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* Posts by Daniel B.

2650 posts • joined 12 Oct 2007

Apple MacBook Air 13-inch 2013: Windows struggles in Boot Camp

Daniel B.
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Re: Why would you want to use Windows 8 on a Macbook Air?

Also if it is so worthless why has the author of this article gone to the hassle of installing in on a Macbook?

You'll notice that the author installed Windows 7. The 8.1 preview was mostly to test if it could be installed as well, but the main test was on Windows 7.

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Unmasked: Euro ISPs raided in downloads strangle probe

Daniel B.
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FAIL

Re: wtf

not being funny here but they are the isp's own networks and right or wrong they can do what the fuck they like with them. Am I the only one that understands capitalism

But you don't understand peering agreements, it seems. Once you enter one, you're legally obligated by contract to honor whatever you agreed to. In peering agreements, it is to free-flow the packet deliveries.

Not sure what kind of tree hugging liberal world you think we all live in, it's all about money.

I smell a conservatard.

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Daniel B.
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Facepalm

Evidence

The raids are to gather evidence that the Cogent-to-enduser streams are being throttled, while the ISP-to-enduser streams aren't. If there's a significant difference, Cogent has a case.

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Chinese police probe iPhone user's death by electrocution

Daniel B.
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Facepalm

Ow.

One report said she was in the bath (steamy bathroom?).

That would make it less of a "dangerous charger used!" and more of a Darwin Awards winner.

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Security bods boycott DEF CON over closed door for feds

Daniel B.
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They've clarified they aren't banning feds.

In fact, they were asked about this stance by an actual Fed who mentioned he mostly goes on his dime and not in official status. So the clarification is aimed at these people as well.

Indeed, the DEFCON conference has usually been a nice neutral ground for hackers and Feds (insert your favorite three-letter agency here), and it will be quite different if absolutely no Feds are there!

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Internet overlords deny Google's 'dotless' domains dream

Daniel B.
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Boffin

Re: Oh please... this is a 10+ year old rehash of AOL era technology

Not quite that. In fact as the IETF and IAB dudes have pointed out, it won't work as advertised. DNS resolution can indeed search for TLDs ... but the first thing it'll do when presented with a dotless query is to search for $DOTLESS_FQDN.my.default.search.domain.com and return that if it finds it. If you really want to search for a TLD on DNS, the correct way to do this is by appending a dot on the search. So for http://search to work, you'd actually need to type http://search./ for it to work unambiguously!

AOL had its closed wall garden to implement keywords, the overall internet is not the same.

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Analyst: Tests showing Intel smartphones beating ARM were rigged

Daniel B.
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Holmes

Heh.

The whole benchmark looked fishy since it came out, so it is no big surprise that the benchmark had been gamed to favor Intel.

Please, keep that garbage arch out of our mobile devices, its already doing enough damage on the regular PC market, thank you very much.

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Sysadmins: Everything they told you about backup WAS A LIE

Daniel B.
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Boffin

Full and incremental backups

Usually you do a Full backup and then incremental ones during the week. That's why you don't have to backup Terabytes upon Terabytes of data. Of course, you should also have another team restoring said backups on the DR platform, which serves as both DR readiness and testing that the backup media is actually working.

Ah, the woes of a certain company that found out their backups were worthless the day their Server went down...

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Swollen cloud could burst at any time, splatter us with FAIL – anxious tech biz

Daniel B.
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Boffin

But that's the problem...

'Cloud' is in fact vague, and remains mostly a buzzword in IT. What is 'the Cloud'? VPS? Externally hosted webapps that do a mediocre job of emulating MS Office? Outsourcing email to Gmail? Just the 'Cloud Storage' part?

The thing is that everyone's pushing one thing or another as 'on the Cloud' and the concerns about security and reliability are pretty much valid. Some of the cloudy solutions are indeed good for the SME sector, as you get fat data pipes on your VPS for less $$$ than deploying the full solution on site. But dumping all the operational stuff on the cloud? That would be bad, as the SME doesn't have a fat internet pipe and needs to go to the cloud to get all their data.

So yes, the cloud has a place, but first you need to know what exactly do you want to put there, and do it responsibly.

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Microsoft biz heads slash makes Ballmer look like dead STEVE JOBS

Daniel B.
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They're trying to pull an Apple, it seems

By saying that they are 'listening' customer feedback, then ignoring it and doing what they wanted to anyway. That's why Metro is still there, annoying users in Win8.1.

But Apple had Jobs and the RDF, Microsoft not only lacks that but they're generally seen as the uncool guy. Even IBM can be seen as the cool guy these days, but that's because they changed a lot in the last 15 years or so.

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Icahn offers to sweeten his Dell deal with warrants

Daniel B.
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Thumb Down

Hopefully

Stockholders should be ignoring this bastard. Sure his offer is a no-brainer ... as in only those with no brains would want it.

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Apple builds flagship store on top of PLAGUE HOSPITAL

Daniel B.
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Etimologies

hehe. In Spanish, computers are female (La Computadora) though sometimes they have it as a male (El Computador). Spaniards have male sorting machines (El Ordenador), haven't seen them use that word as a female though.

(BTW, the 'sorting machine' variation was inherited from French, wonder what gender they use for ordinateur?)

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'Clippy' coup felled by Microsoft twitterati

Daniel B.
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Re: Fringe Case

Clippy was indeed useful, mostly to search or learn about features you didn't know Office had. Back in '97, this included the (sadly excised) option of saving versions of a Word document. You could have "version1", "version2" and current versions of your files in one place. And the animations triggered when you did certain activities (saving, sending email, printing) were funny.

What really made Clippy annoying was that the "HEEEY IT LOOKS LIKE YOU'RE WRITING A LETTER!!!" helpfulness couldn't be disabled; you either closed the whole agent away, or had it there ready to annoy you. Had MS put an option to have Clippy not intrude like it did, it might have had a better reception.

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Daniel B.
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Joke

He's alive!

I thought the BOFH's Alter Ego from Salmon Days had turned him into a bike or something...

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Forget Snowden: What have we learned about the NSA?

Daniel B.
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Facepalm

DEFCON

The DEFCON "ban" on Feds (they'll probably still go, but this time they won't be as welcome as on previous events) is particularly damning. Last year, the NSA Director actually went to DEFCON gave a keynote, something that was seen as positive by both the NSA and DEFCON organizers and attendees. It meant that finally the top spooks were seeing hackers as an asset instead of "pesky problems", which used to be the situation for past administrations.

But current revelations have made the very people that could really help the NSA uncomfortable. So while the "ban" on Feds doesn't mean they aren't going, it is a relevant message from the hacking community.

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Microsoft waves goodbye to Small Business Server

Daniel B.
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El Cheapo Windows Server

I remember once monkeying around with Windows Server 2003 SBS. Wasn't it mostly a cheap package with WS2003, with added Exchange and easier wizards for setting up stuff? It did seem to be nice if you had n00b IT folks who didn't know how to set up a full blown Windows Server, but I remember just going for the full WS2003 Standard edition. Of course, my employer back then had licenses for both products so the cost issue wasn't a problem.

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Oh please, PLEASE bring back Xbox One's hated DRM - say Xbox loyalists

Daniel B.
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Facepalm

Re: Already exists

Both companies already sell digital copy games on the current gen consoles: PS3 and XB360. Both have the non-transferable licenses, but at least you know what you're getting when you buy the online games.

XBone was forcing gamers to only have the stupid digital scheme. We already have the best of both worlds!

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Daniel B.
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Devil

hahaha

I'm split. One part of me wants this to be heard, because a DRM-riddled XBoxOne will sink faster than the HMS Victoria. On the other side, it sets a bad precedent in the gaming industry, something for which the consumer should have zero tolerance. The fact that 8000 people are asking to get reamed with this awful scheme proves that at least someone will buy into such an awful scheme.

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HP admits to backdoors in storage products

Daniel B.
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Coat

Re: Complex passwords?

I'm guessing it is more along the lines of "hewlettpackard" or "icarlyfiorina"

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Iron Man 3.

Daniel B.
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Boffin

They do it deliberately.

The tradition goes all the way back to The Net, where the third octet for the Praetorian's IP was wrong. Interestingly, a lot of what Angela Benett does is actual UNIX stuff, only shown more graphically (you can see output from whois, ps and other commands there.) They just added drama to what amounts to a traceroute+who+whois search. Given how much they actually researched on IT stuff, it is obvious it was deliberately made to not match a real IP.

One movie that did use a valid IP address but that can't be truly mapped in the public internet was Matrix Reloaded, with an IP in the 10/8 "private class A" block. But then that movie actually used a real exploit for that particular scene!

Other examples using obviously broken IPs would be Criminal Minds, CSI:NY among others...

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'Priyanka' yanks your WhatsApp contact chain on Android mobes

Daniel B.
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Boffin

Re: Old skool

Or doing the WinNuke thingy. All those Win9x boxes that would BSOD upon receiving a MSG_OOB packet, which made a good case for us to use Linux when telnetting or IRCing to hostile territories.

The interesting thing about WinNuke is that on LAN PCs it would only kill "the internet" (the interface would no longer have IP capabilities until reboot) but on dialup-connected PCs, the OOB packet would cause it to infinitely loop on BSODs and require a reboot. Had this happen to me a few times, before I blocked port 139, installed a patch and then for good measure added a port listener on the thing. Ironically, it was the only way to read the messages the 'h4><><0125' sent with said attack...

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Sina's self-censorship scheme swamped with spam, not rumours

Daniel B.
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Coat

Re: "Rumours...

You take the brown line. It crashes. You die.

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Microsoft splurges on single sign ons with Active Directory update

Daniel B.
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Boffin

Re: The world turns @SecurityPedant

Oracle killed OID. It was one of those weird cases where Oracle actually checked out user feedback and installed base; they found out that OID was rarely used at all, while DSEE had the lion's share of the market. That's why they instead retooled OpenDS into Oracle Unified Directory. Source? Actual Oracle employees; in fact many former Sun and Oracle employees are in the IT Security market these days.

On DSEE, yes, I know Ludovic Poitou & friends are no longer at Oracle, but then there's OpenDJ which is OpenDS's fork, maintained by him. Personally I'd prefer OpenDJ, but the corporate world doesn't work like that.

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Daniel B.
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Facepalm

Re: The world turns

eDirectory was a fantastic product, but it had its flaws, as does Microsoft's AD. But if eDirectory was the vast superior solution, how come its use is in massive decline?

The one LDAP solution that I've seen installed more than AD, and used by the financial sector is Sun's DSEE. And yes, it actually outperforms AD everywhere, and it's used in the financial and telecoms sector. In fact, it is one of the Sun products that actually survived the Oracle acquisition because of this, and its offspring OpenDS was morphed into the Oracle Unified Directory.

IBM also has its own LDAP, and it basically has a shared market with DSEE, especially in places where IBM iron is running. While eDirectory has declined in usage, at least IBM's Tivoli Directory Server, ODSEE/OUD, 389 Directory Server and others have taken its place and are still used a lot. AD is actually the ugly duckling.

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Daniel B.
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Boffin

Re: AD?

If you think AD crumbles in real world deployments you must be an intern that has yet to work in the "real world".

6 years experience, financial sector, worked for a certain bank that has a large presence in America (the continent). One particular system has 10+ million users, supports about 2000 concurrent users in peak hours and is managed by *two* LDAP servers. Real LDAP servers.

In comparison, a 700 user deployment requires no less than 11 AD Domain Controllers just to work, for another not-so-large organization. The same product that copes with the 2000 concurrent users in the other place, shits itself because of AD's weird behavior.

I'd like to note that most, if not all of the big financial institutions actively avoid the MS ecosystem. AD is used only for the in-company PCs, but the business stuff is using either LDAP, some Identity/Access Managment stack or RACF. AD is a joke among the application security market and is usually limited to only the MS stack and/or the Windows boxes in the company.

There are a LOT of admins out there with AD skills and CxO's are comfortable with the technology.

Betting on AD ended up killing our Production Environment for a couple of days at a former job. The CEO actually listened the "I told you so" crowd and are now switching platforms. They're not pleased with what they ended up getting with MS.

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Daniel B.
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Devil

AD?

So why would I want to choose the worst LDAPv3 implementation out there instead of a true LDAP or SSO implementation? Especially when AD crumbles under real world authentication requirements.

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Google loses Latitude in Maps app shake-up

Daniel B.
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Re: B0rked

I'm also miffed at Latitude's dissappearance. It is useful to find people, especially those asking for directions while driving. And as you, I won't ever join + and keep losing Google features every now and then.

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Dead STEVE JOBS was a CROOK - Judge

Daniel B.
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Happy

Common sense prevails

So the judge accurately told off Apple that "but they did it first!" is not a valid defense to engage in illegal activities. Vigilantism is frowned upon by the law, and even if Apple's argument were to be correct, it would amount to corporate vigilantism.

As the judge noted, if Apple or the publishers thought that Amazon was engaging in anticompetitive practices, they should've sued through the proper channels. Indeed, "Dumping" is frowned upon and there are usually laws against this practice. But that's why you sue, not commit a worse offense by price-fixing, which has an immediate anti-consumer effect, as opposed to the medium to long-term effect that dumping has on consumers.

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Apple surrenders in 'app store' trademark suit against Amazon

Daniel B.
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Holmes

No shit, Sherlock

Apple's Huguet said that Apple chose to drop the case now because its App Store brand had grown strong enough to not require additional legal protections.

Given that the App Store only sells either OSX or iOS apps, and that you can only buy iOS apps on the App Store, I'd guess it never even needed said legal protections. Amazon's (or any other's) Appstore doesn't compete with the App(le) Store.

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France's 'three strikes' anti-piracy law shot down

Daniel B.
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Flame

Re: @ Daniel B. - Nice.

Ah yes. I have 2, maybe 3 DVDs that come with an unskippable version of the hideous "you wouldn't steal a car" ad. Yeech!

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Daniel B.
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Happy

Nice.

Bad on the tax hike, but at least they're taking out the retarded law to pasture. It's copyright which needs fixing; it was intended as a temporary grant similar to patents, but has been eternally extended thanks to Walt Disney's zealous protection of their stuff. Copyright terms should be scaled back to 56 years, no exceptions, worldwide.

And on battling piracy? How about not being asses to legal purchasers? DRM, stupid regional restrictions ... the more locks they put, the more people that resort to piracy.

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Snowden: US and Israel did create Stuxnet attack code

Daniel B.
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Proper date formats

2001-09-11 is the correct format.

ISO 8601 d00d!

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Look, can we just forget about Snowden for sec... US-China cyber talks held

Daniel B.
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Black Helicopters

Re: Just Scum

Both governments are evil. The difference is that China doesn't really hide much of its evilness, and openly targets those groups they dislike, such as Falun Gong.

The US will spy on all your stuff and not do anything ... until you piss off the wrong G-Man. That's when the spooks act...

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Radar gremlins GROUND FLIGHTS across southern Blighty

Daniel B.
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Alert

Re: I'm going on holidays in two weeks

Didn't a teen just get jailed because he joked about "going to blow up a school full of kids and eat their corpses" ... even though the next lines said "lol, jk" ???

The security services seem to be going dumber every day...

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Apple: Ta for blowing £££s on apps, fanbois. Now we've set them FREE

Daniel B.
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Re: Why?

They take potshots at everyone, not just Apple. I quite like El Reg's take on IT, as it is up till now the only IT site that doesn't suck up to any IT vendor. Compare to other "IT News" sites where you can easily spot when Apple, MS, Oracle or similar companies have paid off for articles praising whatever they're peddling out.

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Emergency alert system easily pwnable after epic ZOMBIE attack prank

Daniel B.
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Facepalm

Missing the point

The image has a private SSH key on the open that has access to the accounts. It would be like having the official Windows Server release have 'password' as the default Administrator account password on it.

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Daniel B.
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Boffin

Re: Public / Private keys @Bluewhelk

Yes, indeed that's the point. Some lazy admins have been known to run the following commands:

# ssh-keygen

(generate passwordless key)

# cat .ssh/id_rsa.pub > .ssh/authorized_keys

then they copy around the .ssh/id_rsa file. Now if this were the case with said firmware, it means that anyone getting their hands on the firmware gets the id_rsa key, and said key has access to the box. With no password.

Not sure if this is the case, but I wouldn't be surprised if it was...

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Samsung Galaxy S3 explodes, turns young woman into 'burnt pig'

Daniel B.
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Boffin

Re: Only a matter of time, and lack of protection.

I prefer to carry my phone on a belt-clip holster. If I hear it pop, I could theoretically just rip the holster off my belt and throw it away, or in the worst case simply unbuckle my belt, drop my pants and run. Ok, that last scenario might be awkward, but rather do that than have myself burnt to a crisp. And I never carry my phone on any pocket!

Also, if I ever feel my phone getting extremely hot, I'm pulling out the battery. If it's starting to do something else (like er... generating smoke) I'll just throw the phone before it blows up!

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US public hate Snowden - but sexpot spy Anna Chapman LOVES him

Daniel B.
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Mushroom

Re: Dear Mr Snowden

Actually, most of the Central and South American countries have been directly or indirectly fucked upon by the CIA. Pinochet was indirectly supported by the CIA to take over the democratic government in Chile. The CIA helped a lot of tyrant dictatorships in the region, including the secret network they had to kill dissidents who managed to flee to non-tyrant countries. Then there's Nicaragua, El Salvador ... get the idea? The one country which has managed to avoid CIA-backed bloody dictatorships in the 20th Century has been Mexico... and even then, it wasn't because the US didn't try to. A certain General was called upon by er... US agents after the 1968 Tlatelolco massacre, offering support in pulling off a coup against the government, seizing the opportunity as it had ordered a massacre against the civilian population. Said general declined the offer, as he thought it was worse to do that than to keep with the not-so-evil Mexican Government.

So yes, those governments are offering Snowden asylum as a 'fuck you' to the US ... but in this case, the US earned said disrespect.

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French snooping as deep as PRISM: Le Monde

Daniel B.
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Facepalm

Re: And in Egypt...

The "former government" had lost a lot of support from the public, nonetheless because they were silently taking over the entire government. It sounds weird, but the consensus seems to be that the Egyptian Army actually saved the country. Of course, it remains to be seen if the Army will actually hand back the country to the next elected gov't...

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BBC abandons 3D TV, cites 'disappointing' results

Daniel B.
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I must be going to the better cinemas here...

I haven't had the chair kicking problems in years. Or chatty people. At most, someone might be checking their phone but seeing that requires me to actually stop watching the movie and look down, as the angle in which seating is set means that the forward row is at your feet instead of being in front of you.

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Germans brew up a right Sh*tstorm

Daniel B.
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eeeeeeeee

The French are the ones responsible for the horrible 'ordinateur', which then found its way to the equally English-hating Spaniards who turned it into 'ordenador'. That's why Latin Americans talk about computers, but Spaniards talk about Sorting Machines...

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US states: Google making ad money on illegal YouTube vids

Daniel B.
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Boffin

Re: MacKeeper! Gah! @LaeMing

Ah, so I see I'm not the only one returning to the Mac. Been 7 months since I switched back, but indeed my previous experience with Macs was precisely System 7. Well, 7.5 to be precise. And indeed, MacKeeper is the same kind of PC scam, except it is the one you will find mostly anywhere whenever you browse with a Mac!

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Daniel B.
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Facepalm

MacKeeper! Gah!

That piece of crap is actually scamware and shouldn't be installed anywhere! Didn't know that Google was peddling that garbage!

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Patriot hacker 'The Jester' attacks nations offering Snowden help

Daniel B.
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Meh

Meh.

The Jester is a lamer script kiddie. And to top it off, he's on the wrong side of public opinion, yet again. I do wonder why the FBI isn't going after him, as he has done at least much of the stuff that the LulzSec guys have?

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Vulcan? Not on our tiny balls. Pluto moons named Kerberos, Styx

Daniel B.
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Kerberos

Great. Now I'm thinking either about the bear thingy from Sakura Card Captors, or an authentication system when I talk about that moon...

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Nominet resurrects second-level namespace plan: 'Before you say no...'

Daniel B.
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Coat

Re: wot no gb tld?

Political correctness made the UK get UK instead of GB, though I think it is still out there.

Wales did push for a .cymru thingy, though populating that would make domains that look like .onion addresses or autogenerated botnet C&C domains.

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PC decline whacks 2013 IT spending projections

Daniel B.
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FAIL

Yay Microsoft!

Windows 8 is now responsible of slowing down IT spending as well! Woo!

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Lights, camera, action: Snowden movie hits the web

Daniel B.
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Trollface

Re: Cor...

I think this is the icon you were looking for. --->

Unlike Assange, the crimes imputed to Snowden can be directly linked to his whistleblowing and thus might be considered as political persecution. Think Deepthroat, not Aldrich Ames.

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Dubya: I introduced PRISM and I think it's pretty swell

Daniel B.
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Re: Mañana

In Mexico it also means tomorrow or morning; but there's also the "not today" meaning. Like in "not today, maybe tomorrow".

That's how the Spanish joke about the Tomorrow Man came to be: H2's the Tomorrow Man because whenever you ask "when will X be finished?" he will answer "Tomorrow".

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