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* Posts by Graham Dawson

1512 posts • joined 5 Mar 2007

Did your iPhone 'just stop working' - or did you drop it in your BEER?

Graham Dawson
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Re: just an idea

The damage isn't from shorting (though I suppose that can happen), it's from the crud and oxidisation that occurs when water gets in the device. Unless you drop your phone in absolutely pure, distilled, de-mineralised water it's going to end up with all sorts of nasty oxidants in it that will eat away the circuitry in no time. You can't fix that by just shutting down.

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Google makes Opera bloggers an offer they can't refuse: Use Chrome

Graham Dawson
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"Some parts of Blogger will not work" is not an invitation, it's a statement implying itself to be true, leading the user to infer that blogger and opera are incompatible, not that they might be, yet the evidence so far is that it's also a big fat lie.

If you can provide proof that blogger breaks in Opera then it would be a statement of truth.

However you'd still be wrong, because you're attempting to argue that it's merely a helpful tip and not a warning that things will definitely break.

I don't use Opera and I like google products, but that doesn't change the fact that they're still lying. I don't like blatant lies.

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Big media little iPad stories suggest Apple is cranking up the spin cycle

Graham Dawson
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The argument falls down somewhat when you realise that "big media" mostly relies on what's trendin on twitter for its news these days. Apple probably haven't said or done a thing.

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GPS spoofing countermeasures: Your smartphone already has them

Graham Dawson
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Re: Typically 'Mercans

BAe Systems. Formerly British Aerospace, still has its headquarters in the UK. American?

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Orange San Diego Intel-based Android phone

Graham Dawson
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Re: battery life

Apps require emulation? I... Don't think so. They run in dalvik. Java in all but name. No need for emulation.

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BAE proposes GPS-less location

Graham Dawson
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Nice idea, but will it work in the empty wastes of flashpointistan?

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Mad fan-fitted mouse keeps mitts moisture-free

Graham Dawson
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A very brief dip wouldn't cause any problems, the nitrogen forms a momentary vapour layer as it boils off from the heat of your skin, which allows for silly party tricks.

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War On Standby: Do the figures actually stack up?

Graham Dawson
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Re: BS economy, the comments are more interesting

You'll find it's not watt-hours but watt-years, which makes the guilt-trip even more silly.

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Graham Dawson
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Re: annoying

I understand that's more of a collective effort.

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Nexus 7 and Surface: A bonanza for landfill miners

Graham Dawson
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Happy

Re: Annnnd...

Not entirely sure what he is today, since his entire argument amounts to "I don't have a use for it therefore it's a stupid and pointless thing". The same was said about electricity once. Nobody could see the point, until suddenly they could.

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Apple wins US ban on Samsung's Galaxy Tab 10.1

Graham Dawson
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Re: Tab2 @droid on droid

Amusing. Silly, but amusing.

I own, or used to own I should say, an iPod touch. I had one of the old iPod minis. They were very good devices (the touch in particular got me through many a slow day at work when wifi was available). Apple are good at design, however they are not above using conniving tricks and gotchas as part of a concerted effort to use the force of the state to crush their competition. They are using the courts to prevent a fair market. That is not justifiable in any way and I don't understand why people are continuing to claim otherwise.

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Graham Dawson
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Re: Tab2 @toadwarrior

Compare like with like. Opening the app drawer and comparing that with the iOS home screen is a huge con.

Also the dimensions are different, like I said, and then there's the camera, and the buttons on the side, and the status bar across the bottom, the lack of a "home" button...

The fact that it's designed to sit horizontally.

Face it, your entire premise is bunk.

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Graham Dawson
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Re: Tab2 @toadwarrior

Looking arond, say, Dell's website or maybe Alienware I see... nothing that looks like Apple. My little Zbox looks nothing like apple. The various cases I can buy for my home-assembled boxes look nothing like apple.

Are you trying to claim that apple invented industrial design? That's probably the statement of greatest hubris I've heard all year.

Speaking of cars, most do look very similar. The 2012 Ford Focus looks a lot like the Audi A8, which looks like the BMW 5 series, which looks more than a little bit like the Rover 75. They're all 4 door saloons, similar profiles, similar sizes, similar design features, but do you see BMW suing Ford or Audi over that? No? No. Because that would be STUPID.

Apple's entire complaint is that the Samsung Tab looks a bit like an ipad, as long as you ignore the different dimensions, the different shape and the different design features. By that merit every car manufacturer in the world should be suing every other. They don't because the functional requirements of a car force it to be within a certain range of shapes that look very similar. In the same way, a tablet has to be a certain shape to be viable. That would be a rectangle with round corners, a few buttons, a screen and a case. Apple's argument is that the samsung tab is a rectangle with round corners, a few buttons, a screen and a case.

Do you see the problem?

Possibly not, considering your entire argument seems to be that nothing good came before Apple, and everything bad is someone else's fault. That's possibly the most insane and ridiculous argument anyone can make. It's the literal definition of cultic behaviour.

If you actually place the tablets side by side (without photoshopping them) the differences are immediately obvious, not least the shape of several main features, the difference in size and the fact that it says SAMSUNG on it in bloody great letters. Only an idiot could mistake one for the other.

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HP open sources WebOS TouchPad tablet GUI

Graham Dawson
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Re: Okay

I for one am wondering if the generic version will run on the raspberry pi. Worth checking out at least.

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Even Apples sometimes have worms in them, admits Cupertino

Graham Dawson
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One of these.

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Mensch pal Bozier defends Menshn security, dubs critics 'snippy geeks'

Graham Dawson
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+ + + RECURSION DETECTED + + + REDO FROM START + + +

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Stonehenge WASN'T built by ALIENS - Boffins' shock claim

Graham Dawson
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Re: Not calculate!!!

Tom, we can guess at its significance from surviving religious behaviours. In Europe, especially northern and western Europe, a great deal of effort (and food) was expended around the winter solstice and a great many rituals evolved around the idea of bringing back the sun and the fear that it would go away forever. It was considered to be the most dangerous and magical time of year, with the nights growing longer and the days growing shorter, darkness and death and emptiness covering the land. Winter was always thought to be the time of year when the world might end.

So fine, measurement rather than calculation but the reasons for it don't change: they wanted to know when the sun was going to come back.

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Graham Dawson
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I was always under the impression that it was designed to calculate the winter solstice so they could know when the new year started. And also impress the plebian mass with their magical sacrifices that bring back the sun.

In fact a google search for the paper involved says that, yes, it was designed to mark the winter solstice, not the summer solstice. ALl those hippies turning up in the middle of summer have it completely wrong: they should be dancing around in the nudd in the middle of a snowfield. It'd definitely separate the posers from the genuine believers...

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No one watches TV, Nielsen, and you know it

Graham Dawson
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Thumb Up

@ A J Stiles Re: sheilas wheels

I hang my head in shame sir.

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Graham Dawson
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Headmaster

Re: sheilas wheels

Adverts aren't technically any louder than television programmes, they just appear subjectively louder for a couple of reasons: the audio is compressed and everything is pumped up to near the peak. In a TV show you get a varied audio from very quiet to very loud, for a lot of reasons: they want you to hear the actors talking, they want to draw yor attention to particular sounds over a quiet background, and they don't want to piss you off and wear you out. Adverts on the other hand want to GRAB YOU AND SHAKE YOU LIKE A RAG DOLL so they compress and maintain a constant volume, exploiting a few quirks of how the brain processes sound to draw your attention. They don't want to hold it for long, just long enough to insert a message.

In addition, the use of constant volume and relatively high frequency sound effectively overloads the brain and places it in a highly receptive state; the sheer amount of information presented by a full spectrum of sound at the same volume forces your brain to stop trying to pick and choose what to process and just take it all in.

As far as I can tell (and this isn't backed by any studies, it's just me yammering at this point) the effect creates a condition very similar to that of a mild autism spectrum disorder. Most of these disorders affect the way information is filtered and processed by the brain, usually preventing effective filtering and prioritising, with one of the side effects being form of pronoia (or anti-paranoia perhaps), being unable to understand lies and implicitly trusting everything someone says as authoritative# simply because they said it. People with higher functioning autism spectrum disorders develop coping mechanisms that allow them to understand when something isn't true, or at least put it aside until they can find out, and also allow them to filter out unwanted simuli. We who are not "blessed" with this ability are turned into absolutely trusting innocents for just a few moments when an advert blasts at us. Just long enough for the message to start worming its way in.

They're a very primitive and ineffectual version of snowcrash. But they aren't any louder.

Also, volume isn't measured in parts per million. :)

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Graham Dawson
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Re: Product placement

The classic I always remember is that scene from The Matrix with a... Motorola was it? Floating serenely in the breeze right in front of the camera for nearly 15 seconds before suddenly whipping away into the distance. Similarly in the H2G2 film with that Nokia buzzing away in space right before Journey of the Sorcerer began to play.

There's product placement, and then there's that. You have to laugh...

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Vatican subtly shifts its position on The Blues Brothers

Graham Dawson
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Re: Reconsidering

And that changes what, precisely? He's still choosing his tastes based on whether or not somebody or some body of people to whom he is negatively predisposed are expressing a positive opinion about it. It would be like me deciding that I didn't like Star Trek because the current Russian president penned a positive review, or declaring I no longer thought positively about Blade Runner because Tony Blair liked it.

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Graham Dawson
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Re: Bring on the Babel fish

I'd say it was written by someone who is more used to Latin grammar than English. It's an unusual construction but it does make perfect sense.

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Graham Dawson
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Re: Reconsidering

So you're willing to stop liking a good film simply because someone you don't like thinks it's a good film? There's a term for that. Tip of my tongue... oh... ah yes.

"Fuckwit". Seems to cover it quite nicely really.

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CIOs should fear the IP police ... have your get-out-of-jail files ready

Graham Dawson
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Re: never have copyright transfer

Die-hard randians and objectivists tend toward the idea that copyright terms should either not exist or be very short - they're a creation of the state and a state-sponsored monopoly, which runs counter to the objectivist and more generally libertarian ideal of the smallest possible state with the fewest possible laws. They prefer to handle things with contract law rather than issue-based legislation as contract law is more consensus-based and handled through arbitration, whilst legislation is often the result of someone trying to inflect their personal opinions on everyone else. Very different fields of endeavour.

Of course there are always crazies. However I think it's safe to say that, if you meet someone who calls himself an objectivist but insists that the government MUST DO SOMETHING, they're probably not very familiar with the ideas they claim to espouse. And also likely to be no true scotsman. :D

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So you wanna be a Wall Street techie? Or anyway, get paid a lot

Graham Dawson
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@sir runcible

I guess Microsoft didn't learn much from their own interview questions then, considering the hole of their own making they're rapidly falling into.

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Graham Dawson
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Re: Impossible to answer interview questions

The answer is actually quite simple: None.

At least there's never one around when you need one...

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Mad Apple patent: Cloneware to convince trackers you don't like porn

Graham Dawson
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Re: I suspect...

Wouldn't that mean you're one too?

And me?

<-- The one identical to the one next to it please...

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Americans stand against UN internet-tax plan

Graham Dawson
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Re: @Anon

Maybe you've heard of these things called DVDs?

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Graham Dawson
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@Anon

Or we get Stargate SG1, The Venture Brothers, Game of Thrones, Futurama, Deadwood, The Wire, Sharpe, The Sopranos, House, Farscape, Firefly... the list goes on and on and on and on. What has the BBC produced in the last decade that could match that? Dr Who. Maybe a couple of documentaries, a "world class" news service that can't even get basic facts about even close European neighbours like Norway and Sweden right and then scads of mindless shite trying to compete with ITV.

Face it, your argument is lame. Other companies produce far better television for far less cost with the added benefit that I don't have to pay for them if I don't want to watch them.

And no, people "like me" haven't been whining about the BBC doing everything in house. My argument has always been that the BBC's funding is simply immoral and has always been used to fund the lavish lifestyles of a self-selected group of wannabe-kingmakers with delusions of grandeur and a belief that they're the only ones who know how the world should be run. In-house or external production doesn't change that; the fact that it's using a government-mandated levy extracted by threat of force to fund private companies is merely the latest layer of icing on the cake.

I don't watch television. To do so would require me to pay the wages of people I am fundamentally in disagreement with and I'm not prepared to do that.

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Graham Dawson
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Facepalm

Re: Yes lets kill the BBC

Except that argument isn't valid any more. The BBC produces nothing that isn't either matched or beaten by other broadcasters world-wide. In fact most of the BBC's content is produced by external production companies - it makes very little in-house, most of which is useless tat, and most of what it broadcasts is produced with an eye on foreign markets, which is why the BBC has such long idents. They're filling the time that would be taken with adverts. Even its vaunted nature documentaries and big-name dramas are produced by third-parties and aimed at the international market first and foremost.

The license fee is only used to pay over the odds for slebs and wannabe opinion-makers, and the layers and layers of managers that infest broadcasting house. It is a regressive anachronism that forces people to pay for a service they don't even use.

If Microsoft extracted a tax for every computer that was sold you would be up in arms but when another greedy, overbearing corporation with delusions of superiority does it you're just fine with it.

OH WAIT!

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Average selling price of tablets drops 21% in three months

Graham Dawson
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Re: Boy's Toys

I call my tf101 a toy. But then I call my main computer a box and my graphics tablet a cat bed, so... yeah.

I don't get the whole problem with grown men having "toys". To assume that adults can never have anything to enjoy is a very childish way to view the world. To be an adult means knowing when you can let go and simply enjoy life - and play with your toys.

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Windows 8: Not even Microsoft thinks businesses will use it

Graham Dawson
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Holmes

Re: When does thing launch again?

You’ve got to be kidding me. I’ve been further even more decided to use even go need to do look more as anyone can. Can you really be far even as decided half as much to use go wish for that? My guess is that when one really been far even as decided once to use even go want, it is then that he has really been far even as decided to use even go want to do look more like. It’s just common sense.

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O2, Be Broadband axe Pirate Bay access

Graham Dawson
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Re: oh noooooo

It isn't their money being wasted and they get paid for the time spent. No incentive to be smart about it.

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We'll pull the plug on info-leak smart meters, warns UK.gov

Graham Dawson
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Re: Case hasn't been made

Oh yes it has. The case is simple: "Shut up or we'll raise your bills and taxes again."

And then they do it anyway.

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Dual-screen, detachable and Windows 8 star at Computex

Graham Dawson
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And still no word on the UK release of the padfone. Come on, Asus, hurry up!

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Techies beg world to join the 1% on IPv6 launch day

Graham Dawson
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They get millions of IP addresses each, I'm stuck sharing with hundreds of other people on a rotating basis because there aren't enough left to go around. I am the 99%.

... right?

Oh. Never mind then.

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Earth bathed in high-energy radiation from colossal mystery blast

Graham Dawson
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Re: I wonder what they saw that they interpreted as a "red crucifix"

A "red crucifix" and "wonderful serpents" are both very good descriptions of highly active Aurora Borealis, which form all sorts of marvellous shapes. If they're strong enough you'll begin to see coherent plasma formations taking on the form of pillars, crosses, humanoid figures, chalices and all sorts of fancy things. Serpents, which were traditionally sinuous, flying creatures and not necessarily snakes, would be fairly run of the mill.

A large CME impacting earth would generate very strong, very southerly aurora.

Additional evidence: the magnetic north pole was much closer to Europe in the 700s and 800s AD (it's moved quite a bit since then) which means that aurora would be more southerly in Europe to begin with, which would explain the serpents - bright glowing, snaking shapes in the sky would be seen as serpents and the flying, dragon-like "worm" and might even have been related back to the norse mythology of Jormungand.

So the question becomes, was that CME powerful enough to generate more coherent shapes? If it were at the level of the Carrington Event (look it up) then it could well have been responsible for both the sky sightings and the C14 increase.

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Flexible Willow glass displays thin and curvy gadget future

Graham Dawson
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Facepalm

"Add slimness".

Are they going to simplificate and add more lightness too?

yeesh. :)

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My part in the GREATEST IPO SUCCESS of ALL TIME

Graham Dawson
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Re: It's Verity Stob

You mean placing it in Bootnotes, the way it was written, the location of his VC company and the obviously implausible content of the article itself wasn't enough for you?

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Firm applies for .sucks domain

Graham Dawson
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If this goes through, who's going to register really.sucks and sell subdomains?

This whole tld thing is starting to sound like usenet... how long before we see the domain will.wheaton.really.really.sucks? (this is an example, I actually think Will Wheaton is a pretty cool guy).

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SpaceX signs deal to put its giant rocket to good use

Graham Dawson
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Re: Large loads to GEO

A space-station or three up there would be fantastic.

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Graham Dawson
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Re: Vandenberg?

Well, it's possible to do a 270-something degree plane change and get your satellite orbiting in the right direction before you boost it up, it just takes a lot of fuel, like I said.

Bubba is disappointed that he can't make an enormous bbq out of that rocket stage.

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Graham Dawson
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Re: Vandenberg?

You can launch to GEO from vandenberg, it just requires a lot more fuel for all changes you'll be making to your orbital plane before you get there. If fuel were no object then you could launch to geo from the north pole, and I'm sure they'll start doing that once they've invented a Fuel Tank of Holding.

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I need to multitask, but Windows 8's Metro won't let me

Graham Dawson
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Re: "Er, Microsoft? Multi = more than 2"

I thought it was one two many lots.

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Final countdown for NASA's NuSTAR X-ray black hole telescope

Graham Dawson
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Italy has a space agency?

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Agriboffins' site downed by DDoS after GM protest

Graham Dawson
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Is it just me, or are Anon becoming the al qaida of "hacking" these days? For every new ddos or password pile leak in the news, you get some nefarioius new group who claims or is rumoured to be linked to them. It's getting silly.

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People-powered Olympic shopping mall: A sign of utter tech illiteracy

Graham Dawson
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Re: Crichton

Does it involve night arrows?

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Passwords are for AES-holes

Graham Dawson
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Re: I don't hate my users

Given the way you post here it wouldn't surprise me if you frog-marched them all into a small concrete room and screamed at them for an hour about your new security policy before sending them off to the daily waterboarding session.

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Steve Jobs' death clears way for vibrating Apple tool

Graham Dawson
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Re: Deja vu from recent Reg headlines

Or parodying people who say Jobs was in the way.

Or both.

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