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* Posts by Daniel B.

2685 posts • joined 12 Oct 2007

Microsoft exits climate denier lobby group

Daniel B.
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Re: @Notas Badoff RE: "non-partisan" groups.

as opposed to an uber left-wing rant? Which is ok? A word comes to mind, hang on, it's...it's.... oh yeah, hypocrite!

… or maybe, just maybe, most of the rants are actually right-winger nuts and thus that's what you'll assume you'll be served with when someone utters those words? Kind of like hearing "Mainstream Media" these days will automatically flag whoever utters those words as a right-winger nutcase in the US, even though dissing the "mainstream news sources" is usually something done by the left-wingers in most parts of the world. Just ask my countrymen about Ukraine, and they'll tell you that all the news are being manipulated by the US war machine and that Putin is telling the truth, yadda yadda. But in the US, it's "the MSM is defending BHO".

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Daniel B.
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Re: ...that word. I do not think it means what you think it means

Wow. Of all the places I frequent on the 'net, this is the last place I would have thought to find a republican troll.

I guess you're new here. Yes, even though this is a site for more intelligent people than the average dudes, there is actually a pack of Republitards trolling around the comments section. Their most active point must've been during the Snowden brouhaha last year, they're easy to weed out because they're the ones calling him a traitor.

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Microsoft refuses to nip 'Windows 9' unzip lip slip

Daniel B.
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Meh.

The real question for the new Windows is: "Will I get back the Start Menu and a Disable Metro option?" which is probably what most Windows users are asking. If the answer's no, expect it to flop.

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Did you swipe your card through one of these UPS Store tills? You may have been pwned

Daniel B.
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FAIL

Re: What OS & server platform was infected?

Heh. I read this barely 2 weeks after DEFCON, where I learned that a lot of POS/Payment Applications use Windows Embedded. So my guess is that they were running Windows and that's why they got 0wn3d. When will they learn?

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The agony and ecstasy of SteamOS: WHERE ARE MY GAMES?

Daniel B.
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Re: Steam on Mint

So was I downvoted because someone did not want Windows 8 or because they dared to want dual boot?

I'm guessing because someone didn't want Windows 8. The MS shills think that Windows 8 being refused by non-techies is heresy speak and does not exist at all.

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Daniel B.
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Boffin

Re: still early days

Everything can and should be on OpenGL instead of DirectX. It used to be that everything was on OpenGL, it was sometime around the 2000s that some studios started using DirectX instead. But looking at the current PC gaming market, it seems everyone's switching back to OpenGL. And that's for full engine games; some use engines like Unreal that already do OpenGL on non-Windows platforms.

Goodbye Windows, and thanks for all the BSODs.

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Call of Duty daddy considers launching own movie studio

Daniel B.
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Prince of Persia

On Prince of Persia: Sands of Time:

For all I know, the concept may even have been created to explain the mechanism rather than the other way around.

That's exactly how the concept came to be. They were dealing with levels that would cause severe frustration, but they wanted to 'em. Thus the 'Sands of Time' were born. It seems they basically implemented moving checkpoints with this, except instead of being "checkpoints" you get to see them as part of the story instead of "GAAAAME OOOOOVERRRRR TRY AGAIN!"

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Daniel B.
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Re: Starcraft

Actually, a StarCraft movie is the one I'd see having far more potential than any of their other franchises. They might even use the same cutscene tech and pull off a SquareSoft-ish movie with their existing tech!

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Daniel B.
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Joke

Re: It can't be any worse than...

Daikatana : The Movie ????

Uwe Boll is about to make you his bitch.

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Daniel B.
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Re: FMV Sequences

So you get a live action movie centered around Jean Claude Van-Damnit and Gomez Adams with barely a nod at the already established lore.

To be honest, Street Fighter II didn't have much "established lore" when that movie came out besides M. Bison being the bad guy and Sagat being his second-in-command. King of Fighters was notorious in having the story that SF lacked. Capcom started adding real background stories to SF sometime later, with the "Zero" and "Alpha" games, but before that there was no real "story" in the SF games. It's kinda like doing a Pacman movie based on the first Pacman game.

That said, many game-based movies end up being horribly mangled, especially those that had the bad luck of getting "adapted" by Uwe Boll. The one movie made by that dude that didn't suck (as long as you forget it's based on a game) would be Bloodrayne. That one works as a corny vampire movie.

However, I wonder if having the real team behind a movie adaptation would avoid the mangling? After all, Chris Roberts directed the Wing Commander movie and it sucked compared to the games. Even though he "directed" that particular saga...

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Daniel B.
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Go

Re: Just record a playthrough of COD...

Heh. Funny that they go straight for COD (which indeed can be made by simply doing a play through and passing that as the "film") when they have better stuff from their Blizzard side. I would rather see a StarCraft movie. With the actual owner of the stuff doing the movie, it will probably fare much better than other attempts like say, the Wing Commander movie (another one that could be simply have a play through passed as the movie, but at least that one was fun to play!).

By the way Steven, I feel you. Bioshock Infinite had a very good story, but the gameplay fell flat on me because it went down the "Call of Halo" route where everything's linear, you get two weapon limits, no meaningful choices to affect the ending (which the previous Bioshock titles did have) among other things. At least Wing Commander's ending was affected by both decisions made in the "intermission" scenes as well as the stuff you did during your missions. Infinite's choices ended up being irrelevant.

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Why hackers won't be able to hijack your next flight - the facts

Daniel B.
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Boffin

Re: We don't need no stinkin' backups

You should test your ABS on the road partly so you know it works but more importantly that YOU know how it feels on the bike when it does work.

I'd be VERY wary of testing motorcycle ABS brakes like that, because they're far more critical in a bike than they are in a car. Having your wheels lock up (ABS ain't working) on a car results in smokey tyre rubber burning and pretty much that. Having the back wheel lock up leads to slipping and horrible snaking; having the front wheel lock up usually results in what we call a highside. It usually involves the rider being catapulted in front and serious injury… really, really nasty. Oh wait … you can also trigger a highsider if the back wheel locks up as well. So basically, no. Do not go around testing motorcycle ABS systems. Do not depend on them working properly either. Test them with OBD if you have to, but never, ever do that live.

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Daniel B.
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Re: "ARINC 629 is actually harder to hack that ARINC 629,"?

Yes, they'd need to be on-board, or running really fast to keep up. Otherwise the target plane will be out of WiFi range in about half a second.

Um… it isn't the WiFi but the collision detection systems they were talking about on that particular scenario. IIRC, it was ADS-B they were talking about. And yes, you have to keep up speed but mostly because they use directional antennas so you basically have to be spoofing your signal from the exact point where your "plane" would be at. Which means it's actually easier to actually fly a plane there instead of trying to fake it, as you need to do it for real anyway!

By the way, check out the videos. Another theoretical hijack consists on sending fake ACARS messages, their example was really, really funny.

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Oracle Database 12c's data redaction security smashed live on stage

Daniel B.
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Whoa!

Looks like the Vultures are far better than me at picking interesting tracks. I missed the Oracle one!

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It's official: You can now legally carrier-unlock your mobile in the US

Daniel B.
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Boffin

A glimmer of hope

Now, if the US could simply pass legislation making it illegal to produce non-user-serviceable products. As it currently stands, it seems that Apple is turning MacBook Pro laptops into non-upgradeable devices and that's a bad precedent.

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Indie ISP to Netflix: Give it a rest about 'net neutrality' – and get your checkbook out

Daniel B.
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Re: ...

The solution is metered pricing, because like other utilities it charges people for what they use. Can you image the waste if people paid a fixed charge for water, electricity & gas regardless of consumption?

See, this is where the water & power utility analogy breaks down. Water, electricity and gas (CNG or LPG) are finite resources. The utility company has to buy that from someone else to give it to you, the more you use, the more stuff the utility company has to buy (electricity, gas, water, whatever).

Data, however, is sent through fixed "pipelines". Your ISP only pays for a fat pipe, with a fixed data rate and sometimes variable pricing on certain data rates (say, base rate covers up to 10 Mb/s, then you get charged per Mb/s extra up to the physical limit for that pipe being 30 Mb/s), but the thing is: they are paying the same as you are charged, by data rate. So it shouldn't be an issue if you're using 5%, 50% or 100% of your allocated data rate all the time because that is what the ISP sold you in the first place!!!! If ISPs want to get better data rates, they should upgrade their uplink pipes, increase pricing for home subscribers or reduce advertised speeds. The days of 50:1 contention ratios are over.

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DAYS from end of life as we know it: Boffins tell of solar storm near-miss

Daniel B.
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Ouch

So basically, worldwide EMP. Nice! I would be out of money, out of a job, and everything kicked back to the stone age! Hopefully we'll learn to shield our planet from those CMEs before one actually hits us...

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The Pirate Bay opens mobile site

Daniel B.
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Re: Yes, actually, carriers WILL love it

there's only so much they can send on their little slice of bandwidth

This is why I consider all this "move to wireless" fad as incredibly stupid. I'm OK with having phat pipes on my smartphone, but some people want to go fully wireless as in using a mobile carrier as their ISP. This will backfire hilariously if it ever gets big.

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Daniel B.
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Only if they offer unlimited data

I'm guessing that those of us that are stuck with paying by data use are going to be screwed if we do big downloads using our mobile data connection. They'll be happy for us to overload their network as long as they get to charge the big bucks on us!

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Putin: Crack Tor for me and I'll make you a MILLIONAIRE

Daniel B.
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Big Brother

Re: Will the NSA tender thru a proxy party ?

I'm sure the KGB, or whatever their post-cold-war equivalent is

That's the FSB. Even if they haven't cracked Tor, I guess they have … other methods to get what they want.

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The seven nations where SIM CARDS outnumber PEOPLE

Daniel B.
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Heh.

My country made that list!

It's the last one, though.

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Carlos: Slim your working week to just three days of toil

Daniel B.
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Trollface

Re: Should not this be

You're getting your media moguls mixed. The one that produces distasteful and icky stuff is Emilio Azcárraga, owner of Televisa. Mexican Televisa soap operas are good for killing brain cells!

Basically Azcárraga amounts to what could be described as the Mexican Rupert Murdoch. It's fitting that the Mexican branch of SKY is owned by Televisa...

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X marks the chop: Microsoft takes axe to Nokia's Android venture

Daniel B.
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FAIL

Re: FFS

Actually, Elop should've canned the WinPhone platform instead and beefed up the X phones. Of course, the mothership would not approve of that...

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Fox wants Time to wrap up even more content

Daniel B.
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Stop

Oh no Rupert Murdoch no.

The last thing we need is to give that jackass more power. Fox News is already poisoning people, I don't want him owning any more stuff.

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Apple ebook price-fix settlement: Readers get $400m, lawyers $50m

Daniel B.
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Facepalm

Re: and the result is...

The problem with what Apple was doing is that they in fact colluded with publishers to increase ebook prices across the board. Two wrongs do not make a right, and if publishers are worried about monopolistic lock-ins they should go to the DoJ instead of doing corporate vigilantism.

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Tesla trademark spat threatens Musk's China dream

Daniel B.
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FAIL

Pirated name?

This Chinese guy's got balls. He didn't register "Tesla", he registered "Te Si La". The case should be laughed out of court. It's stupid, and an obvious IP troll.

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BOFH: You can take our lives, but you'll never take OUR MACROS

Daniel B.
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Well...

I've once done the Excel to Access to Access-but-using-PostgreSQL-backend dance. A pretty nice lady from Payments had to do a big-ass cost analysis which involved call logs for the last 3 years. Back then, Excel had the 65536 row limitation. So I went on "hmmm… Access can handle this" only to find that Jet would start barfing somewhere around the 300k record mark. However, I had already done the whole DB query stuff, and found out about "linked tables" so I used that and ended up dumping all the data into Postgres. Then I just pulled a view from Postgres out to Access, then used that with my lady friend. Worked really good, and Postgres does the heavy grunt work in 40 seconds.

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SQL fights back against NoSQL's big data cred with SQL/MDA spec

Daniel B.
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Re: Oh, please

But that isn't what the NoSQL guys are usually trumpeting around. They're mostly about the "NO SQL" part, killing ACID, killing all RDBMS concepts to implement their fantasy RDBMS-free world. It's sent the wrong message out there.

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DOH! Google’s internet of things vision is powered by… Mac OS

Daniel B.
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Boffin

Makes sense

The Chromebook is more of a consumer device and thus isn't yet ready for development stuff. Then there's the need for commercial software, which is usually only available for Windows or OSX. And lastly, if your options are Linux or OSX and you don't want to pay the MS tax, you really, really want to buy a Mac. Because buying a regular laptop then installing Linux means that you paid the MS tax anyway.

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Daniel B.
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It actually makes sense

If you need to use commercial software, you basically need either Windows or OSX. If you want to use a laptop and not pay the MS tax, you're better off buying a Mac. Ok, you can buy a Chromebook as well but again, no commercial software.

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US Supreme Court: Duh, obviously cops need a warrant to search mobes

Daniel B.
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Boffin

Two seconds of sanity

Looks like the Supreme Court has seen the light on this matter. Now, if only they could decide on warantless laptop seizures at the US points of entry, I might actually stop worrying about CBP being able to break my NDAs on client information by copying all my laptop's hard drive...

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Bitcoin is MONEY, says Canada

Daniel B.
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Re: Here comes the taxman!

Since BTC is, now, real money in Canada... buying/selling BTC for Canadian Dollars wouldn't count as "profit", would it? It should be counted as changing money. Shouldn't it?

Nope, the taxman in many countries will apply some rules on exchange rates that will apply on any BTC transactions. The usual method is that if you receive X quantity of "foreign currency", the exchange rate for the day the transaction was made is the exchange rate used for taxation purposes. I'm guessing Canada's taxman will follow the same rule with BTC.

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T-Mobile boss: 'High and mighty' Verizon and AT&T are 'raping you for every penny you have'

Daniel B.
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Happy

Re: Pot-Kettle-Black

T-Mo US acts very differently from T-Mo UK. In the US, they're in the "underdog" category and thus competition has pushed them to be actually nice. You'll see the same thing when comparing Telcel in Mexico vs. America Movil-owned subsidiaries in the US (i.e. TracFone). Not owning a large % of the mobile market makes wonders to a carrier...

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Student promises Java key to unlock Simplocker ransomware

Daniel B.
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Re: Colour me an idiot, but..

Baring in mind the underlying issue here, perhaps he could write a version in something that isn't an insecure malware magnet like Java? C# for instance would be a much better choice.

Nice try my dear AC MS shill, but you fail at comprehension. The ransomware's running on Android, thus coding is done in Java (though compiled for Dalvik, not Java). C# is an MS only tech and after all it's basically pirated Java anyway.

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Greenpeace rejoices after getting huge renewable powerplant CANCELLED

Daniel B.
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Re: is that Lewis's knee jerking?

well founded distrust of their government, a genuine lack of belief that this project made any sense and the refusal of their government to consider alternatives.

Distrust? How about "they got voted out of government in the following election"? I'm pretty sure the whole project is why Chileans preferred to vote Michelle Bachelet back into power rather than letting Piñera destroy their national park. It seems they learned that voting for conservatives is a huge mistake, something they should know better given their recent past.

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Daniel B.
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Re: @petur @DougS

I don't know anything about the project, but most dams also have great benefits for flood control and droughts,

You should actually check out what the project is before blindly assuming it's not bad. It's actually pretty bad.

Granted, Chile could do better by setting up a nuke plant, but I'm guessing that's not going to fly in this post-Fukushima era.

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Daniel B.
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Re: It's looking more and more...

It's a bit more complex than just GreenCheese getting mad at this. The project was going to cause irreversible damage to natural reserves in the area, and it was opposed by a whopping 74% of the population. It was basically Piñera's pet project, a right-winger, and given that his party was ousted in the last general election it was pretty much a given that Hidroaysén would be axed.

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TIME TRAVELLERS needed to secure Windows 7

Daniel B.
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Boffin

Re: 149 Updates, plus 23 more, plus several more, plus several more...

That's still a couple orders of magnitude less than the Linux (Ubuntu) updates.

Unless you have an assload of installed packages, any Linux distro update list isn't going to be that massive. And as others have mentioned, you only need to download the latest patch level packages, instead of going "3.0.1, 3.0.2, 3.0.3, 3.0.4" as Windows forces you to do.

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Daniel B.
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Boffin

Re: Combo Upate

You mean like Microsoft Update? Or like WSUS? Or Like SCCM?

Nope. More like yum or apt-get, where typing "yum upgrade" or "apt-get upgrade" will automatically download the latest patch, apply 'em and everything's done. Ok, you might think that's just an Open Source thing, but IBM also has the ability to download just the latest patch for their products, so you don't have to engage in "download fix pack 17 … download fix pack 18 … only 46 patches to go" like MS does.

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Daniel B.
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yadda yadda yadda yadda

The MS shills are quick to pop up, and they usually do as AC's. Why am I not surprised? I'm starting to miss Eadon. At least he had the balls to put up his handle.

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Microsoft promises no snooping in new fine print for web services

Daniel B.
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Big Brother

Re: Target advertising?

It isn't a revenue stream - but it is something that they have done (see how they caught their employee that leaked Windows 8),

This is the first thing I was thinking about, and also made me notice that the new fine print doesn't cover this. It's only saying they're not going to read your email for targeted advertising purposes. Which means they can read it for pretty much any other purpose. Oops!

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The cute things they say

Daniel B.
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Re: Users have trouble with new tech

The first time I heard the cupholder joke, it wasn't quite a joke, it was an actual support call.

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Daniel B.
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Re: Techies - The stupid $H1T they say!

Ah, the elusive 500. Sometimes you'll actually get interesting stuff on the logs, or on the page. But if it's IIS, there's a good chance that the only thing you'll get is "500 Internal Server Error" and nothing on the logs. Which leads to this interesting exchange from a couple years ago:

Developer: What does a 500 error mean?

Sysadmin: Oh, it means "Internal Server Error"

Developer: Yeah, but what does that actually mean?

Sysadmin: That there's been an error inside the server.

Everyone starts laughing

Sysadmin: No, really. I'd usually get something to work on in the logs, but bloody IIS won't give me jack shit this time!

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Anonymous plans hacktivism against World Cup sponsors

Daniel B.
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Re: Self-defeating?

Why would the Brazilian authorities spend any kind of money defending network infrastructure that isn't even in their country? I doubt the sponsors have their stuff hosted in Brazil. What they do have in droves are script kiddies; most of my lastb entries for "root" or generic accounts like "mysql" come from Brazilian IP ranges. So it isn't even as if they're going to get more "hack" traffic than usual.

Most of the World Cup facilities are probably going to fall in disrepair again, that's what happened after the last Brazil World Cup and that's what's probably going to happen again. The media might not be harping on that, but at least one of those stadiums doesn't even have running water. They set up a big-ass tank to be used for the duration of the World Cup, I'm guessing that tank will rarely be used, if at all, after the Cup.

I suspect the reality is these are typical wallflower skiddies that were either too fragile to do sports at school or had no athletic skills. They resent the 'jocks' and their sports and therefore feel the need to throw a tantrum.

Brazil is basically the football country in South America, second closest would be Argentina. Brazilians are protesting the World Cup themselves, which shows it isn't just the "jock haters" who are mad at the event.

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Daniel B.
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Devil

Re: I'll be grabbing the popcorn...

Indeed. FIFA's "content exclusivity" killed DirecTV in Mexico, and left only SKY, which over here is doubly evil as local media mogul Azcárraga (think "Mexican Rupert Murdoch") owns both Televisa and SKY and already had a near-monopoly before DirecTV got axed.

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US Marshals seek buyer for Silk Road's Bitcoin

Daniel B.
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Re: Interesting!

Only if the buyer is an idiot. A smart dude will wait for the market to bounce back, and would sell them little by little instead of dumping all the BTC in a huge dump.

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Daniel B.
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Interesting!

If those BTC end up selling below the current market price, whoever wins 'em is definitely going to end up richer overnight!

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Stephen Fry MADNESS: 'New domain names GENERATE NEW IP NUMBERS'

Daniel B.
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@Condiment

I'm guessing that Poe's law was in full effect. Even though given the article's topic basically guaranteed that someone was going to make a satirical comment on the topic.

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When will Microsoft next run out of US IPv4 addresses for Azure?

Daniel B.
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Boffin

Re: Confused about IPv6 vs. NAT. @cynicalcsyan

One of the advantages of the way NAT and PAT are implemented in many ADSL routers is that the PAT is dynamic, making it very difficult to effect an inbound connection to any system on my network unless an inbound translation rule for that specific system has been explicitly set up. I'm not sure how IPv6 can improve on this out-of-the-box security.

Set up the firewall to DROP (or reject) inbound connections. Only allow connections to whatever services you need outside connections for. Done! I suspect IPv6 enabled ADSL routers are already doing this anyway.

And in fact, this is what we should be doing in the IPv4 world anyway. NAT was a quick hack-fix because of IPv4's issues concerning private networks and the upcoming IPv4 scarcity.

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Daniel B.
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Re: @BlueGreen @Crazy Operations Guy

A lot of these things aren't quite problems or have been somewhat solved, some remain, but it isn't as bad as it would seem.

*You can't manually set a default route on most OSes (You need to enable Routing Advertisements)

Which OSes? I've been able to manually set default routes on Windows and Linux. Not sure about OSX but I'd assume it's possible as well. The one I did have problem setting up was with a particular Solaris box, which indeed required me setting up SLAAC/radvd.

*There are a bunch of other services needed on DHCP-based clients

Not sure what you're talking about here.

*Many ISPs don't support IPv6, which means you have to pay for a tunnel

There are free tunnel brokers, SixXS and Hurricane Electric at the least.

*ISPs that d support IPv6 will charge you an arm, a leg and your first born for IP addresses (usually a /64)

Some ISPs are giving out larger blocks. Sometimes a /56 or a /48.

* The smallest IP block you can use is a /64, so you need a new block for every network segment you have.

Agreed, while having /64 as a minimum is a "feature" intended to avoid having the IPv4 problem of "ISP didn't give me but one IP for my home network", if your ISP only gives you a /64 you'll need to ask for new blocks if you want to segment your network. ISPs would have to be forced to give out larger than /64 blocks then.

*No NAT, so rather than just needing a small block of external addresses and using chunk of the 192.168.*.*/16, 172.16.*.*/20 or 10.*.*.*/8, you now need a separate /64 for each piece you were planning on taking.

This is a feature. NAT was originally brought in because of the IPv4 address exhaustion. But the internet was never intended to have a zillion private addresses being hacked into a single IP on the global network and the protocols show it. NAT breaks a lot of stuff and the only reason we see it running smoothly at some places is because the gateways are keeping tabs on the whole NAT stuff. But some things won't work at all. IPv6 brought the "scoped addresses" concept, so your internal stuff can set up a private address space similar to the 10.0.0.0/8 and similar variants for internal equipment, and you don't need to dole out global-scope IPv6 addresses to boxes that aren't going to need access to the global internet.

Sure, it requires a lot of re-training on the security side of IT, but we have to realize that the current "NAT == Security" mentality is wrong and move on.

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