* Posts by Graham Dawson

1574 posts • joined 5 Mar 2007

Think your CV is crap? Your interview skills are worse

Graham Dawson
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Trollface

problem?

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Graham Dawson
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I don't generally remember the last book I read vecause I'm already on to the next one. Surely thats a more desireable trait in a go-getting trend-setting hip and desireable candidate for the meat mill?

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Jim Westwood, home micro revolutionary

Graham Dawson
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No, what shoved us down the crapper was the never-ending stream of golden yellow emanating from westminster palace and spraying far and wide.

Capitalism is simply the private ownership and use of capital - that is, money, resources and time, expended at the whim of the private owner of those things. Nothing more and nothing less.

What you're objecting to, without apparently realising it, isn't capitalism but essentially a form of fascism, where the state has merged its with monopoly corporate entities that it helped to create through regulation and control of the economy - said regulation being designed to prevent effective competition to the large corporate entities that have made themselves so willingly available to the piss-passers dangling themselves above hoi poloi.

That isn't capitalism. It's statism, which is the opposite of capitalism, and the end result isn't very pretty.

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My home is bugged ... with temp sensors to save me cash

Graham Dawson
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Pint

Then the only solution:

1. blazing row

2. make-up sex

3...

4. You don't care any more (aka PROFIT!!!)

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New claim: iPhone 5 was a goer until Jobs bottled it

Graham Dawson
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That's never stopped apple patenting everything under the sun up to now.

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Fusion boffins crack shreddy eddy plasma puzzle

Graham Dawson
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Brudine, whilst the correlation is not absolute, the majority of countries with a high average of children born per woman are third world, generally african and central asian.

https://www.cia.gov/library/publications/the-world-factbook/rankorder/2127rank.html

Next time, look before mouthing off.

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Graham Dawson
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Perhaps you could forgo forcing the entire wrld to pay for the inentive to vissit your neighbours now and then and just go outside, you lazy bum!

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Mars, Moon, solar system could be littered with alien artifacts

Graham Dawson
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Alien

We aren't. Stop asking.

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Ten... high-end Android tablets

Graham Dawson
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What are you talking about? It works great in portrait!

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'Puzzling structures on surface' of YU55 spaceball

Graham Dawson
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Happy

Not so simple. It's stupendously rare for objects in space to meet at anything other than relatively enormous speeds, which is why the problem exists - at such speeds the objects in question would shatter regardless of their composition.

And, whatever idea is picked, it has to explain why there are so many of them here in our solar system. If it were just one or two it could be put down to fortuitous meetings and unusual circumstances, but the number of objects that display these characteristics has moved well beyond the realms of random chance into "good god that's scary". That's why there's a somewhat unacknowledged problem with the current models. They can't account for the number of these objects with craters so large that they should have been destroyed by the impact.

For asteroids there are proposals that many are actually loose conglomerations of material held together by microgravity, which works to a certain extend but can't explain Phobos and other solid objects with similar features.

So research is ongoing. :)

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Graham Dawson
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A fully-occupied stadium surrounding a football would have a particular, known mass that could be short-handed to "football field" in a pinch.

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Graham Dawson
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Boffin

Putting on a serious face for a moment, I have to assume that the "puzzling structures" refers to the apparent, enormous crater that seems to be just about visible on the right, almost facing us as it rotates in to view. A lot of very small objects in the solar system appear to have these very large craters and they're quite a problem for current models, as the force required to make such a large crater would generally be enough to pulverise the object being impacted.

The most well known is Phobos, which has a crater on one end that almost can't be explained. Theories have been mooted as to how such a crater could be formed but none are really quite adequate. Research, as they say, is ongoing.

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Is the electromagnetic constant a constant?

Graham Dawson
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It's the subsequent bug-fixing that took millions of years. Certainly felt like it.

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Graham Dawson
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So the universe is written in perl? That... sort of makes a lot of sense.

+++ RECURSION DETECTED +++ REDO FROM START +++

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Graham Dawson
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Or it boosts it, by providing evidence that the entity in question crafted a cosmos with a high degree of variability within certain bounds that would provide both safe areas for life to thrive and other, interesting areas from which they could gain insight and knowledge and ultimately understanding of their role.

Or you could put the "lets poke fun at people who believe different things to me" snottiness aside and just enjoy an interesting and potentially very important scientific discovery.

Assuming it isn't instrumental problems, which it may be...

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Apple faces Germany ban after court no-show

Graham Dawson
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Pint

Friday? I'd suggest they were at the pub.

Cheers!

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Greens threaten to sue over solar 'leccy cash slash

Graham Dawson
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It's an odd definition of "middle class" that includes a place in the country and an acre of roof-space. Maybe it's just because I'm a dirty sooty northerner but, I've always assumed myself to be (just about) middle class and yet I live in a flat. My parents definitely are, and it's true that their house is quite large, but it also has eight people split across two families living in it.

The definition of middle class I see bandied about in the media seems very southern-centric. Up here, if you're so rich you can afford a country pile, you're a toff and possibly a banker, whereas it seems the home counties would consider you working class if your yacht is shorter than 110 feet and you only have one land rover.

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Compact Disc death foretold for 2012

Graham Dawson
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End of CDs? Hardly the end of the world, is it? Then again, perhaps it's what the Mayans were predicting...

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German website offers custom cow killing

Graham Dawson
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It doesn't? My entire world view has fallen apart!

<-- Hung beef?

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Ginormous sunspot spews solar guts towards Earth

Graham Dawson
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This spot is still a tiddler compared to some of the spots the sun had in the late 80s and early 90s. They were sort that were visible to the naked eye when the sun was setting and looked like rags of cloud or malformed birds floating in front of the sun.

And I had to walk uphill to see em. In the snow! At night!

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Are we in the middle of a PATENT BUBBLE?

Graham Dawson
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There are these things called contracts, perhaps you've heard of them? Apple and XYZ manufacturing develop a contract for the production of iGadgets, with punitive measures if either party breaks the contract. Manufacturing clones and selling them to all and sundry would break the contract so hard it makes an audible snapping noise and XYZ would face all sorts of legal wrangles from Apple.

Patents aren't particularly relevant to the manufacture of goods in east asia by American companies as they're often manufacturing goods that aren't protected by the local patenting regime; the distribution of those goods is protected by contract. Where the issue rises up is when a company in, say, China begs, buys or borrows a patented widget from Widgets R Us and begins manufacturing their own without permission, in order to undercut the patent-protected market, either foreign or domestic.

All that said, I agree that patents, as they were originally conceived, are a good thing. They were designed to encourage the sharing of new ideas whilst still providing the originator with income. Now, they're used to kill off competition by application to such generic ideas as buttons, business methods and wiggling fingers against glass. The problem started the moment the patent office dropped the requirement for a working model.

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Bill Gates strangled Microsoft's 'tablet for creatives'

Graham Dawson
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I would have bought one of these. I can't quite think of what I'd use it for, but I would have definitely bought one because it is *exactly* the sort of device I have been craving ever since I realised what a computer was. But no, Gates had to take it away before I could spend my money on it...

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ASUS: 'We run out of hard disks at the end of the month'

Graham Dawson
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I had one SSD drop dead on me in a week - catastrophic total failure. One minute it was working, next it wasn't and I couldn't get a single bit off it. The replacement - exactly the same make and model - performed flawlessly. Is this typical? Maybe. I can't completely rule out murphy's static finger but it seems that the consumer drives are still a bit of a crapshoot.

Which reminds me, I really should run a backup.

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Graham Dawson
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The transformer is very netbookish but, as a hybrid device, it's a little hard to really categorise it as "just" a netbook. From the perspective of netbooks it looks like an ultrabook, but from the perspective of ultrabooks it looks like a netbook. And it's a tablet.

Neither fish nor fowl.

Must be why I love mine. :)

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CERN boffins re-running neutrino speed test

Graham Dawson
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Neutrinos only interact very weakly with matter and wouldn't follow an optical fibre.

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Dell bundles Ubuntu Linux on PCs in China

Graham Dawson
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@AC They don't, they just sit in the middle of it and complain.

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Stallman: Did I say Jobs was evil? I meant really evil

Graham Dawson
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Actually they do have a monopoly. You can't run non-apple-approved software on an iOS device. They often simply ban software from iTunes if it competes with their own offerings. How is that not abusing a monopoly?

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As iPhone 4S battery suckage spreads, fixes appear

Graham Dawson
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Coffee/keyboard

All I can say to that is...

... I want sushi. At least that part of this fantasy is achievable.

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Sony and Ericsson divorce

Graham Dawson
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Why is it that these things always go kaput just as I buy into them? I seem to have a habit of getting started with something just as it's about to drop dead. It's really quite annoying.

Ooh, I know, I'll buy an iPhone. Apple will be out of the phone business a week later. Rejoice world, I have come to save you from their tyranny!

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Corning launches can-stand-the-heat Lotus glass for phones

Graham Dawson
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Nanolinguini?

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Jobs: 'I'll spend my dying breath destroying Android'

Graham Dawson
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Your argument seems to be "Apple made a thing, then something similar came along to exploit a similar market, therefore they are ripping off apple". By that logic apple are ripping off... HTC, who released the Wallaby (aka O2 XDA, Qtec 1010 and others) a full four years before the iphone, with a full-featured touch-screen interface. Icons on a grid...

There was a trend towards touch-screens before Apple glot the iphone out. Android was following that trend. Apple was following that trend.

Sorry, you lose. Apple may have marketing success but they did not invent this interface, and they cannot claim they are being ripped off by something that is merely *similar*, yet different enough to be noticeably so, and which is simply following the prevailing paradigm.

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Graham Dawson
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Facepalm

Android was in development before the iphone came out and has a completely different user interface. How can that be considered "ripping off"?

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Libel reform vows to slay anonymous trolls

Graham Dawson
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Holmes

All right, stop that, this is far too silly!

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Graham Dawson
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Defamation is in the eye of the beholder. Or would you rather give people the power to have every post critical of, say, Orlowski removed from this site because it was "defamation"? Because that's what they're proposing, in essence: the ability to have posts removed simply because someone has complained, without recourse to courts or any form of defence.

The ability to speak freely and anonymously is one of the cornerstones of western democracy. It allows us to hold our "masters" to account by providing a means to disseminate information that they don't want us to see. Given that much of that information could and has ben declared defamatory in one way or another, it's arguable that people *must* be allowed to post defamation if democratic government is to function. The alternative would cripple our ability to hold the state to account; we already face the reality of people declaring the truth to be libel in this country. This proposal would allow them to not even bother having to go to court to do it.

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Mystery over bogus Facebook login data dump

Graham Dawson
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Coat

Would it be tasteless to add something about a stylised bitten apple to that list?

I suppose it would. Oh well...

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Ballmer disses Android as cheap and complex

Graham Dawson
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Everyone within chair range at least professes to believe it.

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Michael Dell declines to eat his Apple (humble) pie

Graham Dawson
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Thumb Down

Well now your'e just being obtuse.

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Graham Dawson
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He was right, based on the information he had at the time. Subsequent information doesn't change that.

Steve Jobs took a risk and it paid off but it was a *big* risk. The sort of risk that either makes you a billionaire or leaves you wandering the streets in the tattered remains of your last suit. He was right too. They were both right, it just depends on how you look at it.

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HTC's iPhone, iPad ban bid derailed by US judge

Graham Dawson
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Slavishly copied?

I'm holding an LG GD510, also known as the "pop". First released at the end of 2009 or thereabouts. Predates the iphone 4 by about a year. Now from a distance, if you aren't paying too much attention, it does actually look a *lot* like an iphone. It's got about the same dimensions,in bright light it's about the same colour (admittedly very bright light), it's got roughly the same radius on the corners..

What I'm trying to say is, you seem to believe that apple invented this look, but I'm holding a device that disproves that.

Now stop slavishly copying and trying to pass off on my name or I'll sue you.

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Apple iPhone 4S

Graham Dawson
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Made it work... by redesigning the antenna to avoid the problems highlighted with the previous one. Problems they denied were ever there.

A failed design gets replaced and that somehow justifies denying it was a failed design.

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Graham Dawson
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You must be new. The only editorial line The Register seems to have is "barbecue the sacred cow!"

And long may it stay that way.

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Genetics and technology make Columbus Day a fraud

Graham Dawson
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To be, or not to be.

Hm. Not to be.

*BOOM*

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Graham Dawson
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In the frozen north, people didn't celebrate the winter solstice. They feared it. They feasted because they might never see the sun again, and they did everything within their power to convince the gods to bring it back.

Ok, so maybe it was a n excuse for a piss-up, but it wasn't a celebration...

It was, however, the main festival of the north-europea pre-christian calendar. All that dancing around stone henge in the summer is a modern invention, a creation of ppeole too pansy-arsed to do it properly. The *original* pagans did it in the winter. Naked. And then they killed things. bring back that good old-time religion I say!

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OMG! Berners-Lee has an iPhone

Graham Dawson
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When IIS came around the web was already well established enough that it wasn't going anywhere, so the market was able to bear a license fee, which would only ever take a minority position against free alternatives. With Gopher, unless I'm misremembering, there wasn't the same entrenchment, WWW was already there to compete and there wasn't any alternative to the licensed server. So it died.

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Graham Dawson
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Big Brother

The intro for that series remains ever apt.

Where am I?

On the internet

What do you want?

Information.

Who's side are you on?

That would be telling. We want information, Information. Information.

You won't get it!

By hook or by crook, we will.

Who are you?

The new Social Media.

...

And it sort of breaks dwon there. Oh well.

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An ode to rent-a-nerds and cable monkeys

Graham Dawson
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An ode may rhyme, there's no rule that says it *must*.

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Where am I going tomorrow? My 'leccy car charger wants to know

Graham Dawson
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@AC

It's true. The issue is energy density, something that fuel cell, hydrogen and battery advocates always either ignore or prefer not to talk about.

Currently the most efficient form of energy storage for road vehicles is petrol simply because it packs the most energy into the smallest space without the need for expensive, dangerous active storage facilities. Hydrogen can leak from even the most perfect of seals because it's so small and requires extreme compression to achieve even remotely the same energy density as petrol, which then requires expensive and dangerous cryogenic storage. Hydrogen fuel cells are marginally better but still suffer the same basic storage and transport problems as hydrogen. Batteries? They're largely dead weight. Look at the average battery powered car and you'll see that they're essentially useless. People complain about a phone that lasts less than a week, how will they act if they have to "fill up" their car every day? I'd only have to fill my car every day if I was doing a daily commute all the way from lands end to john o'groats.

The only solution I can see is artificial petroleum produced in some sort of high intensity centralised facility (ie not one that requires the use of vast tracts of arable land and food crops). Everything else seems to be a waste of time and effort with very little energy returned on energy invested, especially given the fundamental rebuilding of a large chunk of our infrastructure and economy that always seems to go along with them.

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Nanotubes, sulfur expand battery storage

Graham Dawson
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Coat

It's the long and curly outer coat of the Lesser American Lingual Sully. The Lingual Sully (Soliens Lingua Destructor) also known as the Typographical Sully, the Dictionary Eater and the Vowel Vermine, is a tiny mammal approximately seven eighths of an inch from nose to tail, covered in tightly wound fur often referred to as "sulfur", which is capable of expanding by some thirty thousand times, making the Sully appear to be a huge elephant in the room. Its primary habitat is libraries, where it has a peculiar habit of eating ink from the pages of books, leaving a trail of misspellings and typographical errors in its wake. By "sullying language" in this way it earned its primary name. It is also sometimes referred to as Websters Muse.

Related Species

S. Apostrosplatidown (aka Grocer's S'ully)

S. Dinkum Justii (The Australian Sully)

S. Puerlargum Innitii (The Essex Sully)

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Boffins fear killer gamma death blasts from space

Graham Dawson
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I don't get sunburned any more!

Perhaps we should invent a giant hat for the earth. :)

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