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* Posts by stizzleswick

351 posts • joined 25 Oct 2007

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DISPLAY DESTRUCTION D'OH! Teardown cracks Surface Pro 3 screen

stizzleswick

Re: Sad

Correct; a 2-year warranty has to be given free of charge. Not all customers, however, are aware of that...

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D-Wave disputes benchmark study showing sluggish quantum computer

stizzleswick

Re: I think I know what's up

I just hope it's not Schrödinger's computer.

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Adobe all smiles as beret bods spaff cash on non-cloud Creative Suite

stizzleswick

Having been in Pre-Press for a long time...

...I find Adobe have lost the ball with their move to subscription-only. For most purposes in Pre-Press, GIMPshop (which is based on the GIMP, but can do CMYK colours--a must-have in Pre-Press!!!), Scribus (which lacks some of Quark XPress' and InDesign's features but stacks up extremely well against anything else on the market--think PageMaker 7 meets VistaDesigner) and Inkscape do the job, with one single lack, and that is interoperability. No drag-and-drop from one to the other etc., which is the thing that made the CS dominate the market.

Mind, for me, that is not a problem because I'm not in pre-press any longer. I use those three applications for my own purposes, plus for my photography work, Aperture, which takes more than enough care of the tasks I used to do with Photoshop.

Half a decade back, I had to buy the CS4 for business reasons. Guess that will remain the final version of Adobe's products I'll ever buy.

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Hubble Telescope loosens Kuiper belt to reveal ICY BODY for NASA boffins' PROBE

stizzleswick

I would love those, too, esp. to explore the atmospheres of those two extreme bodies, plus a few other interesting features including the likes of Mimas. Mind, depending on the incoming results of New Horizons, there might be another New Frontiers-level mission forthcoming which does either a tour or takes on Neptune. Or ESA finally decides to do a stand-alone deep-space mission and sends some serious materiel out there. The Huygens lander proved they have the know-how.

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stizzleswick
Boffin

"[...]...why Pluto? [...] say, one of Jupiter's or Saturn's moons that may or may not contain an ocean. The asteroid belt has some some interesting objects. [...]"

At the time New Horizons was planned, there were already missions either on their way or being planned (and on their way by now) that target all of those objectives. The Dawn mission is checking on the Main Belt (particularly, Vesta and Ceres, but the spacecraft does the occasional sideways glance on the way), Cassini/Huygens is still busy in between Saturn and its moons, there is a lander mission being planned for Europa, and so on.

Pluto, being a potential KBO, is the nearest such that we know of, and the entire Kuiper Belt is a rather unexplored place which probably holds a lot of insights into how our solar system came together, so it's a logical area to explore.

Personally, I wish the funding for the originally planned Kuiper Express probe would have come together; the potential scientific gains would have been far larger, but there you go, NASA doesn't get the kind of funding they actually need.

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Readers' choice: What every small-business sysadmin needs

stizzleswick
Pint

Most useful thing I've had...

...over the last 15 years was and remains the Victorinox Cybertool. Has everything one needs to (literally) screw around with hardware. At one place, they used to call me the "walking toolbox" because I always had the right screwdriver/tongs/scissors/uninsulator/etc. in my pocket. Plus, it features a bottle opener... cheers :)

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Recommendations for NAS-based home media set-up

stizzleswick
Pint

Buffalo-based system

Similar situation for me, so I figure I'll just post my home/office (I mostly work from home...) setup.

Based around a Buffalo NAS/media box, 4 discs, RAID 0+1. The box, besides being a file server, also offers various media and streaming services, including iTunes media and various standards fit for "smart" TVs. Connected to my in-house network via gigabit Ethernet.

The upper floor is wired; I have an 802.11 ac wireless bridge to downstairs, which floor again is wired. Living room: huge Samsung TV (can get HD/3D video from the box on its own) with a 3D/surround theatre box underneath which is connected to the intranet. Sitting room: much smaller, cheap-o smart TV, also no player needed. Upstairs, one workstation has surround sound and 24" screens, so that works just fine with the VLC playing anything the NAS can throw at it.

The NAS box supports ACLs for access control; those can be set up on an inclusion (only the following are allowed...) or exclusion (everybody except...) basis. For backup, I have set the box up to automatically do its backups onto an attached USB drive, and to another, rather more basic NAS sitting in the basement, via Ethernet. That may seem excessive to some, but my primary NAS holds not only video and audio, but also all my work and customer data, which I'd rather not accidentally lose.

I have one workstation equipped with DVB-T reception and occasionally record broadcasts; those are saved as h.264 videos on the box and are therefore available anywhere in the house immediately after recording finishes.

That said, I think I'll sit back with a cold one and enjoy a movie...

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Apple inaugurates free OS X beta program for world+dog

stizzleswick
Black Helicopters

Re: What ho!

@nanchatte: so you say you're not on the programme, too?

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Big Yellow loses its head... again: Symantec, we need to talk

stizzleswick

I agree with Irongut, there.

Don't Buy Software That Comes in Yellow Boxes.

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Reporters without Borders confirms, yes, lots of nations are spying on their citizens

stizzleswick
Black Helicopters

Re: Bit confused here....

"Yet any other country [...] would probably have shut down such newspapers, imprisoned the owners and probably shot the journalists."

And the U.S. didn't try to shut Snowden down?!?

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166 days later: Space Station astronauts return to Earth

stizzleswick
Pint

Re: Taking the air?

I think it works... after all they do take some air along with them ;)

No compressed air bottle icon, so I'll use the next most important thing...

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Space-junk RAYGUN wins Australian government funding

stizzleswick
Happy

Re: About bloody time...@annodomini2

Exactly what I was thinking there; thank you for clarifying where I failed to do so in my original comment. Have an upvote :)

@Graham Marsden: I had not been aware of that series, but yup, that's the general idea! (and, of course, also have an upvote for pointing out the Prior Art here :P )

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stizzleswick
Thumb Up

About bloody time...

...that somebody actually does something about space junk.

Personally, I would like to have an international co-operation that agrees to de-orbit or otherwise eliminate anything in orbit that is not registered. So, a piece of space junk, be it defunct TV satellite or non-registered spy satellite, would be tracked, the orbital and any other obtainable data posted for six months at a central registry site, and if nobody claims the object within that time, get it the hell outta there.

We (mankind) have been able to shoot garbage into space for far less than a century, yet there is an incredible amount of stuff up there that serves absolutely no purpose, but makes it more and more hazardous to place anything else in Earth orbit, and that "anything" includes humans.

Come to think of it, I figure it would also be fair that the companies or organisations that put the junk up there in the first place be billed for its removal. They could have planned and engineered for de-orbiting or otherwise removing their scrap metal once it became such, after all, but obviously didn't, leaving it to others to clean up after them.

Maverick thought here: there are a lot of very valuable resources in various Earth orbits. Rare Earth metals, gold, other precious materials which have already been refined to usability so would be relatively easy to recycle at a much lower cost than that of originally refining them. I wonder whether it would become feasible, once the various private space ventures manage to get an affordable ground-to-orbit transport together, to "mine" disused satellites?

Just an idea.

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Mt Gox fielded MASSIVE DDOS attack before collapse

stizzleswick
Boffin

The headline is rather misleading...

...since in military parlance, "fielding" something means bringing it into combat. So the headline "Mt Gox fielded MASSIVE DDOS attack before collapse" (emphasis added by commentard) implies that Mt Gox itself started a DDOS attack, not that it was the subject of one.

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Bitcoin bank Flexcoin pulls plug after cyber-robbers nick $610,000

stizzleswick
FAIL

Re: I do wonder

"How many of these BitCoin banks/exchanges hired security/network/web admins who had formerly worked for a real bank or some other secure entity?"

What makes you think that the regulated banks are in any way more secure?!?

I have a few acquaintances among the people working in that area, and from what they tell me, the "security" in "regular" banking is hair-raisingly, and notoriously, bad!

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India launches its very own VIKASPEDIA

stizzleswick

Re: Wonder where the Indians outsource to. China?

Well, the URL I quoted shows conclusively that you were re-routed using anonymouse. All I suggest is that you turn that off to acces this one site. *shrug* What more can I say?

Mind, I'm not blaming anonymouse in any way; good service there. But obviously, this Indian site does not like it... and as already said, the anonymouse-re-routed URL gave me the same error message you quoted in your original post. The non-re-routed URL got me there first time.

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stizzleswick
FAIL

Re: Wonder where the Indians outsource to. China?

Maybe your problem has something to do with the URL you are targeting:

"http://anonymouse.org/cgi-bin/anon-www.cgi/http://vikaspedia.in/" -- quoted from your previous post. Try the same thing without the anonymouse bit, maybe? Because that gives me an error page, too, and that isn't much of a surprise for me...

Mind, they may be filtering for anonymouse and/or TOR; they are certainly not filtering for country...

Plain "http://vikaspedia.in" works fine for me, anyway.

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stizzleswick
Linux

Re: Wonder where the Indians outsource to. China?

I've had no problems accessing the site; everything looked fine to me. Took a relatively long time for the first load, though. Using current Firefox with Adblock Plus and Ghostery on Linux.

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Microsoft may pick iPad for first release of Fondleslab Office™

stizzleswick
Coat

Honestly, I wouldn't be...

...interested in anything that had Visual Bollocks support... VBA being one of the major problems I have encountered whenever I was administering Windows-based networks. The less VBA, the better. And yes, go ahead and flame me. I am fully aware that an incredible number of companies survive on VBA script-gloms, and of the size of some of those companies--the fact that some of those companies basically live and die by VBA is rather scary to me. My point being that they should switch to proper programming and let go of their main source of hackability.

Mine's the one with the LibreOffice print on it...

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California takes a shot at mobile 'killswitch' mandate

stizzleswick
FAIL

Funny old thing...

Back when I was forced to get my first cellphone because of my job at the time, the thing was the size of a brick and could actually be turned into one by calling the supplier's hotline in case it was stolen. That was in 1994. The thing couldn't do text messages or anything, really, other than making phone calls... but you could have it bricked.

The question I have is why current "smart"phone manufacturers do not offer that feature today, since obviously it is trivial enough to have been implemented 20 years ago on a budget cellphone.

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Twitter may sue US government over right to disclose snooping orders

stizzleswick
Coat

To get around the muzzling orders...

...the solution would be simple, really: move headquarters out of the U.S. Heck, move the entire business out of the U.S; that's the good thing about the internet: it does not matter where you are based except maybe for tax reasons. So, if Twitter were based in, say, France, let's see what happens if/when the NSA demands to get free access to user data w/o notice to the public. Could be worth a few chuckles. Or move the headquarters to Sealand; that might yield some interesting actions, too...

In the long run, if U.S. data-collectors like Google, Amazon, Facebook, Twitter, Apple, Microsoft, etc. were to move their headquarters out of the U.S. in order to evade the IMHO ludicrous way the rights of their users are being mishandled there, this would have a rather heavy impact on the U.S. economy. I wonder how long it would take, in that case, for the U.S. Senate to finally get on the job it is currently neglecting, i.e., overseeing the secret services...

Check, please... mine's the anonymised coat...

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Microsoft takes InfoPath behind the shed, says successor will be better

stizzleswick
Coat

Good riddance.

During the few years that I was admin in a Winslows Server-driven shop, InfoPath/SharePoint were the major bears I had to, er, bear administering (I managed to talk the management out of continuing with Hyper-V after a catastrophic failure brought on by a "security" update...). There are far better solutions out there which are far more flexible and easier to administer...

Go ahead. Flame me. Mine's the asbestos-lined one...

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Optical filters head to Germany for Solar Orbiter build

stizzleswick
Boffin

Re: Don't understand

"If the accuracy is 1/30th, why give us the wavelength down to 1/10000th?"

Simple. That is the nominal wavelength the filter was designed for. The accuracy is + or - one thirtieth nanometer. So, we have a theoretical value for what we're shooting at, and the accuracy is, as said, plus or minus one thirtieth nm. Meaning that while the design value is accurate down to 1/10000th, the actual value achieved may be anywhere near there within plus or minus those 1/30th nm.

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stizzleswick
Boffin

Re: Interesting, but

Er... nope. Solar irradiation is a major factor for several reasons, including generation of atmospheric water vapour, which is a greenhouse gas. So is methane, which is about 20 times more efficient than CO2 as a greenhouse gas.

Mind you, the quote from the article was not about global warming models, but about climate models. I.e., what they use to make long-term weather forecasts, among other things.

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Boeing bent over for new probe as 787 batteries vent fluid, start to MELT

stizzleswick
FAIL

Most efficient in a class of one

"which is touted as the most fuel-efficient airliner in its class." -- that should be all right, since until the A350 starts being delivered later this year (hopefully), it is the only airliner in its class, making this kind of distinction rather easy to obtain.

What I do not understand is why Boeing are not learning lessons from their previous failure (i.e., the well-publicised battery desaster). Part of the reason for the delays of the A350 is that EADS are checking their options on what can be done safely concerning fuels, batteries, etc.; maybe Boeing should take the time, too. Costly, yes. But necessary, it seems.

Oh well... I'm only a lowly technical editor writing operating and repair manuals (obviously not for Boeing... or EADS--need a good TE, you guys, I'm available...) with an engineering background. But until you've fixed your plane, I won't get on it...

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Chinese Moon rover, lander duo wake up after two-week snooze

stizzleswick
Joke

"According to the old stories, the rabbit is constantly pounding herbs on the lunar surface to give to the gods."

Wonder what "herbs" those are, considering the gods' recent behaviour...

</joke>

Seriously, well done those guys. Here's hoping for a lot more pix and data from lander and rover--cheers!

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Asteroid-hunting beauty AWAKENS, takes cheeky snaps of neighbours

stizzleswick
Boffin

Re: What I can't make out - why oh why was it ever put into hibernation?

Quick check on Wikipedia; source link to NEOWISE official homepage followed, hence to this press release giving the reason for the hibernation:

http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/news/news.php?release=2011-031

To cut a long story short, they couldn't think of anything for NEOWISE to do after its extended primary mission was over, so put it to sleep until they could think of something.

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Facebook to BLAST the web with AUTO-PLAYING VIDEO ads

stizzleswick

No I don't think servers etc. are free. But I don't use facebook either, so... *shrug*

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Microsoft: Anonymous hacktivists DDoSed us? Really?

stizzleswick
Joke

Considering MS' track record with such statements...

...it probably wasn't a DDOS, it was a feature.

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D-Link FINALLY slams shut 'Joel's backdoor'

stizzleswick
WTF?

"Only turning off remote administration would protect the device."

For a SOHO bit of kit, I (being an admin/consultant) would not even connect the router to anything except the machine I'm using for initial setup, let alone the internet, without turning off remote admin--truly small offices (and home users) quite simply don't need that bug feature. And in my personal opinion, using most D-Link offerings in a larger setting would be akin to suicide anyway.

So... it may be a backdoor, but for anybody who knows the very first bit about security, it would be turned off anyway. Sort of like people using "passw0rd" as a password tend to have their systems hacked into more often than those who use actual passwords. Hence, very limited news value in this article from my point of view. There's a bug in a router. Not going to be the last one. It can be switched off, but most users won't. Their problem. If you don't know how to handle your own kit, hire a pro. My hourly rates are reasonable...

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I want to play with VMs

stizzleswick

How I do it

Two scenarios: first, occasional use of a different OS needed. Second, several different OS needed a lot of the time.

First case

I prefer using VirtualBox for my own use-case (got two pieces of software that require XP--not any versin of NT/Windows, but XP specifically); it's FOSS, relatively lean, easy to handle and pretty flexible. Good driver support for guest OSs, too. I have it running on both my main workstations (one on MacOS X, one on Debian GNU/Linux) for that quick access to the special bits, and for testing Linux and BSD distributions I plan to install on my own or my customers' machines before doing so. Need something with good tech support, I'd go for VMware.

Second case

I'd suggest a full hypervisor running on a dedicated machine with lots of RAM. Lots and lots of RAM. From experience, I recommend Xen. Got that up and running for a customer in 10 minutes flat. I'm not kidding. Installer disc in drive, fire up machine, ten minutes later I was importing the first set of VMs from the customer's failed previous hypervisor (Hyper-V. Big failure, as in, several VMs trashed in the process and customer as well as administrator swore never to use the product again). Alternatively, use Zen. Both are free and are Linux-based; Zen comes with some goodies from the SuSE project and optional tech support.

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Our irony meter exploded: Apple moans ebook price-fixing watchdog is too EXPENSIVE

This post has been deleted by a moderator

NASA shines a light on rehab plan for crocked Kepler probe

stizzleswick
Boffin

Not all that sci-fi.

After all, successful tests have been conducted (though rather smaller in scale) on the theme of lightsails etc. So, science: yup, it's science. The method has been demonstrated to work. Fiction: it used to be fiction, but isn't any longer. They're putting it into practice.

I love it when a plan comes together... and my Kudos go to the likes of Asimov, Heinlein, Hildebrandt, Clarke, L.N. Smith, et infinite al for having seen the possibilities decades before we could do it.

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Guess which major US telco ISN'T cracking down on premium SMS spam?

stizzleswick

Re: PSMS scamming only exists in the US and Canada, @AC 18:40 GMT

Had not been aware of Brazil also having the problem, and as I have since learned, also Australia. Thank you for pointing it out, have an upvote!

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stizzleswick
WTF?

Funny thing there.

Interestingly, it seems the practice of PSMS scamming only exists in the US and Canada--where the telcos charge people for incoming calls and SMs. In most of Europe, as far as I am aware, it is strictly "who initiates the call, pays for it." I may be ignorant, but a PSMS "feature" does not seem to exist in my home country, because of that very simple principle being enforced by according law--nor in any neighbouring country AFAIK. If I err here, please feel free to correct me.

I find the article to be a little ambiguous on whether the ban is on the SM being sent by the scammers, btw, or on the content: is the fraud perpetrated by sending unwanted SMs, or is the damage done by the recipients of said messages replying to them?

In the latter case, I would have to ask why they are replying? The only way to eliminate spam/cram is for everybody to simply not respond, thereby removing the economic basis for spamming.

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You can't have that many! China scuppers US, EU tech tariff talks

stizzleswick
FAIL

"They will soon get the point."

Would be nice if it worked, really. Back in the 1960s, the U.S. imposed heavy tariffs (90 % says one source) on European steel products (targeting imported cars specifically, but they didn't want to go ahead and say it outright). The European Community answered by imposing a 79 % tariff on U.S. produce, driving the price of pipe tobacco and bananas up noticeably. Most European car manufacturers responded by manufacturing cars in the U.S. and in countries nearby on which the U.S. did not impose those ridiculous tariffs.

Both the U.S. and the European tariffs are still in place 50 years later. Guess nobody learned anything from the whole episode, except that that the state, being the man in the middle, can fill its coffers with most consumers not noticing that it is at their expense.

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PANIC OVER DROOPING house prices hits MEMBER-shaped estate

stizzleswick
Boffin

City planners...

...must have been able to see this before the streets were even built--you don't need a satellite image to see the shape of this if you have a map--, so I will assume the responsible architect had a good chuckle when he drew up the plans for this development.

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Rogue trader gets 2½ years for BILLION-dollar Apple share plot

stizzleswick

Re: Bring back the stocks

" Bring back the stocks "

For a moment there, I thought you meant he should return the stock certificates... and that there were too many of those involved already.

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Deep beneath MELTING ANTARCTIC ice: A huge active VOLCANO

stizzleswick
Boffin

"*I* think that that's kind of a funny story."

Wait 'til your feet get wet, then re-think the comedy value :P

And yes, I take the entire global warming thingy with a few grains of salt. But I do keep up with the actually happening science as opposed to the political garbage being spewed forth by the various political parties the world over...

Mind you, where I am, I'll probably not get wet feet, but frozen ones. You see, Global Warming is a global average thing, as in the global average temperatures go up. That means that the temperatures go up more than they go down, in general, over the entire globe. But that is only the average development of temperatures. Which means that it is entirely possible and even likely that while on average, temperatures rise on a global level, in many places, the temperatures are still going down. World-over average, see?

And unfortunately, I'm in one of the areas that get colder while much of the rest of the world gets nice and cozy... oh well, I'll get to do more skiing, at least...

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Schiller: 'Almost everyone' at Apple works on iPhones - not Macs or anything

stizzleswick

Re: Pure gut feeling

Point well made, and taken.

I still wouldn't cry a single tear if the parasites lawyers could be laid off...

Have an upvote :)

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stizzleswick
Flame

Pure gut feeling

But you know, I really think Apple and Samsung should get into bed and make a couple of babies, so to speak, putting out the world's next smartphone-to-beat. Together they could do it; their current patent spats are going to be fruitless, what with most of the patents involved being ludicrous for lack of any technical innovation, in my personal opinion--as the holder of two patents myself --in my estimation they both would profit by collaborating, and much more importantly, two boatloads of lawyers would be laid off.

That alone would be worth it.

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Sony's new PlayStation 4 and open source FreeBSD: The TRUTH

stizzleswick

Re: And this is news? @Kebabbert

"Back then, they all suddenly jumped shipped and bet heavily on Linux, that was very immature back then"

Funnily enough, some then-large and some still-large players originally went BSD instead, like Sun Microsystems (Solaris), IBM (AIX, though admittedly with a UNIX source license in their pocket), HP (OSF/1, later rebranded as HP/UX), NEXT (and consequently, Apple, who still use FreeBSD on a MACH kernel as the base of their OSs). All of those companies have contributed hugely to the BSD flavour of their choice.

IBM and HP hedged their bets by supporting Linux and contributing to that project, too. As have many others. So, no news, agreed. But I don't share your conspiracy-theory point of view there.

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Stratfor email, credit-card hacker Hammond thrown in cooler for 10 YEARS

stizzleswick
Pint

Honestly? Good.

Having been a victim of CC fraud myself (and proud owner of one of the two cards that actually were instrumental in catching the culprit in my case--not this guy, though), I note that until very recently, this sort of crime seems to have been regarded as something of a "gentleman thief" thingy. You're doing it in the name of Anonymous (a movement I at least partially respect because they do bring up and make public real infringements on my rights, though I don't necessarily agree with their methods), so stealing innocent and non-involved people's hard-earned money is OK? Doesn't wash. Stinks even if you do wash it.

Lock 'em up, melt down the keys, throw resulting slag into ocean, etc. Meanwhile, I'm off for a nice pint; I finally, after two years of struggling, got the stolen money refunded to my bank account. Minus fees etc.

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Dell orbits Linux a third time with revamped Sputnik notebooks

stizzleswick
Flame

<rant>Actually, from the point of view of an end-user (many of my customers are end-users), I'd want developer machines to be restricted to about 640k of RAM to enforce proper coding instead of the memory-gobblers that even relatively simple applications like PIMs have become these days because developers just chuck in libraries without end which have at most one single function that is actually used in the application.

A point in case being the wordprocessor/page layout crossover Papyrus, which in its latest version needs about 50 MB of hard disk space and a negligible amount of memory, yet has all features 99 % of all people need out of a wordprocessor plus quite a few that go into page layout. I wonder why it is that, say, Quark XPress and Adobe InDesign need more than .5 GB each on the disc and won't run on less that 2 GB of memory these days. Let alone MS Office, or, not to be too picky here, also OpenOffice.org. Half a gig for an office suite? WTF?!?

And yes, I know most coders have little to no choice because of time constraints; they have to deliver something that somehow works on time. But if they didn't have machines that allow them to do things 95 % of all consumer PCs can't do (because of lack of memory and CPU oomph) and would be restricted to those constraints, that would IMHO lead to more consumer-friendly applications.

As sysadmin, I have seen too many instances of companies having to upgrade their complete end-user hardware just because the latest version of whatever-it-is needs ludicrous amounts of memory and HD space despite adding little to no new functionality.

</rant>

Rant aside (sorry, that one has been building inside me for years...), I laud every effort, even if overpriced, to give consumers choice other than between W8 Home and W8 Professional. Or whatever the editions are called these days.

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Boffins agree: YES we have had an atmospheric warming pause

stizzleswick
Boffin

Re: higher levels of UV rays

The thing with the elevated UV irradiation is that UV gets transformed to infrared upon hitting any of a large number of possible irradiation targets, like glass, concrete, sand, water, etc. by being reflected with a slight energy loss.

Infrared is, perhaps fittingly, also popularly called "heat radiation" because irradiation of the skin with it causes a feeling of warmth and it can transport energy such as "heat". More importantly, the energy the UV radiation loses in the transformation heats up the media irradiated. If you want to know how unbelievably efficient this mechanism is, get into a car that has just sat in the sun for a few hours (granted, not all of the heat melting the skin off you in that car is directly caused by direct UV irradiation, but a good part of it is).

Hence, more UV irradiation = higher temperatures.

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Microsoft's so keen on touch some mice FAIL under Windows 8.1

stizzleswick
Pint

"Mouse movement is not to scale even after acceleration is turned off"

Funny thing there; when I was making most of my money by doing high-quality pixel graphics some time ago, this is what I noticed the most about my customers' Windows machines I was supposed to do my work on. The mouse tracking (and the graphics tablet tracking, at the time, too) was not nearly as accurate as it was on those overpriced, underspecced machines by that unloved vendor.

By now, LXDE, Gnome, KDE etc. do a better job of mouse tracking than Windows ever did, right up to W8.1. No idea why that is. But maybe Microsoft should review their priorities, seeing as they are trying to market a graphical user interface...?

It's a bit early in the week, but I'll have a stiff one, thank you.

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Apple scrambles to fix buggy Mavericks apps

stizzleswick
Thumb Up

Fixes are out already, it seems

At least, I got the iBooks and Mail fixes installed today. No idea what they were fixing, because like a few others above have noted, I haven't experienced any bugs. From my point of view, Mavericks and its associated stack of applications is one of the smoothest OS releases in my lifetime, and I started out on MS-DOS 2.1.

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WD slips bullet between teeth, gets ready to hand $706 MEELLION to Seagate

stizzleswick
Meh

Re: Quality drop, @Nigel11

Interestingly enough, I have used a lot of Maxtor drives through the decades, as well as all other large brands; the Maxtors were never the fastest drives, but I have never had one fail. I remember the controller problems from the early 90s (couldn't use a Maxtor on the same bus as a Conner), but that was about it. Want a brand that really sucked? Quantum... remember the Fireball desaster?

These days, btw, most of the disc failures I see are Samsung. Having no problems with either WD or Seagate, but then I'm not buying their consumer-level discs either.

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OS X Mavericks mail client spews INFINITE SPAM

stizzleswick
Thumb Up

Agreed, OOo works fine, as does LibreOffice. Had a few hiccoughs with Aperture though (since fixed).

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