* Posts by Neil Alexander

222 posts • joined 19 Oct 2007

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Lexus cars suffer Purple Screen of Death – code bug turns the air blue

Neil Alexander

Re: So what else have they borked that's a little more serious ...

Presumably they mean "don't shout at the infotainment system whilst driving".

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Adpocalypse 'will wipe out display ad growth' by 2020

Neil Alexander

split the revenue 70:30 with publishers

Very ominous sounding, given that this would either require them to be tracking your site visits for fair metrics, at which point you are the product yet again, or distributing wealth in some greedy, predetermined and unfair fashion that doesn't represent user browsing habits.

I think I'll stick with current and free content filtering methods. Strangely it seems more ethical by comparison.

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Kill Flash now? Chrome may be about to do just that

Neil Alexander

I wonder if anyone at Adobe is ever kept awake at night wondering how the hell they managed to inherit one of the Internet's most hated products.

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US work visas for international tech talent? 'If Donald Trump is elected all bets are off'

Neil Alexander

Re: Good for competition?

But I agree the visa system needs to be stopped immediately, entirely, permanently.

You've clearly been burned. I'm sorry for that, but that's no reason to be so insular and closed-minded. If we all looked at the world as full of opportunity instead of obstacles then we'd all be better off for it.

I've never understood why skilled, proactive and willing people should have such a hard time getting a working visa anywhere. What a terrible thing to want to come to your country and contribute to society and pay taxes and better ourselves and the work we do.

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Privacy warriors take legal action over UK gov's right to hack

Neil Alexander

Re: What expansion of capabilities?

All the bill does is document what the journalists and Snowden have managed to uncover so far

It also sets a disturbing legal precedent that corners citizens into thinking they have a lessened right to privacy because "it's the law" and also "we need to stop the terrorists", "think of the children", etc.

If one thing is for certain, a legal precedent such as this will only ever be extended, and never be firmly revised or reduced. The Government will never admit "actually, this was a complete and total waste of time" and repeal.

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The 'new' Microsoft? I still wouldn't touch them with a barge pole

Neil Alexander

"If enough customers disagree with Microsoft loudly enough a response will appear on a VP of somethingorother's blog detailing why Microsoft Knows Best and thus nothing will change."

Unfortunately accurate.

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MongoDB on breaches: Software is secure, but some users are idiots

Neil Alexander

"servers [...] on the internet that were completely open"

Firewalls. They aren't just for fun.

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HTC 10: Flagship goes full Google – but the hardware's top notch

Neil Alexander

AirPlay

If you can't beat 'em, join 'em.

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HERE: We're still, er... HERE

Neil Alexander

The navigation system in my Volvo already uses HERE maps, I wonder if other manufacturers do too already.

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Cook moves iPhone debate to FBI's weak ground: The media

Neil Alexander

Re: My question is: why Apple gave away the phone backups, but refuses to access the phone?

The law can compel them to hand over data to which they have access. The law hasn't yet successfully compelled them to create the ability to hand over data which they currently can't access.

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Confused as to WTF is happening with Apple, the FBI and a killer's iPhone? Let's fix that

Neil Alexander

"For Your Protection", yadda yadda.

At least someone significant is standing up for our privacy. Feels like the Government aren't.

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Why Tim Cook is wrong: A privacy advocate's view

Neil Alexander

Re: "Either it is possible to load a compromised firmware into the phone"

When you have ultimate freedom to cryptographically sign whatever firmware you want for the hardware in question, of course it's possible.

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Time acquires Myspace, creates 2004's most fearsome media giant

Neil Alexander

I imagine MySpace's customer data would be completely ideal for your advertising network if you were interested in advertising to last decade's 13-year-olds. I can't think that anyone has so much as touched it since.

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FaceTime, WhatsApp UDP streams AWOL on iOS 9 beta with T-Mo US

Neil Alexander

Re: Another story?

464XLAT support in iOS is the beta bit, not IPv6.

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Microsoft to begin alerting users about suspected government snooping

Neil Alexander

Shame that the UK is already legislating against such alerts.

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Tesla recalls every single Model S car in seatbelt safety probe

Neil Alexander

Customer service done right.

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UK citizens will have to pay government to spy on them

Neil Alexander

"I think you mean revolution. It's not a boat."

The UK is a lot like a boat, in a "sinking ship" kinda way.

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Neil Alexander

"Whilst I sympathise, what exactly will stop the useless, self interested, ignorant fuckers?"

Mutiny?

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Neil Alexander

Insult to injury.

Trying to understand exactly why the Government would think that people actually want this sheer violation of privacy in the first place, let alone why the Government would think that we want to pay for the privilege.

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UK's internet spy law: £250m in costs could balloon to £2 BILLION

Neil Alexander

Wait a minute.

We're basically paying to be spied on?

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UK govt sneaks citizen database aka 'request filters' into proposed internet super-spy law

Neil Alexander

Re: How long...

Not long at all, given Gov.uk's track record.

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We snubbed Microsoft's Surface Pro wooing, says Lenovo exec

Neil Alexander

In fairness to HP, it's pretty obvious that reselling the Surface is only interesting to them because enterprise is their number one game and they want to win IT outsourcing contracts (even if customers insist on Surface) that are actually worth much more than the hardware.

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Official: North America COMPLETELY OUT of new IPv4 addresses

Neil Alexander

Despite this, IPv6 adoption probably won't increase.

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Apple rains refunds on Peace'd off axed ad-blocker netizens

Neil Alexander

"roller coaster of surprise, guilt, and stress"

None of these emotions will be felt by the advertisers as they use up my data allowance, slow down page loading and profile my web browsing, and publishers ultimately decide to get into bed with advertisers knowing full well that these things will happen. I have no sympathy for them.

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CHEAT! Volkswagen chief 'deeply sorry' over diesel emission test dodge

Neil Alexander

Re: Hmm...

Yes, I've sometimes found that setting the adjustable speed limiter and feathering the accelerator produces better MPG than using cruise control.

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BBC Micro:bit delayed by power supply SNAFU

Neil Alexander

One million clocks to be delayed. Andrew Parker can sleep easy for another night.

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'Hey Siri, it's Obama, what should we do about Iran?'

Neil Alexander

Flash content. Welp.

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US gov to Apple: COUGH UP iMessages or FEEL our FEDERAL FROWN

Neil Alexander

Re: all three companies are standing side by side trying to keep the spooks out

I might believe that if Google Hangouts or Skype were also using strong end-to-end encryption, but the fact that my message history in both seem to automatically replicate to a newly signed-in device suggests that my messages are not actually that strongly protected in the first place.

They can, and should, do better.

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They’re FAT. They’re ROUND. They’re worth almost a POUND. Smart waaatch, smart waaatch

Neil Alexander

Re: The Apple Watch also feels nice on the wrist

Yes, I have to confess to rather liking my Apple Watch Sport. I don't think it solves any huge problems, I very rarely use any "apps" on it and I certainly could live without it, but it's a nice enough watch to wear and the complications (i.e. sunset/sunrise, temperature, daily calendar) are a nice touch.

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Patching a fragmented, Stagefrightened Android isn't easy

Neil Alexander

Google did attempt to repair this mess before with the "Update Alliance", and look how quickly that fell apart. I hate to use the F word, but fragmentation is a problem with Android will never go away.

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Apple and Google are KILLING KIDS with encryption, whine lawyers

Neil Alexander

Yet governments and law enforcement will continue to want encryption to protect their interests, so that they cannot be easily held accountable for their systematic corruption and incompetence. My privacy is no less important than theirs.

In short, they can pull the encryption from my cold dead hands.

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UK's first 'DIY DAB' multiplex goes live in Brighton

Neil Alexander

Finally.

Ofcom doing something useful.

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HP insists 'we don't have a global dress code' – while deleting one from its website

Neil Alexander

Re: genuine HP clothes

They also would need to be green on one side, blue on the other and be separable with zips.

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MORE Windows 10 bugs! Too many Start menu apps BREAK it

Neil Alexander

"Their manager should be fired."

I wish I could use that one at work.

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Wi-Fi 'reflector' hooks you up at 0.1 per cent of current power budget

Neil Alexander

This probably has some great potential in the IoT world, sensors and the like, since it would probably greatly increase the amount of time that a sensor can operate from a battery (if one is needed at all).

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We put Windows 10 on a small fondleslab: STILL not ready, 3 days to go

Neil Alexander

Re: From one mistake to another...

"Frankly, the task bar is really useless in tablet mode"

After foisting a Windows tablet upon my dad, the first thing he said after a couple of minutes of furious prodding was "I can't find anything!", especially as the edge-of-screen gestures (whilst natural after a while) are completely alien at first. Bringing the taskbar back like that is a good way to remove the barrier for people who are picking one of these devices up for the first time and wouldn't know about those invisible gestures.

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Now car hackers can bust in through your motor's DAB RADIO

Neil Alexander

Re: "this isn't a fly-by-wire fighter jet you know"

In modern cars, it is very much drive-by-wire, especially in cars where stability control (ESC) is standard, or have any optional features along the lines of cruise control (or the adaptive variant), adjustable speed limiter, lane keeping assistance or any number of other features that modify the throttle, brake or steering input in any way.

Not to mention that ABS is computer-controlled, as are TCS and TVC (on cars that have them), and so are plenty of other safety features (whether you realise the car is doing them or not). Sure, you don't need these things because these systems are technically non-essential - you could own a car that has none of them - but if I'm about to be involved in a potential accident, then I welcome all the computerised help I can get to minimise the impact.

Finally, a number of parameters to actually keep the engine itself functional are typically regulated by a computer too - things like idle revs, fuel/air mixture and operating temperature. That's partly why modern engines are so smooth and actually work properly in extreme cold, extreme warm, etc.

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WHOA! Windows 10 to be sold on USB drives – what a time to be alive

Neil Alexander

Re: Windows should let users create a 'live' boot disk

They already invented Windows To Go in 2011 for USB sticks, and even before that, Windows Embedded and WinPE have been able to boot from alternative media for years.

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Neil Alexander

I imagine it's more to do with ultrabooks, nettops and tablets, and the disappearance of DVD drives.

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Neil Alexander

Re: Mac OS X

Apple didn't really need to provide USB media anymore because around about 2011 was probably the same time that they added the EFI Internet Recovery to Macs and started providing OS X upgrades through the Mac App Store.

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Microsoft nixes A-V updates for XP, exposes 180 MEEELLION luddites

Neil Alexander

Re: "We strongly recommend that you complete your migration to a supported operating system"

Equally, and at the risk of hundreds of downvotes, I don't fully understand why so many people reject Windows 8 either (and I'm typically an Apple or Linux kinda guy). I use it at work everyday, set to boot to desktop with my favourite programs pinned to the taskbar or on the Desktop, and I don't remember the last time I even saw the new "Start screen".

It's largely no different to Windows 7, except for the fact that it boots up faster than Windows 7 did. People will make mountains out of molehills.

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Blighty's BONKERS BANKING BONKING BONANZA: Apple Pay arrives

Neil Alexander

HSBC are systematically incompetent.

So no Apple Pay for us yet, then.

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BT issues formal whinge to Ofcom over Sky dominance in pay telly

Neil Alexander

Two words:

Virgin Media.

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Blurred lines: How cloud computing is reshaping the IT workforce

Neil Alexander

"[...] push code out live with minimal testing and not get vanished in a dark alley for it."

"What could possibly go wrong?", they asked.

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Migrating from WS2003 to *nix in a month? It ain't happening, folks

Neil Alexander

"because you can totally migrate from 2003 to 2012R2 in a month"

You stand a better chance of achieving a Windows upgrade in a month compared to trying to migrate your solutions to an entirely different operating system, even if the upgrade does require some work. The road ahead is not necessarily free of pot holes, but at least there's a road.

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UH OH: Windows 10 will share your Wi-Fi key with your friends' friends

Neil Alexander

Apple only use random MAC addresses for Wi-Fi beacons/probes - once you connect to a known network, the primary MAC address is always used, so as to not cause a problem with MAC filtering.

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Chap slapped in Dogecoin crap app flap

Neil Alexander

Theft of electricity!

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Yep, it's true: Android is the poor man's phone worldwide

Neil Alexander

re. things you can do on Android which you simply can't do on iOS because it is too locked down

Does the average person want to do these things? Probably not.

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VMware's got SaaS – and you – surrounded with SSOaaS

Neil Alexander

What else can we make into an "as a Service"?

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Dodgy colon bug is a total pain in the butt for Skype users today

Neil Alexander

"tweaked its servers to simply blocks the transmission of the characters between users"

I guess that rules out end-to-end message encryption, then.

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