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* Posts by Mephistro

981 posts • joined 8 Oct 2007

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US judge 'troubled' by Apple's $450m bid to end ebook price-fixing row

Mephistro
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Re: This looks like an exact clone of...

"How is that a new trick?"

New for Apple. And I don't mean necessarily that they didn't know the concept before, just that they didn't dare to use it, perhaps afraid of the PR backlash or the judges reactions. It would seem that nowadays they don't give a shit.

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Mephistro
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This looks like an exact clone of...

... the agreement in the "no poaching agreement" case against Apple. And I'll say the same thing I said then:

This agreement is an insult to justice.

It would seem that Apple has learnt a new trick. To boot: negotiating out of court agreements that are good for the lawyers but not for the plaintiffs.

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Debian Linux, Android share a bed in upcoming distro

Mephistro
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Re: Who invented permissions transparency?(@ Eulampios)

Oppsss... sorry, I forgot this:

"An API bug which was fixed in the latest versions of Android. Bugs happen, can't see the nightmare in that either."

In the real world, given the way Android updates reach the customer's devices, fighting an uphill battle against the phone makers and the telcos and the crud they both install, I'd be surprised if more than one in ten handsets out there are correctly patched.

Perhaps you're right, and this is not a security nightmare. It's just the frecking Hamburger Hill! ;-)

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Mephistro
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Re: Who invented permissions transparency?

"you can't deny an app access to your GPS hardware You will be able to with SELinux soon."

Which has nothing to do with what we're discussing here. Actually, in my first comment, I expressed my hope that this VolksPC distro would fix this particular issue. And that would be a good thing, as Google doesn't seem to have too much interest in fixing it.

However, don't install an app if it requires something you don't wanna give it or it doesn't need it it for what it is supposed to do.

That's precisely what I do. On the other hand, 99.9% of Android users have no idea of what said permissions mean, and just click through the installation notices. And that, added to the fact that most apps are closed source and the review process by Google isn't exactly too thorough, gives a -...wait for it...- security nightmare.

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Mephistro
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Re: Who invented permissions transparency?

"2) (various guid's) permissions that you could see before installing"

Apples and oranges, Mr. Eulampios.

The apps you install in Android are -mostly- closed source. The permissions are given in an 'all or nothing' basis, so, e.g. you can't deny an app access to your GPS hardware, your mic or your contacts, even when that particular app doesn't have any conceivable reason to access said elements. Not much transparency here, I'd say.

1) apps run under separate uid's

Which somehow doesn't prevent said apps from leaking data to other apps, as has been already reported in Elreg and other technical forums.

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Mephistro
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Re: what's that?

"Can you specify what this nightmare is? Thanks in advance."

From the top of my head:

Lack of fine grained permissions control.

Bugs in some apps allow their data to be accessed/modified by other apps.

Is that enough for you?

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Mephistro
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"...by running both Linux apps and Android apps in native mode."

If, while they're at it, they also fix the nightmare that is Android permissions and security, they can count me in.

If they don't, well, one of the main reasons for using Linux is security, and adding Android to Linux would totally invalidate this reason.

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Microsoft takes on Chromebook with low-cost Windows laptops

Mephistro
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Devil

A low-priced version of Windows 8.1 dubbed "Windows 8.1 with Bing"

They should have dubbed it "Leprosy with Syphilis". It sounds far better! ;-)

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Japanese artist cuffed for disseminating 3D ladyparts files

Mephistro
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Joke

Re: Manco

That must to be the reason* there weren't any Japanese players in WOW Spanish servers, as 'manco' is also the Spanish equivalent of 'noob'. Probably all of them committed seppuku after their first error in a raid.

* That and the language barrier, and the lag. ;-)

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German government orders local CIA station chief to pack his bags

Mephistro
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FAIL

Re: Mephhead Ole. Jule A mild reaction (@ Master Bullshit)

" In his post. Trying reading before bleating, mmmkay?"

Again, he wrote "... jailed and charged ...". Who's bleating, Matty?

Oh, hell!. I'm trying to reason with Matt. That's a waste of bandwidth. I'm really really sorry.

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Mephistro
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Re: Mephhead Ole. Jule A mild reaction (@ Master Bullshit)

"but that's not what the original indignant poster demanded, they want jail without charge or trial"

Exactly where does the 'original indignant poster' demand jail without charge or trial? What he actually wrote was "... jailed and charged ...". .

Another low quality straw man argument from Matt. Colour me surprised. ;-)

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Mephistro
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Re: Ole. Jule A mild reaction (@ Matt Bryant)

"the correct chain of events would be charged, tried, then if convicted, jailed"

No. For serious crimes and with some evidence the suspect is put in custody -i.e. 'jailed'- until a judge assesses the case and decides on escape risks, bailout and such.

And I'm glad to see you don't like the way they do things in Guantánamo.

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Mephistro
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They should have sent the ambassador packing too.

Now, THAT would send a clear message!

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NSA dragnet mostly slurped innocents' traffic

Mephistro
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Re: Oh, well... (@ Bernard M. Orwell)

I had figured out that much, but the vetting process is very subjective, and prone to lots of false negatives and false positives.

Another issue is that people changes over time. They acquire new relationships, new relatives, new vices and even new mental issues. In order to counter that, the vetting process should be continuous, and include all the vetted analyst's family and relationships. Which sounds like just another recursive security nightmare. Quis custodiet ipsos custodes?

In my opinion, due to these and other circumstances, mass data slurping can't be made 'safe enough'. The guys that set up this massive surveillance system should have known better. Or maybe they just didn't give a shit.

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Mephistro
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Facepalm

Oh, well...

We all seem to be forgetting an important point in this discussion.

Those mountains of data the NSA and their chums are slurping & keeping are not only being accessed by three letter agencies. They are being accessed by tens of thousands of analysts (~80,000*, from what has been stated in other articles) under quite lax security rules, as has been proved without doubt by the Snowden leaks and the LOVEINT report.

Now, please consider this:

Of those 80,000 (or whatever is the exact number) analysts, how many can be blackmailed/bribed/coerced by third countries secret services? How many of them have been/can be 'turned' by said secret services? How many of them are cheating on their partners? How many have committed serious crimes? How many are closet homosexuals? How many have relatives or beloved ones that can be used as 'hostages'? How many are degenerate gamblers?...

From what we know about human nature, I'd be really surprised if there weren't several hundred analysts already working for third parties, be it state actors, private companies or criminal groups.

Actually, the NSA and their pals are making things easier for Russia, China, the Norks, Israel, the Mafia, [Insert your favourite baddies names here]. These third parties have/can gain access to already filtered and classified data for peanuts, compared with the expenses of setting up and maintaining the NSA operations.

As an example, consider carefully what this means in the context of witness protection programs.

Note*: Or whatever the real number is. I've read articles stating that the real number is 60,000 and others claiming ~100,000.

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Insecure AVG search tool shoved down users' throats, says US CERT

Mephistro
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Re: KM Player installs -- is it ever anything but a way to trash your PC?

"(and any of my computers that I let family or friends use)"

Easy peasy. Create an account without admin rights for your family and friends, and protect the admin accounts with a password only you know. That won't totally protect your important accounts from zero day exploits and/or some viruses, but it's a step in the right direction and will save you lots of sweat.

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Storm-battered Rockall adventurer recalls 'worst experience of my life'

Mephistro
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Re: I'll just repost this

Holy shit! a 50 meters tall wave!!!

If it had been one of these the one that hit his pod, the lack of food would be the least of his problems.

Balls of steel, indeed.

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NSA, GCHQ spies have hurt us more than they know – cloud group

Mephistro
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Angel

the "FUD factor" increased, but given the actual number of breaches, "there is a massive gap between perception and reality".

This gentleman is naively assuming that the people that answered the survey:

a) Were aware of all the security breaches

b) Were interested in disclosing said breaches

What is next? Bigfoot and Elvis Presley living in a condo in Albuquerque?

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Germany dumps Verizon for Deutsche Telekom over NSA spying

Mephistro
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Happy

"The US government cannot compel us to produce our customers' data stored in data centres outside the US"

This statement reminds me of that episode of Breaking Bad where an undercover cop tells Badger that "the Constitution doesn't allow cops to lie to suspects" or words to that effect.

It's really close to implying that the German Govt. is about as intelligent as a meth addict. He he he. Great!.

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Brit bank Barclays rolls out voice recog for telephone banking

Mephistro
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Sigh...

My take on this is that with all the loss of information due to sound codecs, noisy environments, different phone models and such, the voice recognition can't be too picky. This tolerance* will in turn make it relatively easy to make a program that can change any voice sample to mimic any customer's voiceprint.

So if this tomfoolery ever catches on, miscreants will be cruising the streets and shopping malls with sound recorders**, in order to capture customers voices and -with a bit of luck- even the security codes themselves. Of course, this last part assumes that the bank asks for the security codes to be spoken aloud (suicidal), instead of being input through the keyboard and then giving the customer a random list of common words to be used in the voice biometrics part.

The next step is using stolen/imported/whatever phones and SIM cards to, probably with the aid of a fat laptop, fool the voice recognition system.

"4: Profit!"

* & **: These two points have been already made by several commentards in this thread.

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Judge could bin $325m wage-fixing settlement in Silicon Valley

Mephistro
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Re: Add another 3 Zero's!!!!!!!

If the fine+compensation these companies have to pay is smaller than the money they 'saved' by acting illegally, they still have a big incentive to do it again. This 'agreement' is an insult to justice.

And any fine should also include the harm done to American IT workers as a whole, because the consequences of this collusion by the biggest IT employers in the USA indirectly affects every IT worker.

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YouTube will nuke indie music videos in DAYS, says Google exec

Mephistro
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Re: Don't Be Evil

" I have yet to meet someone who has side-loaded anything on their phone"

You should get out more and meet more people! ;-)

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Crooks use Synology NAS boxen to mine Dogecoin, yells Dell

Mephistro
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Happy

First, Bitcoin, now Dogecoin...

It's as if, one week after the tulip market crash in the Netherlands everybody started investing massively in, say, daffodils. Human gullibility, when paired with greed, knows no limits.

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Blame WWI, not Bin Laden, for NSA's post-9/11 intel suck

Mephistro
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Re: Mephhead Maphhead All Governments are ...(@ MasterBollocks)

Yawn...

Yawn...

Yawn...

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Mephistro
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Re: Mephhead Maphhead All Governments are ...(@ MasterBollocks)

Yawn...

Yawn...

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Mephistro
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Re: Mephhead Maphhead All Governments are ...(@ MasterBollocks)

Yawn...

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Mephistro
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@ John 62 (was Re: Mephhead Maphhead All Governments are ...(@ MasterBollocks))

"King William III introduced the first UK government bonds, predating the Federal Reserve by quite some time"

Both are different mechanisms, even when both can be used to finance wars. Government bonds have to be purchased by private investors, but the Fed can create money from thin air, though the citizens will be ultimately the ones that foot the bill, through inflation.

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Mephistro
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Re: Mephhead Maphhead All Governments are ...(@ MasterBollocks)

"I don't remember the Chewbacca Defence being providing verifiable facts you cannot debunk?"

Hello, Matt!

The facts you provided were either orthogonal to the issue at hand -e.g. the number of French casualties vs. the economic costs of the war- or downright false -e.g. the commies causing the German Hyper-Inflation. My former comment debunks all those 'verifiable facts' of yours, and whoever bothers reading both your comments and mine and check the 'facts' -someone with lots of patience- will probably agree with this statement.

As usual, your strategy seems to be ignoring the points in my comment, trying to transform them into straw man arguments, using elementary fallacies and peppering everything with ad hominems (you love that expression, don't you, Matt?).

I could go on debunking the quite obvious BS you spewed also in your last comment, but, you know what? that's not necessary. Both your comments and mine are in the record in these forums for everyone to see -and judge. In this last comment of yours, as usual, you're just rewording your former BS, dodging, misrepresenting, lying and ignoring the objections.

The part about why I read Das Kapital but wasn't able to finish Mein Kampf has a funny answer. I did it as a part of a sort of dare in an informal discussion group -basically a group of friends that met once or twice a week, originally to play computer games, tabletop games and roleplaying games while listening to loud music and smoking some pot. It took us almost a year to finish the thing and I even took some notes :-). I also coded some simulations to try to prove or disprove some of the points in Marx's book, but my dear Commodore 128 just lacked the horsepower to reach too significant conclusions in a reasonable time. Only two of us finished it, but everybody in the group participated in the discussions, which were really interesting.

And yes, Matt, I'm aware thad DK and MK are not history books. But as they were relevant to parts of the discussion, I listed them in my comment, but clearly separated from History books and magazines. The fact that you interpreted that as proof that I believed those two books to be History books says a lot about you.

Oh, and good luck with that Marathon race. I bet you'll be here in a few days telling us how you won the race, even when you were caught on film taking a cab halfway through the race and were disqualified by the organizers. It's more or less the same thing you use to do in Elreg forums. ;-)

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Mephistro
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Mushroom

Re: Mephhead Maphhead All Governments are ...(@ MasterBollocks)

Hi, Matt, sorry for not answering your post before, I've been busy. I see you have changed your strategy and now are engaging in a variation of the famous Chewbacca Defence. Well done, Matt, keep on digging!

And now, to the fray:

"The French were the senior ally in the Great War, they had by far the largest number of forces involved in the first few years"

That's true, but doesn't have much to do with the issue at hand. The French were borrowing money from the UK and the USA, and later on the British were also borrowing money from the USA. Hell, at the beginning of the war, even the Germans were borrowing from American banks. The number of soldiers the French put on the battlefield and the amount of casualties they suffered is NOT THE POINT. The point is the amount of debt all involved parties incurred while financing the war. So your point is just another convoluted straw man argument.

None of which had anything to do with the French desire to cripple post-War Germany. The Brits and Yanks could have been bankrupt and it would still have done nothing to stop the French

The Brits and Yanks could have threatened France with getting TFO of continental Europe if sensible and reasonable conditions hadn't been negotiated, were it not for the fact that they were in debt up to they ears also, thanks to all the dough they borrowed through the Federal Reserve. Which was the point in my comment -and in Infernoz comment before mine.

Rubbish. Britain made a tiny amount from reparations compared to the income derived from the post-War colonies, especially India

India had been in a continuous state of turmoil for several decades, and keeping order there was becoming more expensive every year. As a matter of fact, the Brits trying to milk more wealth from India -by taxing salt, for Chrissake!- caused Gandhi's revolution, that for once was -quite miraculously- peaceful. Who knows? If the Brits had tried to extract more money from their colony from 1918 onwards, everything could have ended in a terrible bloodbath, and a terribly expensive one for Britain, to boot.

Again, rubbish. Germany was not invaded, her wealth was not looted by a conquering force, her factories were not bombed into ruin

Rubbish yourself, Matt. Germany had been four years under an almost complete blockade, with almost half of its workforce either enlisted, killed or producing weapons and ammo. Undernourishment and famine were common occurrences in the last half of the war. The difference between this and the situation after the armistice was that, during the war, the ruling classes were seen as the culprit, hence giving the proper growth medium for communism. After the Armistice, and due to its awful conditions -economic an otherwise-, the guilt was shifted to "everybody else" and "foreigners", at least in the eyes of the general population, giving the perfect growth medium for Nazism.

"Do you really want to claim 'Communism' was born in Germany only AFTER the Great War?"

Another huge straw man argument. Socialism and Communism were both born in the Nineteenth Century. Perhaps you should buy yourself a dictionary and learn what 'growth medium' means. Just saying.

Nope, they were caused by Germany going to war...

Yes, and before that by the Prussian-French wars, and before that by Napoleon, and before that... up to the Big bang itself. But the fact is that, for the German public opinion, the culprits were the allied powers and the goddamn awful conditions they imposed. Again, a little bit of generosity could have probably prevented WWII.

The post-War struggles against 'revolution' in Germany and the subsequent instability was the destroyer of wealth and of the living standards of the people

Da fuq?. Do you really believe that? Where did you take that funny idea from? Mein Kampf? So, for you, either the German Hyper-Inflation never happened or it was caused by the communists? Obvious Bullshit!

"It is very obvious you have never studied any history of Europe"

LOL. I was subscribed to 'Historia16' -a quite reputed History magazine in my country- for 6 years in the eighties and nineties, read occasionally "Historia y Vida" (another History magazine), I have read eight 'serious' History books covering the first half of the Twentieth Century, e.g. "Catastrophe 1914: Europe Goes to War" by Max Hastings, one regarding the Rotenkapelle and another one covering the Russian Revolution and several others covering the Spanish Civil War - which is closely related to WWI and WWII.

Fuck!, I've even read 'Das Kapital' (in a Spanish translation, as my German is basically non-extant) and an English translation of Mein Kampf (well, the first eighty pages or so, as I couldn't swallow more of that crap). On a lighter note, I've also read Fall of Giants, by Ken Follet, which is fiction, but really well documented fiction. Studied them? No, I just read them. Did you 'study' European History? OMG, we have a professional historian here!

...by pretending you have done anything more than read Leftie pamphlets.

Frankly, I don't remember the last time I've read a leftie pamphlet. Not in this millennium, of that I'm quite sure. Anyway, I can recognize pamphlets -leftist or otherwise- from some distance.

PD.: How's your blood pressure, Matt? Be careful, you could burst a blood vessel!

PPD.: Chewbacca strikes back! ;-)

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Mephistro
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Re: Maphhead All Governments are ...(@ MasterBollocks)

Hey, it's Matt, our resident omni-expert!

All right, here we go:

"Not so. The French had been through three wars with Prussian Germany..."

The French weren't the only ones fighting Germany, don't you know? The war was fought, and the armistice was signed by some other 'minor players'</sarc>, like the UK and the USA.

If these countries hadn't spent trillions they didn't have thanks to the Federal Reserve and similar schemes, their role in the war would have been more limited and less expensive, and they would have forced France to accept more generous conditions. The way things went, with all the debt incurred, they didn't have much choice but to milk Germany till exhaustion or face a long bankruptcy. A bankruptcy that came anyway in 1929, thanks also, amongst other causes, to the Federal Reserve.

" All the parts for the rise of the Nazi party were in place already"

Of those parts, the most important one was the poverty caused by the war. If such state of poverty had been improved the same moment the War ended, the Nazis would have lost their growth medium, which was -as is usually for most political extremisms- injustice and poverty. Compare the situation in Germany between the wars with that in the UK, where the Communist Party and Oswald Mosley's Fascists never gained serious traction, thanks to better standards of living for most of the population.

"Indeed, the biggest trigger for popular support of the far right was the dreadful behaviour of the Communists throughout Eatern Europe"

Ha ha. Wrong. The Communists, the Nazis, and the Anarchists were all a direct result of poverty and injustice. It's extremely difficult to convince someone to go on strike, get to the streets and risk their lives burning government buildings or fighting against the Police and/or the Army when that someone is reasonably well fed, dressed and housed and has a reasonable set of rights. In Russia, the injustice was caused by its own ruling classes and its feudal political system. As a result, the extremisms that got a hold there were 'internationalists' and 'far leftists'.

Meanwhile, in post-war Germany, the causes of the poverty and injustice were caused by 'the rest of the World' and affected all classes (though not to the same extent, mind you), and created the ideal growth medium for ultra-nationalist and 'far right' extremisms, like Fascism and Nazism.

"the Left grew the rise of Facism with their own stupidity."

Before that, the Right had done the same with Communism. Again, extremisms only prosper in extreme conditions. That's something they teach in History 101, Matt.

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Mephistro
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Re: All Governments are dangerous and can easly end up as criminal gangs

"It is no concidence that WW1, the Great Depression, and WW2 happened after the Federal Reserve conspiracy was devised and created"

Too true. The Federal Reserve and similar schemes helped funding most of the 'big' wars in the Twentieth and Twenty-first Centuries. One can only wonder what Modern History would have looked like without these devices. WWI would probably have been shorter and far less massive, as none of the involved sides would have been able to borrow the funds to train, feed, arm and deploy so many millions of soldiers for so long, and WWII wouldn't have happened at all, because the Germans wouldn't have had to pay the allies all their costs plus interests plus penalties -which in turn wouldn't have caused the hyperinflation and misery in Germany and the subsequent rise of the Nazi party.

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Tor is '90 per cent of the net' claims City of London Police Commish – and he's dead wrong

Mephistro
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@ Nuke (was Re: @Mephistro - @ qwertyuiop)

ThumbsUp++ for the Grantham Grocer Fallacy.

I was aware of the facts stated in your link, but I had never heard about this fallacy. Your link will come very handy in discussions with people who claims that 'free' unregulated markets will save the world.

Every time someone reads that link, Ayn Rand spins in her grave. :-D

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Mephistro
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@ qwertyuiop

...They, after all, are "...in the payroll of the Public Teat..." too.

All rules have exceptions. :-)

Now, seriously, I've known many civil servants that use their braincells and do it for the public good, usually in 'technical' stations, like the ones you listed, and I've known many others -usually in management positions- that could be replaced by a rotten cucumber without any noticeable difference in their intellectual yield. YMMV, of course.

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@Velv

"...its a requirement of accepting any publicly elected post that 99% of your brain cells are removed."

True, but as this kind of mindphuck seems to be also quite common amongst Civil Service staff, I'd change that to "...it's a requirement for being in the payroll of the Public Teat...".

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Mephistro
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@ wolfetone

... Jen from the IT crowd...

Sorry to dissent, but this gaffe surpasses "Jen level" by a good margin. This is clearly a "Raynholm Junior level" event. I mean, Jen is intelligent but ignorant. This fine gentleman seems to be ignorant AND stupid. Either that, or he was too busy fiddling with his expenses sheet to give any serious thought to the matter he was addressing.

And Jen is far sexier! ;-)

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Democrats pitch long-shot bid for FCC ban on prioritization deals

Mephistro
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Flame

And why, oh why...

... hasn't the Internet been already classified as a common carrier? How else could it be classified???

Perhaps the government fears -and has been fearing for a long time- that classifying the Internet as a common carrier would help give its users the same kind of legal protection that users of phone landlines have? No legal eavesdropping without a court order?

Does any fellow commentard know of a better explanation?

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The cute things they say

Mephistro
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Circa 1988, in my first paid job in IT, a manager in one of our customers called to get help with a program that was misbehaving in his -if I recall correctly- IBM AT. After some questions, it was clear that the program itself was damaged, so I started the process re-installing it.

Me: Sir, are you in the main program's menu?

User: Yes

Me: Well, take the 'xxxinstall' disk and put into the drive.

User: Done

Me: Now exit, close the door and resta... (sounds of footsteps going away in the distance and a door closing) Sir? SIR???

And a dozen or so of incidents with users stapling notes to floppy sleeves, people writing in floppy sleeves with ballpoint pens and people sticking post-it notes with the adhesive band in direct contact with the floppy's magnetic surface.

And this is a good one:

User: I purchased a box of floppies from your shop yesterday, but they're all defective, none of them works.

Me: Please bring back the box and the floppies and we'll give you a new one.

When the customer came, it was clear that he had removed the protective sleeve from all the floppies in the box. Sigh...

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Kids hack Canadian ATM during LUNCH HOUR

Mephistro
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(@ MasterBollocks) Re: Mephhead Not an 'hack'. (@ Jim 59)(tl; dr)

I have made similar statements -in these same forums- except for a little twist, i.e. that this is -and has been for a long time- a lost battle, as mass media has already had its say on the matter and the meaning of the verb 'hack' is already fixed. The best we can do nowadays is to add some qualifiers to it to distinguish different kinds of hacking, e.g. Black Hat or White Hat. And there is no law against synonyms or quasi synonyms, like 'Black Hat Hacking' and 'Cracking'.

The situation was generally considered quite irreversible already circa 2000 AD, when RMS wrote this piece you quoted. It hasn't changed since then.

I'd also like to point out that in that same article you quoted, RMS talks about a 'hack' he did using exclusively six chopsticks, which seem to clash with your bullsh former statement that "...hacking in the computing industry has ALWAYS referred to coding...". Yes, one of those points in my comments you cunningly dodged, without anyone noticing it, seriously!. Perhaps you should read your own references before posting them here, Matt. :-)

And, FYI, Matt, RMS is not a dictionary nor a technical tome and a few of his opinions are not shared by a big part -or even by the majority- of the technical community. So again, Matt, please point us to some 'technical tome' or technical dictionary where 'coding' is defined as necessary for hacking. Still waiting.

And regarding the Quest To Prove Matt Bryant Wrong Just Once*, hur hur, that happened years ago and happens quite often (without the 'Just Once' part, of course). Perhaps things will improve for you if you ever finish your Quest To Find Your Own Arse Without Using Both Hands, A Torchlight, A GPS And A Phone Support Hotline. Or they won't, who knows, and, frankly, who cares?

Note*: Dude, aren't you full of yourself!

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Re: Mephhead Not an 'hack'. (@ Jim 59)(tl; dr)

" LOL, such a well-known technical tome!"

Oh, so you can point us to another dictionary or 'technical tome' that agrees with your funny exclusive definition of 'hacking', aren't you? We're waiting, Matt.

...hacking in the computing industry has ALWAYS referred to coding...

ROFLMAO. More falsehoods straight from your backside, Matt, haven't you emptied yourself already?

"...panties!... sheeple ... herd life ..."

Exactly how does this paragraph disprove my point? Please, Matt, use your superior intellect and explain to us. Take your time.

On a side note, that obsession of yours with sheep and herds and such doesn't seem too healthy. Perhaps you should be getting professional help, unless you yourself are a sheep, of course. ;-)

"Proving Matt Bryant Wrong At Least Once"

LOL. Just LOL. You have been proved wrong in these forums so often that 'Proving Matt Bryant Wrong At Least Once' sounds as difficult as 'farting just once' or 'beating the crap out of a tetraplegic midget just once'. But keep on, Matt, your comments' lack of logic is often compensated by their -unintended- comedic value.

"...panties in a bunch... sheeple ... "

Again? Yep, I have to agree with you that there is someone in these forums who has an unhealthy obsession with sheep and panties and probably needs professional help ASAP.

/need a 'stalker' icon, please!

Sorry, Matt, but most Elreg readers agree that we don't need avatar icons. ;-)

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Mephistro
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Re: Mephhead Not an 'hack'. (@ Jim 59)(tl; dr)

' "Hack" is not the first word I would reach for to describe somebody reading a password from the manual and typing it in'

Jim, my comment was an answer to the first sentence in Master Bollocks'* previous comment, where he stated that "Using the default administrator's password from a downloaded manual is not hacking, it's exploiting poor security practices". Now, Merriam Webster's 11th Collegiate Dictionary seems to support my opinion by giving these definitions for the verb(emphasis mine) hack:

"4 a : to write computer programs for enjoyment b : to gain access to a computer illegally"

You may have noticed that these definitions -similar to most definitions of 'hacking' in other dictionaries- imply clearly that what the lads did is 'hacking', totally thrashing MB's arguments. He could also have stated that what the kids did "is not hacking, because they weren't chopping timber with an axe" and that statement would be as true as his original statement, that is, totally false. It's just logic and semantics. I know that MB nitpicking and using elementary fallacies to support his funny worldview is not exactly breaking news, but it saddens me to see how MB sometimes gets away with using such tactics in Elreg forums, where, supposedly, commenters are more skilled and intelligent than those on, say, the Daily Mail forums.

Note:*: Yes, that's an 'ad hominem'. Now count the ad hominems in this thread and you'll notice that -at the time of writing this comment, at least-, most of them were made by our friend MB. I'm just trying to balance the scales a little. :-)

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Mephistro
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Re: Mephhead Not an 'hack'. (@

'So how do you distinguish between a "hack" and a "crack"?'

Firstly, I was addressing the part of MB's comment where he claimed that "(what the kids did) is not hacking". Which is totally bollocks, in my opinion.

To me, computer 'cracking' is a subset of computer 'hacking' and both can be often carried out without coding a single line. Hell, sometimes both can be carried out without even touching a computer (through 'social engineering').

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Mephistro
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Coffee/keyboard

Re: Mephhead Not an 'hack'.

" I thought I was rather generously ignoring your lack of insight into the technical side of hacking"

HAHAHAHAHAHAHAAAAA!!!

Your 'insight into the technical side of hacking', judging from your previous comments, comes probably from a few Hollywood flicks and TV shows. And pulling straight from your arse some 'definitions' nobody else agrees with doesn't help to raise your credibility either. As for your 'generosity' part... see icon.

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Mephistro
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Happy

Re: Mephhead Not an 'hack'.

From your original comment: "...is not hacking"

Please, Matt, stop moving the goalposts. It's so obvious it's not even funny.

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Mephistro
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Re: Not an 'hack'.

"Using the default administrator's password from a downloaded manual is not hacking, it's exploiting poor security practices"

Matt, FYI, "exploiting poor security practices" is ~90% of hacking. So yes, what they did is hacking. White Hat hacking, to be more precise.

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Measure for measure: We visit the most applied-physicist-rich building in the UK

Mephistro
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Joke

Re: Peak pedantry

"I presume you used the send corrections link?"

Oh, come on! If everybody did that, poor Ed - you know, that guy who writes snarky comments inside other people's articles- would find himself unemployed, you insensitive clod!

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Snowden's Big Brother isn't as Orwellian as you'd think

Mephistro
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Re: @RyokuMas It's not today's government you need to worry about...(@ RyokuMas)

"Google is entirely an unelected body"

I find your argument a little bit disingenuous. Google is a private company, and the public has just two ways of putting pressure on them, which are:

- Voting with their wallets: If Google sells your privacy to a government or to the highest bidder, don't use Google services*.

- Putting pressure on the government -with votes and if that fails, with protests and demonstrations- to change the laws in such a way that these acts -by Google or whoever- are made illegal.

Seriously, if one of the parts -the American government- can order Google -or any other private company- to hand over our private data without proper judiciary oversight and then cover their requests with gag orders, the biggest culprit -quite obviously- is not Google.

*: Disclaimer: I use Gmail for routine communications with my customers and friends, i.e. anything that doesn't seriously compromise their security/privacy or mine. For more sensitive communications, I have a 'safe' and well protected account, and the data and email text are encrypted using several open source tools. My customers usually keep in a safe one of those 'computers in an usb stick', with printed instructions and passwords.

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Mephistro
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Stop

Re: It's not today's government you need to worry about...

Agreed. Give any government such a power without counter-balances, responsibility and accountability and wait for a few decades, and see what happens.

Now, I think that this process is similar to the one that sent the French nobility to the guillotine and put their Russian equivalents in front of firing squads -and many millions of innocents as well. At some point, the big fish always get so far removed from the consequences of their acts that forget what lots of small fish can do when they're really pissed off.

What worries me about the current developments is that, thanks to the technology currently available to governments, they may be able to escape the consequences of their acts for a long long time, bringing about the famous 'boot stomping on a human face for a thousand years'. Or a million.

And I think Mr. Mathieson is wrong/disingenious when he claims that the current situation is not 'Orwellian' because the general populace is not subject to a similar level of surveillance as in '1984'. What the NSA and pals are doing is the same thing any good sheepdog does instinctively, i.e. scrutinize 'normal sheep' very lightly, but subjecting the leader sheep to total surveillance.

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Google to let Chromebookers take video content OFFLINE

Mephistro
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Angel

"Google to let Chromebookers take video content OFFLINE"

At last! I'm going to buy one of these, to see if they finally take offline that video with the goat*. I was young, and I needed the money!.

* Whitey, if you're reading this comment, please come back with me! Everything is forgiven!

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'THERE'S BEEN A MURRRDER!' Plod probe Street View 'slaying'

Mephistro
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Thumb Up

Re: At least it wasn't the...

And after a long forensic study of the images, I reckon we can safely discard the Pint Sized Slasher as well. Unless both criminal and victim were midgets in a 1/2 scale car model expo.

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