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* Posts by Daniel B.

2651 posts • joined 12 Oct 2007

Greenpeace rejoices after getting huge renewable powerplant CANCELLED

Daniel B.
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Re: is that Lewis's knee jerking?

well founded distrust of their government, a genuine lack of belief that this project made any sense and the refusal of their government to consider alternatives.

Distrust? How about "they got voted out of government in the following election"? I'm pretty sure the whole project is why Chileans preferred to vote Michelle Bachelet back into power rather than letting Piñera destroy their national park. It seems they learned that voting for conservatives is a huge mistake, something they should know better given their recent past.

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Daniel B.
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Re: @petur @DougS

I don't know anything about the project, but most dams also have great benefits for flood control and droughts,

You should actually check out what the project is before blindly assuming it's not bad. It's actually pretty bad.

Granted, Chile could do better by setting up a nuke plant, but I'm guessing that's not going to fly in this post-Fukushima era.

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Daniel B.
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Re: It's looking more and more...

It's a bit more complex than just GreenCheese getting mad at this. The project was going to cause irreversible damage to natural reserves in the area, and it was opposed by a whopping 74% of the population. It was basically Piñera's pet project, a right-winger, and given that his party was ousted in the last general election it was pretty much a given that Hidroaysén would be axed.

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TIME TRAVELLERS needed to secure Windows 7

Daniel B.
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Boffin

Re: 149 Updates, plus 23 more, plus several more, plus several more...

That's still a couple orders of magnitude less than the Linux (Ubuntu) updates.

Unless you have an assload of installed packages, any Linux distro update list isn't going to be that massive. And as others have mentioned, you only need to download the latest patch level packages, instead of going "3.0.1, 3.0.2, 3.0.3, 3.0.4" as Windows forces you to do.

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Daniel B.
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Boffin

Re: Combo Upate

You mean like Microsoft Update? Or like WSUS? Or Like SCCM?

Nope. More like yum or apt-get, where typing "yum upgrade" or "apt-get upgrade" will automatically download the latest patch, apply 'em and everything's done. Ok, you might think that's just an Open Source thing, but IBM also has the ability to download just the latest patch for their products, so you don't have to engage in "download fix pack 17 … download fix pack 18 … only 46 patches to go" like MS does.

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Daniel B.
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yadda yadda yadda yadda

The MS shills are quick to pop up, and they usually do as AC's. Why am I not surprised? I'm starting to miss Eadon. At least he had the balls to put up his handle.

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Microsoft promises no snooping in new fine print for web services

Daniel B.
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Big Brother

Re: Target advertising?

It isn't a revenue stream - but it is something that they have done (see how they caught their employee that leaked Windows 8),

This is the first thing I was thinking about, and also made me notice that the new fine print doesn't cover this. It's only saying they're not going to read your email for targeted advertising purposes. Which means they can read it for pretty much any other purpose. Oops!

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The cute things they say

Daniel B.
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Re: Users have trouble with new tech

The first time I heard the cupholder joke, it wasn't quite a joke, it was an actual support call.

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Daniel B.
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Re: Techies - The stupid $H1T they say!

Ah, the elusive 500. Sometimes you'll actually get interesting stuff on the logs, or on the page. But if it's IIS, there's a good chance that the only thing you'll get is "500 Internal Server Error" and nothing on the logs. Which leads to this interesting exchange from a couple years ago:

Developer: What does a 500 error mean?

Sysadmin: Oh, it means "Internal Server Error"

Developer: Yeah, but what does that actually mean?

Sysadmin: That there's been an error inside the server.

Everyone starts laughing

Sysadmin: No, really. I'd usually get something to work on in the logs, but bloody IIS won't give me jack shit this time!

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Anonymous plans hacktivism against World Cup sponsors

Daniel B.
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Re: Self-defeating?

Why would the Brazilian authorities spend any kind of money defending network infrastructure that isn't even in their country? I doubt the sponsors have their stuff hosted in Brazil. What they do have in droves are script kiddies; most of my lastb entries for "root" or generic accounts like "mysql" come from Brazilian IP ranges. So it isn't even as if they're going to get more "hack" traffic than usual.

Most of the World Cup facilities are probably going to fall in disrepair again, that's what happened after the last Brazil World Cup and that's what's probably going to happen again. The media might not be harping on that, but at least one of those stadiums doesn't even have running water. They set up a big-ass tank to be used for the duration of the World Cup, I'm guessing that tank will rarely be used, if at all, after the Cup.

I suspect the reality is these are typical wallflower skiddies that were either too fragile to do sports at school or had no athletic skills. They resent the 'jocks' and their sports and therefore feel the need to throw a tantrum.

Brazil is basically the football country in South America, second closest would be Argentina. Brazilians are protesting the World Cup themselves, which shows it isn't just the "jock haters" who are mad at the event.

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Daniel B.
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Devil

Re: I'll be grabbing the popcorn...

Indeed. FIFA's "content exclusivity" killed DirecTV in Mexico, and left only SKY, which over here is doubly evil as local media mogul Azcárraga (think "Mexican Rupert Murdoch") owns both Televisa and SKY and already had a near-monopoly before DirecTV got axed.

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US Marshals seek buyer for Silk Road's Bitcoin

Daniel B.
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Re: Interesting!

Only if the buyer is an idiot. A smart dude will wait for the market to bounce back, and would sell them little by little instead of dumping all the BTC in a huge dump.

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Daniel B.
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Interesting!

If those BTC end up selling below the current market price, whoever wins 'em is definitely going to end up richer overnight!

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Stephen Fry MADNESS: 'New domain names GENERATE NEW IP NUMBERS'

Daniel B.
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@Condiment

I'm guessing that Poe's law was in full effect. Even though given the article's topic basically guaranteed that someone was going to make a satirical comment on the topic.

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When will Microsoft next run out of US IPv4 addresses for Azure?

Daniel B.
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Boffin

Re: Confused about IPv6 vs. NAT. @cynicalcsyan

One of the advantages of the way NAT and PAT are implemented in many ADSL routers is that the PAT is dynamic, making it very difficult to effect an inbound connection to any system on my network unless an inbound translation rule for that specific system has been explicitly set up. I'm not sure how IPv6 can improve on this out-of-the-box security.

Set up the firewall to DROP (or reject) inbound connections. Only allow connections to whatever services you need outside connections for. Done! I suspect IPv6 enabled ADSL routers are already doing this anyway.

And in fact, this is what we should be doing in the IPv4 world anyway. NAT was a quick hack-fix because of IPv4's issues concerning private networks and the upcoming IPv4 scarcity.

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Daniel B.
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Re: @BlueGreen @Crazy Operations Guy

A lot of these things aren't quite problems or have been somewhat solved, some remain, but it isn't as bad as it would seem.

*You can't manually set a default route on most OSes (You need to enable Routing Advertisements)

Which OSes? I've been able to manually set default routes on Windows and Linux. Not sure about OSX but I'd assume it's possible as well. The one I did have problem setting up was with a particular Solaris box, which indeed required me setting up SLAAC/radvd.

*There are a bunch of other services needed on DHCP-based clients

Not sure what you're talking about here.

*Many ISPs don't support IPv6, which means you have to pay for a tunnel

There are free tunnel brokers, SixXS and Hurricane Electric at the least.

*ISPs that d support IPv6 will charge you an arm, a leg and your first born for IP addresses (usually a /64)

Some ISPs are giving out larger blocks. Sometimes a /56 or a /48.

* The smallest IP block you can use is a /64, so you need a new block for every network segment you have.

Agreed, while having /64 as a minimum is a "feature" intended to avoid having the IPv4 problem of "ISP didn't give me but one IP for my home network", if your ISP only gives you a /64 you'll need to ask for new blocks if you want to segment your network. ISPs would have to be forced to give out larger than /64 blocks then.

*No NAT, so rather than just needing a small block of external addresses and using chunk of the 192.168.*.*/16, 172.16.*.*/20 or 10.*.*.*/8, you now need a separate /64 for each piece you were planning on taking.

This is a feature. NAT was originally brought in because of the IPv4 address exhaustion. But the internet was never intended to have a zillion private addresses being hacked into a single IP on the global network and the protocols show it. NAT breaks a lot of stuff and the only reason we see it running smoothly at some places is because the gateways are keeping tabs on the whole NAT stuff. But some things won't work at all. IPv6 brought the "scoped addresses" concept, so your internal stuff can set up a private address space similar to the 10.0.0.0/8 and similar variants for internal equipment, and you don't need to dole out global-scope IPv6 addresses to boxes that aren't going to need access to the global internet.

Sure, it requires a lot of re-training on the security side of IT, but we have to realize that the current "NAT == Security" mentality is wrong and move on.

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We're ALL Winston Smith now - and our common enemy is the Big Brother State

Daniel B.
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Big Brother

Re: Indifference @JimmyPage

Most people in East Germany selection for political "re-education" were dobbed in by neighbours (probably in a pre-emptive strike) or more chillingly, their own children. A common classroom trick was to ask the kids to sing the theme tune to the news, to identify whose parents were watching the banned West German news.

This is also seen in 1984. Then again, the real-life inspiration for 1984 was Stalinist USSR, of which the GDR was pretty much a carbon copy/puppet state anyway. It is also why the fall of the GDR caused a lot of grief when the Stasi secret files were uncovered; many formerly GDR citizens started finding out that neighbors, friends or even their own family had ratted them out to the Stasi.

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IPv4 addresses now EXHAUSTED in Latin America and the Caribbean

Daniel B.
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hahahaha

Hah! I'm sure that's what they're going to do, and not just roll out CGN to their end users.

BAHAHAHAHAHAHAHA

The cable ISPs in Mexico have been doing CGN since forever. Those cheap bastards have done that to "save" on buying IP blocks. It also breaks a lot of stuff on the 'net. In fact, my first "experience" with NAT was thanks to those guys.

It's just another good reason for IPv6 to kill NAT forever.

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Marc Andreessen: Edward Snowden is a 'textbook traitor'

Daniel B.
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Oh dear.

It proves that there are people in the IT industry that have been infested by conservatardism. Really sad.

I would take him seriously if he were to say that he's a traitor in the sense that his whistle blowing activities are questionable, but no. He basically goes down the "everyone should've know about the NSA stuff and what he released was unnecessary but harmful". It was only "harmful" on US-based cloud computing stuff, which is probably why he's throwing a tantrum on Snowden's affair. And legally the NSA shouldn't be able to do all of this, but it is probably covered by the infamous PATRIOT Act. So no, nobody expected the NSA to pull off what amounts to a blanket wiretap on all US comms, including ordinary citizens. That is what angered people.

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Daniel B.
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Meh

Re: Bye bye Brand America

Until the 1990s, USA was flying pretty high as an international brand.

Maybe in Europe, but over here in the American continent, most if not every single country south of the US border has been wary of the US. Especially due to their Central/South America misbehavior. How do you think Hugo Chavez got to be president? Down in Central and South America, the surefire way to win the presidential ticket these days is to be an anti-imperialist (that is, anti-USA) dude.

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Thanks for nothing, OpenSSL, grumbles stonewalled De Raadt

Daniel B.
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Boffin

Re: So....

" He has explicitly said that any security bugs in OpenSSH, he will not report it to the FreeBSD project, because someone once made him cry."

Interesting -- may we have a reference?

You aren't familiar with Theo de Raadt, are you? The guy's basically a 5 year old in the body of an adult, throwing tantrums on everything. This is the guy that called Linux a hackjob just because it ended up being more popular than his renegade branch off BSD (itself a product of another of his tantrums). LibreSSL seems to be his most recent tantrum, though his concerns might be actually valid on OpenSSL (how the hell did they let something like Heartbleed sit around for 2 years?!). But notice that one of the things LibreSSL cut was FIPS 140-2 support, which is probably dumb. Oh well...

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Net neut supporters CRASH FCC WEBSITE with message deluge

Daniel B.
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Maybe Obama should listen.

It's becoming very clear that putting Wheeler as the Big Man in the FCC was an awful mistake. Obama should ax him and put a more competent dude, preferably someone who doesn't have a conflict of interest in that post.

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US dairy biz in a churn over TPP

Daniel B.
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Happy

Nice.

I was kinda expecting the 'net dudes to torpedo TPP, but it seems that most of the 'net dudes were lulled into a false sense of security after SOPA/PIPA got torpedoed and ACTA was killed by the aftermath of that. Still it's good to see that the other parties being hard-hit by these stupid treaties are ganging up. Hopefully they'll actually kill this stupid TPP thingy.

Of course, we'll still have to keep an eye for the next TPP/ACTA/whatever revival in a couple of years.

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Microsoft's NEW OS now runs on HALF of ALL desktop PCs

Daniel B.
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Re: Its not suprising.. @Sandtitz

Mexico, sometime around late 2012/early 2013. Suppliers were insisting on Win8 because MS wanted that, company just plain put the brakes on purchases. They did eventually start buying PCs with the same agreement you've mentioned, where Win7 Pro was preinstalled instead of Win8. But a more obvious telltale of 8's rejection is that there was an XP to 7 migration project, and they didn't switch it to "XP to 8" even with the volume license discounts that MS was doling out. It could have saved them money, but they preferred to keep 7 as the migration path.

Interestingly, MS is giving out "XP to 8" incentives, but IIRC only charities have taken in those offers.

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Daniel B.
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Re: Downvoters

Up/downvotes have no effect in your standing. Upvotes count towards the badges award, but down votes are irrelevant. Unlike other commenting systems, the up votes and down votes are simply for comment judgement alone. Otherwise the usual MS shills would have had awful standing by now.

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Daniel B.
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Boffin

Re: Its not suprising..

Really, how many of the MS shills/apologists actually work in IT departments? Most, if not all of our large companies have pretty much banned Windows 8.x from their premises. When MS was strong-arming OEMs to sell only Win8 boxes, one of our clients cancelled all PC purchases. This client is a Fortune 500 company, by the way.

Sure, people might adapt, but it doesn't mean they will want to do so, and if the interface is strange they will be less productive. No, Win8 isn't like driving a manual/standard car, it's like driving a standard car that has the stick shift mounted on the ceiling, or a motorcycle with a stick shift instead of the foot gear shifter you usually have on a motorbike.

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You've got two weeks to beat off Cryptolocker, GameoverZeus nasties

Daniel B.
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Re: Think of the children!!!!!

Mexico's El Universal managed to 1-up most panic headlines. The headline for the Heartbleed vuln mentioned "Most Dangerous Computer Virus Discovered!".

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YOSEMITE GLAM: Apple unveils gussied up OS X

Daniel B.
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Gaaah!

So it's true? They're slamming that awful flat Dock on the new OSX? Damn, and now that I'm barely warming up to upgrade to Mavericks! Wondering if they're taking Microsoft's cue on making the UI step backwards (Start Screen reminded me of the god-awful Program Manager from Win3.x when I first saw it)

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Snowden shoots back: 'So you DO have my emails, after all'

Daniel B.
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Boffin

Heh.

But there's a catch with Snowden's claims. Where did he send those emails from?

If it was from Lavabit or another public webmail service, he's spot on with this proving that they are in fact snooping on everyone's emails.

However, if he sent it from his NSA organizational email system, there's a good chance the NSA is already storing a copy of every single email sent by anyone inside the NSA. Why? Because companies have this right, and I'm sure as hell the NSA has it as well. Especially for "national security", as someone might leak state secrets using email.

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Oi, ebook price fixer. Yes, you, Apple – stop whinging and get your chequebook out

Daniel B.
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Facepalm

It's the MFN clause!

it's hard to see how a company with a mere 10% market share of ebook sales at best was the dangerous one in breach of anti-trust regulations, while Amazon—who have over 90%—were not.

You're missing the whole picture. The "Amazon is the dominant player" card is what Apple tried to use to justify their actions. But in reality, they were involved in a price-fixing conspiracy that gave plausible deniability to both parties thanks to how the contracts were made. The key was in the following things:

Publishers were giving Apple the books under the "agency" model, which unlike the "wholesale" model the price per book is fixed by the publisher. Apple gets to set the percentage they keep, which they put at 30%. Up till here it seems to be OK, except:

Apple added a "Most Favoured Nation" clause. Publishers that sell to Apple can't offer lower prices to other vendors, like Amazon/Kindle. Thus this clause forces everyone else to a) switch to the agency model, even if they don't want, and b) sell at the price point that the publisher has fixed. Oh, but the publishers could just point and say "oh but Apple is selling them at that price and we can't offer 'em cheaper due to our MFN contract!". But the truth is that the e-book market as a whole had a massive price hike after Apple & Co. made their deal; it was getting so stupid that paper books ended up being cheaper in some cases! And that's why Apple lost; the price hike was so noticeable that it was successfully proven in court.

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Google's driverless car: It'll just block our roads. It's the WORST

Daniel B.
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Facepalm

Go on green?

Is it just me, or is the 1 second delay after green light actually a real-life safety feature? Especially in big cities, where someone will run a red light. In fact, here in Mexico City there's already a 2 second delay between the red going on in one street to the green going on on the other one. And even then, it is still wise to wait because there's bound to be a jackass plowing through the intersection.

Oh, and now try doing that on a motorcycle. I've always waited a second or two, and I've seen at least twice an HGV hurtling down the intersection not giving two fucks about the red light. There's a particular intersection where red light runners are the norm, not the exception. I'm not about to gun the throttle just to get splattered all over the pavement!

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IT'S ALIVE! ISEE-3 responding to commands

Daniel B.
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Indeed

calling itself V'ger and looking for its creator.

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TrueCrypt turmoil latest: Bruce Schneier reveals what he'll use instead

Daniel B.
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Re: PGP

in Australia, Symantec WILL NOT SELL TO END USERS

Holy crap. I must admit that I haven't delved much into PGP licenses after Symantec's borging, but now I'm worried. Maybe the same thing applies to me? I'm in Mexico.

So it does seem I'm going to be stuck with FileVault2 or LUKS for the time being.

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Daniel B.
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Boffin

PGP

Looks like PGP is indeed going to be the solution for this. That's what I used before jumping to OSX. My license was stuck at the 10.x version, which seems to be no longer available for download so I'm screwed. I'll have to buy a new license if I want to use that.

Or, I simply open up my PGP volumes with my Windows VM and just make all new portable media devices as FileVault2 volumes. Sad, as I lose the "multi-OS" approach but lacking TrueCrypt, there isn't much I can do. I'll also stick to LUKS for Linux.

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Daniel B.
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Boffin

Are you sure? We have never been able to get truecript to work on any of our industrial computers OSs. Maybe you mean any WINDOWS OS.

Truecrypt works for Linux, OSX and Windows; the source code might even compile for other platforms though I've never checked that out. What industrial OS are you using?

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TrueCrypt considered HARMFUL – downloads, website meddled to warn: 'It's not secure'

Daniel B.
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Boffin

Hm...

Sounds fishy. Wonder what happened? I've been using FileVault2 ever since I switched to OSX, but TrueCrypt was my one true multi-platform crypto option. What should I use now?

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Daniel B.
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Re: Intriguing

The site goes out of its way to provide the information needed in order to move data away from truecrypt volumes, for all platforms - not just Windows.

It skims over Linux, just saying "use any integrated support for encryption". They did give the quick instructions for OSX though.

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Google clamps down on rogue Chrome plugins and extensions

Daniel B.
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Re: Is Google following in Apple's footsteps?

Flash, anything from Adobe and Java are all running via browser plugins, so technically this "development" affects all of them. I'm guessing those plugins will require NaCl.

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Four-pronged ARM-based Mac rumor channels Rasputin

Daniel B.
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Happy

ooooh

I'd love to see a non-x86 Mac in the near future, but I'd also like to see them perform better than the craptel stuff as well. It's about time someone brings back RISC on mainstream computers...

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Watch: Kids slam Apple as 'BORING, the whole thing is BORING'

Daniel B.
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Boffin

Re: Who taught these children ??

I think it depends on the kind of kid you're showing this stuff to. There will be kids interested in working on older stuff, probably just for the "how did they do this without current tech?" value. Maybe an Apple II isn't that good to spark that question on a kid, but I've seen it happen with mechanical stuff. That is, stuff like a mechanical calculator; that'll garner a lot of interest. "Wow, this thing can add, subtract, multiply and divide without using electricity? No microchips? Cool!!!"

An Apple II probably would garner more attention if you can show at least basic stuff working like "phonebook program" or something like that. I know my dad was able to make me get interested in his age-old TI-59 calculator as a kid.

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Ask yourself, AT&T: Do you really want a Latin American adventure?

Daniel B.
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Re: Government On Your Side?

Nuh-uh. The Mexican Government's current "edition" owes its ass to Televisa. In fact, DirecTV winded down its Mexico operations because SKY owned the market sometime around the turn of the 21st Century. Any attempt to barge into Televisa/TV Azteca's duopoly will fail miserably, mostly because Peña Nieto depends on those media moguls to prop up his government.

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Daniel B.
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Fact checking...

but then there remains Dish, already competing head-on with DirecTV in Mexico, but with no larger Latin America footprint.

Um… DirecTV hasn't operated in Mexico for at least 10 years, maybe longer. They lost out to SKY, which in Mexico is owned by our own evil media mogul: Televisa's Owner Emilio Azcarraga. That guy is basically the Mexican Rupert Murdoch… which makes SKY Mexico being owned by Azcarraga somewhat appropriate.

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Spanish village of 'Kill the Jews' votes for rebrand

Daniel B.
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Re: They have to get with the times

Unless you're talking about the Catholic far-right, which is the particular flavor you'll find in Spain. Those are also after Jews and Freemasons.

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Daniel B.
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PP

I'm guessing the votes against it are from PP supporters. After all, those still worship Francisco Franco, who was helped by That Famous Nazi Dictator during his rise to power: Remember Guernica.

Anyway, it does seem that the new name is actually the old name anyway, so it's more of a "St. Petersburg / Leningrad" thing instead of "Constantinople / Istanbul" issue.

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DUDE, WHERE'S MY CAR? New leccy BMWs have flimsy password security – researcher

Daniel B.
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Devil

PINs and Smartphones

If a user is mad enough not to have a [screen unlock] PIN on their device

Ah, haven't met many smartphone owners? A lot of them don't have any kind of password/PIN protection, and those who do still use the old 4-digit PIN standard. 10k attempts should be feasible!

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Microsoft to release epic Xbox One update in June

Daniel B.
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Trollface

Yes, it's time to switch

I'm pretty sure that MS has done too little, too late on the whole XB180 issue. By the time they started backtracking, the damage had been done. At this point, having your game as an XB1 exclusive is probably going to be a bad thing; maybe that's why Titanfall has also been released for the XB360. Hell, even the exclusives are having lackluster reception; Dead Rising 3 has sold 1.2 million copies after 4 months, while inFAMOUS Second Son sold 1 million in 9 days. Oh, want to compare it to a similar bestseller exclusive on the XB1? After a month, Titanfall sold 925k copies… and that includes PC and XB360 sales.

The XB1 isn't quite dying, but it's getting a lukewarm reception. People are either holding on to their PS3s and 360's or just buying PS4s.

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128-bit crypto scheme allegedly cracked in two hours

Daniel B.
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Trollface

Re: Boring Green Too smart for their own good? @Plump & Bleaty

I could already be using non-mathematical encryption and you wouldn't know anything about it

Vignére Cypher! Wait, that was cracked … by math. Even though it was basically a rehash of the Caesar shift that simply added the ability to use more than one shifted alphabet.

I don't think that dude was posting a diversion just because. Maybe he's just pointing out the troll? The one that trolled everything Sun Microsystems until their Oracley demise?

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Watch this: IPv4 must die! So let's beef up on IPv6

Daniel B.
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We really should have larger IPv6 deployments by now...

Most of us are using OSes that already support IPv6. Client-side, the problem is nonexistent.

Most ISPs and backbone networks should have IPv6 support on their gear unless they haven't upgraded their stuff for longer than 5 years.

Then why the hell are we still lacking large-scale IPv6 deployments?

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Wacky 'baccy making a hash of FBI infosec recruitment efforts

Daniel B.
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Re: Option C

The problem here isn't about dudes going to their interview while stoned, but that the FBI restriction on hiring spans 3 years backwards. I don't know of any drug that has a 3 year lasting effect on your brain, though you might feel that long depending on the mind-altering drug...

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Wolfenstein: The New Order ... BLAM-BLAM! That guard did Nazi that coming

Daniel B.
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Boffin

Re: PS4 best platform to play this on.

As much as I like the PS4, and as much as it is better in the tech department over the X-Bone … both consoles are basically rebadged PCs with mad GPU specs. I weeped when I found out that the next gen consoles were falling to the x86 dark side. I'm guessing the PC version has the appeal that most id games have: the ability to churn out mods.

Sadly, it seems that this one wasn't made by id Software but by someone else using the idTech engine. Still I'd like to check it out. Though I'll have to do so on PC, because my stepson has been glued to GTA5 Online and I can't get him to give up the PS3...

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