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* Posts by Graham Dawson

1548 posts • joined 5 Mar 2007

Hm, nice idea that. But somebody's already doing it less well

Graham Dawson
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Re: @But do we actually need all this progress?

Except, of course, the little problem that is never acknowledged: the European economies had begun making all of the changes necessary to bring about this new peaceful era in the aftermath of world war 2, before even the Coal and Steel union between France and Germany was put into place, never mind the EU, which wouldn't be implemented until the mid 90s. The EU was late to the party, claimed credit for something it had nothing to do with, and in the end spent most of its time fighting over which of its presidents would get to hold the prize certificate and who'd pocket the cash.

The EU and the EEC before it did nothing to create peace in Europe. They rode on the post-war economic boom that was brought about by rapid (and necessary) cooperation and integration between the nations of Europe, then claimed they were responsible for it, when in reality they've done the most to rein it in and crush it with their constant regulation.

And the nobel peace prize wasn't meant to be awarded to organisations anyway. It's right there in the charter for the damn thing.

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Graham Dawson
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Re: Ahem

You should have got in sewer ants against that.

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Tibetan monks lose their TVs as China's censors raid monasteries

Graham Dawson
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FAIL

Re: My karma just ran over my dogma

And you have the gall to compare other people to the nazis?

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When your squash partner 'endorses' your coding skills on LinkedIn...

Graham Dawson
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Re: Two thumbs up

You forgot apple.

I was goig to say "you forgot mirosoft" too, but nobody likes Microsoft.

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Graham Dawson
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Coat

I thought it was bad when they invented the A* rating at GCSE. Never understand that.

I still don't.

Must be why I get such a snippy attitude on ebay all the time. "Will purchase from this seller again" probably means I want to murder their dog and eat their children these days.

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Senate votes to continue FISA domestic spying through 2017

Graham Dawson
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Legitimising systematic abuse of your population through legislation does not make it good.

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Christmas ruined for 2,100 sex offenders booted off online games

Graham Dawson
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Re: Guess these subsibers are feeling like those who ...

Perhaps someone said they didn't like paying the licence fee.

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The LINUX TABLET IS THE FUTURE - and it always will be

Graham Dawson
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Pint

Re: Android

Linux is not "fragmented". It is adapted to multiple environments and capable of running the same tools and applications on the vast majority of them. Those environments where you can't run, say, Konqueror are probably not suited for desktop browsing in the first place.

To pick a random example, I could run abiword on my old n900, my desktop computer and, with a bit of tinkering, my router. Okay, a lot of tinkering, and it's probably not much fun running a word processor and all the other bits necessary to make that happen on a router, over a vnc session. It would be a dog.

But that's sort of the point. Linux doesn't fragment. You wouldn't want to have the exact same user experience across divergent devices. By the logic you're employing, Apple is fragmented because it has completely different user interfaces on iOS and OSX and can't run the same applications. It's a laughably stupid argument, yes? So why are you making the exact same laughably stupid argument about Linux?

Merry boxingmas.

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Graham Dawson
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> Asus Transformer?

Marvellous machine. Mine is still going strong after nearly two years. I think. I've written an entire novel on it. I'm considering replacing it with a padphone or one of those fancy slender models Asus do, at which point I'll likely start experimenting with some version of Linux + KDE just to see how well it works.

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Graham Dawson
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Re: The big problem...

That should be UI, not GUI... oh well. Silly fingers. :D

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Graham Dawson
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Re: The big problem...

No, the unix philosophy is one program, one task. Text is the interface. You just made the same mistake as the author, confusing the GUI with the OS.

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Graham Dawson
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Re: Android

My only two gripes about Android are the way it manages multitasking and the way Android-based systems are so locked down. I like to get a command-line interface to play with because I'm a tinkerer, but rooting and installing a terminal emulator gives me a lot of options in that regard. The multitasking issue is more fundamental. A few times, to begin with, I lost quite a lot of writing on my Asus transformer because I switched away from the app without saving and came back later to find it had been dumped from active memory and lost all my work.

Frustrating.

Other than the enforced "save all the time" regime, which is good practice anyway, I have almost no complaints. Now if only I could get jellybean on my phone...

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Graham Dawson
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Re: KDE/Plasma is a much better contender

Likewise. I saw a demo of Plasma on the n900 some time back and it looked rather spiffy, albeit a little slow as it wasn't particularly optimised. It did all the necessaries though.

Given a little time it could easily contend with Android for the mobile space.

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Graham Dawson
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Pint

The writer seems to have an odd view of linux as basically just Gnome + Unity. KDE (yes, yes, I went there) is wonderfully touch-friendly and a very different user experience to gnome. Just as widespread, too.

But then, you see, that still makes the mistake of thinking Linux = UI. Android is Linux. Simple as. It's a fork of the kernel - but it's slowy being merged back into the trunk - sitting under all the same userspace tools, or at least a large subset of them, and it has a fancy Java-based UI on top. In that sense it's no different to Ubuntu, it just has more market penetration in the tablet space.

So the Linux tablet is already here. What we don't have is a gnome tablet, which is an entirely different kettle of fish. I don't want a gome tablet. I'd be rather keen on a KDE/Plasma tablet, but I have an android tablet. And they are all (or would be) Linux tablets.

Now back to the boxing day belly-ache. Turkey sandwich anyone?

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Thunderbirds, Captain Scarlet creator Gerry Anderson dies at 83

Graham Dawson
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I only saw the Captain Scarlet reboot last year but boy, what a nostalgia trip. It was the sort of thing the original Scarlet wanted to be.

Shame the broadcaster cocked it up...

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Boffins build elastic wires with liquid metal

Graham Dawson
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Re: Plastic

Plastic means flexible and soft. We tend to associate it with hardness because petrochemical "plastics" appear hard in comparison, but they're generally quite malleable.

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8086 and All That. Revisited

Graham Dawson
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Headmaster

Re: Oh Yeah, Anglo Claptrap

The question is, were they turing complete?

Computer says no.

Babbage was the only one to work on a true general purpose computer that would have been turing complete if it was ever completed. Shame it wasn't, really. We could have ruled the world.

Moreso.

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iPhone tops US market, but trounced by Android in world+dog

Graham Dawson
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Re: Apple fanboys...

Example below...

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Japanese firm lifts lid on Android-controlled toilet

Graham Dawson
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Re: Does it have a button "Old Faithful"?

Surely a BSJ would also be 150 feet tall and somehow made from bergamot and rice?

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Anonymous hacks Westboro Baptists over Sandy Hook protests

Graham Dawson
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FAIL

Re: WBC are scum

Scum speaks to scum.

You're willing to exploit the deaths of children to "undermine religion".

Were he to exist, his noodly appendage would recoil from you in disgust.

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Fish grow ‘hands’ in genetic experiment

Graham Dawson
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Re: mermaids

Most of the barmaids around here look like dugongs anyway...

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Graham Dawson
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Headmaster

Technically they already have them. The bones of a dolphin's flipper are equivalent to the bones of a human hand, they're just shaped slightly differently and wrapped in a big lump of flesh .

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UK cops: How we sniffed out convicted AnonOps admin 'Nerdo'

Graham Dawson
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Holmes

Re: NIC?

But what if they have a PC?

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Bio-integrated circuitry melds man and machine

Graham Dawson
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If the doors jammed and you haven't got a battering ram handy, perhaps?

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New transistor tech could beat silicon and save Moore's Law

Graham Dawson
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Re: May I be the first to say....

For I do not come to destroy Moore's Law, but to fulfil it.

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Report: Apple, Google, Microsoft join forces to buy Kodak patents

Graham Dawson
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Re: What's wrong with worshipping satan?

Oh shut up, you old goat. Who are you? I do not know you.

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Republican staffer fired for copyright reform suggestions

Graham Dawson
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Re: There is only one answer to Washington's issues:

Ah but the thing is. IT Vet, a corporation has to have some status as a "person" in order to be taxed on its income (what we call corporation tax). Anything else gets complicated extremely quickly. Considering how complicated current tax law is, do you really want to make things even more convoluted?

And of course, if a corporation is a "person", then that "person", under US law, has to have the same constitutional rights as any other citizen, otherwise you re-establish the precedent that certain citizens can be deprived of their rights simply because they fall outside an arbitrary definition of "deserving".

It's a very difficult and complicated situation, something of a conundrum in fact. Expecting politicians to fix it is madness. Expecting the courts to fix it is wishful thinking because they tend to be extremely conservative when it comes to taking away "rights" once granted. There is no simple and easy solution, and certainly depriving corporations of "personhood" will not fix things and will only, in fact, make them worse.

You'll lose corporation tax, for starters. You'll lose the ability to enforce law and judgements against corporate entities because those entities will no longer have any legally recognised "body" against which to bring judgement - and at the same time you'll not gain the ability to enforce judgements against the owners or managers, as they can simply hide behind collective responsibility, because individuals can't be legally held liable for the actions of others. Corporations, however, won't lose the ability to fund lobbying or contribute political donations. They'll just organise a few employees to do it on their behalf.

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Forget fluorescents, plastic lighting strips coming out next year

Graham Dawson
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Re: CF bulbs are fine here too

All fluorescent lights give me a headache. Every single one I've tried, no matter how cheap or expensive, no matter the build quality, they all give me a headache without fail. I can always tell when there's a CFL in a room - even the high quality ones that emit an otherwise pleasing glow. Fortunately there are "energy efficient" halogens to keep me sane and headache free.

Something being "old" doesn't mean it's inferior and being "new" doesn't make something better.

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Curiosity finds organics on Mars, but possibly not of Mars

Graham Dawson
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Re: And now for the Hoagland interpretation

Seems like he took Iron Sky to be a documentary...

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Microsoft cues next-gen Xbox for Crimbo 2013

Graham Dawson
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@Chris

Yes. And then you stamp on it a few times and keep going.

(disclaimer: I own an xbox. I play two games on it. This proves nothing.)

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NASA: THE TRUTH about the END OF THE WORLD on 21 Dec

Graham Dawson
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Actually they used string.

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America planned to NUKE THE MOON

Graham Dawson
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Thumb Down

Re: mentality of our friends from across the pond.

AC, I don't know if you're an idiot or just poorly educated. I'll assume the latter.

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Graham Dawson
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Re: Note on Sagan

Nah, nah, you're all wrong. The existence, or lack thereof, of any god is a non-testable hypothesis. There is no means of falsification, hence no theoretical basis by which the existence of a deity can be tested. There can never be "scientific proof" of the existence of god, or the lack, or even the possibility of a quantum superposition of states of God, because the very concept of an omnipotent, omniscient, omnipresent being is not falsifiable.

So to say that science can't prove God doesn't exist is correct. The scientific method can't be applied the idea, therefore it lies outside the realm of science, and any opinion on the subject is a matter of faith. Any opinion. Not just the ones that you don't like.

Same with m-theory and whole bunch of other stuff that gets waved around as "science" when it's just so much handwaving and fancy hypothetical models. Can't be tested, not falsifiable, ergo not science. Might as well claim the universe looks pink on the outside.

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Graham Dawson
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Re: mentality of our friends from across the pond.

Probably shouldn't express that sentiment anywhere east of germany, mr noodles...

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Google+ exec declares Facebook 'social network of the past'

Graham Dawson
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Re: What's this "ad" stuff people keep talking about?

You realise that an advert is a paid-for recommendation, yes?

Anyway, not that it matters. Usually word of mouth is easier to assess for quality, whilst paid-for ads are more likely to be something I don't want.

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Register readers mostly too ashamed to cop to hideous hoard horrors

Graham Dawson
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Coat

Re: ah well

Flee market? Is it called that because they run away whenever they see you coming?

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Dawn of the X-Men? MUTANTS swarm AMONG US, say geneticists

Graham Dawson
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Facepalm

Oh gawd. I just realised I've spent the last ten minutes trying to decipher amanfromMars...

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Ten badass brainy computers from science fiction

Graham Dawson
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Coat

I'm vaguely disappointed that The General from The Prisoner wasn't included.

Not that disappointed, mind. It was a terrible episode.

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Anti-Israel hackers leak nuclear watchdog email addresses

Graham Dawson
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Brace yourselves, a shitstorm is coming...

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Android seven-inchers swipe rug from under Apple

Graham Dawson
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Re: More fake numbers by Google....

"The parents" are people around my age. It's depressing.

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Real sci-fi space ships coming at last? NASA tests nuclear engine

Graham Dawson
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Re: Earth orbit?

Presumably they mean LEO.

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Apple granted patent for microphone silhouette

Graham Dawson
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Re: Oooh

Just popped open the app drawer on my phone and, lo and behold, an essentially identical icon is used for the Voice Search app. It even has rounded corners!

These design patents are silly. At least they haven't managed to snag a real patent on the thing. Things aren't that far gone yet.

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Graham Dawson
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Re: Did Apple

Swiss.

Though, come to think of it, I do recall a very similar design on a button in the railway station under Arlanda airport...

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Elon Musk envisions small town of VEGETARIANS ON MARS

Graham Dawson
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Re: Won't happen for that price

Apollo could carry 5 astronauts with the addition of two more seats in the equipment bays from the very start. Improvements meant it could probably have carried 6 or even 7 by the time it was used on Spacelab, though things would have been rather cosy.

Dragon has significantly more internal space due to the miniaturisation of much of the tech involved and it's not inconceivable that it could also carry 6 without any difficulty, or more if you want to get really friendly with your fellow passengers.

But lets just assume that they haven't made any advances at all on the Apollo-era tech and that they're never going to make any cost-saving improvements at all. Ever. That makes it so much easier to argue against the idea.

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Google parks panzers on Germany's lawn over 'link tax' plan

Graham Dawson
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This would be equivalent to being required to pay a tax for pointing at a newspaper and saying "there's a story in there about the big event that happened yesterday".

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Bash Street bytes: Do UK schools really need the Raspberry Pi?

Graham Dawson
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Re: Seriously!?

hplasm nutshells it. There seems to be this strange idea that everything should just be handed to "us" (us being teachers, students, workers or whoever) on a silver platter without any effort. Life is not like that. Life is hard and painful and requires that we do something to get something.

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Asteroid miners hunt for platinum, leave all common sense in glovebox

Graham Dawson
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Re: This is assuming the products are the same

Oh fine, if you want to get picky about it, they're tin-plated steel, the point is that it would have been unthinkable to use tin for that in the not so distant past. Once it was used as jewellery, now it's used to prevent corrosion in disposable cans.

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Graham Dawson
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Re: This is assuming the products are the same

Think outside the box then. Gold and copper reach price and supply parity. Now, you'll find that gold would be used in place of copper for a lot of jobs, because it doesn't corrode or oxidise and is somewhat more ductile, thus less likely to break in stressful installations.

Tin used to be a precious metal. Now it's used to make cans. The point is that an increase in supply allows the market to experiment with new uses for a material. And yes, there may be something that people don't want to use, but I'd be surprised if any raw materials - particularly metals - would fall under that category.

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Graham Dawson
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Re: This is assuming the products are the same

A lot of these arguments are also applicable to earlier "novel" infrastructure projects. Uranium mining in Australia, for instance. Or oil in saudi arabia. The market for oil was growing but constrained when the saudi fields were exploited and there was a certain worry that it would cause a price crash that would make the whole endeavour pointless.

After a short lag the demand rose to consume the supply. If we're able to source large quantities of what are currently relatively rare materials from space, they will be used. The price might bounce around a bit before it settles down but the market will expand once the supply is there and new uses for the materials are found.

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