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* Posts by Jakob

10 posts • joined 7 Oct 2007

Apple vs Nokia not as wrapped up as it appears

Jakob

On the topic of Motorola

Actually Motorola sued Apple over a number of patents, and Apple counter-sued with some other patents a few weeks ago, so at least one american mobile phone company is in a legal kerfuffle with Apple.

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Apple director 'disgusted' by Jobsian health secrets

Jakob

Corporate Governance - or the lack of it...

Steve Jobs, being both chairman of the board and chief executive of the company, is bad according to current guidelines on corporate governance.

http://www.fsa.gov.uk/pubs/ukla/lr_comcode2003.pdf

This document is from "Financial Services Authority" in the UK, that however, does not limit it to only being relevant for the financial sector - it is relevant for all sectors, as it tries to counter bad behavior in the management of the company.

(The relevant section is section A.2 - "Chairman and chief executive", and more precisely in section A.2.1, where it states: "The roles of chairman and chief executive should not be exercised by the same individual. The division of responsibilities between the chairman and chief executive should be clearly established, set out in writing and agreed by the board.")

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Warner to back a single HD disc format?

Jakob
Stop

@Anonymous Coward

I see you are in a good mood today.

If you actually took the time to get your own facts straight before claiming that I did not have my fact straight, then maybe I would read your comment next time. Until then, learn to read the article, and the comments entirely before claiming my comment was a diatribe.

If you read my comments, I just said that I think it was unwise of Tim to discredit the 2 Business Week journalists, just because they apparently have a history of writing articles that HD-DVD fans dislike. I did not mention the Tony Smith from El Reg, so maybe it is YOU that need to learn how to read...

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Jakob
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@Answer - yes

If the research that the journalist have done, have shown that Blu-ray has a better possibility of surviving, why should he not write that? Discrediting a journalist just because he does not write the article from the viewpoint that you might have, does not make it a bad article. You are, of course, allowed to have your own viewpoint, but please accept that journalists might write something that you may disagree with, but that does not automatically make that articles worthless, just because you believe something else. Why not accept that not everybody thinks that HD-DVD is the future, and not automatically begin discrediting the journalist for not supporting your viewpoint?

Your remark about "especially as BD is still only being propped up by the PS3 (it can sell all it wants to gamers but to bank on a movie format based on only one viable player, and a games console at that, is suicide)" - I get, from your comments, that you are very pro HD-DVD and very anti Blu-ray, and that is okay, but just as Toshiba, sometimes, chooses to sell their players below production price (as far as I know, they were disallowed the sale in certain states in the US, due to non-compliance with anti-dumping laws), so are Sony allowed to include Blu-ray in the PS3 - if people did not want Blu-ray, and that desire were strong enough, I am sure they would stay away from the PS3, and Blu-ray also - but from what I have read, it seems that quite a few PS3 users actually use the Blu-ray part of the PS3 for film viewing. So much, that Blu-ray, at least according to Nielsen numbers, seem to be selling more, and is that not the point of producing either format? to sell well?

"but to bank on a movie format based on only one viable player, ..., is suicide" - you could say the same about the $99 Toshiba player, but that does not make it any more valid and likewise with the comment about the PS3.

"HD DVD players are set to flood the market next year." - was that not the point of the $99 HD-DVD player?

I do not care what format wins, I have my preference, but like everybody else, I have a life, so this is just a hobby and I think that the rhetoric needs to be scaled down quite a bit, on both sides - nobody is hating anyone, but it sure seems like this is a bad remake of Cut-throat Island (pardons to those that found that film memorable).

Having said that, I still think that one of the 2 formats need to be declared "winner" before we will see mass adoption of high definition media, whatever one might think of the players, statistics, strategies, and actions from either side.

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US HD DVD player sales pass 750,000

Jakob
Stop

@Scott Mckenzie

Scott Mckenzie,

Do you have a credible source, besides Toshiba, that have verified that the new 51 GB HD-DVD disk actually does work in already existing HD-DVD player, without physical alteration of the player, besides a firmware update?

And likewise, have you got a credible source for your claim that Blu-ray disks, that use Profile 2.0 features, will not work at all in Profile 1.0 or Profile 1.1 players, and not just not display, as an example, the PiP track?

Unless you got a credible source for a claim, then stop spreading information that you purport as to be the truth.

Some time ago, I read an interesting article about prices regarding replication on both formats. It might be of interest, although it has to be said that it was written back in February - http://wesleytech.com/blu-ray-vs-hd-dvd-replication-costs-analyzed-again/113/

Since that post was from February, I checked and found that ProActionMedia lists on their website how much it costs to replicate in either format,

HD-DVD: http://www.proactionmedia.com/hd_dvd_replication.htm

Blu-ray: http://www.proactionmedia.com/blu-ray_replication.htm

Although ProActionMedia is only able to procure single-layer Blu-ray disks, they practically cost the same as producing a size wise comparable HD-DVD disk.

The cost of producing a batch of a specified size is, according to ProActionMedia, as follows:

5.000 disks

Blu-ray 25 GB - $1.99

HD-DVD 30 GB - $1.99

10.000 disks

Blu-ray 25 GB - $1.79

HD-DVD 30 GB - $1.85

25.000 disks

Blu-ray 25 GB - $1.59

HD-DVD 30 GB - $1.69

100.000 disks

Blu-ray 25 GB - $1.49

HD-DVD 30 GB - $1.55

Of course, those prices are only from ProActionMedia, but finding a direct quotation, without having to contact the company, is not easy, so therefore I have only included ProActionMedia. I only bring this in, because I often hear that Blu-ray (the physical part of it) is much more expensive than HD-DVD. At least at ProActionMedia, getting a size wise comparable disk produced in either format is about the same, price wise. Now, ProActionMedia does not produce 50 GB disks, but the post from Wesleytech.com claims that it is approximately 12% more expensive to produce a double layer Blu-ray disk. Both formats will very likely have become cheaper to produce since Febuary, and since double layer Blu-ray disks have become much more used since then, it it likely that the price difference between a single and a double layer disk is reduced.

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Blu-ray dominates Japanese HD recorder sales

Jakob
Coat

Re: All this proves...

Did you actually read the article?

It is talking about recorders, not players, there is quite a difference between, you know.

If you want to start a flaming war, because you have not read the article, please proceed to Slashdot, were it is almost a virtue not to read the article before posting.

By the way, you might need to check up on your prices. The $99 HD-DVD standalone player was a sale, regularly around $199 now, and the PS3 is down at $399, sometimes lower.

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Ballmer: Microsoft will power the mobile revolution

Jakob

One wonders...

I might be the only person here with this point of view, but I will have a go at it anyways -

Having Microsoft in everything we own is not something I look forward to with joy, or for that matter any company. I live in Denmark, and we can get our cable TV via a solution called TDC TV (IPTV via ADSL). Probably a somewhat okay solution. Software done by Microsoft. Then of course, I could get my music player - done by Microsoft. If I wanted to play games, then again that would be done by Microsoft. If I wanted to watch movies in high def, that would be Microsoft. As this point I think everybody can see what I mean by this. I for one actually like the idea of competition, and for that reason I am very glad that I am living in the EU, because they seem to be about the only institution with enough ball to actually stand up to Microsoft when they do break the law.

Elsewhere, it just seems as it is okay for Microsoft to want the role of world domination, but when some other company tries exactly the same tactic, everybody cries. We should not cry when some other company tries the same tactic as Microsoft, we should instead when anybody, including Microsoft itself, tries those tactics.

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Blu-ray outsells HD DVD 2:1 in US

Jakob
Stop

Re: Still early days...

Wow, have Sony run over your kitten or something?

Great a grip and start caring about other things than what is ultimately a piece of plastic. They are all "evil" companies looking out for their profits, and if they happen to entertain you along the way, then fine, but they do not really care about that, except if it provides them with boatloads of money.

Having said that, it seems that Sony has become the new company to hate. I thought Apple (and somewhat Microsoft) were that company, but I guess I am just not fast enough to keep up with "who are we hating today?" trend...

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Cheap PS3 won't help Blu-ray, claim HD DVD backers

Jakob

Standards - or double standards

@Scott Mckenzie

"HD DVD is still the superior format in my view, people talking of BR 4 layer discs becoming standard is utter speculation.... and will be yet another nail in the coffin as existing players won't be able to handle them... HD51 discs are readable by existing players, so you invest in something and it's not made redundant by the next "standard" that BR announce."

Hitachi has published a press release claiming to have developed a 100 GB Blu-ray disc, capable of being played in a already released Blu-ray player, although it requires a firmware, apparently to tweak the focusing mechanism of the laser. Neither Hitachi, nor Toshiba, has shown any working solution, so I will therefore take both developments with an appropriate amount of salt.

If Toshiba succeeds in bringing out a 3 layer, 51 GB disc capable of working in every single one of all the current HD DVD players, then I will stand down and applaud Toshiba, but if it only works in some of the players, then of course its not a viable solution. Of course, then you could claim that it is exactly like Blu-ray with the different profiles and that would be somewhat correct, but with the caveat that even if you bought a 1st generation Blu-ray player, you would still be able to play the new disc, just not with the new features.

If Toshiba does not succeed in making it work in every single player on the market so far, that would make that version of HD DVD somewhat near "dead in the water" and would certainly remove the claim of Blu-ray being the only specification under constant review. And according to this site, http://thedigitalbits.com/#mytwocents (dated 9th october 2007), even Toshiba claims that it is not possible to get it to work without physical hardware modification, so until Toshiba (and Hitachi for that matter) shows a vanilla, older generation, HD player playing one of the new discs, then I will claim that the new "extensions" are worthless - for both sides.

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DRM on steroids controls backfires on Blu-ray

Jakob

Perhaps The Registers article should be updated...

According to this site, not mine, http://www.thedigitalbits.com/mytwocentsa144.html#panhd, it is not BD+ to blame, but actually the Java part, and therefore an update is required.

As much as I like Java, I do not necessarily think it was a good idea to implement it in the BD spec, and the 3 different profiles is not helping either, but last time I read about it, it was still the better selling format, despite some peoples feelings about it.

On the DRM side of Blu-ray: since the general population runs Windows, resulting in a mighty marketshare, I would venture the guess that people do not care about DRM as much as people here do. I am not saying DRM is good, but perhaps in general, people have better things to do with their lives than to complain about DRM - perhaps they just want to watch the movies - just a thought.

The DRM system on DVDs was accepted gladly by the consumer, and everybody hated CSS back then - today nobody speaks about CSS because it was broken - it also happened with AACS and that was earlier in the game than with CSS and AACS is a more complex algorithm, on the paper. Since a Blu-ray is static, I would guess that it will not be long before BD+ is broken also - since these 2 Fox releases were the first discs known to utilize it, the hackers have not yet had anything material to work with, and now they got it.

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