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* Posts by Daniel B.

2733 posts • joined 12 Oct 2007

Watch a bank-raiding ZeuS bot command post get owned in 60 seconds

Daniel B.
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Boffin

Meh

If they're using RC4 they're doing it wrong. Not just because RC4 has been deemed possibly crackable or exploitable, but because they shouldn't be using symmetric crypto for these things. Oh well, better for us as it's going to be easier to shut down these things.

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Security guru: You can't blame EDWARD SNOWDEN for making US clouds LOOK leaky

Daniel B.
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Linux

Re: Well said that man.

Nokia the non-MS-Borged company might simply resume work on Harmattan and have that as an EU OS for mobile platforms. Or reacquire Symbian from Accenture. That would give the EU a non-US OS. And the rest of their operations? Simply base 'em off Linux.

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Daniel B.
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Black Helicopters

Of course Snowden didn't hurt

Anybody who could've had issues with the Snowden leak was already wary of US-based services thanks to the PATRIOT Act. And then there are the warantless SWIFT data grabs by the US, while SWIFT did side with the US on that issue, they subsequently moved all EU banking data and processing outside the US.

By the time Snowden leaked the NSA/PRISM thing, the possible clients had already been scared away.

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HALF of London has outdated Wi-Fi security, says roving World of War, er, BIKER

Daniel B.
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PKI

We theoretically could solve the issue with PKI, but even "type down this password on your device" is too much of a hassle for non-techies. Interestingly, the one place where I've seen PKI used for "public" WiFi access is at DEF CON, but then that's because you know most people going there are going to be tech savvy to boot. And the one thing that was made to do this easily (WPS) has the stupid PIN method which can be cracked easily, thus the method being disabled by anyone tech savvy these days...

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Stephen Elop: I was RIGHT to BURN the PLATFORMS

Daniel B.
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Facepalm

Re: What was the point of getting Lumia out in record time?

Downvoted for liking something.

Happens all the time. Though it's usually harsher when the "liked" thing is rarely liked by people who aren't shills, or are outright splitting the world into X and Y brand. See the iZombies that dismiss non-iZombies as either "Windows fans" (on PCs) or "Android fans" (on Smartphones). The OP explicitly said "down voted for not praising Android" … where are the other mobile OSen?

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Daniel B.
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Re: What was the point of getting Lumia out in record time?

"Cue downvotes for daring to like something that's not Android."

Nope, you're going to get down votes for liking WP8. Symbian, MeeGo and Harmattan had their appeal, and any of those three (even Symbian) could have made a far better competitor to the iOS/Android ecosystem than measly WP. That thing only succeeded in killing Nokia's market value and market share, from being the worldwide #1 smartphone market share platform to being the one in a neck to neck race with BlackBerry to be the one just above the "Others" category. And given the awful talk from actual WP owners vs. iOS/Android/BB/Symbian handset owners, I doubt they'll gain ground at all.

At least it seems we're finally watching the MS empire slide down. The Xbox1 is losing the next-gen console wars, Windows8 fails to gain traction, WP8 seems to stay stagnant and the Nokia X seems to be the hottest stuff in the now renamed "Microsoft Mobile" division has to offer...

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FCC seeks $48K fine from mobile phone-jamming driver

Daniel B.
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Facepalm

Meanwhile...

Ray LaHood was proposing installing exactly the same kind of device on all cars. My argument against that back then seems to be the same reasoning behind this fine: blocking calls like that also blocks emergency calls, and that's a big no-no.

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Trolls and victims watch Supremes for definition of meaningless patents

Daniel B.
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Boffin

Patent purpose

The purpose of a patent is to protect an invention, allow a monopoly for a limited time in which the inventor can profit from his invention … and document the exact thing being patented so that anyone can build the invention themselves. During the patent's validity, anyone building the patented product has to pay the patent holder a fee, to be set by said patent holder. Once the patent expires, the invention is fully documented as to be useful to the rest of the world.

Vague patents are thus useless in this sense. They must be struck down.

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Google's self-driving car breakthrough: Stop sign no longer a problem

Daniel B.
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Terminator

Motorcycle blues

Ok it can see cyclists doing turn signals. But the real question is: how do they handle motorcycles? Lane sharing is legal in many jurisdictions, but has some restrictions in others. For example, here in Mexico City you can't lane-split unless traffic is stopped or moving veery slow according to the Greater Mexico City traffic rulebook. So a self-driving car should know that it should yield to a lane-splitting motorcycle if traffic starts rolling. It should also detect motorcycles quickly as to not swerve into/against a bike running on the adjacent lane; humans do that every now and then, I'd be scared shitless by robo-driver failing to detect me! Some automated toll booths already ban motorcycles because their sensors don't detect us; I've also read about "smart" street lights in the US that detect cars to pre-empt green lights but fail to detect motorcycles. Sorry, but I'm very skeptical on self-driving cars unless they're given dedicated lanes to run on.

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Lost treasure of Atari REVEALED

Daniel B.
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Re: Don't understand the fuss

I'd think that the ET dig is because it was the first time a game flopped so hard, the manufacturer had to do this dump. Then there's a certain curiosity to find the game that was so bad that it not only bombed, it brought down the whole video game industry into the Great Crash of 1983. To put it in more recent history, this would be as if Battlefield Earth had sent all Hollywood Studios into bankruptcy.

Then again, ET is probably 'buried evil' in this sense. Microsoft funded the expedition, maybe that's why their Xbox1 isn't selling?

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Daniel B.
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At least it did serve a purpose

It proved that the Atari ET cartridge dump was real. But it seems that part of the myth was indeed untrue, as the cartridges aren't crushed. Maybe they couldn't crush them all?

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Daniel B.
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Joke

Re: 2044

They'll probably add the Xbox1 there as well. And the now defunct LucasArts will probably want to bury their unsold copies of Star Wars Kinect as well...

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Microsoft's naughty Cortana NOT ALLOWED NEAR CHILDREN

Daniel B.
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Uh-oh

The "under 13" thingy means they're using that stuff for marketing purposes or selling your info for marketing. Oopsie!

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WTF happened to Pac-Man?

Daniel B.
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Happy

Actually

Most mobile games are of the arcade variety because they fulfill the "kill some time" requirement. Back in the day, it was more about who could set a high score on PacMan than beating the game, thus the infinite never-ending nature of PacMan. Many of the mobile games like Flappy Bird cash in this concept, especially as many of the 80's arcade gamers are usually the same people carrying iSlabs these days. And when they fire up games, they're usually trying to kill some time.

Actual games, the ones made for consoles have evolved far beyond the good ole Pacman days.

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Daniel B.
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Happy

Seconded!

Indeed, Pac-Man Championship Edition is closer to the arcade experience and IMHO, it's far less frustrating in that sense. It was also the one game I could play during my 2 month one-armed handicap period (motorcycle accident, clavicle fracture. immobilized right arm, very annoying!).

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APPLE FAILS to ditch class action suit over ebook PRICE-FIX fiasco

Daniel B.
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Doubtfully

One thing I like about El Reg is that they slam everyone. On the ebook scandal, its sad that the publishers didn't get to foot the harsher bill but then Apple could've had it easier if they had entered the deal as the publishers did. They knew they were wrong, otherwise all five publishers wouldn't had wimped out...

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Heartbleed exploit, inoculation, both released

Daniel B.
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Boffin

Re: No, early

No they didn't. What they did is write their own wrapper around malloc so that they could cache memory instead of releasing it.

Hm… this could be interesting. If they have a wrapper around malloc(), they could theoretically zero out recently allocated memory before returning the new pointer to the caller. That would render Heartbleed (and any similar attack) useless as the whole allocated bunch would be full of NULLs wouldn't it? I'd fill it out with 0xDEADBEEFs but that would probably be more costly to pull off...

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Windows 8.1, which you probably haven't upgraded to yet, ALREADY OBSOLETE

Daniel B.
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Re: Does ANYBODY still believe this tripe?

It's even easier: They're giving vanilla Win8 the Vista treatment. IIRC Vista was EOL'd shortly after 7 came out. Probably justified as Vista remained in the under-10% range for most of its life, and 7 was basically "fixed Vista" so it made more sense for businesses to simply upgrade to 7 as "compatibility issues" weren't a problem if you already had Vista.

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Daniel B.
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Trollface

But the real question is...

Will this new update bring up the Start Menu? At least it seems that TIFKAM apps now get windowed mode...

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Internet-of-stuff startup dumps NoSQL for ... SQL?

Daniel B.
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Boffin

Re: ha

Says the people who would have recommended the noSql solution in the first place.

I use a lot of open source stuff. Yet I would never recommend NoSQL for the same reasons these dudes switched to PostgreSQL: it's got issues. Never mind that NoSQL's name itself shows the real motive behind most of those "newfangled" DBs: they're built and promoted by crybabies that hate SQL so much they made their own DBs that don't do SQL or ACID. The same kind of crybaby attitude made me switch back from MySQL to PostgreSQL, as MySQL's documentation couldn't stop whining that transactions and foreign keys were for losers or lazy developers, we won't implement them ,yadda yadda yadda. (Ironically, they had already added the multi-engine support and InnoDB did support all those things. Yet the documentation still had this baby rant.)

NoSQL stuff has its place. But devs should really see if they need it or if they just have relational data that doesn't need those other things. It'll pay in the long run. :)

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SpaceX Falcon tests HOVERCRAFT tech – despite ISS outage

Daniel B.
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ohoh

Nice to see reuseable stuff being tested. I've always thought that one-use rockets are a stupid waste of money. At least the Space Shuttle was mostly reused sans the fuel tank...

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Anatomy of OpenSSL's Heartbleed: Just four bytes trigger horror bug

Daniel B.
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Boffin

Re: Simple script? @boltar

Most people definitions of "simple" mean something like a 10 line script sending one or 2 strings down the line. Not 300 lines of code doing challenge response.

Are you a script kiddie? I didn't get ROP but I do know what ASLR is. And indeed the script is simple as the only thing it does is send a malformed package (the phony heartbeat request) and get the juicy bytes in response. Compared to the weirdness usually involved with exploits like stack smashing/injecting shell code, it's pretty straightforward.

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Rackspace refuses to enlist in cloud's latest price cutting war

Daniel B.
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I have to concur with Rackspace, even when that means I don't get super cheap virtual servers. Price wars are good for us, but if nobody stops at some point it becomes a bloodbath where only those with deep pockets will be able to survive.

As far as my experience goes, Rackspace does have pretty good uptime and support, and its pricing is still within the decent range. They're now offering IPv6 and extra "storage blocks" which seem to be just extra virtual HDDs. My only complaint in the earlier days was that you had to up everything, not just the HDD space if you needed more. This seems to no longer be the case and that's good.

Haven't been able to do AWS as they don't do CVV2 validation and all my cards bounce because of that; and Google is one company I just don't trust for private data. So I think I'm staying on Rackspace Cloud even if it is now a bit more expensive...

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Gay marriage foes outraged at Mozilla CEO flap, call for boycott

Daniel B.
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Re: Should have told protesters where to go

The main issue that caused the whole controversy is that he was appointed CEO. For years he was CTO and nobody peeped a thing about his donation on Prop8. But the moment he gets into the CEO chair, he's able to manage donations for the Mozilla Foundation. Which means that coupled with his beliefs, he theoretically could have started making Mozilla give donations to groups like the "Kill the Gays" organization that caused the Chik-Fil-A controversy last year. In fact, that other scandal was uncovered because of that company's CEO speaking against same-sex marriage, which led to LGBT groups checking out where Chik-Fil-A donations were really going.

On the other side, Eich doesn't seem to have had the intention of steering Mozilla into 'fund the crazies' mode, so the pressure on demanding his resignation does seem to be overkill. His whole contribution was a relatively minor one, and it was made years ago. Views have changed in the years between, what some people did a couple of years ago might not be indicative of what they think right now. Maybe Eich's "mistake" was not to say he's no longer against same-sex marriage… but that was probably not a good reason for him to be pressured into resigning.

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Video games make you NASTY AND VIOLENT

Daniel B.
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Holmes

O RLY?

My parents were told by my psychologist about games that were so hard they were more frustrating than fun would just cause frustration and that this was a known thing. Kids playing these games would start going frustrated, then start getting violent fits o' rage with these games.

In 1986.

We're talking about the Atari and C-64 era. I'd say these effects are probably well documented since the 80's but not everyone got the memo...

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Windows XP still has 27 per cent market share on its deathbed

Daniel B.
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Re: Underlying meaning of the data ...

"If 85-90% of business used *nix there would probably be 85-90% of El Reg's readers using *nix."

Or they're using Unix stuff, just not in the desktop PC's.

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Vint Cerf wanted to make internet secure from the start, but secrecy prevented it

Daniel B.
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Re: It isn't too late.

Adding an encrypted V2.0 TCP-IP stack is perfectly doable, just like adding IPv6 support.

We already have it, it's called IPSec and its available in IPv4 and IPv6 flavors. It is kind of a problem with IPv4 thanks to horrible things like NAT and the fact that moving around means your IP is always changing… but theoretically IPv6 should simplify a lot of things and thus IPSec over IPv6 is easier to pull off.

But server-to-server comms can be secured via IPSec...

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Torvalds rails at Linux developer: 'I'm f*cking tired of your code'

Daniel B.
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Boffin

Yadda yadda yadda

I have a better proposal: just KILL that freaking systemd monstrosity!!! Go back to SysV init. The whole thing is causing more headaches than actually solving stuff. There's also that 2048 character password bug where typing in a 2KB password will get you on. Come on!!!!

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Tamil Nadu's XP migration plan: Go Linux like a BOSS

Daniel B.
Silver badge
Holmes

Re: The man from Munich

Not surprised that the resident MS shills are slamming the article or quoting FUDy extra costs. It's becoming predictable...

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Snowden files latest: NSA and GCHQ targeted German satcomms

Daniel B.
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Boffin

Blackberry

The Nokia got 0wn3d, but it seems the BlackBerry didn't. Maybe BB should capitalize on this? They've got "we're the only one authorized to operate on the DoD networks" but adding "NSA proof" has got to give them some extra points.

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Tesla firms hot bottoms: TITANIUM armor now bolted to Model S e-cars

Daniel B.
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Re: Historical

The one video I did see of one of these Teslas catching fire was the one in Mexico. The dude crashed its way doing something near 200 km/h, went over a bridge, crashed through the railing, crashed down to the street, then plunged into a fountain or something like that before crashing yet again. Yet the driver managed to get out and run away from the scene before the car lit itself up. I'd like to see a regular car take that much abuse and not catch fire!

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FINALLY Microsoft releases Office for iPad – but wait there's a CATCH

Daniel B.
Silver badge
Boffin

Re: beginning of the end or the end of the beginning?

Seeing as those are both by miles the market leaders in their fields, the answer would undoubtedly be very few extra ones on Linux...And why would you want to - all those extra Linux security patches to integration test - not fun.

Ah, the MS shills are fast to react. As ACs yet again.

I'll give you a point: Exchange doesn't make much sense in Linux as it depends on Active Directory, MS's take on LDAPv3 and Kerberos5. But there are quite a bit of systems that can do what Exchange/Outlook does and they only require an LDAP server. And they're pretty secure as it is. On security patches, no platform is free from that. Especially Windows.

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Hot, young under-25s: Lonely slab strokers who shun TV

Daniel B.
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Re: Stating the obvious ..

It depends on which 20-somethings group you're checking. Even 30-somethings. I've mostly retreated to Netflix (I'm 32) because I am rarely at home so I don't see the value in having cable TV, and Mexican OTA programming is awful. Series on OTA lag so far behind current seasons that the teens and 20-somethings are simply watching 'em online instead.

I really really know that I'm mostly using my TV as a PS3 screen most of the time, the exception being late-night TV when some interesting (but sadly, cancelled in the US) series show up.

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Spooks vs boffins: MIT bods say they've created PRISM-proof encryption

Daniel B.
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Boffin

Um...

Seen this at least a decade earlier with Hushmail. If you use the Java-enabled version of their service, encryption takes place on the client. The private key does reside in Hushmail's servers but it isn't decrypted on-site as long as you're using the Java-enabled version of the service.

Sure, the client code is stored on the server and could be tampered (and this being the NSA, they might even have a valid cert to sign their tampered code as well) but the logic's there.

What this MIT stuff does is something I've already done at least once for secure cloud storage. Somewhere on my 'land of dead project code' I have a piece of Java code that uploads stuff to Rackspace's Cloud Files storage but encrypts it in-transit and adds the key to metadata … said key is encrypted with someone's public key. Thus the data can be only decrypted by someone who has the corresponding private key. The concept isn't groundbreaking at all and anyone who is security conscious has been doing this for years. At least one employer basically crammed sensitive data inside a TrueCrypt portable drive and uploaded that to the Cloud Storage service du jour.

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Forget sledgehammers – crooks can CRACK ATMs with a TEXT

Daniel B.
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Boffin

Windows on ATMs

Looks like using Windows for ATMs doesn't sound as bright right about now.

I have always been miffed at this, especially given that I have worked at certain banks (yes, MEXICAN banks) and most of them snub Windows for everything else. But the ATMs are on Windows, no surprise they're getting 0wn3d on the ATM side.

Oh well, beats having the whole ATM stolen, which happens every now and then.

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Daniel B.
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Re: ¿Plata o plomo?

Heh. Been a while since my country appeared on El Reg, and I'm not quite surprised it came up with an ATM slurping malware bit. But it does confirm that I was properly annoyed when I realized they had switched from OS/2 to WinXP on ATMs … and I was thinking "geeze, we shouldn't be putting that OS on ATMs!"

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No Notch niche: Minecraft man in rift with Oculus after Facebook gobble

Daniel B.
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Re: ..a multimillionaire already ..... can afford to walk away

Being neck-deep in debt does mean you can actually have negative wealth. It's a basic concept few people grasp, otherwise we wouldn't have so many people who go broke as soon as they spend more than a month without a job.

And not all people in debt are using their CCs to buy useless crap; some have to do so to survive.

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White House may ditch BlackBerry, adopt LG or Samsung, ignore Apple

Daniel B.
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Meh

Meh

So the "news" is actually hearsay. Haven't these rumors been doing the rounds for a couple of years now? And yet, Blackberry does seem to keep the edge on security, being the only ones with "Authority to Operate" by the DoD. If the White House were to switch smartphones, they should use their own NSA-approved Sectera Edge handsets, instead of going for stuff from other parts of the globe. At least most of my Blackberry handsets are made in Mexico, which at least is within the US's vicinity vs. "somewhere in China".

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Daniel B.
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Re: Right...

Dear MS shills, if you're trying to pass off as actual users, stop using the AC flag.

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Daniel B.
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Boffin

Bummer

WP8 got FIPS 140-2 certified. While it is commendable (IIRC other non-BB devices haven't got that yet), WP8 still needs the other cert, the one from DoD mentioned in the article. And well, vulns can and will be patched, while having 0 known vulns doesn't mean there aren't any.

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Daniel B.
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Boffin

Re: My own view

Except they are still relevant, and are still the only ones with "Authority to Operate" by the DoD. As long as the competition doesn't get this, BB will remain in government and military sectors. Of course, there's also the Sectera Edge, but I wonder how many people in the DoD actually have one of those...

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RIP Full Disclosure: Security world reacts to key mailing list's death

Daniel B.
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Re: USENET?

Yeah, the first thing that popped into my mind was the lame Scientology attempt to kill one of the USENET groups that was critical against them. Which of course was ignored.

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Hidden 'Windigo' UNIX ZOMBIES are EVERYWHERE

Daniel B.
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Re: The devil's in the detail

"I'm plesantly surprised by the lack of gloating from Windows-only people"

You didn't stay long enough. The very first post here is an MS shill/troll, followed by a lot of replies made by ACs gloating. It does seem that most of 'em are hiding behind the AC mask though.

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Daniel B.
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Windigo?

The cannibal thingy is called 'Wendigo' IIRC.

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Daniel B.
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Re: "exploits poor configuration and security controls"

Yup. It's pretty much a given that those 0wn3d servers are the kind that someone set up and then proceeded to ignore. I still remember one site that spilled its MySQL creds, someone posted said creds in some forum and the trollosphere proceeded to DROP TABLE everything. 3 *months* after that, it was still missing its DB. There are a lot of people out there that have lax security practices and I'm guessing that is biting them back right now.

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NSA's TURBINE robot can pump 'malware into MILLIONS of PCs'

Daniel B.
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Boffin

FOXACID?

Seems to me that someone in that NSA team has been playing too much Metal Gear Solid.

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UK's CASH POINTS to MISS Windows XP withdrawal date

Daniel B.
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Re: NCR

Linux didn't exist until a decade AFTER the first release of DOS. DOS was 1981, Linux didn't exist until 1991.

So I assume you didn't read the full statement you yourself quoted:

All UNIX derivatives, including Linux, have had "remote management" capabilities for a decade before even DOS existed!

UNIX is the one that has had remote management since its inception, which dates back to 1970 (probably earlier). Linux got it since it was born due to being a UNIX derivative as well. Windows had to have the remote management stuff added later, and even then it had to be changed at least once from the proprietary thing they had on NT4 and earlier to the LDAP/Kerberos5 thingy they made in Win2000.

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Daniel B.
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Re: NCR

"The banks mainly use Windows because of the excellent remote management offered which isn't/or wasn't until recently available for Linux."

You're joking, aren't you? All UNIX derivatives, including Linux, have had "remote management" capabilities for a decade before even DOS existed! And it's also why most banks actually use AIX, Solaris, Linux in their server stacks instead of Windows. Even AD is basically a pirated implementation of LDAP and Kerberos5. And before that we had NIS and NFS. What the Windows world was barely achieving in the late 90's/early 00's was already standard in the UNIX world!

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Daniel B.
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OS/2

I'm guessing banks chose Windows because of their choice of running OS/2 on earlier ATMs. WinNT is after all a breakaway "pirated" OS/2 so it's possible that Windows would be able to run most of the OS/2 software without a problem. Also, at least until Win2000, NT had an OS/2 subsystem and that might help as well.

Me? I would've probably gone down a hardened Linux route, or simply gone down an even safer route with QNX.

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CIA hacked Senate PCs to delete torture reports. And Senator Feinstein is outraged

Daniel B.
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Heh

Though she is right. The CIA is forbidden from operating within the US. That alone makes it unlawful for them to have deleted stuff from the oversight committee.

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