* Posts by Ben Tasker

1129 posts • joined 23 Oct 2007

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Google helps Brit crims polish their image – but what about the innocent

Ben Tasker
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Re: Rape victims not a great example

@Drewc

Those accused of rape aren't though. Someone has a false allegation made against them, ends up in the papers and forever has their name tarnished.

Though, to be fair, I don't believe the right to be forgotten is the way to fix this. For crimes that have a strong knee-kerk emotive link to them, the accused needs to be guaranteed anonynimity too (until the point of conviction).

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Bitcoin, schmitcoin. Let's play piggyback on the blockchain

Ben Tasker
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Re: The Real Story About The Bitcoin Blockchain

> I've gone from crazy to "a stretch". That's progress.

One argument simply being a stretch doesn't stop the theory from being crazy, though hyperbolic would likely have been a fairer original description.

> I assure you that a court would consider adding an official block to the blockchain to be a consideration passed from the miner to bitcoin in order to qualify for a prize.

I don't doubt you could find _a_ court who'd consider it, but realistically the court you'd ultimately need to convince in the US is the Supreme, and there's still the rest of the world to think about.

You could also argue that the blockchain is a community asset, and that in fact there isn't a sole entity acting as a lottery operator - not only does that make it harder to shut down, it's a little harder to prove that there's sufficient benefit to call it a lottery in the legal sense.

There's also the difficulty of how they'd manage the confiscation if it were to come to pass, but that's not something you'd consider when having the is/isn't argument.

I doubt the US govt would think twice if it brought them financial benefit, mind, so that's not to say it couldn't be made to fit

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Ben Tasker
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Re: The Real Story About The Bitcoin Blockchain

> The "consideration" clause is legally met once the miner adds the block which is a undeniable benefit to bitcoin.

Personally, I think that's a big stretch.

> The scam part comes because bitcoin has no limitation on the number of miners. If all had an equal chance it would be just a lottery. But with 50k winners and 325k losers during the effective lifetime of the gear, there is no equal chance for all.

So lets assume it is legally a lottery for a sec

Every block mined has an equal chance of getting the BTC.

Not every miner has an equal chance of course, if I spend out on a lot of kit that can hash at a huge rate then I've potentially got better odds in that I've got more entries. That's no different to if I buy £1000 lottery tickets, I've got more entries that you.

So, still not a scam

> All the rest is irrelevant details.

When you're claiming something is legal or illegal, there's very little that can be called an irrelevant detail

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Ben Tasker
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Re: The Real Story About The Bitcoin Blockchain

> It's not crazy, it's legally true

I'm perfectly happy to wait for a court to decide that, but I disagree with your interpretation:

As far as as chance and prize go, I'm not going to argue with you because I think mining meets that to some extent.

As for consideration:

You _may_ have a point if a miner has bought dedicated single-purpose hardware (i.e. an ASIC) specifically to mine, but there are also other options (though your ability to mine may be reduced). For example, if I buy a GPU and use that both to mine and to play with password hashes, does that constitute enough of a consideration to fall foul?

The electricity usage is a byproduct of the activity, and I think you'd struggle to call that significant effort given it's reasonably expected that if you're doing any kind of computation, it's going to need the leccy

Similarly, bandwidth usage is simply a byproduct

There's also a wide world outside the US (who I suspect would be the first, if anyone to go that route) so although US BTC acceptance could suffer following caselaw supporting your argument, it's going to take quite a while (if ever) for the rest of the world to follow suit.

Even if the above is wrong, you're still wrong. You _might_ have an argument that BTC is a lottery (though I disagree), but that's very different from a lottery scam. For a lottery scam, you'll first need to show that it's a lottery and then show the mal-intent - without that it'd just be a lottery.

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Ben Tasker
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Re: The Real Story About The Bitcoin Blockchain

Crypti does look interesting, but your comment comes across as hyperbolic. You've identified issues with BTC, and didn't need to take the leap of craziness into insisting that it's an illegal lottery scam. It harms your credibility.....

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Britain beats back Argies over Falklands online land grab

Ben Tasker
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Re: Local control

Presumably, if .fk were to be taken away (not that I think it would), the fallback would be precisely that...

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MAC address privacy inches towards standardisation

Ben Tasker
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Re: Randomising MAC address

> It's only the MAC address used when probing for known networks that is being randomised. As soon as you connect (or try to connect) then you're using your real MAC address. More details here.

That's how iOS 8 does it, but not how the experiment was run. The devices MAC was randomised before connecting to a new network but wasn't then reverted back to the real address.

They essentially ran

MAC_ADDR=06:`openssl rand -hex 5 | sed 's/\(..\)/:\1/g;s/^.\(.\)[0-3]/\12/;s/^.\(.\)[4-7]/\16/; s/^.\(.\)[89ab]/\1a/;s/^.\(.\)[cdef]/\1e/'`; sudo ifconfig <WLANIFACE> ether $MAC_ADDR; networksetup -setairportnetwork <WLANIFACE> <ESSID> <WiFi KEY>; echo $MAC_ADDR >> <PATH_TO_LOGFILE>

(they used the 06 at the beginning to identify trial participants and DHCP/VLAN them differently).

More info on mentor - https://mentor.ieee.org/privecsg/documents

There's some interesting reading there actually....

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Dyre banking VXers LOVE Mondays, Symantec says

Ben Tasker
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Joke

Re: Bloatware from Mountain View

> At layer 3? Good look with that.

Simple:

iptables -I INPUT -j DROP

And just in case the machine is already infected, strip the viruses and spam it's trying to send

iptables -I OUTPUT -j DROP

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Anakin Skywalker chased by cops, crashes podracer into tree

Ben Tasker
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Re: like son like father?

According to wookiepedia (seriously), yes - http://starwars.wikia.com/wiki/Mark_Hamill - just before filming closed for the first film.

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Assange™ celebrates third year in Ecuadorian embassy broom closet

Ben Tasker
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FAIL

Re: Truer words were never spoken --- "EIT"

Why would they need an extradition request when they just use extraordinary rendition.. /facepalm

Why would they go that route? Even if that had been the plan at the outset, every day that Assange has been in that embassy has been a little more rope toward his noose.

Say Assange gives up, goes to Sweden, get's a slap on the wrist, followed by a stern talking to here for being a bailjumper, then nothing. What does the rest of the world then assume about the guy who's been swearing blind it's a US plot against him?

He's been very vocal from the outset, and even if he was right initially, he's given the US all the tools they need to destroy his credibility (who'd trust a crank leaker?).

And that's assuming you even believed his claims in the first place.

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THIS TIME we really are ALL DOOMED, famous doomsayer prof says

Ben Tasker
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Re: To Append A Necessary Phrase.

Partly true - if it was viewed that they weren't likely to become self-sufficient we should cut food aid (so starve them).

But also, if we viewed that a particular region had more promise than the country as a whole, we should encourage a seperatist movement.

So to my mind, that's tantamount to starving them into starting a civil war.

He also floated the idea of mass sterilisation via the water supply and then discounted it on the basis that there hadn't been enough research into it.

I know we're talking about a doomsday scenario, and hard decisions would need to be made, but if you're going to effectively sentence an entire country to death (leaving aside the 'who has the right?') at least make it a bit more humane than starvation y'know?

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Oi, UK.gov, your Verify system looks like a MASS SPY NETWORK

Ben Tasker
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Re: Looks like, walks like, talks like...

The point of a federated system is that you can choose an identity provider which you trust,

I'm being slightly pedantic, but, Given the providers involved, I think it's more a case of choosing the provider you distrust least. Take a look at the list

Barclays

Digidentity

Experian

GB Group

Morpho

PayPal

Post Office

Royal Mail

Verizon

I'll admit to having had to google digidentity, Morpho and GB group (which means they're distrusted by default - I know nowt about them). Are there any on that list you could say you actively trust? I'm not sure I could.

I think I'd need to default into choosing whichever company I felt already had sufficient information on me (as it's too late to change that).

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Sprint: Net neutrality means we can't stamp out download hogs

Ben Tasker
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Re: Bu****it!

Even then, it's not always that straight forward once marketing get involved

This plan allows you to make an unlimited number of phone calls* to anywhere in the U.S.

* of a duration of 5 seconds or less, calls exceeding 5 seconds will be charged at normal network rates

Or

* calls charged at normal network rate

The problem with 'Unlimited' broadband is the same as the example above - they're taking a different interpretation of exactly which part is unlimited.

They're not imposing a 'limit' on how much you're allowed to download that month, they're simply reducing the rate at which you can do so - obviously ignoring the effect the latter has on your abilities in respect of the former.

The whole thing's a joke and has been since it's inception, but simply defining the word unlimited isn't enough, you've got to get them to admit which part of the sentence it relates to and any caveats that might impact the picture that marketing are trying to paint.

TL:DR The ISPs who sell 'UNLIMITED' need more than a language lesson, sadly.

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Israeli firm gets legal on Indian techie over ISP ad injection spat

Ben Tasker
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Re: Bharti Airtel and Flash Networks

> The issue isn't that this person did a quick "View Source", it's they the published someone else's IP to

> a public site. That is theft, plain and simple.

So, in your world - if rather than View Source, Ctrl-c, Ctrl-v he'd taken and posted a filtered packet capture showing the issue where would he stand?

If I'm troubleshooting why I'm having problems accessing your site and take a quick pcap to investigate, am I breaching your copyright? What about if I chuck it up to Cloudshark

> Injection of various assets to provide improved service (or pay for a free one), is common practice and

> people accept its benefits.

Not sure that people accept the 'benefits', I think they just put up with it. In cases of ISP injection it rarely leads to an improved (or cheaper) service, just higher profit margins for the ISP in question.

It's also an incredibly nasty and potentially dangerous thing to do IMO and I'd drop my ISP if I caught them doing it.

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The weapons pact threatening IT security research

Ben Tasker
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Re: Exposing software flaws for profit

> some standardized form of compensation which should not constitute win the lottery

Given that the standardised amount probably won't be much, the low hanging fruit will get picked up on, and no-one will spend the time digging into the less easy to find, but still potentially critical stuff.

I'm not advocating selling flaws, but a standardised compensation level will just be exploited by the major industry players with no real benefit to the rest of us.

> Anyone choosing to blackmail by not disclosing the software defect for the set financial compensation

> should do serious prison time.

Only if the fuckers who missed it because they wanted to save some money in the QA department face a similar threat, which whilst potentially appealing is just as stupid. First they fuck up and get millions of machines pawned, and then the taxpayer pays their cost of living for 'serious time'?

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Hackers steal files on 4 million US govt workers

Ben Tasker
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Joke

Re: With all these breaches

Free credit monitoring for the average american..... but... but... but.... surely that's one step away from socialism and must be banned?

- A tea-bagger

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So, EE. Who IS this app on your HTC M9s sneakily texting, hmm?

Ben Tasker
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Re: Stock Rom

If you look at the link to the forums, the guy apparently tried putting a stock ROM on there and it re-appeared. They've (at least in some cases) made it persistent by sticking it on a separate partition.

Some flashing your ROM isn't necessarily a defence against it.

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Musk: 'It's BS for ex-Vulture to claim I forced employee to miss sprog's birth'

Ben Tasker
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Re: Big moments vs the small...

> each of those moments more precious to me than that initial birth thing.

Agreed - I'm glad I didn't miss littlun's birth (though I should have said no when told I could see him crown :( ) but it's the times since that stick in mind.

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Lightbulbs of the future will come with wireless extenders and speakers

Ben Tasker
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Re: And unless the security is up to scratch...

And all so you don't have to get off your arse to let them in - I don't get the problem with going and opening the door personally....

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'Use 1 capital' password prompts make them too predictable – study

Ben Tasker
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Re: Password generators

Max lengths piss me off, given the things should be salted and hashed in the database anyway (long passwords are all reduced to the same length as short passwords in terms of DB storage). So why limit me to 8 characters??

I can understand having some kind of a limit so I don't try and set a 10KB string as a password, but low character limits are just stupid.

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Ben Tasker
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Re: Password rage

Yup, VbV is a complete waste of time.

I actually made the effort to try and remember the phrase I used a while back (rather than setting a random string knowing I'd just reset next time). Got one, ONE character incorrect the next time I tried to use it, and as a result of that single borked attempt they made me reset and wouldn't let me reset to the phrase I'd bother to remember.

So I'm back to 'forgot my password' -> set to a random string -> make no attempt to remember it

Which means it, once again, provides bugger all value whatsoever.

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This open-source personal crypto-key vault wants two things: To make the web safer ... and your donations

Ben Tasker
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Just guessing, but:

I'd hope the thing was thoroughly audited by someone else before shipping - finding that someone will cost something.

Getting set up to manufacture, even with limited runs can be an expensive proposition. You might be able to design and build a rough prototype for 50, but good luck getting any manufacturing plants interested without

a) a high cost small run

b) a lower cost, guaranteed run of a given quantity

It's not like they're planning on building these hsms in their garage, is it?

The other option is to not raise so much upfront, and hold orders until the manufacturers minimum run size is achieved. IME that's insanely frustrating when you're wanting to get your hands on the thing.

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Self preservation is AWS security's biggest worry, says gros fromage

Ben Tasker
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Re: Wrong priority

To an extent you're right, but also wrong.

They need to insulate customer B from nefarious customer A as far as possible, that's true.

But if customer A gets pwnd and the attacker ultimately manages to get a block of IPs added to a RBL then, even if customer A leaves, that may effect customer C (who's been unlucky enough to be allocated one of those IPs).

Would I lose sleep? No. But there is definitely some worth in trying to educate customers not to be complete tools when it comes to security.

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Because the server room is certainly no place for pets

Ben Tasker
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Re: Tape and VM? - LMFTFY

This is a pointless article with baseless scaremongering

'Toxic IT'? Seriously?

Not everything can be efficiently virtualised. JIRA is a (reasonably) popular enterprise app, and it _can_ be virtualised (in the sense that it's not impossible), but the problems you invite by doing so can be potentially myriad (especially if you've got vmotion set up). If your business relies on a tool being available, why take that risk?

Virtualisation is a tool, it's important to understand when to use it and when it's not appropriate to do so - that's going to change on a case by case basis, so there aren't really any blanket rules on what should be virtualised.

It's also equally important to ensure non-technical managers understand that just because you could run all those 'toxic' servers as VMs on a single host (to reduce costs), it's not necessarily a good idea.

The phrase 'Toxic IT' sounds like the garbage you might hear come from a marketing dept, not from an educated professional.

For the record, I definitely wouldn't fall into the 'old' category either.

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Google sticks anti-SQL injection vaccine into MySQL MariaDB fork

Ben Tasker
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So in case anyone's still wondering (or y'know, wants to make the article factually correct).

The Anti-SQLi measures are implemented by sending your queries to the Database Firewall Filter (called MaxScale) rather than direct to MariaDB itself.

Maxscale appears to support a wide range of filters (including things like requiring a WHERE within delete queries), including time based one's (no delete's outside of working hours for example).

There's not a huge amount of documentation on the anti-SQL side of things at the moment (it just says block specific queries) so I'd guess it's using simple pattern matching rather than fingerprinting (which is what this script for MySQL does).

There's a public repo for Maxscale here but I'm guessing the anti-SQLi filter has yet to make it into there as I don't see any commits that stand out as obviously related (and nothing referring to it in the release notes).

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Ben Tasker
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I'm completely guessing here, though if I get time I'll probably go and have a read of a more reliable source than TFA.

As the SQL Injection protection seems to be within a query firewall (rather than related to the encryption as El Reg claimed), I'm going to hazard a guess that it does simple query interpretation, looking for things like a UNION within a query that, every time it's run previously, has not included a UNION.

i.e if the query is normally

SELECT title,content FROM articles where id=1;

And the following comes through

SELECT title,content FROM articles where id=1 UNION SELECT username,plaintextpass from users

Then it'd be blocked.

It's only a guess mind, but given Google's propensity for behavioural analysis, I wouldn't be surprised if there's some profiling of queries received and then anything outside of the 'normal' profile gets additional filtering to try and identify whether it's an SQLi attempt.

Still better to fix/avoid SQLi at the application though

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Aw, snap! How huge HTML links can crash Chrome tabs in one click

Ben Tasker
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On the upside, the pre-fetching is relatively easy to disable, though the naming is a bit flakey - "Predict network actions to improve performance".

I'm not sure what benefit it really gives, even on a slow connection I tend to find DNS resolution is often the fastest element of accessing a new site.

The page pre-loading functionality is potentially fucking scary too (disabled by the same checkbox) - Chrome will try and work out which link on a site you're likely to click on next and then pre-load in the background.

You can drop meta-tags into a page to tell Chrome what to prefetch (so presumably link rel='dns-prefetch' href='lorem ipsum.......' would also cause a crash) - so can do link rel="prerender" href="myevilpage.htm"

Google's docs note that pre-rendering is resource heavy, so in theory (at least) you could probably also create a page that just spams the browser with prerender.

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You want disruption? Try this: Uber office raided again, staff cuffed

Ben Tasker
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There's no barrier except that Uber are supposed to... you know.... comply with local legislation and get a license.

Whether or not there's protectionism going on doesn't really factor in to that. If local laws specify that Uber need to do something, they have 2 options

- comply

- challenge the legislation

What they can't do, is pretend that the legislation doesn't apply to them and operate any way.

Unfortunately, that's what they seem to have been doing.

We don't tolerate the likes of Kraft coming over here and saying "well the food standards requirements are lower in the US, so we're going to ignore the UK standards". Why would this be any different?

To operate in a country, you need to comply with their laws, even if you think the laws are backwards

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Ben Tasker
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Re: illegal software...

@ac

Whilst you might be right about the existing industry being overprotected dinosaurs, it should be pretty clear by now that Uber make a pretty crap poster child.

They may be challenging the existing models, but the company is clearly a walking nightmare.

From security to data-mining, they don't seem capable of operating in a manner that is in the interest of consumers.

The appears to be a bunch of incompetent, over-litigous data-sucking assholes, but hey they're challenging the status quo so it's all forgiven right?

The enemy of your enemy is not always your friend.....

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Dot-sucks sucks, say lawyers: ICANN urged to kill 'shakedown' now

Ben Tasker
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Joke

Re: Who the hell cares about domain names? It's just an address!

>The Human language name is NOT the IP address... snip...The Human Language name(s) have

> NOTHING to do with the IP address, except in the minds of the technologically incompetent ...

What about

seventy-two-dot-six.ty-one-dot-fourty-three-dot-eig.ht

That could also be the IP (72.61.43.8), in which case it'd also have quite a lot to do with the IP - though I suspect the technologically incompetent _would_ fail to make the association.

EDIT: Reduced label length by adding a subdomain

Sorry.... feeling ever so slightly argumentative today, does it show?

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Assange™ lawyers demand Swedish prosecution files or no London interview

Ben Tasker
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>If he refused to meet them, then hopefully the prosecution could use that to make a case for waiving the statute of limitations? The fact that he makes a new demand everytime he gets a concession should be going into the building of a case

It's quite possible it is - the prosecution have to show diligence, so it may well be that they go to a court, and use his 'evasiveness' to have the statute waived.

Aside from perhaps arguing points of law, there's not much his defence could do about that if it's Julian that's been unreasonably causing the delay (and demanding changes in laid down process would be unreasonable I think).

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Ben Tasker
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It's an interesting question, Assange has been given asylum to protect his physical person, not so that he can do and say whatever he feels like after all.

Ecuador would probably have a harder time (diplomatically) refusing to allow a 'harmless' interview. On the other hand, that's assuming that no spin is applied to it at all.

Asking to have the prosecutors papers at an earlier stage than it would normally occur sounds very much like a stalling tactic to me. If it's not a stalling tactic, it's pure arrogance in thinking that a country's legal system should willing jump through the hoops put in place by a suspect.

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Shock development: Darkweb drug n' gun dealers are untrustworthy

Ben Tasker
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Re: Stealing from crooks is never a good idea.....

I heard from a friend of a friend that, erm, Justin Beiber did it.

A comment like that can only lead to this - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7Dci1iet9kc

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Ben Tasker
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Re: Important distinction

They might have a dollar value on some dodgy market somewhere but that doesn't mean you can do anything economically worthwhile with them.

That's likely part of the problem they now face. The dollar value of the BTC may be high, but there are going to be some very pissed off people watching the blockchain trying to work out where that money has gone.

Cashing that amount out, even in small amounts is going to be pretty risky for a while (given you don't know exactly who you've pissed off, or how well connected they may or may not be).

After a theft a while back, one guy was even dedicated enough to follow transactions through a tumbler, so tumbling the coins (and it's likely no tumbler has that amount spare anyway, so you'll poison your tumbling pool pretty quickly) isn't necessarily a defence.

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Microsoft scrambles to kill Live.fi man-in-the-middle diddle

Ben Tasker
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suggests that attackers had their fingers in the [email protected] pie before asking Comodo for a certificate

Nope, it sounds like the guy realised he could add 'hostmaster' as an alias for his account, told Microsoft and the Finnish authorities and nothing happened.

Eventually MS woke up, and froze his account completely.

What isn't entirely clear, is whether he told MS and then registered the cert to prove his point, or whether he registered the cert and then told MS.

Either way, registering the certificate was probably an overstep IMO

http://arstechnica.com/security/2015/03/man-who-obtained-windows-live-cert-said-his-warnings-went-unanswered/

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Princeton boffins sniff Tor users' IDs from TCP ACKs and server sweat

Ben Tasker
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Re: "Boffins confirm what Tor has said all along"

Yup. Whilst it's good to see research still being aimed at Tor, the headline makes it sound like a brand new attack vector has been achieved, rather than further confirmation of a known threat.

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Linux kernel devs adopt Bill and Ted's excellent code of conduct

Ben Tasker
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Every time I have read about Linus addressing mails to someone before, it was for his absolutely unacceptable attitude as far as professional communication is concerned.

Do you follow the kernel dev mailing lists? There's some interesting reading, but most of it isn't news worthy. The stuff that makes the news is normally a flame, but the majority of the emails you'll see over there don't even come close.

It's like judging an entire (small) country based on what you've seen about it in the news. You'll likely only have seen the very best (or worst) of what someone else has judged news-worthy.

Generally speaking, making _a_ mistake isn't enough to get flamed. It's continually making the same mistake, or arguing that you're right and everybody else needs to change that gets you flamed.

I'm not saying it's the right way to approach it, but it's hardly as black and white as you've painted it

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Ben Tasker
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Joke

Re: Code reviews

That sounds like middle management waffle, but it's still better than standing on a chair/desk and screaming at people telling them how useless they are.

You're doing it wrong. How are you supposed to throw the chair if you're stood on the thing?

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Ben Tasker
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Begging your pardon, but I do not where the withering attack on his intelligence is. Nor do I see any overt contempt of coding skills. Finally, there is no invitation to become a pizza deliverer.

He may well have gone that route, verbally, seeing as the object of his ire (himself) was in the same room as the one expressing that ire (himself).

It'd be kind of weird if he emailed a huge flame, addressed to himself, into lkml. That he didn't doesn't mean there was no brimstone, just that he didn't need email to communicate it (which he does with other contributors).

Not saying that the way Linus behaves is necessarily right, simply that what you're saying is wrong as it misses a few logistical points.

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Fareit trojan pwns punters with devious DNS devilry

Ben Tasker
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The latest variants of Fareit are infecting systems via malicious DNS servers, Finnish security firm F-Secure warns.

These servers push bogus Flash updates that actually come packed with malicious code

Now, that's not exactly true is it?

The malicious DNS server is ensuring that your query for facebook.com resolves to a malicious webserver. The DNS server itself isn't pushing the bogus flash updates, that's the job of the malicious web server (which may or may not be the same physical box).

The means of payload delivery has nothing to do with DNS, DNS is simply being used to get browsers to the server that worries about that delivery.

What's happened to El Reg lately?

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Don't pay for the BBC? Then no Doctor Who for you, I'm afraid

Ben Tasker
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"And while they are at it, could they add road fund license, and 3rd party car insurance to the cost of fuel - no avoidance, no collection required, no enforcement costs."

You've got people complaining about having to pay the license fee already, what do you think it's going to be like when they start complaining that they shouldn't need to pay road tax/insurance whenever they need to refill their lawnmower/generator/chainsaw?

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Ben Tasker
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Re: We should pay for TV we dont want

So how does "The Discovery Channel" and "The Disney Channel" survive?

By catering to the lowest common denominator, which may or may not (in the viewers opinion) lead to lower quality programming. In my view, it generally does, though it's not like I don't criticise some of the crap that the BBC churns out (Strictly, some of the 'science' shows) they do sometimes put a real investment into some high quality shows

Someone mentioned ITV and it being free, presumably they haven't looked at the garbage that ITV have resorted to airing. Most of it is utter shite.

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Ben Tasker
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Re: Well

My experience of people who complain that the BBC is biased is usually that they're talking about a specific episode/series rather than looking at the whole offering. So you get 'the Beeb is biased' as a result of a documentary specifically looking at one side of the argument, whilst ignoring the fact that other programs look at the other side (or both sides).

I don't watch it much anymore, but I think the Beeb is pretty good value. Look at what the commercial broadcasters do with things like nature documentaries and you soon realise the BBC is a step ahead. Personally, I would rather they'd scrap Strictly Come Dancing (as I think that's something a commercial broadcaster would happily make) but I try not to whinge about it and claim the licensing fee should be scrapped.

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NO ONE is making money from YouTube, even Google – report

Ben Tasker
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Re: No one making money from YouTube

My littlun seems rather taken with the videos she makes, I dare say he'd be making her a nice amount if the ads weren't blocked.

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'If someone in Australia says lick my toad, it's not a euphemism'

Ben Tasker
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Re: Marmite?

instead of washing it down the drain where it belongs

You can't do that with Marmite! Subjecting anyone working in the sewers to something so unimaginably gross is inhumane.

Probably better to burn it, or maybe throw big globs of it at politicians.

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Wham, bam... premium rate scam: Grindr users hit with fun-killing charges

Ben Tasker
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Joke

Re: Are we talking about a parallel universe I'd like to live in?

I am anti-gay in the sense that I am anti-avocado. I don't like avocado and so I don't have it.

So you don't like fruits?

Sorry......

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I ain't afraid of no GHOST – securo-bods

Ben Tasker
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Definitely well worth a read :)

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Sly peers attempt to thrust hated Snoopers' Charter into counter-terror and security bill

Ben Tasker
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Feckin hell, I had to double check that wasn't on The Onion.

That's a pretty big leap in utility from a system sold as being used for detecting terrorists. Can't say I'm surprised to see Council Tax listed as one of the things they'll stop you leaving the country for, given they already charge you council tax for the period that you're in prison for failing to pay said council tax....

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China 'upgrades' Great Firewall. Oh SNAP! There goes VPN access

Ben Tasker
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It only looks like https at a casual glance, and even then that's dependant on what's traversing the tunnel (we're of course talking volume).

It's certainly more expensive to block (as you'd need to do some analysis), but it's certainly doable.

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YOU. Your women are mine. Give them to me. I want to sell them

Ben Tasker
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Re: "In no way am I suggesting that INgrooves is an evil bunch of bastards"

The DMCA can be particularly harsh when a copyright holder crosses the line, however, that's only IF the copyright holder manages to do the one thing that the DMCA provides punishment for - KNOWINGLY filing a notice for which you are not the copyright holder (or authorised on behalf of).

In other words, if a company files a shitload of correct ones and accidentally includes half-a-shitload of incorrect ones, they're safe. They have to have known they didn't have the rights, and proceeded anyway for there to be any chance of them getting slapped.

So when a company accidentally gets Github projects unlisted from Google, or 'accidentally' monetizes someones videos, that's apparently fine as they didn't deliberately set out to file a notice against something they had no claim to.

The cynic in me wonders whether this is part of the reason they use bots. Bot's are great for dealing with the huge amount of content which may need reviewing, but are also a way to avoid having a human review the notice before it's sent - anything wrongfully submitted is accidental, so you don't get raped by the DMCA's counter provisions

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