holiday, let alone 6 months spent, presumably mainly at her majesty's pleasure or undergoing stressful complicated legal wrangling...

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max allan

So, blab your password straight away

"You have the right to remain silent ... mention now ... etc...."

Yes officer I'd like to say "zxplLkIujnn*&^fh44£$FklpkjbMHFGXFWzchbjn kju642dhvnblp}[1b36nndfj3jdnx^nbghfhkl;LHGGVBL"

Later in court :

Q: Would you like to tell us your password?

A: I already did. It's not my fault if the police didn't capture that evidence, is it? I've been stuck in a holding cell for the last 3 months awaiting trial and I've now forgotten what the password (if there ever was one) was.

Would that work????

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Google bags Blind Type

max allan

I don't believe it...

I can't believe this crap is patentable.

Spelling checkers work now by finding words that have a few similar characters in, generally somewhere near in the alphabet or phonetically.

Finding a replacement character that is nearby on the keyboard doesn't seem to be too big a leap intellectually and something I've been cursing about the lack of ever since I started using a "soft" keyboard.

Surely it needs nothing to do with a "pattern of dots". Simply take the 8 characters surrounding each typed character and search each of them through the valid word database. I'm guessing there would only be a couple of matches, (bearing in mind the design of qwerty was that normal English would have minimal striker collisions on an old mechanical typewriter running at speed.)

I expect indexing could be clever enough to narrow down most words after only a few characters.

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Hundreds of Americans, bystanders injured playing video games

max allan
FAIL

What about school sports?

I seem to recall what seemed to be a horrific number of injuries through supervised sports when I was at school. I have seen (during "games") :

One death (yes really!)

Several broken arms/legs/wrists/ankles

One broken face (blood everywhere and no sign of a chin, courtesy of hockey stick)

Several cricket ball/groin incidents

I reckon only about half of us made it through undamaged, we were the half that normally just hid during games, being typical computery geeks.

So, exactly what are these idiots complaining about?

Really, video games are the safe option, trust me.

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Car wrecks rise after texting bans imposed

max allan

Phones while driving are a bad thing

I drive to/from work along a motorway and most days there is some idiot in the middle lane getting slower and slower (down to about 40-50) and as you pass them you can quite clearly see that they are on the phone. Either talking or texting.

(Alternatively, someone in front slams on the anchors and veers wildly through traffic to the "slow" lane without looking in mirrors, to answer their phone. Because of course braking and veering on the M-way are much safer than continuing on your course at the same speed...)

I always find it amusing that American road safety people suggest that phones aren't as dangerous as :

"adjusting the radio, to eating and drinking, to tending a child in the rear seat, to reading, shaving, and applying makeup, to swatting bees"

Most of which are actually illegal in the UK, even while stationary.

I suspect even swatting bees would come under a generic "being distracted" category!

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Apple TV stripdown reveals mystery solder pads

max allan
FAIL

Eco friendly???

So if it's eco friendly, can we assume that they included the hours of processing time to convert from various common media types to Apple's own proprietary formats?

As well as needing to leave something else switched on to stream the media to it.

You could replace it with a bump on the wire and get your PC/MAC to "stream" HDMI to the bump and the bump can transmit it to the telly. Oh look, there's a set top box that needs no power at all.

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ICO lets police maintain ANPR location secrecy

max allan

It'll end up like speed cameras

Just like speed cameras, there will end up being a database online somewhere linked in to google maps or GPS systems etc....

Maybe like the #uksnow tag in twitter someone could make something that uses geolocation on photos of ANPRs posted to twitter to build the database. (don't use the geo info from twitter, by the time someone tweets, they'll have left the area of the camera)

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Logica salvages gov contracts

max allan
Grenade

Feckin Eejit...

Considering the entire IT estate gets changed out about every 5 years or so I completely agree with your plan to skip everything right now and start again from scratch. Big Bang solutions are always so good especially when done across the entire infrastructure like you're proposing.

As opposed to the obviously idiotic step of having a phased approach where as systems go end of life they follow their natural path to the bin and get replaced with something with "free" software.

At the same time they can take the people who know how to use a system that's gone and give them the training that they would naturally expect to receive when replacing one expensive system with another (in my experience that's about sod all).

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